Corinth sentence example

corinth
  • The king of Corinth was his friend.
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  • The people of Corinth never grew tired of praising his sweet music.
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  • MEGARA, an ancient Greek town on the road from Attica to Corinth.
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  • Simultaneously Megarian commerce in Sicily began to be supplanted by Corinth and Corcyra.
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  • In the following spring he fastened a quarrel upon Potidaea, a town in Chalcidice, which was attached by ancient bonds to Corinth, and in the campaign which followed Athenian and Corinthian troops came to blows.
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  • The combined complaints of the injured parties led Sparta to summon a Peloponnesian congress which decided on war against Athens, failing a concession to Megara and Corinth (autumn 432).
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  • The Albanians in Greece, whose settlements extend over Attica, Boeotia, the district of � Corinth and the Argolid peninsula, as well as southern Euboea and the islands of Hydra, Spetzae, Poros and Salamis, descend from Tosk immigrants in the 14th century.
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  • DINARCHUS, last of the "ten" Attic orators, son of Sostratus (or, according to Suidas, Socrates), born at Corinth about 361 B.C. He settled at Athens early in life, and when not more than twenty-five was already active as a writer of speeches for the law courts.
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  • Corinth, Chalcis, Eretria and Miletus, Aegina founded no colonies.
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  • The change in Athenian foreign policy, which was consequent upon the ostracism of Cimon in 461, led to what is sometimes called the First Peloponnesian War, in which the brunt of the fighting fell upon Corinth and Aegina.
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  • 46), at Corinth (Acts xix.
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  • On his arrival at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, messengers from Nero met Corbulo, and ordered him to commit suicide.
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  • The isthmus on which the town stands (which position has caused it to be likened to Corinth) can be crossed without surmounting any great elevation, and offers a feasible canal route.
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  • Like Cleisthenes of Sicyon and Periander of Corinth, he realized that one great source of strength to the nobles had been their presidency over the local cults.
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  • During the Civil War battles were fought at Corinth (1862), Port Gibson (1863), Jackson (1863) and Vicksburg (1863).
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  • On the arrival of Timoleon he was compelled to surrender and retire to Corinth (343), where he spent the rest of his days in poverty (Diodorus Siculus xvi.; Plutarch, Timoleon).
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  • Entering the Union army in 1861, he took part in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth and Vicksburg, as major of the 15th Iowa volunteers.
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  • On the other hand Athens, like Corinth, Megara and Argos, was sufficiently far from the sea to enjoy security against the sudden descent of a hostile fleet.
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  • The greater commercial advantages offered by Nauplia, Corinth and Patras were outweighed by the historic claims of Athens in the choice of a capital for the newly founded kingdom, and the seat of government was transferred hither from Nauplia in 1833.
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  • In addition to researches at Sicyon, Plataea, Eretria and elsewhere, it has undertaken two works of capital importance - the excavation of the Argive Heraeum and of ancient Corinth.
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  • The port and the capital are now connected by railway with Corinth and the principal towns of the Morea; the line opening up communication with northern Greece and Thessaly, when its proposed connexion with the Continental railway system has been effected, will greatly enhance the importance of the Peiraeus, already one of the most flourishing commercial towns in the Levant.
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  • Besides securing her Aegean possessions and her commerce by the defeat of Corinth and Aegina, her last rivals on sea, Athens acquired an extensive dominion in central Greece and for a time quite overshadowed the Spartan land-power.
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  • The Sicilian kings ruled Athens by viceroys till 1385, when the Florentine Nerio Acciajuoli, lord of Corinth, defeated the Catalonians and seized the city.
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  • At the synod of Corinth (338) Philip was solemnly declared the captain-general (o-TpaTsyis auroKpitTCep) of the Hellenes against the Great King.
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  • The recognition as captain-general he had obtained at another synod in Corinth, by an imposing military demonstration in Greece immediately upon his accession.
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  • The old Greek cities of the motherland were not formally subjects of the empire, but sovereign states, which assembled at Corinth as members of a great alliance, in which the Macedonian king was included as a member and held the office of captain-general.
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  • Demetrius had presented himself in 307 as the liberator, and driven the Macedonian garrison from the Peiraeus; but his own garrisons held Athens thirteen years later, when he was king of Macedonia, and the Antigonid dynasty clung to the points of vantage in Greece, especially Chalcis and Corinth, till their garrisons were finally expelled by the Romans in the name of Hellenic liberty., The new movement of commerce initiated by the conquest of Alexander continued under his successors, though the breakup of the Macedonian Empire in Asia in the 3rd century and the distractions of the Seleucid court must have withheld many advantages from the Greek merchants which a strong central government might have afforded them.
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  • Corinth, however, was allowed to go on striking staters under Antigonus Gonatas; Ephesus, Cos and the greater cities of Phoenicia retained their right of coinage under Seleucid or Ptolemaic supremacy.
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  • The associations of his home, not far from Corinth, where Arion was said to have established the cyclic choruses of satyrs, may account for his preference for this kind of drama.
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  • There were also public slaves; of these some belonged to temples, to which they were presented as offerings, amongst them being the courtesans who acted as hieroduli at Corinth and at Eryx in Sicily; others were appropriated to the service of the magistrates or to public works; there were at Athens 1200 Scythian archers for the police of the city; slaves served, too, in the fleets, and were employed in the armies, - commonly as workmen, and exceptionally as soldiers.
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  • CORINTH, a city and the county-seat of Alcorn county, Mississippi, U.S.A., situated in the N.E.
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  • Because of its situation and its importance as a railway junction, Corinth played an important part in the western campaigns of the Civil War.
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  • After the first Confederate line of defence had been broken by the capture of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson (February 1862), Corinth was fortified by General P. G.
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  • of Corinth; after this engagement Beauregard withdrew to Corinth.
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  • Corinth then became the headquarters of the Union forces under General W.
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  • Isthmus Of Corinth >>
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  • In 1446 Corinth, Patras and the north of the Morea were added to the Turkish dominions.
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  • The main provisions of these were, that Turkey retained the Banat, while Austria kept Transylvania; Poland restored the places captured in Moldavia, but retained Kamenets, Podolia and the Ukraine; Venice restored her conquests north of Corinth, but kept those in the Morea and Dalmatia.
