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cor

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cor

cor Sentence Examples

  • I cor anglais.

  • 5 3 oboes and cor anglais, or 4th oboe.

  • The table on next page shows them in their more cor rect position, in order to display more clearly their relation to the hieratic and demotic equivalents.

  • Extensive use is made of building materials from the Roman station of Corstopitum (also called Corchester), which lay half a mile west of Corbridge at the junction of the Cor with the Tyne.

  • 4 For a very complete exposition of the operation of valves in the horn, and of the mathematical proportions to be observed in construction, see Victor Mahillon's "Le Cor," also the article by Gottfried Weber in Caecilia (1835), to which reference was made above.

  • cor, Heart within the pericardium.

  • Our knowledge of Lanfranc's polemics is chiefly derived from the tract De cor pore et sanguine Domini which he wrote many years later (after 1079) when Berengar had been finally condemned.

  • corum, a double star, of magnitudes 3 and 6; this star was named Cor Caroli, or The Heart of Charles II., by Edmund Halley, on the suggestion of Sir Charles Scarborough (1616-1694), the court physician; a cluster of stars of the firth magnitude and fainter, extremely rich in variables, of the goo stars examined no less than 132 being regularly variable.

  • Its name, derived from the small river Cor, a tributary of the Tyne, is said to be associated with the Brigantian tribe of Corionototai.

  • leaf-gap; cor cell; per.

  • It was clearly a gift productive of much disturbance in the Church (1 Cor.

  • A very early example of criminal spiritual jurisdiction exercised by St Paul is found in the case of the incestuous Corinthian (1 Cor.

  • 15-17 and i Cor.

  • 1 The Christian Church, warned perhaps by the words of Christ, appears at first to have avoided a similar use of the term, while St Paul, St Peter and St John speak of their converts as spiritual children (1 Cor.

  • Here, then, we have pictured as late as the 4th century a Lord's supper, which like the one described in I Cor.

  • "The whole of time is a festival unto Christians because of the excellency of the good things which have been given" is the comment of St Chrysostom on 1 Cor.

  • during mass he takes it off when he turns to the altar, placing it on his head again when he turns to address the people (see 1 Cor.

  • Of the supreme miracle of His resurrection there is earlier evidence' than of any of the others (1 Cor.

  • The apostolic epistles are equally free from any trace of chiliasm (neither r Cor.

  • The particular prohibition of Paul (i Cor.

  • 15; 2 Cor.

  • N OH R C R' -SRN: C(OH)R'-->RNH COR' (Rand OH," syn").

  • 7, 2 Cor.

  • St Paul (r Cor.

  • The characters of the six classes Cor biloculare, biauritum; Sanguine calido, rubro: Cor uniloculare, uniauritum; 1 Sanguine frigido, rubro: S Cor uniloculare, inauritum; Sanie frigida, albida: are thus given by Linnaeus: - viviparis, Mammalibus; oviparis, Avibus.

  • The term "rulers" appears to be derived from Manichean speculation, or from the same cycle of myth which is reflected in Cor.

  • Veiling was ceremonial (1 Cor.

  • Thus Tertullian, while (De Cor.

  • 31) or "the god of this age" (2 Cor.

  • Origen, Ambrosiaster, and Euthalius ascribe to it r Cor.

  • The peculiar form in which r Cor.

  • APOLLOS ('AiroXXd s; contracted from Apollonius), an Alexandrine Jew who after Paul's first visit to Corinth worked there in a similar way (1 Cor.

  • He was with Paul at a later date in Ephesus (1 Cor.

  • In 1 Cor.

  • 4, 14, Cor.

  • with i Cor.

  • We learn from 1 Cor.

  • 9; r Cor.

  • The tradition which St Paul received included, so to speak, the germ of the central prayer in the Eucharist (r Cor.

  • 16) or reminiscences of oral teaching (r Cor.

  • Clement (Cor.

  • " No man can say that Jesus is the Lord save in the Holy Ghost " (1 Cor.

  • 7; 1 Cor.

  • 40; but the Pauline writings are freely employed, especially i Cor.

  • The word used in the New Testament to describe an excommunicated person, a iOeµa (1 Cor.

  • In the locus classicus on this subject (1 Cor.

  • There is a reference in 2 Cor.

  • i Cor.

  • 15-17; public offences are to be dealt with according to the rule in r Cor.

