How to use Cornwall in a sentence

cornwall
  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

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  • It was found in some abundance at the end of the 18th century in the copper mines of the St Day district in Cornwall, and has since been found at a few other localities, for example, at Konigsberg near Schemnitz in Hungary, and in the Tintic district in Utah.

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  • He took Devizes and Laycock House, Winchester and Basing House, and rejoined Fairfax in October at Exeter, and accompanied him to Cornwall, where he assisted in the defeat of Hopton's forces and in the suppression of the royalists in the west.

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  • In the slow process of time they drove them into the most southerly corner of Australia, just as the Saxons drove the Celts into Cornwall and the Welsh hills.

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  • Robur; in the mild climate of Devonshire and Cornwall it has reached a height of TOO ft.

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  • He afterwards went for the same purpose to Cornwall, where he spent a year.

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  • It was provided that the hundred court of Powdershire should always be held there and two fairs at the feasts of St Peter in Cathedra and St Barnabas, both of which are still held, and a Tuesday market (now held on Friday) and that it should be a free borough rendering a yearly rent to the earl of Cornwall.

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  • With this apparatus some of Marconi's earliest successes, such as telegraphing across the English Channel, were achieved, and telegraphic communication at the rate of fifteen words or so a minute established between the East Goodwin lightship and the South Foreland lighthouse, also between the Isle of Wight and the Lizard in Cornwall.

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  • Later, when the west was better explored, it was found that tin actually came from two regions, north-west Spain and Cornwall.

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  • Small islands off the coast of north-west Spain, the headlands of that same coast, the Scillies, Cornwall, the British Isles as a whole, have all in turn been suggested.

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  • Behind the Rathaus is the Grashaus, in which Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans, is said to have held his court.

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  • Before his death his eldest son, John Howard, was a knight and already advanced by his marriage with Joan of Cornwall, one of the bastard line founded by Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans.

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  • His first attempt, made in the same year, at the Dolcoath mine in Cornwall, failed in consequence of an accident to one of the pendulums; a second attempt in 1828 was defeated by a flooding of the mine, and many years elapsed before another opportunity presented itself.

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  • In 1750 he was admitted a fellow of the Royal Society; and in 1754 he published, at Oxford, his Antiquities of Cornwall (2nd ed., London, 1769).

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  • In 1758 appeared his Natural History of Cornwall.

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  • Borlase's letters to Pope, St Aubyn and others, with answers, fill several volumes of MS. There are also MS. notes on Cornwall, and a complete unpublished treatise Concerning the Creation and Deluge.

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  • His father, Jacob Stephen Hawker, was at that time a doctor, but afterwards curate and vicar of Stratton, Cornwall.

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  • During the 13th and 14th centuries the castle and lordship changed hands very frequently; they were granted successively to Hubert de Burgh, whose son forfeited them after the battle of Evesham, to Richard, earl of Cornwall, whose son Edmund died without issue; to Piers Gaveston, and lastly to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, and so to the Crown as parcel of the duchy of Lancaster.

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  • As captain of the "Cornwall" (80),(80), the flagship of Sir Charles Knowles, he was in the battle with the Spaniards off Havana on the 2nd of October 1748.

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  • Among his informants were Earl Richard of Cornwall and Henry III.

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  • Other small-fruited pears, distinguished by their precocity and apple-like fruit, may be referred to P. cordate, a species found wild in western France, and in Devonshire and Cornwall.

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  • A similar work on Lancashire, Cheshire and the Peak was sent out in 1700 by Leigh, and one on Cornwall by Borlase in 1758 - all these four being printed at Oxford.

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  • Theobald was followed (1240-1241) by Richard of Cornwall, the brother of Henry III., who, like his predecessor, had to sail in the teeth of papal prohibitions; but neither of the two achieved any permanent result, except the fortification of Ascalon.

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  • Among institutions there are a specially fine public library, museums of geology and natural history and antiquities, mining and science schools, the West Cornwall Infirmary and a meteorological station.

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  • Nevertheless thirty years later it is described by Leland as the westernmost market town in Cornwall "with no socur for Botes or shippes but a forsed Pere or Key."

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  • He died at Helston in Cornwall on the 29th of March 1833.

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  • Helston (Henliston, Haliston, Helleston), the capital of the Meneage district of Cornwall, was held by Earl Harold in the time of the Confessor and by King William at the Domesday Survey.

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  • He then settled for some years as a medical practitioner at Penzance; there geology engaged his particular attention, and he became secretary of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall.

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  • Next year he took Cornwall by storm.

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  • Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans, made it an imperial city in 1257.

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  • There it was interpreted as Troy Novant, the "new Troy," and connected with the names of the Trojans Brutus and Corineus who were reputed to have given their names to Britain and Cornwall.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • Another half-brother, Robert of Mortain, earl of Cornwall, showed little capacity.

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  • All we know is that about the 1st century the Greek word Kacroircpos designated tin, and that tin was imported from Cornwall into Italy after, if not before, the invasion of Britain by Julius Caesar.

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  • The crude tinstuff raised in Cornwall carries on an average a little over 2% of black tin.

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  • In Europe, Australasia and one large works at Singapore it has been practically replaced by the reverberatory furnace process, first introduced into Cornwall about the year 1700.

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  • In England an outbreak at the Dolcoath mine, Cornwall, in 1902, led to an investigation for the home office by Dr Haldane F.R.S.

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  • Its main use in England was to colour pastry and confectionery, and it is still used for this purpose in some parts of the country (notably Cornwall).

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  • His knowledge, his sympathy, his enthusiasm soon made themselves felt everywhere; the ruridecanal conferences of clergy became a real force, and the church in Cornwall was inspired with a vitality that had never been possible when it was part of the unwieldy diocese of Exeter.