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  • Finally, they reached Iolcus, and the "Argo" was placed in a groove sacred to Poseidon on the isthmus of Corinth.
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  • The conterminous states were Corinth, Argos, Troezen and Hermione.
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  • When Procles the tyrant was carried captive by Periander of Corinth, the oligarchy was restored, and the people of Epidaurus continued ever afterwards close allies of the Spartan power.
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  • On the 29th of September a Greek naval force, commanded by an English Philhellene, Captain Frank Abney Hastings, had destroyed some Turkish vessels in Salona Bay, on the north side of the Gulf of Corinth.
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  • - The object of this epistle is the restoration of harmony to the church of Corinth, which had been vexed by internal discussions.
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  • In the American Civil War he served in the Federal army first as lieutenant-colonel and after February 1862 as colonel of volunteers, taking part in the fighting at Shiloh, Vicksburg and Corinth.
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  • BELLEROPHON, or Bellerophontes, in Greek legend, son of Glaucus or Poseidon, grandson of Sisyphus and local hero of Corinth.
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  • Bellerophon was honoured as a hero at Corinth and in Lycia.
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  • It has been suggested that Perseus, the local hero of Argos, and Bellerophon were originally one and the same, the difference in their exploits being the result of the rivalry of Argos and Corinth.
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  • According to Plutarch, he attempted to break the power of Corinth, by requesting the Corinthians to send him 1000 of their picked youths, ostensibly to aid him in war, his real intention being to put them to death; but the plot was revealed.
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  • Pheidon is said to have lost his life in a faction fight at Corinth, where the monarchy had recently been overthrown.
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  • 4, p. 269) Chersicrates and Archias of Corinth, both Heraclidae, left their native city together with a band of colonists, the former stopping with half the force at Corcyra, where he expelled the Liburnians and occupied the island, while Archias proceeded to Syracuse.'
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  • Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela (498-491), threatened the independence of Syracuse as well as of other cities, and it was saved only by the joint intervention of Corinth and Corcyra and by the cession of the vacant territory of Camarina.
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  • Just before his arrival a few ships from Corinth had made their way into the harbour with the news that a great fleet was already on its way to the relief of the city.
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  • Syracuse, in its extremity, asked help from the mother-city, Corinth; and now appears on the scene one of the noblest figures in Greek history, Timoleon.
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  • The younger Dionysius had been allowed to retire to Corinth; his island fortress was destroyed and replaced by a court of justice.
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  • After the murder of Jason's second wife and her own children, she fled from Corinth in her car drawn by dragons, the gift of Helios, to Athens, where she married king Aegeus, by whom she had a son, Medus.
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  • Medea was honoured as a goddess at Corinth, and was said to have become the wife of Achilles in the Elysian fields.
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  • APOLLOS ('AiroXXd s; contracted from Apollonius), an Alexandrine Jew who after Paul's first visit to Corinth worked there in a similar way (1 Cor.
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  • Jerome says that Apollos was so dissatisfied with the division at Corinth, that he retired into Crete with Zenas, a doctor of the law; and that the schism having been healed by Paul's letter to the Corinthians, Apollos returned to the city, and became its bishop. Less probable traditions assign to him the bishopric of Duras, or of Iconium in Phrygia, or of Caesarea.
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  • Such nymphaea existed at Corinth, Antioch and Constantinople; the remains of some twenty have been found at Rome and of many in Africa.
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  • When, after being virtually under arrest, he rejoined his army, it was concentrated about Savannah on the Tennessee, preparing for a campaign towards Corinth, Miss.
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  • From this it is easy to pass to the most widely spread Greek form, the ordinary In Corinth, however, and its colony Corcyra, in Ozolian Locris and Elis, a form < inclined at a different angle is found.
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  • The early policy of Ambracia was determined by its loyalty to Corinth (for which it probably served as an entrepot in the Epirus trade), its consequent aversion to Corcyra, and its frontier disputes with the Amphilochians and Acarnanians.
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  • During the ensuing years, apart from a brief return to the Cimonian policy, the resources of the league, or, as it has now become, the Athenian empire, were directed not so much against Persia as against Sparta, Corinth, Aegina and Boeotia.
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  • It is, however, equally noticeable on the one hand that the main body of the allies was not affected, and on the other that the Peloponnesian League on the advice of Corinth officially recognized the right of Athens to deal with her rebellious subject allies, and refused to give help to the Samians.
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  • Her failure was due partly to the commercial jealousy of Corinth working on the dull antipathy of Sparta, partly to the hatred of compromise and discipline which was fatally characteristic of Greece and especially of Ionian Greece, and partly also to the lack of tact and restraint shown by Athens and her representatives in her relations with the allies.
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  • In 366 Athens lost Oropus, a blow which she endeavoured to repair by forming an alliance with Arcadia and by an attack on Corinth.
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  • Alliances with various land powers, and an inability to understand the true relations which alone could unite the league, combined to alienate the allies, who could discover no reason for the expenditure of their contributions on protecting Sparta or Corinth against Thebes.
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  • " Dorian " colonies, from Corinth, Megara, and the Dorian islands, occupied the southern coasts of Sicily from Syracuse to Selinus.
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  • The conquest of Corinth and Megara was placed a generation later: Arcadia alone claimed to have escaped invasion.
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  • The conquest of Laconia at least is represented in 5th-century tradition as immediate and complete, though one legend admits the previous death of the Heracleid leader Aristodemus, and another describes a protracted struggle in the case of Corinth.
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  • Corinth, Sicyon and Megara, with similar political compromises, mark the limits of Dorian conquest; a Dorian invasion of Attica (c. 1066 B.C.) was checked by the self-sacrifice of King Codrus: "Either Athens must perish or her king."
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  • The colonies of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara, and the Sicilian offshoots of the Asiatic Dorians, belong to historic times (8th-6th centuries).
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  • The other states, such as Argos and Corinth, exhibited just such compromises between conquerors and conquered as the legends described, conceding to the older population, or to sections of it, political incorporation more or less incomplete.
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  • He took part in Halleck's advance on Corinth, Mississippi, and at the close of 1862 led the Mississippi column in the first Vicksburg campaign.
