Coulomb sentence example

coulomb
  • The practical unit of quantity of electricity, the coulomb, is named after him.
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  • Coulomb is distinguished in the history alike of mechanics and of electricity and magnetism.
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  • Coulomb's researches provided data for the development of a mathematical theory of magnetism, which was indeed initiated by himself, but was first treated in a complete form by Poisson in a series of memoirs published in 1821 and later.
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  • Coulomb proved the proportionality of electric surface force to density, but the above numerical relation E= 42ra was first established by Poisson.
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  • The French mathematicians, Coulomb, Biot, Poisson and Ampere, had been content to accept the fact that electric charges or currents in conductors could exert forces on other charges or conductors at a distance without inquiring into the means by which this action at a distance was produced.
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  • Coulomb, who by using very long and thin magnets, so arranged that the action of their distant poles was negligible, succeeded in establishing the law, which has since been confirmed by more accurate methods, that the force of attraction or repulsion exerted between two magnetic poles varies inversely as the square of the distance between them.
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  • No material advance upon the knowledge recorded in Gilbert's book was made until the establishment by Coulomb in 1785 of the law of magnetic action.
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  • Coulomb, 2 however, by using long and thin steel rods, symmetrically magnetized, and so arranged that disturbing influences became negligibly small, was enabled to deduce from his experiments with reasonable certainty the law that the force of attraction or repulsion between two poles varies inversely as the square of the distance between them.
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  • The accuracy of this law was in 1832 confirmed by Gauss, 3 who employed an indirect but more perfect method than that of Coulomb, and also, as Maxwell remarks, 1 The quotations are from the translation published by the Gilbert Club, London, 1900.
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  • Coulomb proved that this mechanical force varies inversely as the square of the distance between the centres of the spheres.
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  • Coulomb proved experimentally that the electric force just outside a conductor at any point is proportional to the electric density at that point.
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  • This is usually called Coulomb's Law.2 (ii) Seat of Charge.
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  • If we consider a length l of the cylinder, the charge Q on the inner cylinder is Q=27rR l ly, where v is the surface density, and by Coulomb's law v = E i /47r, where E 1 = A/R 1 is the force at the surface of the inner Ai cylinder.
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  • The above is a statement of Coulomb's law, that the electric fores at the surface of a conductor is proportional to the surface density of the charge at that point and equal to 41r times the density.3 See Maxwell, Electricity and Magnetism, vol.
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  • Meters intended to measure electric quantity are called coulomb meters and also ampere-hour meters; they are employed for the measurement of public electric supply on the assumption that the electromotive force or pressure is constant.
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  • The following empirical formulae for the stiffness of hempen ropes have been deduced by Mono from the experiments of Coulomb: Let F be the stiffness in pounds avoirdupois; d the diameter of the rope In inches, fl = 48d2 for white ropes and 35d2 for tarred ropes; r the effectire radius of the pulley in inches; T the tension in pounds.
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  • Coulomb (1736-1806), who in France addressed himself to the same kind of exact quantitative work as Cavendish in England.
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  • Coulomb has made his name for ever famous by his invention and application of his torsion balance to the experimental verification of the fundamental law of electric attraction, in which, however, he was anticipated by Cavendish, namely, that the force of attraction between two small electrified spherical bodies varies as the product of their charges and inversely as the square of the distance of their centres.
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  • Coulomb's work received better publication than Cavendish's at the time of its accomplishment, and provided a basis on which mathematicians could operate.
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  • Adopting the hypothesis of two fluids, Coulomb investigated experimentally and theoretically the distribution of electricity on the surface of bodies by means of his proof plane.
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  • Coulomb experimentally proved that the law of attraction and repulsion of simple electrified bodies was that the force between them varied inversely as the square of the distance and thus gave mathematical definiteness to the two-fluid hypothesis.
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  • He was the original inventor of the torsion balance, which afterwards became so famous in the hands of its second inventor Coulomb.
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  • Coulomb pointed out long ago that the resistance of a body to be set in motion was in many cases much greater than the resistance which it offered to continued motion; and since his time writers have always distinguished the "friction of rest," or static friction, from the "friction of motion," or kinetic friction.
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  • Topics include: basic electrostatics, electrostatic induction, Coulomb's Law, electric field strength, and electric potential.
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  • Atomic or molecular transitions are often induced by the screened Coulomb potentials of atoms or partially ionized ions.
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