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  • At Wheal Cock near St Just in Cornwall the protecting roof was so thin that holes bored for blasting more than once penetrated to the bed of the ocean, and wooden plugs were kept on hand to drive into such holes when this occurred.

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  • Recent investigations have shown an alarming increase in mortality from miners' phthisis in Cornwall, South Africa and elsewhere.

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  • In the metal mines of Cornwall and Devon special rules are now in force requiring the use of water in drilling, and other precautions, to lessen this danger from dust.

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  • Both he and his wife occupied themselves with preaching, first in Cornwall and then in Cardiff and Walsall.

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  • He was elected in September 1553 member of parliament for Looe in Cornwall in Queen Mary's first parliament, but in October 1553 a committee of the house reported that, having as prebendary of Westminster a seat in convocation, he could not sit in the House of.

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  • On the 7th of November 1648 Prynne was returned as member for Newport in Cornwall.

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  • It may also be accompanied by pyrites, galena, arsenides and antimonides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, &c. It is widely distributed, and is particularly abundant in Germany (the Harz, Silesia), Austro-Hungary, Belgium, the United States and in England (Cumberland, Derbyshire, Cornwall, North Wales).

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  • Innocent, determined that the Hohenstaufen should not again dominate Italy, offered the crown of Sicily in turn to Richard of Cornwall, Charles of Anjou, and Henry III.

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  • In 1848, while making a tour in Cornwall, Tennyson met Robert Stephen Hawker of Morwenstow, with whom he seems - but the evidence is uncertain - to have talked about King Arthur, and to have resumed his intention of writing an epic on that theme.

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  • His first achievement was the rallying of Cornwall to the royal cause, his next to carry the war from that county into Devonshire.

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  • By Isolda, granddaughter of Robert de Cardinan, the town was given to Richard, king of the Romans, who in the third year of his reign granted to the burgesses a gild merchant sac and soc, toll, team and infangenethef, freedom from pontage, lastage, &c., throughout Cornwall, and exemption from the jurisdiction of the hundred and county courts, also a yearly fair and a weekly market.

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  • His son Edmund, earl of Cornwall, built a great hall at Lostwithiel and decreed that the coinage of tin should be at Lostwithiel only.

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  • Peter visited England several times, one of his nieces, Eleanor of Provence, being the wife of the English king Henry III., and another, Sancha, wife of Richard, earl of Cornwall.

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  • The former is found, generally mixed with iron, copper and arsenic oxides, in Bohemia, Siberia, Cornwall, France (Meymac) and other localities; it also occurs admixed with bismuth carbonate and hydrate.

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  • The hydrated carbonate, bismutite, is of less importance; it occurs in Cornwall, Bolivia, Arizona and elsewhere.

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  • In 1644 he held a command in the artillery under Essex in Cornwall and took part in the surrender after Lostwithiel.

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  • Only one duke had been created in England before, and that was fourteen years previously, when the king's son Edward, the Black Prince, was made duke of Cornwall.

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  • The settlement was founded in 1841 by the Plymouth Company under the auspices of the New Zealand Company, and chiefly consisted of emigrants from Devonshire and Cornwall.

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  • The chief supplies are from Cornwall and Devon, and Freiberg in Saxony, and from Canada and the United States.

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  • Under the Norman earls of Cornwall this was rebuilt, embattled and furnished with munitions of war.

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  • In the parish of Tintagel is the hamlet of Bossiney which under the name of Tintagel received a charter (undated) from Richard king of the Romans, granting freedom to the borough and to the burgesses freedom from pontage and stallage throughout Cornwall, a market on Wednesdays and a three days' fair at Michaelmas.

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  • Immediately opposite are the traces of a supposed British camp, and of the Roman road from Exeter to Cornwall.

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  • At this point the oldest track went across Salisbury Plain towards Stonehenge and so on to Cornwall.

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  • It is served by the Philadelphia & Reading, the Cornwall and the Cornwall & Lebanon railways.

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  • The prince of Wales, in addition to the revenues of the duchy of Cornwall, had L40,000 a year, the princess £Io,000, and an addition of L36,000 a year for their children was granted by parliament in 1889.

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  • He assisted the king in his studies, received from him the monasteries of Congresbury and Banwell, and sometime later "Exeter and its diocese in Saxonland and Cornwall."

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  • In the earlier versions of his story he is the son of Rivalin, a prince of North West Britain, and Blancheflor, sister to King Mark of Cornwall.

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  • Attracted by his gifts, pirates from the North Sea kidnap the boy, but terrified by the storms which subsequently beset them, put him ashore on the coast of Cornwall, whence he finds his way to the court of his uncle King Mark.

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  • Cornwall is at this time in subjection to the king of Ireland, Gormond, and every third year must pay tribute; the Irish champion, Morolt, brother to the queen, arrives to claim his toll of thirty youths and as many maidens.

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  • The Cornish knights (who in Arthurian romance are always represented as hopeless cowards), dare not contest his claim but Tristan challenges him to single combat, slays him and frees Cornwall from tribute.

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  • When recovered he makes a plausible excuse for leaving Ireland (pretending he has left a wife in his native land) and returns to Cornwall.

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  • Tristan and Iseult set sail for Cornwall, Iseult accompanied by her waiting-woman, Brangaene (who, in some versions, is also a kinswoman), to whose care the queen, skilled in magic arts, confides a love-potion.

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  • Later on he returns to Cornwall in disguise, and has more .than one interview with his mistress.

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  • He secretly urged his nephew's candidature for the imperial crown, left vacant by the death of Richard of Cornwall, king of the Romans, in 1272, but without success.

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  • For the future avoidance of any such scenes a cunning workman of Cornwall offered to make a table which should seat 1600 knights and more, and at which all should be equal.