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  • In view of operations against Corinth, Mississippi, Grant's army had ascended the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing and there disembarked, while the co-operating army under Buell moved across country from Nashville to join it.
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  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.
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  • Beauregard thereupon decided to extricate his sorely-tried troops from the misadventure, and retired fighting on Corinth.
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  • Tarquinii is said to have been already a flourishing city when Demaratus of Corinth brought in Greek workmen.
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  • The territory of Corinth was mostly rocky and unfertile; but its position at the head of two navigable gulfs clearly marked it out as a commercial centre.
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  • - In mythology, Corinth (originally named Ephyre) appears as the home of Medea, Sisyphus and Bellerophon, and already has over-sea connexions which illustrate its primitive commercial activity.
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  • In the Homeric poems Corinth is a mere dependency of Mycenae; nor does it figure prominently in the tradition of the Dorian migrations.
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  • The maritime expansion of Corinth at this time is proved by the foundation of colonies at Syracuse and Corcyra, and the equipment of a fleet of triremes (the newly invented Greek men-of-war) to quell a revolt of the latter city.
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  • But Corinth's real prosperity dates from the time of the tyranny (657-581), established by a disqualified noble Cypselus.
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  • As an industrial centre Corinth achieved pre-eminence in pottery, metal-work and decorative handicraft, and was the reputed "inventor" of painting and tiling; her bronze and her pottery, moulded from the soft white clay of Oneium, were widely exported over the Mediterranean.
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  • Late in the 6th century Corinth joined the Peloponnesian league under Sparta, in which her financial resources and strategic position secured her an unusual degree of independence.
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  • In the great Persian war of 480 Corinth served as the Greek headquarters: her army took part at Thermopylae and Plataea and her navy distinguished itself at Salamis and Mycale.
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  • Since 387 the Spartan party was again supreme, and after Leuctra Corinth took the field against the Theban invaders of Peloponnesus (371-366).
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  • of Macedon summoned a Greek congress at Corinth and left a garrison on the citadel.
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  • In 243 Corinth was freed by Aratus and incorporated into the Achaean league.
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  • Quinctius Flamininus, after proclaiming the liberty of Greece at the Isthmus, restored Corinth to the league (196).
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  • In return for the foolish provocation of war in 146 B.C. the Roman conquerors despoiled Corinth of its art treasures and destroyed the entire settlement: the land was partly made over to Sicyon and partly became public domain.
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  • In 46 Julius Caesar repeopled Corinth with Italian freedmen and dispossessed Greeks.
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  • After the Gothic raids of 267 and 395 Corinth was secured by new fortifications at the Isthmus.
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  • Since the Turkish conquest (1459) the history of Corinth has been uneventful, save for a raid by the Maltese in 1611 and a Venetian occupation from 1687 to 1715.
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  • - The modern town of New Corinth, the head of a district in the province of Corinth (pop. 71,229), is situated on the Isthmus of Corinth near the southeastern recess of the Gulf of Corinth, 32 m.
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  • It was founded in 1858, when Old Corinth was destroyed by an earthquake.
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  • Old Corinth passed through its various stages, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Turkish.
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  • The importance of the fountain is attested by the fact that the Greek poets and the Delphic oracle instead of saying Corinth said, "the city of Pirene."
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  • Corinth, Mississippi >>
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  • This victory enabled the Greek allies of Persia (Thebes, Athens, Argos, Corinth) to carry on the Corinthian war against Sparta, and the Spartans had to give up the war in Asia Minor.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Corinth discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • Its situation is exceedingly strong, and it commands all the roads leading from Corinth and Achaea into the Argive plain.
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  • The flames of revolt now spread across the Isthmus of Corinth: early in April the Christians of Dervenokhoria rose, and the whole of Boeotia and Attica quickly followed suit; at the beginning of May the Mussulman inhabitants of Athens were blockaded in the Acropolis.
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  • He fled to Corinth, where he is said to have died.
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  • This very considerable success thrust back Johnston's whole line to New Madrid, Corinth and the Memphis & Charleston railway.
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  • Halleck, who was here in control of all the operations of the Federals, had meanwhile ordered Grant's force to ascend the Tennessee river and operate against Corinth; Buell's well-disciplined forces were to march overland from Nashville to join him, and General O.
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  • Some weeks afterwards, Halleck with the combined armies of Grant, Buell and Pope began the siege of Corinth, which Beauregard ultimately evacuated a month later.
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  • After the capture of Corinth Halleck had suspended the Federal advance all along the line in the west, and many changes took place about this time.
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  • The Confederates, not dismayed thereby, effected their junction and moved on Corinth, which was defended by Rosecrans and 23,000 Federal troops.
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  • Grant's other forces were split up into detachments, and when Van Dorn, boldly marching right round Rosecrans, descended upon Corinth from the north, Grant could hardly stir to help his subordinate.
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  • Rosecrans, however, won the battle of Corinth (October 3-4), though on the evening of the 3rd he had been in a perilous position.
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  • The Confederate failures of Corinth, Perryville and Antietam were followed by a general advance by the Federals.
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  • Nearest in character to the Thessalonian Epistles are the two to Corinth, which have perhaps an interval of a year and a half between them.
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  • Dionysius of Corinth, ap. Eus.
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  • No delay was then made on the Asiatic side: it may still have been in spring when St Paul crossed to Europe and began the course of preaching at Philippi, Thessalonica, Beroea and Athens which finally brought him to Corinth.
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  • From Corinth the Apostle went to Jerusalem to " salute the church," and then again to Antioch in Syria, where he stayed only for " a time " (xviii.
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  • 2), spent the three winter months at Corinth, returning to Philippi in time for the Passover (xx.
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  • vi., Dionysius of Corinth ap. Eus.
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  • SISYPHUS, in Greek mythology, son of Aeolus and Enarete, and king of Ephyra (Corinth).
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  • He was said to have founded the Isthmian games in honour of Melicertes, whose body he found lying on the shore of the Isthmus of Corinth (Apollodorus iii.
