Corpuscles sentence example

corpuscles
  • It consists essentially of a number of minute corpuscles or plastids, the protoplasmic substance of which is impregnated with a green coloring matter.
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  • This was due to the organ having to produce white corpuscles in huge quantities in defense against the snake's venom.
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  • In certain forms of anaemia it increases the number of the red corpuscles and also their haemoglobin content.
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  • Arrhenius, that the phenomenon is due to corpuscles sent off by the earth and repelled by the sun in the same way that they are sent off from a comet and form its tail.
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  • Locally their destructive and irritating effects vary a good deal, but even when very dilute they all have a marked poisonous action on bacteria, white blood corpuscles, yeast and similar organisms. After absorption most of them exercise a depressing effect upon the nervous system, and are capable of reducing high temperature.
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  • In due time the horse is bled, the serum is filtered free of blood corpuscles, and then constitutes the antitoxic serum, which can be standardized to a certain potency.
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  • Footnotes [1] ' According to this theory, matter is composed entirely of tiny, invisible, indivisible bits, called corpuscles.
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  • The medulla is full of renal tubules, but does not contain renal corpuscles.
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  • The renal corpuscles are always found in the renal cortex.
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  • The merozoites are released from the liver to the blood where they are taken up by the red blood corpuscles.
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  • They occupy and destroy the red corpuscles, converting the haemoglobin into melanin; they multiply in the blood by sporulation, and produce accessions of fever by the liberation of a toxin at the time of sporulation (Ross).
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  • The pathological changes in malaria are due to the deposition of melanin and the detritus of red corpuscles and haemoglobin, and to the congregation of parasites in certain sites (Ross).
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  • Vezhdovsky to exist in the embryo of certain forms. The blood in the Chaetopoda consists of a plasma in which float a few corpuscles.
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  • There is no blood system, and the coelomic corpuscles contain FIG.
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  • In one genus (Planorbis) the plasma of the blood is coloured red by haemoglobin, this being the only instance of the presence of this body in the blood of Glossophorous Mollusca, though it occurs in corpuscles in the blood of the bivalves Arca and Solen (Lankester).
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  • The four cells first formed are of equal size, and then four smaller cells are formed by division of these four so as to lie at one end of the first four (the pole corresponding to that at which the " directive corpuscles " are extruded and remain).
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  • The corpuscles floating in the fluid it contains are of definite B FIG.
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  • It is colourless and contains definite corpuscles, which are round or elliptical, and in many Metanemertines are coloured red by haemoglobin, being colourless in other species.
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  • He explained chemical combination on the hypotheses that matter consisted of minute corpuscles, that by the coalescence of corpuscles of different substances distinctly new corpuscles of a compound were formed, and that each corpuscle had a certain affinity for other corpuscles.
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  • All these spaces contain a similar coagulable fluid with sparse corpuscles, and all are lined by ciliated cells.
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  • Whether it contains corpuscles is not yet determined, but if so they must be few in number.
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  • These particles, which were termed by their discoverer corpuscles, are more commonly spoken of as electrons,' the particle thus being identified with the charge which it carries.
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  • Not only are the blood corpuscles of Limulus more like in form and granulation to those of Scorpio than to those of any Crustacean, but the fluid is in both animals strongly impregnated with the blue-coloured respiratory proteid, haemocyanin.
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  • The study of the ultimate corpuscles of living matter, their structure, development and properties, by the aid of the microscope; exemplified by Malpighi, Hook, Schwann, Kowalewsky.
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  • These corpuscles may break down in the blood vessels, and their colouring material (haemoglobin) is set free in the serum.
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  • By his researches on the migration of the white corpuscles of the blood Cohnheim, on the bases laid by Virchow, brought the processes of inflammation within the scope of the normal, seeing in them but a modification of normal processes under perturbations of relatively external incidence; even the formation of abscess was thus brought by him within the limits of perversion of processes not differing essentially from those of health; and "new formations," "plastic exudations," and other discontinuous origins of an "essential" pathology, fell into oblivion.
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  • New elements appear in addition to degenerative changes in the normal red corpuscles.
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  • The oxygen contained in that fluid, and destined for consumption by the tissues, is retained by the influence of alcohol in its combination with the haemoglobin or colouring matter of the red blood corpuscles.