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  • In these either Merlin made the table for Uther Pendragon, or it had belonged to Leodegrance, king of Cornwall and father of Guenevere, and was given to Arthur on his marriage with that princess.

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  • He traced his descent from Robert of Mortain, half brother of the Conqueror and first earl of Cornwall; he married about 1200 the daughter of William de Vernon, earl of Devon; and thus, from the beginning of his career, he stood within the circle of the great ruling families.

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  • He was dragged from the sanctuary at Bury St Edmunds, in which he had taken refuge, and was kept in strait confinement until Richard of Cornwall, the king's brother, and three other earls offered to be his sureties.

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  • In the lead-mining districts of Derbyshire and the north of England the ore occurs as veins and flats in the Carboniferous Limestone series, whilst in Cornwall the veins traverse clay-slates.

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  • Having decided to enter the Episcopal Church, Strachan was ordained on the 22nd of May 1803, and was immediately afterwards appointed to the parish of Cornwall.

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  • Then again there are such large banks as are found in Wales, Devon and Cornwall.

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  • By an arrangement made in 1254 he surrendered part of it to Bela, but when the dispute was renewed he defeated the Hungarians in July 1260 and secured the whole of Styria for himself, owing his formal investiture with Austria and Styria to the German king, Richard, earl of Cornwall.

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  • From the Mallets it went to the Gournays, but in 1536 it reverted to the crown, and it is now included in the duchy of Cornwall.

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  • Later, when this plan had fallen through, he was endowed with castles, revenues and lands on both sides of the channel; the vacant earldom of Cornwall was reserved for him (1175); he was betrothed to Isabella the heiress of the earldom of Gloucester (1176); and he was granted the lordship of Ireland with the homage of the Anglo-Irish baronage (1177).

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  • The denomination arose in the agricultural districts and fishing villages of north Cornwall and Devon; a district only slightly influenced by John Wesley and the original Methodist movement.

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  • The founder was William O'Bryan (afterwards Bryant), a Methodist lay preacher of Luxillian, Cornwall.

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  • At that conference the work had spread from Ring's Ash in Devon to Morrah, a lonely and desolate parish in west Cornwall.

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  • Padstow (Aldestowe 1273, Patrikstowe 1326, Patrestowe 1346) and St Ives are the only two tolerably safe harbours on the north coast of Cornwall.

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  • St Petrock, who has been called the patron saint of Cornwall, is said to have landed here and also to have died here in the 6th century.

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  • On the 31st of March 1820 missionaries of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions - two clergymen, two teachers, a physician, a farmer, and a printer, each with his wife - and three Hawaiians educated in the Cornwall (Connecticut) Foreign Missionary School, arrived from America and began their labours at Honolulu.

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  • The south of England, between Sussex and " West Wales (eventually reduced to Cornwall), was occupied by Wessex, which originally also possessed some territory to the north of the Thames.

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  • But the state's iron foundries moved rapidly westward after the first successful experiments in making pig-iron with bituminous coal, in 1845, and the discovery, a few years later, that rich ore could be obtained there at less cost from the Lake Superior region resulted in a decline of iron-mining within the state until, in 1902, the product amounted to only 822,932 long tons, 72.2% of which was magnetite ore from the Cornwall mines in Lebanon county which have been among the largest producers of this kind of ore since the erection of the Cornwall furnace in 1742.

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  • It is the chief mining town in Cornwall, and the bulk of the population is engaged in the tin mines or at the numerous tinstreaming works.

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  • Among the lay barons, the first place naturally belonged to Richard of Cornwall who, as the king's brother, was unwilling to take any steps which might impair the royal prerogative; while Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester, the ablest man of his order, was regarded with suspicion as a foreigner, and linked to Henry's cause by his marriage with the princess Eleanor.

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  • The compromise with the surviving rebels was arranged by his son in concert with Richard of Cornwall and the legate Ottobuono; the statute of Marlborough (1267), which purchased a lasting peace by judicious concessions, was similarly arranged between Edward and the earl of Gloucester.

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  • From 1745 onwards he seems to have travelled over the greater portion of Cornwall and Devon in search of these minerals, and he finally located them in the parish of St Stephen's near to St Austell.

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  • These were discovered to be, not a part of Britain as was imagined at first, but a separate group by themselves, now known as the Scillies; hence it is improbable that the Phoenicians ever worked the tin-mines in Cornwall.

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  • Finely crystallized specimens of pyrite are obtained from many other localities, especially from Cornwall, Elba and Traversella, near Ivrea, in Piedmont.

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  • Radiolaria are found in cherts in the Culm of Devonshire and Cornwall, in Russia, Germany and elsewhere.

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  • Granites, porphyries and porphyrites belonging to this period occur in the Saxon Erzgebirge, the Harz, Thiiringerwald, Vosges, Brittany, Cornwall and Christiania.

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  • The urban district has an area of 7633 acres, and includes the small industrial colonies near some of the most important mines in Cornwall.

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  • There are ruins of an oratory dedicated to St Helen on Cape Cornwall.

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  • But in the " Drift " maps many other types of deposit are indicated, such, for instance, as the ordinary modern alluvium of rivers, and the older river terraces (River-drift of various ages), including gravels, brickearth and loam; old raised sea beaches and blown-sand (Aeolian-drift); the " Head " of Cornwall and Devon, an angular detritus consisting of stones with clay or loam; clay-with-flints, rainwash (landwash), scree and talus; the " Warp," a marine and estuarine silt and clay of the Humber; and also beds of peat and diatomite.

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  • John's younger son Richard, king of the Romans, left a son Edmund, earl of Cornwall, with whom his line ended; his elder son Henry III.