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  • At Corinth the unit was evidently the Assyrian and not the Attic, being 129.6 at the earliest (17) (though modified to double Attic, or 133, later) and being divided by 3, and not into 2 drachms. And this agrees with the mina being repeatedly found at Corcyra, and with the same standard passing to the Italian coinage (17) similar in weight, and in division into 1/3 -- the heaviest coinages (17) down to 400 B.C. (Terina, Velia, Sybaris, Posidonia, Metapontum, Tarentum, &c.) being none over 126, while later on many were adjusted to the Attic, and rose to 134.
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  • As dictator he planted numerous colonies both in the eastern and western provinces, notably at Corinth and Carthage.
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  • Lack of time alone prevented him from carrying into effect such projects as the piercing of the Isthmus of Corinth, whose object was to promote trade and intercourse throughout the Roman dominions, and we are told that at the time of his death he was contemplating the extension of the empire to its natural frontiers, and was about to engage in a war with Parthia with the object of carrying Roman arms to the Euphrates.
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  • 3) mention is made of one Clement whose office it is to communicate with other churches, and this function agrees well with what we find in the letter to the church at Corinth by which Clement is best known.
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  • The letter in question was occasioned by a dispute in the church of Corinth, which had led to the ejection of several presbyters from their office.
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  • It does not contain Clement's name, but is addressed by "the Church of God which sojourneth in Rome to the Church of God which sojourneth in Corinth."
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  • 7) that the church at Rome, though suffering persecution, was firmly held together by faith and love, and was exhibiting its unity in an orderly worship. The epistle was publicly read from time to time at Corinth, and by the 4th century this usage had spread to other churches.
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  • Its mineral produce, metal-work, purple and pottery not only found markets among these settlements, but were distributed over the Mediterranean in the ships of Corinth and Samos.
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  • Bellerophon caught him as he drank of the spring Peirene on the Acrocorinthus at Corinth, or received him tamed and bridled at the hands of Athena (Pindar, 01.
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  • The same story accounts for the Hippocrene in Troezen and the spring Peirene at Corinth.
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  • On the citadel of Corinth there was a temple sacred to her and Bia (Violence), which none were permitted to enter.
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  • He also tells us that he was at Gyaros (one of the Cyclades) when Augustus was at Corinth on his return to Rome from the East in 29 B.C., and that he accompanied the prefect of Egypt, Aelius Gallus, on his expedition to Upper Egypt, which seems to have taken place in 25-24 B.C. These are the only dates in his life which can be accurately fixed.
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  • Of Greece proper he saw but little; it is by no means certain that he even visited Athens, and though he describes Corinth as an eyewitness, it is clear that he was never at Delphi, and was not aware that the ruins of Mycenae still existed.
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  • of Macedon Chalcis was called one of the three fetters of Greece, Demetrias on the Gulf of Pagasae and Corinth being the other two.
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  • In 1759 he was consecrated archbishop of Corinth in partibus, and in 1761 bishop of Frascati (the ancient Tusculum) in the Alban Hills near Rome.
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  • It was thus that St Paul saw the universal Church of Christ made visible in the Christian community of Corinth."
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  • At a date no doubt previous to the foundation of Syracuse it was peopled by settlers from Corinth, but it appears to have previously received a stream of emigrants from Eretria.
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  • In 435 it was again involved in a quarrel with Corinth and sought assistance from Athens.
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  • In 2 B.C. Augustus, at the dedication of the temple of Mars Ultor, exhibited a naumachia between Athenians and Persians, in a basin probably in the horti Caesaris, where subsequently Titus gave a representation of a sea-fight between Corinth and Corcyra.
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  • But even then the Adriatic in the narrower sense only extended as far as the Mons Garganus, the outer portion being called the Ionian Sea: the name was sometimes, however, inaccurately used to include the Gulf of Tarentum, the Sea of Sicily, the Gulf of Corinth and even the sea between Crete and Malta (Acts xxvii.
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  • They occupied trading-stations on some of the Aegean islands and on the Isthmus of Corinth.
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  • He remained with Grant during the Shiloh campaign, and acted as engineer adviser to Halleck during the siege operations against Corinth in the summer of 1862.
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  • In October he distinguished himself in command of an infantry brigade at the battle of Corinth, and on the 8th of this month was made major-general of volunteers and commander of a division.
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  • Ever anxious to extend the league, in which after 245 he was general almost every second year, Aratus took Corinth by surprise (243), and with mingled threats and persuasion won over other cities, notably Megalopolis (233) and Argos (229), whose tyrants abdicated voluntarily.
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  • As plenipotentiary in 224 he called in Antigonus Doson of Macedonia, and helped to recover Corinth and Argos and to crush Cleomenes at Sellasia, but at the same time sacrificed the independence of the league.
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  • According to the story, he subsequently lived at the court of Croesus, where he met Solon, and dined in the company of the Seven Sages of Greece with Periander at Corinth.
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  • In the House, as chairman of the committee on military affairs, he did much to prepare the Indiana troops for service in the Federal army; in 1861 he became colonel of the S3rd Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and subsequently took part in Grant's Tennessee campaign of 1862, and in the operations against Corinth and Vicksburg, where he commanded a brigade.
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  • After he returned from it he lived at Corinth with his wife Medea for many years.
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  • Peloponnesus and captured its most famous cities, Corinth, Argos and Sparta, selling many of their inhabitants into slavery.
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  • I), Corinth (Epistle of Clement) and Crete (Titus).
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  • 12 suggests the possibility that Peter went to Corinth, as there was a party there which used his name.
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  • Dionysius of Corinth (c. 170) states that Peter was in Corinth.
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  • Neither Corinth (as Lightfoot) nor Rome (as Harnack, who assigns it to Bishop Soter, c. 166-174) satisfies all the internal conditions, while the Eastern nature of the external evidence and the homily's quasi-canonical status in the Codex-Alexandrinus strongly favour an Alexandrine origin.
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  • The next year Corinth began her system of settlement in the west: Corcyra, the path to Sicily, and Syracuse on the Sicilian coast were planted as parts of one enterprise.
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  • Alternately victorious and defeated, spared by the Syracusans on whose mercy he cast himself as a suppliant (451), sent to be safe at Corinth, he came back to Sicily only to form greater plans than before.
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  • Syracuse, threatened with destruction by Athens, was saved by the zeal of her metropolis Corinth in stirring up the Peloponnesian rivals of Athens to help her, and by the advice of Alcibiades after his withdrawal to Sparta.
