Corfu sentence example

corfu
  • The lake of Butrinto (Buthrotum) is near the sea-coast opposite Corfu.

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  • Already, in the negotiations with England during the summer of 1806, the emperor had shown his sense of the extreme importance of gaining possession of that island, which indeed caused the breakdown of the peace proposals then being considered; and now he ordered French squadrons into the Mediterranean in order to secure Corfu and Sicily.

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  • The Greek constitution admits no religious disabilities, but anti-Semitic riots in Corfu and Zante in 1891 caused much distress and emigration.

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  • A Russo-Turkish fleet wrested Corfu from the French; and the Neapolitan Bourbons, emboldened by the news of the battle of the Nile, began hostilities with France which preluded the war of the Second Coalition.

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  • Two submarine cables start from Otranto, one for Valona, the other for Corfu.

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  • After the downfall of the Peloponnesian princes (1460) Phrantza retired to the monastery of Tarchaniotes in Corfu.

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  • Corfu was besieged, but unsuccessfully.

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  • Turkey's action, and the preparations being made for the siege of Corfu, now brought about the intervention of Austria.

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  • War was declared against Austria (1716); the fleet sailed for Corfu and the army crossed the Save from Belgrade to Semlin.

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  • In Aegina the AiywaZa appeared in 1831, edited by Mustoxidis; and at Corfu, in Greek, Italian and English, the 'AvOoXoyia (1834).

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  • He narrates spiritedly enough the dissensions and discussions in the winter camp of Zara and at Corfu, but is evidently much more at ease when the voyage was again resumed, and, after a fair passage round Greece, the crusaders at last saw before them the great city of Constantinople which they had it in mind to attack.

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  • Andrea Mustoxidi, a native of Corfu, published an Italian version in 1820.

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  • Russia was to acquire the Dardanelles, the Sea of Marmora, the Bosphorus with Constantinople, and Corfu.

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  • Sayades (opposite Corfu) and Arta are the places through which it receives its imports.

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  • The main series on which we shall rely here are those -- (1) from Assyria (38) about 800 B.C.; (2) from the eastern Delta of Egypt (29) (Defenneh); (3) from western Delta (28) (Naucratis); (4) from Memphis (44) -- all these about the 6th century B.C., and therefore before much interference from the decreasing coin standards; (5) from Cnidus; (6) from Athens; (7) from Corfu; and (8) from Italy (British Museum) (44).

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  • But the leaden weights of the west (44) from Corfu, &c., average 7580, or 126.3; this standard was kept up at Cyzicus in trade long after it was lost in coinage.

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  • The same passed into Italy and Corfu (44), averaging 6000 -- divided in Italy into unciae (1/12), and scripulae (1/288) and called litra (in Corfu?).

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  • The name Corfu is an Italian corruption of the Byzantine Kopvcd, which is derived from the Greek Kopvy5ai (crests).

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  • In shape it is not unlike the sickle (drepane), to which it was compared by the ancients,--the hollow side, with the town and harbour of Corfu in the centre, being turned towards the Albanian coast.

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  • Corfu is generally considered the most beautiful of all the Greek isles, but the prevalence of the olive gives some monotony to its colouring.

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  • Of these the apple and the pear are now very inferior in Corfu; the others thrive well and are accompanied by all the fruit trees known in southern Europe, with addition of the Japanese medlar (or loquat), and, in some spots, of the banana.

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  • The large old fiefs (baronie) in Corfu, as in the other islands, have left their traces in the form of quit-rents (known in Scotland by the name of feu-duties), generally equal to one-tenth of the produce.

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  • None of the Corfu wines is much exported.

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  • The town of Corfu stands on the broad part of a peninsula, whose termination in the citadel is cut from it by an artificial fosse formed in a natural gully, with a salt-water ditch at the bottom.

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  • By the treaty of Campo Formio Corfu was ceded to the French, who occupied it for two years, until they were expelled by a Russo-Turkish armament (1799).

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  • When, by the treaty of Paris of November 5,18'5, the Ionian Islands were placed under the protectorate of Great Britain, Corfu became the seat of the British high commissioner.