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  • Of its illegitimate descendants the house of Cornwall was founded by Richard, a natural son of Richard, king of the Romans and earl of Cornwall, who was ancestor of Lord Cornewall of Fanhope, temp. Henry VI., of the Cornewalls, " barons of Burford," and other families; but the principal house is that which was founded, at a later date, by Sir Charles Somerset, natural son of Henry (Beaufort) duke of Somerset (beheaded 1464), who was created earl of Worcester in 1513, and whose descendant Henry, marquess and earl of Worcester, obtained the dukedom of Beaufort in 1682.

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  • Mention may be made of the brilliant black crystals from Alston Moor in Cumberland, St Agnes in Cornwall and Derbyshire.

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  • In January 1256, however, William was killed, and in the following year there was a double election for the German crown, Alphonso X., king of Castile, a grandson of Philip of Swabia, and Richard, earl of Cornwall, brother of the English king Henry III., being each chosen by parties of electors.

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  • It has been continuously and carefully bred in Cornwall, Devon, Essex and Suffolk, and from these centres it has rapidly spread all over the country.

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  • Wace, who, while translating Geoffrey, evidently knew, and used, popular tradition, combines these two, asserting that she was of Roman parentage on the mother's side, but cousin to Cador of Cornwall by whom she was brought up. The tradition relating to Guenevere is decidedly confused and demands further study.

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  • The inlet of Trelawne is one of the most exquisite wooded coombes in Cornwall.

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  • West Looe (known also as Porpighan or Porbuan) benefited by a charter granted by Richard king of the Romans to Odo Treverbyn and ratified in 1325 constituting it a free borough whose burgesses were to be free of all custom throughout Cornwall.

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  • Among the birthday honours of 1906 he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Courtney of Penwith (Cornwall).

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  • The Celtic principality in Cornwall, which seems to have survived at least till 926, must long have been practically dependent on Wessex.

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  • Lord Rosebery had just gone down to Cornwall to make a series of speeches in support of the Liberal programme, now fairly well mapped out as regards those items which represented the strong public opposition to what had been done by the Unionist government..

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  • Meanwhile Perkin had failed in Cornwall and been captured.

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  • Lanark, from Oxford, fled to join the Covenanters; Charles imprisoned Hamilton in Cornwall; Montrose was made a marquis; Leslie, with a large Scottish force and 4000 horse, besieged Newcastle.

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  • In winter it is common off Devon and Cornwall, but has not hitherto been caught in such numbers as to be of commercial importance.

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  • Some considerable number of tin drinkingcups and bowls of the Celtic period have been found in Cornwall in the neighbourhood of the celebrated tin and copper mines, which have been worked from a very early period.

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  • The castle, the ruins of which are in part of Norman date, was the seat of the earls of Cornwall, and was frequently besieged during the civil wars of the 17th century.

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  • Reginald, earl of Cornwall (1140-1175), granted to the canons rights of jurisdiction in all their lands and exemption from suit of court in the shire and hundred courts.

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  • Innocent IV., in his determination to crush the Hohenstaufens, offered the kingdom in turn to Richard, earl of Cornwall, to Edward, son of Henry III.

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  • It occurs in metalliferous veins, often in association with iron-pyrites, chalybite, blende, &c., and in Cornwall and Devon, where it is abundant, with cassiterite.

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  • Well-crystallized specimens are met with at many localities; for example, formerly at Wheal Towan (hence the name towanite, which has been applied to the species) in the St Agnes district of Cornwall, at Freiberg in Saxony, and Joplin, Missouri.

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  • The Land's End is the westernmost of the granite masses which rise at intervals through Cornwall from Dartmoor.

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  • This league was joined by a powerful group of princes and nobles and found recognition by the prince-electors of the Empire; but for want of leadership it did not stand the test, when Richard of Cornwall and Alphonso of Castile were elected rival kings in 1257.2 In the following centuries the imperial cities in south Germany, where most of them were situated, repeatedly formed leagues to protect their interests against the power of the princes and the nobles, and destructive wars were waged; but no great political issue found solution, the relative position of the parties after each war remaining much what it had been before.

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  • In this version St Ursula is a daughter of Dionotus, king of Cornwall.

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  • During the 6th century the battle of Deorham gained by the West Saxons in 577 cut off communication with Cornwall, and in 613 the great battle of Chester, won by King Ethelfrith, prevented the descendants of Cunedda from ever again asserting their sovereignty over Strathclyde; the joint effect, therefore, of these two important Saxon victories was to isolate Wales and at the same time to put an end to all pretensions of its rulers as the inheritors of the ancient political claims of the Roman governors of the northern province of Britain.

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  • In Cornwall copper lodes usually run east and west.

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  • Roger de Valletort, the last male heir of the family, gave the honour of Trematon and with it the borough of Saltash to Richard, king of the Romans and earl of Cornwall.

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  • Thenceforth, in spite of attempts to set aside the grant, the earls and subsequently the dukes of Cornwall were the lords of Saltash.

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  • Tin ore is obtained almost exclusively in Cornwall.

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  • The total tonnage of ore included 5757 tons from England (chiefly from Cornwall) and 1146 from Ireland (Wicklow, &c.).

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  • In England the use of tiles has been tried on various occasions, in Cornwall on the river Fal, at Hayling Island and in Essex, but has nowhere become permanently established.

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  • On the 31st of October he was made a canon of York, and on the 15th of December provost of the fourteen prebends of Combe in Wells cathedral, while at some date unknown he obtained also prebends in Bridgenorth collegiate church and St Patrick's, Dublin, and the rectory of Menheniot in Cornwall.

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  • Escaping from the massacre of St Bartholomew, he went to England and returned with a fleet for the relief of La Rochelle (1573), but soon had to withdraw to Cornwall.

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  • He was the younger son of Robert Pitt of Boconnoc, Cornwall, and grandson of Thomas Pitt (1653-1726), governor of Madras, who was known as "Diamond" Pitt, from the fact of his having sold a diamond of extraordinary size to the regent Orleans for something like £135,000.