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  • Potidaea, a Dorian town on the western promontory of Chalcidice in Thrace, a tributary ally of Athens - to which however Corinth as metropolis still sent annual magistrates - was induced to revolt,' with the support.
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  • Corinth however had not only strong, but also immediate and urgent reasons (Potidaea and Corcyra) for desiring war.
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  • so powerful a confederate as Corinth.
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  • Potidaea to Corinth).
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  • and Phormio with only 20 ships defeated the Corinthian fleet of 47 sail in the Gulf of Corinth.
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  • This was not only the worst disaster which befell any powerful state up to the peace of Nicias (as Thucydides says), but was a serious blow to Corinth, whose trade on the West was, as we have seen, one of the chief causes of the war.
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  • The Peloponnesian malcontents turned to Argos as a new leader, and an alliance was formed between Argos, Corinth, Elis, Mantinea and the Thraceward towns (420).
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  • He formed another colony of exiles on the Isthmus of Corinth.
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  • The Achaean and Aetolian Leagues are independent powers, which the Macedonian can indeed check by garrisons in Corinth, Chalcis and elsewhere, but which keep a field clear for Hellenic freedom within their borders.
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  • There are no signs of Oriental influence in her cults, except at Corinth, where she seems to have been identified with Astarte.
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  • Besides these three great foreign wars, Justinian's reign was troubled by a constant succession of border inroads, especially on the northern frontier, where the various Slavonic and Hunnish tribes who were established along the lower Danube and on the north coast of the Black Sea made frequent marauding expeditions into Thrace and Macedonia, sometimes penetrating as far as the walls of Constantinople in one direction and the Isthmus of Corinth in another.
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  • George was sent to Corinth at the end of 1147 and despatched an army inland which plundered Thebes.
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  • Sites have also been explored in Phocis (Hagia Marina) and Boeotia, in AetoIia (Thermon) and the Ionian Islands, in Attica, at Argos, Mycenae and Tiryns, in the neighbourhood of Corinth, and in the islands of Aegina, Cythera, Euboea, Melos, Paros, and Rhodes.
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  • The important excavations of the American School at prehistoric sites near Corinth have been mentioned.
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  • Subsequently he came into close connexion with the Achaean churches and especially with Corinth, bearing letters from Paul and being charged with promoting the proposed collection for poor Christians in Judaea.
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  • At the isthmus of Corinth dwelt Sinis, called the Pine-Bender, because he killed his victims by tearing them asunder between two pine-trees.
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  • He found his father married to Medea, who had fled from Corinth.
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  • He extended the territory of Attica as far as the isthmus of Corinth.
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  • By far the most famous of his festivals was that celebrated every alternate year on the isthmus of Corinth, at which the "Isthmian games" were held.
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  • ARION, of Methymna, in Lesbos, a semi-legendary poet and musician, friend of Periander, tyrant of Corinth.
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  • According to Herodotus, Anion being desirous of exhibiting his skill in foreign countries left Corinth, and travelled through Sicily and parts of Italy, where he gained great fame and amassed a large sum of money.
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  • He then threw himself overboard; but instead of perishing, he was miraculously borne up in safety by a dolphin, supposed to have been charmed by the music. Thus he was conveyed to Taenarum, whence he proceeded to Corinth, arriving before the ship from Tarentum.
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  • In 394 the Argives helped to garrison Corinth, and the latter state seems for a while to have been annexed by them.
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  • The Roman conquest of Achaea enhanced the prosperity of Argos by removing the trade competition of Corinth.
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  • Accordingly, after three years, Hyllus marched across the isthmus of Corinth to attack Atreus, the successor of Eurystheus, but was slain in single combat by Echemus, king of Tegea.
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  • They received the answer that by the "third fruit" the "third generation" was meant, and that the "narrow passage" was not the isthmus of Corinth, but the straits of Rhium.
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  • Baur contends that St Paul was opposed in Corinth by a Jewish-Christian party which wished to set up its own form of Christian religion instead of his universal Christianity.
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  • This centrifugal tendency is most marked in the cases of the more important states, Athens, Sparta, Argos, Corinth, but Greek history is full of examples of small states deliberately sacrificing what must have been obvious commercial advantage for the sake of a precarious autonomy.
    0
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  • Yet at Corinth alongside LC` "3, which is found for the so-called spurious diphthong a (i.e.
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  • the Attic a, which does not represent an IndoEuropean a, but arises by contraction, as in OtXe77-m, or through the lengthening of the vowel sound as the result of the loss of a consonant, as in Eiprt j Avos for FEFpn Avos) the short sound is represented by B; c is found at Corinth in its oldest form, and also as I, while in Thera it is In Thera the w sound of digamma (F) was entirely lost, and therefore is not represented.
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  • from Corinth, an ancient inscription written 1 30vvrpoc 66v has recently been discovered, which shows that though Cleonae for B wrote E {, like the Corinthian ?j, and, as at Corinth, wrote for a vowel sound, the vowel thus represented was not short and long e and n) as at Corinth, but Il only, as in Xp g A, (X p i i a 1 Here 'a represents and the spurious diphthong is represented by a, as in (dycv, Doric infinitive -= a form which shows that c has at Cleonae the more modern form I as distinguished from the Corinthian Regarding three other questions controversy still rages.
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  • We have already seen that, in the earliest alphabets of Thera and Corinth, the ordinary symbol for E in the Ionic alphabet was used for.
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  • chap. ii.) was borrowed from the Locrian alphabet; (2) the Sabellic alphabet, derived from that of Corinth and Corcyra, and found in a few inscriptions of eastern-central Italy; (3) the alphabet of the Veneti of north-east Italy derived from the Elean; (4) the alphabet of Sondrio (between Lakes Como and Garda), which Pauli, on the insufficient ground that it possesses no symbols corresponding to 4 and x, derives from a source at the same stage of development as the oldest alphabets of Thera, Melos and Crete.
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  • In the Achaean League the name is given to ten elective officers who presided over the assembly, and Corinth sent "Epidemiurgi" every year to Potidaea, officials who apparently answered to the Spartan harmosts.
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  • poets of the didactic, mythological and quasi-historical schoolsEumelus of Corinth, Cinaethon of Sparta, Agias of Troezen, and many more.