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  • Malpighi's demonstration of the blood capillaries in 1668, and six years later he gave the first accurate description of the red blood corpuscles, which he found to be circular in man but oval in frogs and fishes.
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  • Though this may dishearten the systematist, Scourfield (1900) reminds us that " It was in a water-flea that Metschni koff first saw the leucocytes (or phagocytes) trying to get rid of disease germs by swallowing them, and was so led to his epochmaking discovery of the part played by these minute amoeboid corpuscles in the animal body."
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  • The body cavity (archicoele) contains a fluid in which very minute corpuscles have been detected.
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  • In the majority of cases it is very uncertain whether they actually come into relation with the blood corpuscles or not.
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  • The blood is colourless, and has colourless amoeboid corpuscles floating in it.
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  • In Ceratisolen legumen, various species of Arca and a few other species the blood is crimson, owing to the presence of corpuscles impregnated with haemoglobin.
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  • According to observations made by Penrose on an uninjured Ceratisolen legumen, no red corpuscles are to be seen in the pericardial A space, although the heart is filled with them, and no such corpuscles are ever discharged by the animal when it is irritated.
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  • The pericardium never contains blood, as is well shown in those forms wl.ich have red corpuscles in their blood; these corpuscles are never found in the pericardium.
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  • The blood is usually a colourless liquid containing amoeboid cells and sometimes other corpuscles called haematids.
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  • Resting on the dividing upper sphere are the eight-shaped " directive corpuscles," better called " praeseminal outcast cells or apoblasts," since they are the result of a cell-division which affects the egg-cell before it is impregnated, and are mere refuse, destined to disappear.
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  • The disease is peculiarly contagious and infectious, owing to the development of the fungus through the skin, whence spores are freed, which, coming in contact with healthy caterpillars, fasten on them and germinate inwards, giving off corpuscles within the body of the insect.
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  • So early as 1849 Guerin Meneville observed in the blood of diseased silkworms certain vibratory corpuscles, but neither did he nor the Italian Filippi, who studied them later, connect them distinctly with the disease.
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  • The corpuscles were first accurately described by Cornalia, whence they are spoken of as the corpuscles of Cornalia.
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  • Attention had been previously directed to the corpuscles of Cornalia, and it had been found, not only that they occurred in the blood, but that they gorged the whole tissues of the insect, and their presence in the eggs themselves could be microscopically demonstrated.
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  • Pasteur established (I) that the corpuscles are the special characteristic of the disease, and that these invariably manifest themselves, if not in earlier stages, then in the mature moths; (2) that the corpuscles are parasites, and not only the sign but the cause of the disease; and (3) that the disease manifests itself by heredity, by contagion with diseased worms, and by the eating of leaves on which corpuscles are spread.
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  • He found corpuscles in Japanese cocoons and in many specimens which had been preserved for lengthened periods in public collections.
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  • At intervals of five days after spinning their cocoons specimens were to be opened and the chrysalides examined microscopically for corpuscles.
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  • The bodies of both male and female were to be examined for corpuscles, and the eggs of those found absolutely free from taint were preserved for similar " cellular " treatment in the following year.
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  • His views, in his chapter on the Laws of Motion, that the physicist forms a conceptional model of the universe by aid of corpuscles, that these corpuscles are only symbols for the component parts of perceptual bodies, and that force is a measure of motion, and not its cause, are the views of Mach.
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  • The palisade layers of the mesophyll contain the larger number of chlorophyll grains (or corpuscles) while the absorption of carbon dioxide is carried on chiefly through the lower epidermis which is generally much richer in stomata.
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  • Thomson, the successor of Maxwell and Lord Rayleigh in the Cavendish chair of physics in the university of Cambridge, began about the year 1899 a remarkable series of investigations on the cathode discharge, which finally enabled him to make a measurement of the ratio of the electric charge to the mass of the particles of matter projected from the cathode, and to show that this electric charge was identical with the atomic electric charge carried by a hydrogen ion in the act of electrolysis, but that the mass of the cathode particles, or " corpuscles " as he called them, was far less, viz.
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  • The study of radium and radioactivity (see Radioactivity) led before long to the further remarkable knowledge that these so-called radioactive materials project into surrounding space particles or corpuscles, some of which are identical with those projected from the cathode in a high vacuum tube, together with others of a different nature.