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  • In Cornwall fluorspar is known to the miners as "cann."

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  • In January 1658 he was elected to Richard Cromwell's parliament as member for West Looe in Cornwall.

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  • He was also canon of Christ Church (1770) and rector of Culham (1753), in Oxfordshire, and was subsequently presented to the living of Menheniot, Cornwall, which he was unable to visit and resigned two years before his death.

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  • Ever since that time it has passed with the earldom or duchy of Cornwall.

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  • His son Edmund earl of Cornwall in 1275 granted to the burgesses for a yearly rent of r8 (sold by William to Lord Somers) the borough in fee farm with its mills, tolls, fines and pleas, pleas of the crown excepted.

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  • The sources of tin in Europe are practically restricted to Cornwall and Saxony.

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  • The westward prolongation of the great south-western promontory of England, occupied by the county of Cornwall, continues as a rugged ridge broken by a succession of depressions, and exceeds a height of Boo ft., nearly as far as the point where it falls to the ocean in the cliffs of Land's End.

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  • Region, which stretches from the Scottish border to the division centre of England, running south; (3) Wales, occupying the peninsula between the Mersey and the Bristol Channel, and extending beyond the political boundaries of the principality to include Shropshire and Hereford; and (4) the peninsula of Cornwall and Devon.

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  • The peninsula of Cornwall and Devon may be looked upon as formed from a synclinal trough of Devonian rocks, which appear as plateaus on the north and south, while the centre is occupied by Lower Carboniferous strata at a lower level.

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  • The remarkable features of the scenery of South Devon and Cornwall are due to a narrow band of Archaean rock which appears in the south of the peninsulas terminating in Lizard Head and Start Point, and to huge masses of granite and other eruptive rocks which form a series of great bosses and dykes.

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  • The great variety of the rocks which meet the sea along the south of Cornwall and Devon has led to the formation of a singularly picturesque coast - the headlands being carved from the hardest igneous rocks, the bays cut back in the softer Devonian strata, The fjord-like inlets of Falmouth, Plymouth and Dartmouth are splendid natural harbours, which would have developed great commercial ports but for their remoteness from the centres of commerce and manufactures.

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  • China clay from the decomposing granites; tin and copper ore, once abounding at the contacts between the granite and the rocks it pierced, were the former staples of wealth, and the mining largely accounts for the exceptional density of population in Cornwall.

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  • Essex and Suffolk, Suffolk and Norfolk, Cornwall and Devon, Durham and Yorkshire, Lancashire and Cheshire, are all separated by rivers, while rivers form some part of the boundaries of almost every county.

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  • It was about this time that the Pennine Hills, the Lake District mountain mass, and the Mendip Hills were being most vigorously uplifted, while the granite masses of Cornwall and Devon wore perhaps being injected into the Carboniferous and Devonian rocks.

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  • From this period, more or less of the Pennine ridge has always remained above the sea, along with much of Cornwall and parts of Devonshire.

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  • It is lowest, naturally, in the mining districts, as Glamorgan, Monmouth, Durham, Northumberland; but an exception may be noted in the case of Cornwall, where a high proportion of females is attributed to the emigration of miners consequent upon the relative decrease in importance of the tin-mines.

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  • Those with the smallest proportional cultivated area are Westmorland, Middlesex, Northumberland, Surrey, Cumberland, the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire, Lancashire, Durham and Cornwall.

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  • In the case of Cornwall and Cumberland the physical conditions are similar to these; but in that of Middlesex and Surrey the existence of large urban areas belonging or adjacent to London must be taken into account.

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  • Riding of Yorkshire are especially productive in all crops these; the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire pro duce a notable quantity of barley and oats; and the oat-crops in the following counties deserve mention - Devonshire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Cornwall, Cheshire and Sussex.

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  • There is also plenty of hillpasture in the south-western counties (from Hampshire and Berkshire westward), especially in Devonshire, Cornwall and Somersetshire, and also in Monmouthshire and along the Welsh marches, on the Cotteswold Hills, &c. In all these localities sheep are extensively reared, especially in Northumberland, but on the other hand in Lincolnshire the numbers of sheep are roughly equal to those in the northern county.

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  • Cattle are reared in great numbers in Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Devonshire, Somersetshire and Cornwall; but the numbers of both cattle and sheep are in no English county (save Middlesex) to be regarded as insignificant.

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  • Of the metals, the production of copper is a lapsing industry, confined to Cornwall.

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  • Fireclay is largely raised from coal-mines, while, among special clays, there is a considerable production of china and potter's clays in Cornwall, Devonshire and Dorsetshire.

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  • As regards igneous rocks, the Charnwood Forest quarries of Leicestershire, and those of Cornwall, are particularly noted for their granite.

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  • Slate is worked in Cornwall and Devon, and also in Lancashire and Cumberland, where, in the Lake District, there are several large quarries.

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  • Similarly, this industry was of early importance along the line of the Cotteswold Hills, from Chipping Camden to Stroud and beyond, as also in some towns of Devonshire and Cornwall, but though it survives in the neighbourhood of Stroud, the importance of this district is far surpassed by that of the West Riding of Yorkshire, where the woollen industry stands pre-eminent among the many which, as already indicated, have concentrated there.

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  • The Scilly Islands, which form part of the ancient county of Cornwall, without being ranked as an administrative county, are provided with a county council and have separate administration.

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  • The sardines of the west coast of France, which are tinned in oil for export, are immature fish of the same stock as those taken on the coasts of Cornwall; they are 5 to 71 in.

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  • He was admitted to the bar in 1840, and settled in Cornwall.

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  • If, however, a prince of Wales and duke of Cornwall should die in the lifetime of the sovereign, leaving a son and heir, both dignities are extinguished, because his son, although he is his heir, is neither a king of England nor the first-begotten son of a king of England.