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  • Proetus, king of Corinth, sent Bellerophon to his father-in-law the king of Lycia, and gave him " baneful tokens " (o jiara Xvy pet, i.e.
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  • The emperor protested that only the Greeks were fit to hear him, and rewarded them when he left by the bestowal of immunity from the land tax on the whole province, and by the gift of the Roman franchise; he also planned and actually commenced the cutting of a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth.
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  • Henceforth its policy was usually determined either by Sparta or by its powerful neighbour Corinth.
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  • In the 5th century it suffered like Corinth from the commercial rivalry of Athens in the western seas, and was repeatedly harassed by flying squadrons of Athenian ships.
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  • In the Peloponnesian war Sicyon followed the lead of Sparta and Corinth.
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  • Again in the Corinthian war Sicyon sided with Sparta and became its base of operations against the allied troops round Corinth.
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  • destruction of Corinth (146) brought Sicyon an acquisition of territory and the presidency over the Isthmian games; yet in Cicero's time it had fallen deep into debt.
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  • Under the empire it was quite obscured by the restored cities of Corinth and Patrae; in Pausanias' age (A.D.
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  • It survived longest when followed by o or v, as at the beginning of the name of the town of Corinth.
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  • 8.2) Neleus restored the Olympian games and died at Corinth, where he was burled on the isthmus.
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  • t, to, so most editors and scholars), or on his way from Ephesus to Corinth, or at Corinth itself (so Lightfoot, Bleek, Salmon).
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  • When Philip, after the victory of Chaeronea, had founded the league of Corinth (337) embracing the whole of Greece, he accepted the national programme, and in 336 despatched his army to Asia Minor.
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  • It was said that he was planning a campaign in the interior, or even an attack on Artaxerxes himself, when he was recalled to Greece owing to the war between Sparta and the combined forces of Athens, Thebes, Corinth, Argos and several minor states.
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  • Most of the literature of the sub-apostolic age is epistolary, and we have a particularly interesting form of epistle in the communications between churches (as distinct from individuals) known as the First Epistle of Clement (Rome to Corinth), the Martyrdom of Polycarp (Smyrna to Philomelium), and the Letters of the Churches of Vienne andLyons (to the congregations of Asia Minor and Phrygia) describing the Gallican martyrdoms of A.D.
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  • 1-3, 4c-6, 11-15, 19-23, 24 seq., written to Timothy from Corinth; b = i.
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  • Cefalonia, ancient and modern official Greek Cephallenia, KE4aXX via), an island belonging to the kingdom of Greece, and the largest of those known as the Ionian Islands, situated on the west side of the mainland, almost directly opposite the Gulf of Corinth.
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  • "There I shall once more make the Apostle's voice heard in the Church of Corinth.
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  • Most of all did it profit by the statesmanship of Aratus, who initiated its expansive policy, until in 228 it comprised Arcadia, Argolis, Corinth and Aegina.
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  • Caecilius Metellus Macedonicus, and again near Corinth by L.
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  • He defeated the Achaeans at Dyme, made himself master of Argos, and was eventually joined by Corinth, Phlius, Epidaurus and other cities.
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  • Now, as he wrote from Corinth, the only other city which answers to this description is Ephesus, the centre of Paul's long Asiatic mission.
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  • 3 It may further be conjectured that the epistle does not lie before the modern reader in the precise shape in which it left Paul and his amanuensis at Corinth.
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  • 1-20 as addressed to Corinth, while Schenkel viewed it as designed for all the churches which Phoebe was to visit.
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  • Paul probably despatched the epistle from Corinth.
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  • Phoebe of Cenchreae, the seaport of Corinth, would also be the bearer of the epistle (xvi.
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  • The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy commanded a fleet in person which detached the coast towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus and crossed to Greece, where Ptolemy took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308).
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  • Ino, pursued by her husband, who had been driven mad by Hera because Ino had brought up the infant Dionysus, threw herself and Melicertes into the sea from a high rock between Megara and Corinth.
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  • The body of the latter was carried by a dolphin to the Isthmus of Corinth and deposited under a pine tree.
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  • Here it was found by his uncle Sisyphus, who had it removed to Corinth, and by command of the Nereids instituted the Isthmian games and sacrifices in his honour.
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  • On the isthmus of Corinth, and also at Olympia and Nemea, he was worshipped as Taraxippus ("terrifier of horses"), his ghost being said to appear and frighten the horses at the games (Pausanias vi.
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  • Galatia, Troas, Philippi (where he was imprisoned), Thessalonica and Beroea, where Silas was left with Timothy, though he afterwards rejoined Paul at Corinth.
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  • At Corinth he built a theatre, at Delphi a stadium, at Thermopylae hot baths, at Canusium in Italy an aqueduct.
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  • He even contemplated cutting a canal through the Isthmus of Corinth, but was afraid to carry out his plan because the same thing had been unsuccessfully attempted before by the emperor Nero.
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  • What he really opposes is the same ultra-Pauline moral laxity which Paul himself had found occasion to rebuke among would-be adherents in Corinth (I Cor.
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  • Quasi jocando, he cited Bede to prove that Dionysius the Areopagite had been bishop of Corinth, while they relied upon the statement of the abbot Hilduin that he had been bishop of Athens.
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  • When this historical heresy led to the inevitable persecution, Abelard wrote a letter to the abbot Adam in which he preferred to the authority of Bede that of Eusebius' Historia Ecclesiastica and St Jerome, according to whom Dionysius, bishop of Corinth, was distinct from Dionysius the Areopagite, bishop of Athens and founder of the abbey, though, in deference to Bede, he suggested that the Areopagite might also have been bishop of Corinth.
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  • religious prostitution, self-mutilation), which subsequently made their way to centres of Phoenician influence, such as Corinth and Mount Eryx in Sicily.
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  • The oriental features of her worship as practised at Corinth are due to its early commercial relations with Asia Minor; the fame of her temple worship on Mount Eryx spread to Carthage, Rome and Latium.
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  • In Corinth there were more than a thousand of these iep030vXot (" temple slaves "), and wealthy men made it a point of honour to dedicate their most beautiful slaves to the service of the goddess.