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  • Corfu contains very few and unimportant remains of antiquity.

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  • At the very outset he had to meet the formidable attack of the Normans (Robert Guiscard and his son Bohemund), who took Dyrrhachium and Corfu, and laid siege to Larissa in Thessaly.

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  • Corfu, the possession of Agathocles and Roger, with Durazzo, Cephalonia and Zante, was granted by William to his admiral Margarito with the strange title of king of the Epeirots.

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  • Corfu and Durazzo were to be more closely connected with the Sicilian crown.

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  • If the kings of Sicily on this side the Pharos kept Corfu down to 1386, those beyond the Pharos became in 1311 overlords of Athens, when that duchy was seized by Catalan adventurers, disbanded after the wars of Sicily.

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  • In January 1814 he had 14,000 peasants at work on the castle of Argiro Castro, and about 1500 erecting a fort at Porto Palermo, nearly opposite Corfu."

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  • They inhabit the Black Sea littoral from Varna to the Bosporus, the shores of the Sea of Marmora and the Aegean, the Aegean archipelago, the mainland of Greece, Epirus and the western islands as far north as Corfu.

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  • A search by rival theorists for evidence which will prove that Cephallenia is Ithaca, has produced nothing more convincing, and efforts to find the city of the Phaeacians at Cape Kephali in Corfu were also unsuccessful.

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  • Among the Greek islands Corfu has produced the most notable find.

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  • The small Ionic temple at Kardaki in Corfu was recleared in 1912.

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  • Here he joined the expedition to Corfu, from which he did not return to Italy till 1798.

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  • But even what may be considered as common experiences have affected the individual islands in different ways; in the matter of population, for instance, Corfu has undergone much more important modifications than Ithaca.

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  • The Ionian islands consist almost entirely of Cretaceous and Tertiary beds, but in Corfu Jurassic deposits belonging to various horizons have also been found.

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  • Miocene beds are found in Corfu and Zante, and Pliocene deposits cover much of the low-lying ground.

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  • Robert Guiscard, having captured Corfu (1081) and Cephalonia, might have become the founder of a Norman dynasty in the islands but for his early death at Cassopo.

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  • Amid the struggles between Greek emperors and Western crusaders during the 12th century, Corfu, Cephalonia, Zante, &c., emerge from time to time; but it was not till the Latin empire was established at Constantinople in 1204 that the Venetians, who were destined to give the Ionian Islands their place in history, obtained possession of Corfu.

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  • They were afterwards robbed of the island by Leon Vetrano, a famous Genoese corsair; but he was soon defeated and put to death, and the senate, to secure their position, granted fiefs in Corfu to ten noble families in order that they might colonize it (1206).

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  • In 1386, however, the people of Corfu made voluntary submission to the Venetian republic which had now risen to be the first maritime power in the Mediterranean.

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  • On the fall of the Venetian republic in 1797 the treaty of Campo Formio, which gave Venice to Austria, annexed the Ionian Islands to France; but a Russo-Turkish force drove out the French at the close of 1798; and in the spring of 1799 Corfu capitulated.

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  • The British forces, under General Oswald, took Zante, Cephalonia and Cerigo in 1809, and Santa Maura in 1810; Colonel (afterwards Sir Richard) Church (q.v.), reduced Paxo in 1814; and after the abdication of Napoleon, Corfu, which had been well defended by General Donzelot, was, by order of Louis XVIII., surrendered to Sir James Campbell.

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  • Under his government the new fortifications of Corfu and some of the most important public works which still do honour to the English protectorate were undertaken.

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  • The rejection of one of those conditions - the demolition of the fortifications of Corfu - led to a new prorogation; but none the less (on March 29, 1864) the plenipotentiaries of the five great powers signed the treaty by which the protectorate was brought to a close.

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  • The neutrality which they attributed to the whole of the islands was (January 1864) confined to Corfu and Paxo.

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  • King George made his entry into Corfu on the 6th of June.