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  • It has thus occasionally happened that the dukes of Cornwall have not been princes of Wales, as Henry VI.

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  • But the mountains of Wales and the moors of Cornwall and Cumbria did not greatly tempt the settler.

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  • It numbered among its leaders the good archbishop, Edmund of Abingdon, and Robert Grosseteste, the active and learned bishop of Lincoln; it was not infrequently aided by the kings brother Richard, earl of Cornwall, who did not share Henrys blind admiration for his foreign relatives.

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  • Henry himself, his brother Richard of Cornwall, and many hundreds of his chief supporters were taken prisoners.

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  • He returned suddenly in 1289, called home by complaints that reached him as to the administration of justice by his officials, who were slighting the authority of his cousin Edmund of Cornwall, whom he had left behind as regent.

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  • Piers was given the royal title of earl of Cornwall, and married to the kings niece; when Edward went over to France to do homage for Gascony, he even made his friend regent during his absence, in preference to any of his kinsmen.

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  • From this date onward Franco-Spanish fleets were perpetually to be met not only in the Bay of Biscay but in the Channel; they made the voyage to Bordeaux unsafe, and often executed descents on the shores of Kent, Sussex, Devon and Cornwall.

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  • In Cornwall especially the disorders grew to such a pitch that local demagogues called out several thousand men to resist the tax-collectors, and finally raised open.

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  • It met with strenuous resistance in Devon and in Cornwall, where rebellions added to the thickening troubles of the protector.

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  • He was chosen member for Newport in Cornwall in the parliament of 1601, and member for St Albans in 1604.

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  • Elizabeth, married to John Holand, duke of Exeter, who was beheadedbyHenry IV.; afterwards to Sir John Cornwall, created Baron Fanhope.

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  • An impression exists in Cornwall, where Murdoch's early experiments were made, that it was a millwright named Hornblower who first suggested the process of making gas to Murdoch, but, as has been shown, the fact that illuminating gas could be obtained from coal by distillation was known a century before Murdoch made his experiments, and the most that can be claimed for him is that he made the first successful application of it on a practical scale.

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  • In 1826 and 1828, Whewell was engaged with Airy in conducting experiments in Dolcoath mine, Cornwall, in order to determine the density of the earth.

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  • He was about to offer his services to the Church Missionary Society, when a disaster in Cornwall deprived him and his unmarried sister of the provision their father had made for them, and rendered it necessary that he should obtain a salary that would support her as well as himself.

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  • On the outbreak of the second war with Great Britain (1812) he was placed in command of the New York state frontier from Oswego to Lake St Francis (near Cornwall, Ontario) and repelled the British attacks on Ogdensburg (October 4, 1812) and Sackett's Harbor (May 29, 1813).

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  • It is probably from this period that the Irish colonies in south Wales, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall date.

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  • Perhaps it was his gift of oratory which suggested his appointment as bishop of the refractory men of Devon and Cornwall.

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  • But in 1497 he thought best to dismiss him, and Perkin, after attempting something again in Ireland, landed in Cornwall with a small body of men.

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  • Already Cornwall had risen in insurrection that year, not liking the taxation imposed for the purpose of repelling the Scotch invasion.

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  • For some years he lived in seclusion in Cornwall and occupied himself with theological studies, producing among other books The Arte of Happines (1619) and Testis Veritatis, a reply to Richard Montagu's Appello Caesarem.

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  • He was deputed by a synod of the church in Wessex to remonstrate with the Britons of Domnonia (Devon and Cornwall) on their differences from the Roman practice in the shape of the tonsure and the date of Easter.

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  • Coal-mining is carried on in various districts of the island, but the principal mines are at Mount Nicholas and Cornwall, in the Mount Nicholas Range; the output of the field is increasing, but no export trade is at present possible, the mines being situated too far from the seaboard.

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  • It is found in the north of England and in Cornwall, and growing in rocky pastures throughout temperate and northern Europe and Asiatic Russia, and also in the mountain districts of southern Europe.

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  • Cornwall was one of the first counties in the UK to adopt this action plan approach.

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  • To digress somewhat, there are a large number of rounds in Cornwall, usually located on spurs of land or prominently on hillslopes.

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  • Looking for self catering accommodation no more than 5 minutes away from the beach in Bude, North Cornwall?

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  • But there is enough in the book to keep audiences amused from Sutherland to Cornwall, Dyfed to Norfolk, for years to come.

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  • An island archipelago only 20 minutes from Cornwall, with over 100 islands waiting to be explored.

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  • Campaigners from both charities visited four beaches in Cornwall, and handed out free portable ashtrays.

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  • Ideally located for all of Cornwall's major attractions.

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  • The ideal base for touring the whole of Cornwall.

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  • The common Mussel is the most common bivalve in Cornwall forming extensive beds on exposed rocky beaches.

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  • Spring comes early in Cornwall and in March the lane is studded with primroses followed by bluebells, campion and foxgloves.

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  • However some species have adapted, like the invasive bracken which has taken over large swathes of dry heath land in Cornwall.

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  • River Camel Cornwall The Camel represents bullhead Cottus gobio in the extreme southwest of its range in England.

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  • Richard, earl of Cornwall granted the burgesses a guild merchant in 1268.

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  • An old fashioned bell announces your entrance into one of Cornwall's oldest family butchery businesses, Vivian Olds.

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  • The transatlantic fibre-optic cable enters the UK at Cornwall, with access points available throughout the region along is route.

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  • The Cornwall rivers Project is targeted at 15 river catchments, outlined in the list to the left.

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  • About the District North Cornwall is the coast edge of Bodmin Moor with high, rocky cliffs.

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  • Chichester Interest Holidays - Relaxed and friendly guided coastal walking holidays in Cornwall for small groups of adults.