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  • CYPSELUS, tyrant of Corinth (c. 657-627 B.C.), was the son of Aeetion and Labda, daughter of Amphion, a member of the ruling family, the Bacchiadae.
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  • When he was grown up, Cypselus, encouraged by an oracle, drove out the Bacchiadae, and made himself master of Corinth.
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  • He pursued an energetic commercial and colonial policy (see Corinth), and thus laid the foundations of Corinthian prosperity.
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  • See Corinth: History; histories of Greece; Herodotus v.
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  • IlepiavOpos), the second tyrant of Corinth (625-585 B.C.).
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  • Periander further appears as a patron of literature, for it was by his invitation that the poet Anion came to Corinth to organize the dithyramb.
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  • PELOPONNESUS (" Island of Pelops"), the ancient and modern Greek official name for the part of Greece south of the Isthmus of Corinth.
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  • The archbishop of Corinth girded him with a sword which had lain upon the Holy Sepulchre, and the metropolitan of Kiev absolved him from all his sins, without the usual preliminary of confession, before he rode forth to battle.
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  • Consul in 146 B.C. Mummius was appointed to take command of the Achaean War, and having obtained an easy victory over the incapable Diaeus, entered Corinth unopposed.
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  • The apparently needless cruelty of Mummius in Corinth, by no means characteristic of him, is explained by Mommsen as due to the instructions of the senate, prompted by the mercantile party, which was eager to get rid of a dangerous commercial rival.
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  • His indifference to works of art and ignorance of their value is shown by his well-known remark to those who contracted for the shipment of the treasures of Corinth to Rome, that "if they lost or damaged them, they would have to replace them."
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  • He who planned his campaigns to the great civilized centres of Corinth, Ephesus and Rome, and thus prepared for a historic future of which he did not dream, drew his parallels of thought with no less firm hand, and showed himself indeed " a wise master-builder."
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  • The demand of the Greeks for the expulsion of Macedonian garrisons from Demetrias, Chalcis and Corinth, as the only guarantee for the freedom of Greece, was refused, and negotiations were broken off.
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  • To attribute to him a Machiavellian policy, which foresaw the overthrow of Corinth fifty years later and the conversion of Achaea into a Roman province, is absurd and disingenuous.
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  • This is proved by the column which, as we learn from Strabo, once stood on the Isthmus of Corinth, bearing on one side in Greek the inscription, "This land is Peloponnesus, not Ionia," and on the other, "This land is not Peloponnesus, but Ionia."
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  • of Macedon one of the three fetters of Greece, Chalcis and Corinth being the other two.
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  • An amphictyony of Corinth has, with less justification, been assumed on the strength of a passage in Pindar (Nem.
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  • of Corinth.
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  • There are two railway stations, one in the north-east on the line to Athens (via Corinth), the other on the line to Pyrgos.
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  • That the town was the scene of the martyrdom of St Andrew is purely apocryphal, but, like Corinth, it was an early and effective centre of Christianity; its archbishop is mentioned in the lists of the Council of Sardica in 347.
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  • The maritime supremacy of Athens was used for commercial purposes, and important members of the Peloponnesian confederacy, whose wealth depended largely on their commerce, notably Corinth, Megara, Sicyon and Epidaurus, were being slowly but relentlessly crushed.
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  • In Greece itself meanwhile the opposition to Sparta was growing increasingly powerful, and, though at Coronea Agesilaus had slightly the better of the Boeotians and at Corinth the Spartans maintained their position, yet they felt it necessary to rid themselves of Persian hostility and if possible use the Persian power to strengthen their own position at home: they therefore concluded with Artaxerxes II.
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  • Again and again the relations between the Spartans and the Achaean League formed the occasion of discussions in the Roman senate or of the despatch of Roman embassies to Greece, but no decisive intervention took place until a fresh dispute about the position of Sparta in the league led to a decision of the Romans that Sparta, Corinth, Argos, Arcadian Orchomenus and Heraclea on Oeta should be severed from it.
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  • This resulted in an open breach between the league and Rome, and eventually, in 146 B.C., after the sack of Corinth, in the dissolution of the league and the annexation of Greece to the Roman province of Macedonia.
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  • Mitchel, but the Confederate army of General Braxton Bragg was transferred thither by rail from Corinth, Miss., before Mitchel was able to advance.
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  • In the next year, while Brasidas mustered a force at Corinth for a campaign in Thrace, he frustrated an.
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  • The word Acropolis, though Greek in origin and associated primarily with Greek towns (Athens, Argos, Thebes, Corinth), may be applied generically to all such citadels (Rome, Jerusalem, many in Asia Minor, or even Castle Hill at Edinburgh).
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  • Here is grown a peculiar dwarf vine, whose fruit, the " currant " (from " Corinth ")") of commerce, forms the chief resource and staple export of Zante, as well as of the neighbouring mainland.
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  • Other philosophical works by Proclus are /roL X ELwoLS 4VO K 7 ti 7 HEpi KLV 7) Uews (Institutio physica sive De motu, a compendium of the last five books of Aristotle's IIEpt qu6LK?7s aKpoaaEWS, De physica auscultatione), and De providentia et fato, Decem dubitationes circa providentiann, De malorum subsistentia, known only by the Latin translation of William of Moerbeke (archbishop of Corinth, 1277-1281), who also translated the JTOtX€LW cs 9EoaoyLK17 into Latin.
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  • incestuous marriage, like that marriage in Corinth.
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  • Corinth was situated on a narrow isthmus having two ports.
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  • Corinth was a pagan town full of pagan temples.
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  • Acts 18.17 Sosthenes (2) was a companion of Paul, referred to in the opening salutation of his first letter to Corinth.
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  • He was probably worried that at Corinth people were erecting a rather inferior superstructure on his sound foundation.
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  • The isothermal of 65° runs from Gibraltar to the north of Sardinia, and thence by the Strait of Messina to the Gulf of Corinth.
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  • The country which belonged to the city was called Meyapis or) Meyapudi; it occupied the broader part of the isthmus between Attica, Boeotia, Corinth, and the two gulfs, and its whole area is estimated by Clinton at 143 sq.
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  • In 459 an attack by Corinth, which had always coveted Megara's territory, induced the people to summon the aid of the Athenians, who secured Megara in battle and by the construction of long walls between the capital and its port Nisaea.