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  • Corfu (Corcyra) with Paxo; Cephalonia; Santa Maura (Levkas) with Thiaki (Ithaca) and Zante (Zacynthos) each form separate nomarchies or departments; Cerigo (Cythera) forms part of the nomarchy of Laconia.

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  • See Mustoxidi, Delle cose Corciresi (Corfu, 1848); Lunzi, IIEpi Tjs - 'ETrramp-a 'Ever&v (Athens, 1856); Ansted, The I.

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  • Switzerland, Belgium, Corfu and Paxo and Luxemburg are respectively neutralized by the treaties of Vienna, 1815, and of London, 1839, 1864, 1867.

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  • In May 1743 a vessel arrived from Corfu, on board of which had occurred some suspicious deaths.

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  • Two insular outbreaks, Malta in 1813 and Corfu in 1815, attracted much attention as being both thought to be cases of importation by sea-traffic,' and there seems good reason for this opinion.

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  • Riemann, Recherches archeologiques sur les lies Ioniennes (Paris, 1879-1880); Partsch, Kephallenia and Ithaka (1890); see also CORFU; IONIAN ISLANDS.

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  • But having been betrayed they fled to Corfu early in 1844.

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  • In the same year the emperor made war upon Roger of Sicily, whose fleet captured Corfu and plundered the Greek towns, but in 1148 was defeated with the help of the Venetians.

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  • In 1149 Manuel recovered Corfu and prepared to take the offensive against the Normans.

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  • He sailed with 16,000 men against the empire in May 1081, and by February 1082 had occupied Corfu and Durazzo, defeating the emperor Alexis before the latter (October 1081).

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  • Robert, returning to restore them, occupied Corfu and Kephalonia, but died of fever in the latter on the 15th of July 1085, in his 70th year.

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  • He saw Cadiz, Seville, Granada, Athens, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Thebes; played the corsair with James Clay on a yacht voyage from Malta to Corfu; visited the terrible Reschid, then with a Turkish army in the Albanian capital; landed in Cyprus, and left it with an expectation in his singularly prescient mind that the island would one day be English.

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  • For size, vigorous growth and productiveness the olive tree of Zante is rivalled only by that of Corfu.

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  • Corfu Town Corfu was one of the first islands in the Mediterranean to attract an influx of British holidaymakers.

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  • There are the island made Greek liqueurs at Kumquat On the road to Corfu Town.

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  • For the real flavor of Corfu do not miss a slow meander through the beautiful countryside of the quiet central areas.

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  • Corfu, Greek Isle Corfu boasts some of the most stunning scenery in the Greek Isles.

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  • The Venetian feudal families pursued a mild but somewhat enervating policy towards the natives, who began to merge their nationality in that of the Latins and adopted for the island the new name of Corfu.

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  • This rivalry was roused to fever heat by the Athenian intervention in 434-33 on behalf of Corcyra, Corinth's rebellious colony (see Corfu) and from that time the Corinthians felt that the Thirty Years' Truce was at an end.

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  • On May 31st of that year Sir Henry Storks left Corfu with with the first, which declared the islands one "sole free and independent state," the protecting Power availed itself of every ambiguity to extend its authority.

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  • The resort of Benitses is situated on the east coast of the Greek Island of Corfu.

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  • With money to spare, Tony might consider various flight upgrade options and a private speedboat transfer from Corfu where they would fly to.

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  • Corfu Lily (Funkia Grandiflora) - Is 12 to 18 inches high, producing in August and September numerous large, pure white, sweet-scented flowers.

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  • His plans respecting Corfu succeeded.

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  • He afterwards resided at Naples, Corfu and Monopoli, and in 1503 removed to Venice, where he held office as a minister of state till his death in 1508.

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  • The cypress, as the olive, is found everywhere in the dry hollows and high eastern slopes of Corfu, of the scenery of which it is characteristic. As an ornamental tree in Britain the cypress is useful to break the outline formed by roundheaded low shrubs and trees.

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  • She built a castle of great beauty and magnificence, ti ailed the Achilleion, in the island of Corfu, where she often o fsided.

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