How to use Cornwallis in a sentence

cornwallis
  • In 1824 Port Cornwallis was the rendezvous of the fleet carrying the army to the first Burmese war.

    3
    0
  • There was much sickness, and after two years, urged by Admiral Cornwallis, the government transferred the colony to the N.E.

    1
    0
  • He held a brigade command in the war against Tippoo, and served under Cornwallis in the Seringapatam operations of 1792, being promoted colonel in 1795.

    2
    1
  • Richard Caswell (1729-1789), was defeated here by the British, about 2000 strong, under Lord Cornwallis, who had joined Rawdon in anticipation of an attack by Gates.

    0
    0
  • Nathanael Greene, who after Cornwallis had left the Carolinas, advanced on Camden and arrived in the neighbourhood on the 19th of April 1781.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He also presided over the negotiations which led to the treaty of Luneville with Austria (February 9, 1801); and he and Maret represented France in the lengthy discussions with the British envoy, Lord Cornwallis, which resulted in the signature of the treaty of Amiens (March 25, 1802).

    0
    0
  • Cornwallis followed a year later.

    0
    0
  • Cornwallis accompanied him, and later Lord Rawdon joined him with an additional force.

    0
    0
  • In June Clinton returned to New York, leaving Cornwallis in command, with instructions to reduce North Carolina also.

    0
    0
  • Before Cornwallis could be brought to bay he was faced successively by four antagonists - Generals Gates, Greene, Lafayette and Washington.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Cornwallis marched leisurely into North Carolina, but before meeting Greene some months later he suffered the loss of two detachments sent at intervals to disperse various partisan corps of the Americans.

    0
    0
  • Despite the weakening his army suffered by these losses, Cornwallis marched rapidly through North Carolina, giving Greene a hard chase nearly to the Virginia line.

    0
    0
  • With his small army, less than 2000 strong, Cornwallis declined to follow Greene into the back country, and retiring to Hillsborough, N.C., raised the royal standard, offered protection to the inhabitants, and for the moment appeared to be master of Georgia and the two Carolinas.

    0
    0
  • Cornwallis, meantime, pursued his Virginia project.

    0
    0
  • There he found British v detachments, 2000 strong, composed of troops whom Clinton had sent down separately under Generals Benedict Arnold and William Phillips to establish a base in the Chesapeake, as a diversion in favour of the operations of Cornwallis in the Carolinas.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Early in August Cornwallis retired to Yorktown to rest and await developments.

    0
    0
  • He had a brush with a small British force under Cornwallis near Bermuda on the 10th of June, and reached Rhode Island on the 11th of July.

    0
    0
  • The French admiral gave the allies a superiority of naval strength on the coast of Virginia, and Lord Cornwallis, the British commander, was beleaguered in Yorktown.

    0
    0
  • The fort, built in 1736, was first named Fort Augusta, and in 1780, at the time of the British occupation, was enlarged and renamed Fort Cornwallis; its site is now marked by a Memorial Cross, erected by the Colonial Dames of Georgia in the churchyard of St Paul's.

    0
    0
  • By the same treaty he was deprived of the forts of Gwalior and Gohad; but these were restored by Lord Cornwallis in 1805, when the Chambal river was made the northern boundary of the state.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Calling himself now Captain Williams, now Lord Gerard or Lord Newport or Lord Cornwallis, he travelled from one part of Europe to another; he underwent imprisonments for crime, and became an expert in all kinds of duplicity.

    0
    0
  • During most of 1781 the borough was occupied by the British, and Lord Cornwallis had his headquarters here.

    0
    0
  • Charlotte was occupied in September 1780 by Cornwallis, who left it after learning of the battle of King's Mountain, and subsequently it became the principal base and rendezvous of General Greene.

    0
    0
  • At the head of Jamestown peninsula Cornwallis, in July 1781, attempted to trick the Americans under Lafayette and General Anthony Wayne by displaying a few men on the peninsula and concealing the principal part of his army on the mainland; but when Wayne discovered the trap he made first a vigorous charge, and then a retreat to Lafayette's line.