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  • An alliance with the Megarians, who were being hard pressed by their neighbours of Corinth, led to enmity with this latter power, and before long Epidaurus and Aegina were drawn into the struggle.
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  • A conflict between Corcyra and Corinth, the second and third naval powers of Greece, led to the simultaneous appearance in Athens of an embassy from either combatant (433) Pericles had, as it seems, resumed of late a plan of Western expansion by forming alliances with Rhegium and Leontini, and the favourable position of Corcyra on the traderoute to Sicily and Italy, as well as its powerful fleet, no doubt helped to induce him to secure an alliance with that island, and so to commit an unfriendly act towards a leading representative of the Peloponnesian League.
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  • A further casus belli was provided by a decree forbidding the importation of Megarian goods into the Athenian Empire,' presumably in order to punish Megara for her alliance with Corinth (spring 432).
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  • A demonstration in Greece, led by the new king of Macedonia, momentarily checked the agitation, and at the diet at Corinth Alexander was recognized as captain-general ('i ye�wv atToxpaTcop) of the Hellenes against the barbarians, in the place of his father Philip. In the spring of 335 he went out from Macedonia northwards, struck across the Balkans, probably by the Shipka Pass, frustrating the mountain warfare of its tribes by a precision of discipline which, probably, no other army of the time could have approached, and traversed the land of the Triballians (Rumelia) to the Danube.
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  • The Albanians in Greece, whose settlements extend over Attica, Boeotia, the district of � Corinth and the Argolid peninsula, as well as southern Euboea and the islands of Hydra, Spetzae, Poros and Salamis, descend from Tosk immigrants in the 14th century.
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  • Hence it would follow that the war lasted from shortly after 507 B.C. down to the congress at the Isthmus of Corinth in 481 B.C. (ii.) It is only for two years (490 and 49,) out of the twenty-five that any details are given.
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  • in -µ€s; ice, for ecv; -ae -art =CI), but differ more among themselves than do the Ionic. Laconia with its colonies (including those in south Italy) form a clear group, in which -e and -o lengthen to -n and -w as in Aeolic. Corinth (with its Sicilian colonies), the Argolid towns, and the Asiatic Doris, form another group, in which -E and -o become -a and -ov as in Ionic. Connected with the latter (e.g.
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  • CORINTH, a city of Greece, situated near the isthmus (see Corinth, Isthmus Of) which connects Peloponnesus and central Greece, and separates the Saronic and the Corinthian gulfs on E.
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  • In the subsequent war Corinth displayed great activity in the face of heavy losses, and the support she gave to Syracuse had no little influence on the ultimate issue of the war (see Peloponnesian War).
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  • The forces left south of Corinth were enough to occupy the attention of Grant and Rosecrans, and almost contemporaneously with Lee's advance on Washington (see below), Price and Bragg took the offensive against Grant and Buell respectively.
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  • Rosecrans, the victor of Corinth and Iuka (see below), was thereupon ordered to replace him.
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  • This rivalry was roused to fever heat by the Athenian intervention in 434-33 on behalf of Corcyra, Corinth's rebellious colony (see Corfu) and from that time the Corinthians felt that the Thirty Years' Truce was at an end.
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  • Corinth did not regain Sollium and Anactorium, while Megara and Thebes respectively were indignant that Athens should retain Nisaea and receive Panactum.
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  • Early Helladic house walls have lately been found by the American School at Corinth (A.
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  • Except for a single Attic inscription (see Plate), the alphabets of Thera and of Corinth are the oldest Greek Alphabets which we possess.
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  • Both Thera and Corinth employ in the earliest inscriptions for ?', not, though in both alphabets the ordinary use as is adopted, no doubt through the influence of trade with other ' In an excellent summary of the different views held as to the origin of the alphabet (Journal of the American Oriental Society, vol.
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  • set up for a sage; Persaeus himself, who had exposed the pretensions of Aristo, is twitted with having failed to conform with the perfect generalship which was one trait of the wise man when he allowed the citadel of Corinth to be taken by Aratus (Athen.
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  • Owing to Aratus's irresolute generalship, the indolence of the rich burghers and the inadequate provision for levying troops and paying mercenaries, the league lost several battles and much of its territory; but rather than compromise with the Spartan Gracchus the assembly negotiated with Antigonus Doson, who recovered the lost districts but retained Corinth for himself (223-221).
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  • It is possible, though not certain, that even those judaizing missionaries at Corinth whom Paul styles "false-apostles" or, ironically, "the superlative apostles" (2 Cor.
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  • Homer calls the God of the lower world Zeus KaraxOovcos, 6 and the title of Zeus XOovcos which was known to Hesiod, occurred in the worship of Corinth;';' and there is reason to believe that Eubouleus of Eleusis and Trophonius of Lebadeia are faded forms of the nether Zeus; in the Phrygian religion of Zeus, which no doubt contains primitive Aryan elements, we find the Thunder-God associated also with the nether powers.8 A glimpse into a very old stratum of Hellenic religion is afforded us by the records of Dodona.
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  • He fostered wealth by the steady encouragement of industry and by drastic legislation against idleness, luxury and vice; and the highest prosperity of the Corinthian handicrafts may be assigned to the period of his rule (see Corinth).
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  • He returned in 146 to find Corinth in ruins, the fairest cities of Achaea at the mercy of the Roman soldiery, and the famous Achaean League shattered to pieces (see Achaean League).
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  • There was a ship just ready to sail for Corinth, and the captain agreed to take him as a passenger.
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  • In a short time they reached Corinth in safety, and the king sent an officer to bring the captain and his men to the palace.
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  • Then, full of joy, the musician hastened to Corinth, not stopping even to change his dress.
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  • He lives in Corinth, [Footnote: Cor'inth.] and his name is Periander. [Footnote: Per i an'der.] Carry the precious gift to him.
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  • Everybody had heard of Periander, king of Corinth.
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  • When he heard that some men had come to Corinth with a very costly golden tripod, he had them brought before him.
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  • Do you expect to find any man in Corinth who deserves so rich a gift?
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  • From thence Paul sends the salutations of Ephesian Christians to those of Corinth.
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