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  • Together with the neighboring settlements of Redruth and Pool it forms the largest urban conurbation in Cornwall.

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  • Simon Butler, prosecuting counsel from Cornwall & Hackney appeared to be very uncomfortable with Sunderland's vicious attack.

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  • Twenty-two canal holidays are planned countrywide from the Bude, Cornwall to the Dearne and Dove, Yorkshire.

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  • This is so sensitive that she is now only duchess of Cornwall and not princess of Wales.

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  • Fit for a king Cornwall's new specialist food emporium has been long awaited.

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  • Seawitch Cottage - Hayle - Ideally base for exploring the beautiful environs of West Cornwall.

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  • The Squadron moved down to Cornwall in March 1943 for fighter patrols and bomber escort missions.

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  • Edinbane Pottery make up their own clay body, blending very plastic clays from Dorset, china clay from Cornwall and potash feldspar.

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  • Fade Launch of actnow flex project First step toward making Cornwall the flexible working capital of the UK.

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  • Set a few yards away from the other holiday cottages it offers a marvelous hideaway in Cornwall for couples or for honeymoons.

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  • The bays, sandy coves and rocky inlets provide some of the safest spots for bathing, sailing and windsurfing in Cornwall.

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  • Away from the misty moors, it is the leafy lanes of South Cornwall which are thought to be haunted by the past.

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  • Police in Devon & Cornwall also took receipt of an anti-tank rocket launcher.

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  • This kingdom, covering from Wiltshire to Cornwall, is the area richest in Arthurian lore.

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  • Our Lizzie was built at Mounts bay, Porthleven, Cornwall as a fishing lugger.

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  • Mining was the economic mainstay of Cornwall in the 19th century.

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  • Here was also the largest rope manufactory in Cornwall, conducted for generations by a family named Williams.

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  • Dr. Hannah Jones from The Eden Project, Cornwall, whose interests include powdery mildew.

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  • He was on his way to study the mineralogy of Cornwall!

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  • Leskernick in Cornwall is typical granite moorland, much the same country as the Reverend Bray's, tho a little further southwest.

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  • The occurrence of this habitat type under such conditions is thought to reflect the highly oceanic climate of Cornwall.

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  • The Pastry In Cornwall, there's no consensus, as to what type of pastry makes the best pasty.

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  • Quiet and unspoiled maybe only a passing Cornwall Coast Path walker disturbing the peace.

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  • This common fern unlike almost all other species found in Cornwall, as its light green leaves do not have separate pinnae.

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  • Next best includes pollock, Cape hake, coley, herring and line-caught mackerel from Cornwall (in season now ).

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  • The Old Chapel is a beautifully renovated former Wesleyan chapel in the heart of Cornwall.

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  • The chairman of North Cornwall District Council will formally reopen the lock on 8th November, following the summer repair work.

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  • Just like where with the welsh Rugby developed due to migration from cornwall.

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  • Praa Sands Surfing Beach Cornwall Praa Sands is well worth a visit, it possessing a mile long sandy beach.

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  • Act One Act I takes place on a rocky seashore on the coast of Cornwall.

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  • Mr Michael Benfield MBE, from Par in Cornwall is a retired RAF flight sergeant and engineer by trade.

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  • It was so clear... December 1879, Cornwall, England Stars littered the midnight sky, shining calmly across the whole of Cornwall.

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  • Cornwall Lanhydrock Daily Good displays of naturalized snowdrops appear during February within the 30 acres of gardens and grounds.

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  • Cornwall is perhaps best known for its pasties a savory dish made from pastry containing suet.

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  • Dale Edmunds Jack Rushton with the sunfish 8 July 2001 Small Sunfish seen near the Bucks (Lamorna, Cornwall) 8th July.

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  • Sunfish take a shine to Cornish coast - 26/07/2006 A shoal of ocean sunfish take a shine to Cornish coast - 26/07/2006 A shoal of ocean sunfish is spotted off the Cornwall coast.

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  • The views are stunning on a clear day and we can often see large areas of Devon and Cornwall from the higher tors.

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  • Cornwall & Scilly Urban Survey covers 19 historic towns.

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  • Laidback trailblazers - Walking Holidays in Cornwall - Premier Walking Holidays Cornwall + 'taster ' bed & breakfast breaks.

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  • It was caught about 24 nautical miles east of Lizard Point, SW Cornwall in a mid-water pair trawl.

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  • Tony Davis found 13 dead triggerfish scattered along the strandline at Perranporth, Cornwall.

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  • I've been picking up dead triggerfish up off the beach in Cornwall since 1991.

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  • Set in 44 acres in a secluded wooded valley on the South coast of Cornwall, Duporth has its own private beach.

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  • Roseland Holiday Cottages Small personally run agency offering luxury waterside & country cottages on the beautiful Roseland Peninsula, South Cornwall.

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  • For example, the UK's first commercial wind farm in Cornwall received 350,000 visitors in its first 8 years of operation.

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  • The best crystals are the brilliant, blackish-brown prisms with terminal pyramidal planes (fig.) from the Restormel iron mines at Lostwithiel, and the Botallack mine at St Just in Cornwall.

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  • Over five-sixths of the world's total production is derived from secondary alluvial deposits, but all the tin obtained in Cornwall (the alluvial deposits having been worked out) and Bolivia is from vein mining, while a small portion of that yielded by Australasia comes from veins and from granitic rocks carrying disseminated tinstone.

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  • In this Richard confirmed him at his accession, and gave him a more tangible endowment by allowing him to marry Isabella, the heiress of the earldom of Gloucester, and by bestowing on him the honor of Lancaster and the shires of Derby, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset.

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  • Unfortunately the prospect of selling virtual West Cornwall holidays lies firmly in the realm of science fiction.