    0
    0
  • Sir Cornwallis Harris gives ro ft.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was extremely popular at court, and in 1783, on the death of Archbishop Cornwallis, the king pressed him to accept the primacy, but Hurd, who was known, says Madame d'Arblay, as "The Beauty of Holiness," declined it as a charge not suited to his temper and talents, and much too heavy for him to sustain.

    0
    0
  • With special reference to the Union see Castlereagh Correspondence; Cornwallis Correspondence; Westmorland Papers (Irish State Paper Office).

    0
    0
  • Monmouth had four sons and two daughters by his wife, who in 1688 married the 3rd Lord Cornwallis and died in 1732.

    0
    0
  • In June 1775 he took his seat in the 1 It was embarrassed with a debt, however, of £3749, which, owing to conditions caused by the War of Independence, he really paid three times to his British creditors (not counting destruction on his estates, of equal amount, ordered by Lord Cornwallis).

    0
    0
  • At last, in 1789, a more accurate investigation into the agricultural resources of Bengal was commenced, and the settlement based upon this investigation was declared perpetual by Lord Cornwallis in 1793.

    0
    0
  • The urgency of foreign affairs, and subsequently internal strife at the council table, hindered Hastings from developing farther the system of civil administration, a task finally accomplished by Lord Cornwallis.

    0
    0
  • If the foundations of the system of civil administration were laid by Hastings, the superstructure was erected by Cornwallis.

    0
    0
  • But the achievement most familiarly associated with the name of Cornwallis is the permanent settlement of the land revenue of Bengal.

    0
    0
  • Accordingly, Cornwallis took out with him in 1787 instructions to introduce a permanent settlement.

    0
    0
  • Though Lord Cornwallis carried the scheme into execution, all praise or blame, so far as details are concerned, must belong to Sir John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth, whose knowledge of the country was unsurpassed by that of any civilian of his time.

    0
    0
  • Shore would have proceeded more cautiously than Cornwallis's preconceived idea of a proprietary body and the court of directors' haste after fixity permitted.

    0
    0
  • In the result, Tippoo Sultan submitted when Lord Cornwallis had commenced to beleaguer his capital.

    0
    0
  • Next, the whole weight of Wellesley's resources was turned against Tippoo, whom Cornwallis had defeated but not subdued.

    0
    0
  • But Cornwallis was now an old man and broken down in health.

    0
    0
  • In 1792, having for some time devoted himself to the study of Persian, he was appointed to the staff of Lord Cornwallis as Persian interpreter, but two years afterwards was compelled by ill health to leave for England.

    0
    0
  • In this office he continued for six years, till, in February 1801, he, a vice-admiral of 1799, hoisted his flag on board the "Neptune," of 98 guns, as third in command of the Channel Fleet under Admiral Cornwallis, where, however, he remained for but a year, when he was appointed governor of Newfoundland and commander-in-chief of the ships on that station.

    0
    0
  • It was in every way fitting, however, that he who had been the mainspring of the war from the beginning, and had borne far more than his share of its burdens and discouragements, should end it with the campaign of Yorktown, conceived by himself, and the surrender of Cornwallis (October 1781).

    0
    0
  • He was present at Cornwallis's surrender at Yorktown, and afterwards left the army owing to ill-health.

    0
    0
  • Late in the 18th century some interference took place on the part of the British government, then conducted by Lord Cornwallis; but the successor of that nobleman, Sir John Shore, adopting the non-intervention policy, withdrew the British force, and abandoned the country to its fate.

    0
    0
  • Acting through Lord Cornwallis, then governor-general, he ascertained and defined the rights of the landholders in the soil.

    0
    0
  • In 1793 Lord Cornwallis declared their rights perpetual, and made over the land of Bengal to the previous quasi-proprietors or zamindars, on condition of the payment of a fixed land tax.

    0
    0
  • But the Cornwallis code, while defining the rights of the proprietors, failed to give adequate recognition to the rights of the undertenants and the cultivators.

    0
    0
  • This measure, now known as the land law of Bengal, effected for the rights of the under-holders and cultivators what the Cornwallis code in 1793 had effected for those of the superior landholders.