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  • Even when they have passed through an abrasion in the skin or through the mucous membranes and enter the blood they are met, in some instances, by a toxic action of the blood itself upon them; and in others they are attacked by the white corpuscles, which destroy them, eat them up, and digest them, the process being known as phagocytosis.
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  • Lastly it may be mentioned that when a toxin has some action which can be demonstrated in a test-tube experiment, for example, a dissolving action on red corpuscles, this action may be annulled by previously adding the antitoxin to toxin; in such a case the intervention of the living tissues is excluded.
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  • By opsonic action is meant the effect which a serum has on bacteria in making them more susceptible to phagocytosis by the white corpuscles of the blood.
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  • Whilst it is not a haematinic, in that it does not increase the number of the red blood corpuscles, it very markedly influences the stability of the compounds of the haemoglobin with oxygen.
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  • The leucocytes or white blood corpuscles are very markedly affected by quinine, the characteristic "amoeboid" movements of the cells being arrested.
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  • Quinine administered by the mouth or by any other means will soon enter the blood, and will then kill the haematozoon malariae, whether it be free in the blood-plasma, in the leucocytes or in the red blood corpuscles.
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  • Also on board is an enemy agent whose mission is to sabotage the project, but he is ultimately attacked by white blood corpuscles.
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  • The mesogloea in the hydropolyp is a thin elastic layer, in which may be lodged the muscular fibres and ganglion cells mentioned above, but which never contains any connective tissue or skeletogenous cells or any other kind of special mesogloeal corpuscles.
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  • They are usually larger than the blood corpuscles.
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  • It contains a colourless fluid, with flat, oval, nucleated corpuscles, as a rule colourless, but in some cases tinged with yellow or red haemoglobin.
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  • An important nucleo-proteid is haemoglobulin or haemoglobin, the colouring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrates; a related substance, haemocyanin, in which the iron of haemoglobin is replaced by copper, occurs in the blood of cephalopods and crayfish.
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  • The origin of the corpuscles, previously a matter of so much difference of opinion, is now pretty fairly set at rest, and has proved the key to the interpretation of the pathology of many diseases of the blood, such as the different forms of anaemia, of leucocythaemia, &c.
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  • It is largely to researches on the bone marrow that we owe our present knowledge of the origin and the classification of the different cellular elements of the blood, both erythrocytes or red corpuscles, and the series of granular leucocytes or white corpuscles.
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  • Whatever be the ancestral cell from which these cells spring, it is in the bone marrow that we find a differentiation into the various marrow cells from which are developed the mature corpuscles that pass from the marrow into the blood circulation.
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  • Haematogenous pigments are derived from the haemoglobin of the red blood corpuscles.
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  • In hydatid disease there is, as a rule, a marked increase in the number of those white corpuscles which possess a specially staining affinity with the dye eosin, and are therefore known as eosinophile cells.
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  • When chemical phenomena occur the molecule may be divided into atoms, and these atoms, in the presence of electrical phenomena, may themselves be further divided into electrons or corpuscles.
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  • The blood is coloured red by haemoglobin in blood corpuscles.
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  • Finally, the Tylopoda differ not only from other ungulates, but from all other mammals, in the fact that the red corpuscles of the blood, instead of being circular in outline, are oval as in the inferior vertebrate classes.
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  • The study of radium and radioactivity led before long to the further remarkable knowledge that these so-called radioactive materials project into surrounding space particles or corpuscles, some of which are identical with those projected from the cathode in a high vacuum tube, together with others of a different nature.
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  • The final outcome of these investigations was the hypothesis that Thomson's corpuscles or particles composing the cathode discharge in a high vacuum tube must be looked upon as the ultimate constituent of what we call negative electricity; in other words, they are atoms of negative electricity, possessing, however, inertia, and these negative electrons are components at any rate of the chemical atom.
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  • Iron being a constituent part of the blood itself, there is a direct indication for the physician to prescribe it when the amount of haemoglobin in the blood is lowered or the red corpuscles are diminished.
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  • It is quickly absorbed into the blood, where its presence can be demonstrated especially in the white blood corpuscles.
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  • For example, if it should turn out that the mass of a body is to be estimated by counting the number of corpuscles (whatever they may be) which go to form it, then a body with an irrational measure of mass is intrinsically impossible.
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