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  • The Living is a rectory in the patronage of the Duke of Cornwall; and the tithes are commuted at £ 250.

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  • Typically he ended that last letter still reminiscing about their visit to Cornwall 21 years ago.

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  • Cornwall only has minor aquifers; groundwater is kept in cracks and fissures in the rocks and is replenished by rainfall.

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  • Plymouth Sound and Estuaries Cornwall; Devon; Plymouth This site is representative of a ria system in southwest England.

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  • Plymouth Sound and Estuaries Cornwall; Devon; Plymouth Plymouth Sound and Estuaries is representative of ria estuaries in southwest England.

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  • The rivers of Devon and Cornwall are rich in metal minerals mainly washed down from the high moorlands of the area.

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  • Just like where with the Welsh rugby developed due to migration from cornwall.

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  • Slow to Cornwall 's pace and find yourself lulled into serenity by the sea.

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  • These are the first reported sightings of porpoises for this year to the Cornwall Wildlife Trust Dolphin Group.

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  • This is an area of Cornwall steeped in mystery.

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  • Cornwall also produced a substantial amount of passion plays during the Middle Ages.

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  • Dale Edmunds Jack Rushton with the Sunfish 8 July 2001 Small Sunfish seen near the Bucks (Lamorna, Cornwall) 8th July.

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  • Sunfish take a shine to Cornish coast - 26/07/2006 A shoal of ocean sunfish is spotted off the Cornwall coast.

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  • Looking for a surfing lesson in Newquay, Cornwall?

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  • Christine 's book tells a tale in pictures of a tightknit community fast disappearing in Cornwall.

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  • Laidback Trailblazers - Walking Holidays in Cornwall - Premier Walking Holidays Cornwall + 'taster ' bed & breakfast breaks.

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  • Tony Davis found 13 dead Triggerfish scattered along the strandline at Perranporth, Cornwall.

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  • I 've been picking up dead Triggerfish up off the beach in Cornwall since 1991.

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  • For example, the UK 's first commercial wind farm in Cornwall received 350,000 visitors in its first 8 years of operation.

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  • The village of Zennor lies upon the windward coast of Cornwall.

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  • Although they look very much like the cats in ancient Egyptian art, these animals developed in Cornwall, UK in the 1950s.

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  • The breed originated from a litter born on a Cornwall farm.

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  • These plants thrive in Devon and Cornwall, and in the milder seashore districts.

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  • There is also a fine specimen at Leonards-lee, near Horsham, and probably others in the gardens of Devon and Cornwall.

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  • In the Isle of Wight, and from thence along the shores of Devonshire and Cornwall to the Scilly Isles, they succeed well, forming a fine feature even in cottage gardens, whilst in some larger gardens whole avenues are planted.

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  • One of the finest specimens in the country is in Mr Rashleighs garden at Menabilly, Cornwall.

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  • Fitzroys Cypress (Fitzroya Patagonica) - A graceful, and in its own country, stately evergreen forest tree, with some claim to hardiness in Devon, Cornwall, and the south and sea-coast of Ireland.

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  • This makes a handsome bushy tree of 20 to 25 feet in the gardens of Devon and Cornwall.

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  • The only native of Britain is the common English kind, which extends from Cornwall to Fife, and is specially plentiful in the south-eastern counties.

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  • America, resembling the Common Bay in its fine appearance and fragrant leaves, and attaining a height of 30 feet or more in parts of Ireland and at Penjerrick, near Falmouth, Cornwall.

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  • L. elegantissima, of New Zealand, has also proved fairly hardy, and with other kinds, such as L. filicifolia and L. propinqua, might be given a trial with the choicer evergreen shrubs in the sheltered shore gardens of Devon and Cornwall.

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  • Napoleons Bell (Lapageria) - A beautiful climber usually grown in the greenhouse, but hardy and flowering well in the open air in Cornwall and the south of Ireland; with care it would be found to do over a larger area round the coast.

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  • It is fairly hardy, and grows best in moist districts, with a mild winter, such as Cornwall, where charming carpets of this little plant are not uncommon in shady places.

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  • The districts in which they are grown to greatest perfection are near Swansea, in Wales, and about Falmouth, in Cornwall, and also in the south of England and Ireland generally, the coast line all round the islands, too, being favourable.

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  • Rhododendron Barbatum - described as being in a wild state 40 to 60 feet high; I have seen it about 12 feet high in Cornwall.

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  • It grows from 5 to 6 feet high, and Loudon states that in Cornwall, on Sir Charles Lemons estate at Carclew, it was planted in hedges, which flowered magnificently without the slightest protection.

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  • Like the older kind, it comes from Chili, and has already reached a height of 7 or 8 feet at Carclew in Cornwall.

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  • The finest trees in the country are not yet much over 20 feet high, and are to be found in Cornwall, where the rainfall is heavy and the atmosphere moist; all the same, there are good ones at Kew, Bagshot, and many other places.

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  • When we speak of the Celts we are referring to the people who once inhabited Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, Wales and Brittany, all of whom spoke Celtic languages.

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  • The Celtic cross hails from the Celtic lands of Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, Wales and Brittany, where it has been used since Christianity took hold in those lands, around 1300 years ago.

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  • An avid surfer, he became a business partner in a company that manufactures surfing products and restored a 15th-century home in Cornwall.

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  • The tribal culture lived in parts of Eastern and Western Europe, with large settlements in Ireland, Scotland, Wales as well as in Cornwall, England and Brittany, France.

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  • The Bodmin Jail, in Bodmin, Cornwall, was the scene of this scary video.

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  • Cornwall offers several golf courses and historical sites.

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  • In January 1901 he established communication by his system between the Lizard in Cornwall and Niton in the Isle of Wight, a distance of 200 m.

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  • The largest British species, Gobius capito, occurring in the rock-pools of Cornwall, measures io in.

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