    0
    0
  • On the 31st of December 1781 he was released on parole, and he was finally exchanged for Cornwallis.

    0
    0
  • The more active co-operation of the French fleets with the land forces in Virginia, which was one result of his mission, brought about the disaster of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

    0
    0
  • In 1791 it was stormed by a British army commanded by Lord Cornwallis.

    0
    0
  • The war was continued for some years with varying results; but in 1781 the capitulation of a second British army under Cornwallis at Yorktown was a decisive blow, which brought home to the minds of the dullest the assurance that the conquest of America was an impossibility.

    0
    0
  • Mention should also be made of Gowers Des patches, the Cornwallis Correspondence, Roses Correspondence and Lord Coichesters Correspondence.

    0
    0
  • The succession of failures in America, culminating in Cornwallis's surrender at Yorktown in October 1781, wearied the nation, and at length the persistent and powerful attacks of the opposition began to tell.

    0
    0
  • He was present at Princeton; was chiefly responsible for the mistake in attacking the "Chew House" at Germantown; urged New York as the objective of the campaign of 1778; served with efficiencylat Monmouth and at Yorktown; and after the surrender of Cornwallis was promoted major-general, and served as a commissioner on the exchange of prisoners.

    0
    0
  • Then followed the celebrated march of the combined forces to Yorktown, where on the 22nd of September they formed a junction with the troops of Lafayette; as the result Cornwallis was forced to surrender on the 19th of October.

    0
    0
  • This leniency may have been partly due to doubts as to the legality of the demand for his surrender by the Hamburg authorities; but the government was probably more influenced by Cornwallis's opinion that Tandy was "a fellow of so very contemptible a character that no person in this country (Ireland) seems to care the smallest degree about him."

    0
    0
  • The victory largely contributed to the success of General Nathanael Greene's campaign against Lord Cornwallis.

    0
    0
  • One of these under Humbert succeeded in landing a force in Killala Bay, and gained some success in Connaught before it was subdued by Lake and Cornwallis, Wolfe Tone's brother Matthew being captured, tried by court-martial, and hanged; a second, accompanied by Napper Tandy (q.v.), came to disaster on the coast of Donegal; while Wolfe Tone took part in a third, under Admiral Bompard, with General Hardy in command of a force of about 3000 men, which encountered an English squadron near Lough Swilly on the 12th of October 1798.

    0
    0
  • This war, by which the United States definitely separated themselves from the British connexion, began with the affair of Lexington in Massachusetts, on the 10th of April 1775, and was virtually ended by the capitulation of Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia, on the 19th of October 1781.

    0
    0
  • This brilliant exploit was followed by another on the 3rd of January, when Washington, again crossing the Delaware, outmarched Cornwallis at Trenton, and marching to his rear defeated three British regiments and three companies of light cavalry at Princeton, New Jersey.

    0
    0
  • Minor battles and skirmishes occurred until in August 1781 Washington conceived the project of a combined American-French attack on Cornwallis at Yorktown, Va., the success of which was decisive of the war (see below) .

    0
    0
  • The danger lay in the suddenly changed situation in that direction; as General Greene, instead of following Cornwallis to the coast, boldly pushed down towards Camden and Charleston, S.C., with a view to drawing his antagonist after him to the points where he was the year before, as well as to driving back Lord Rawdon, whom Cornwallis had left in that field.

    0
    0
  • With about 2500 men he recrossed the Delaware on the night of the 25th of December, surprised three regiments of Hessians at Trenton the next morning, and took 1000 prisoners and 1000 stands of arms. In a series of movements following up this success he outgeneraled the British commander, Lord Cornwallis, and on the 3rd of January 1776, defeated a detachment of his army at Princeton (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • With the colony the name also of Port Cornwallis was transferred to this new locality.

    2
    3
  • The commission reported favourably, selecting as a site Blair's original Port Cornwallis, but pointing out and avoiding the vicinity of a salt swamp which seemed to have been pernicious to the old colony.

    3
    3
  • It was occupied by the British under Cornwallis in June 1780, was well fortified and was garrisoned by a force under Lord Rawdon.

    1
    1