  • How, they argue, could Paul (1(1 Cor.

  • 9) and entrusted with prerogatives of moral jurisdiction (i Cor.

  • In the Apostolic age local office was determined, on the one hand, by the divine gifts (charisms) manifesting themselves in certain persons (1 Cor.

  • 3 ff.); and on the other by the recognition of such gifts by the inspired common consciousness of each Ecclesia (I Cor.

  • As to the specific officers thus called into being, whether for supervision or relief (1 Cor.

  • The local Ecclesia in the Apostolic age was itself responsible for the conduct of its members (i Cor.

  • All turns, as we see from the petition addressed in 1571 to the queen by twenty-seven persons (the majority women, possibly wives in some cases of men in prison), upon the duty of separation with a view to purity of Christian fellowship (2 Cor.

  • 15-18 (I Cor.

  • 1 Cor.

  • The liturgical use of the word in apostolic times is attested by the passage from 1 Cor.

  • 14; I Cor.

  • But it may be noticed here that the phrase "the old serpent" sheds some light on the Pauline phrases "the first man Adam" and "the last Adam" (1 Cor.

  • Jewish Legends.-The parallelism between the first and second Adam in 1 Cor.

  • (1726), and expositions of i Cor.

  • 28; I Cor.

  • I Cor.

  • I; i Cor.

  • Witness, for instance, Paul's reference to false apostles in 2 Cor.

  • 13, and his efforts to establish his own apostolic character to the satisfaction of the Corinthians and Galatians (I Cor.

  • I ff.; 2 Cor.

  • Cor.

  • 17, 18; 1 Cor.

  • 4, 5; 2 Cor.

  • When i Corinthians was written, the attitude of the Church was still strongly eschatological (r Cor.

  • 235: St Paul, r Cor.

  • ad Cor.

  • Not to multiply examples further, it may suffice to refer to (a) the apparent belief that the serpent tempted Eve to unchastity (2 Cor.

  • The Talmud Mo'ed Qatan, 7a, and New Testament (1 Cor.

  • ad loc.) The Apostle Paul, once a disciple of the famous Rabbi Gamaliel, uses in i Cor.

  • 1 0 sqq.) and the doctrine that Christians are God's temple (2 Cor.

  • When Paul says (i Cor.

  • We here learn from Paul that the prophets occupied the second position in point of dignity; and we see from another passage (1 Cor.

  • St Paul (i Cor.

  • As in i Cor.

  • This was surely such a meeting as we read of in z Cor.

  • In i Cor.

  • 31.6 I Cor.

  • Christ who knew no sin (2 Cor.

  • 21) had been made sin, and sacrificed for us, becoming as it were a new Passover (1 Cor.

  • The phrases " discern the body " and " discern ourselves " in i Cor.

  • VG'ith what awe Paul regarded the elements mystically identified with Christ's body and life is clear from his declaration in 1 Cor.

  • et Cor.

  • The Lay of Orpheus is known to us only through an English imitation; the Lai du cor was composed by Robert Biket, an Anglo-Norman poet of the 12th century (Wulff, Lund, 1888).

  • 5), the Temple (i Cor.

  • 10-15) and the Bride of Christ (2 Cor.

  • 7), meeting for the Lord's Supper (1 Cor.

  • 17-34), or for mutual edification in prayer, praise and prophecy (1 Cor.

  • Such fellowship is attributed by St Paul pre-eminently to the work of the Holy Spirit (2 Cor.

  • 12), yet having his own distinctive manner of presenting the Gospel (1 Cor.

  • We do not know precisely how the eucharistic rite was adjusted to these sacrificial meals; but, in the canons of Sahak, r Cor.

  • 12-13 from Macedonia after 2 Cor.

  • 17; i Cor.

  • A reference to the millennial reign of Christ in the period between the two resurrections is sometimes sought in Cor.

  • Universal restoration is inferred from 1 Cor.

  • Paul's shrinking from the disembodied state and longing to be clothed upon at death in 2 Cor.

  • 31, and directly from 1 Cor.

  • 8 ff.; I Cor.

  • The expression maranatha (" the Lord cometh "), which follows anathema in I Cor.

  • In I Cor.

  • Even from passages where he is speaking of the jurisdiction of the congregation, as for example in i Cor.

  • 8.1 The term "governments" in I Cor.

  • 18; 1 Cor.

  • 30 he is seen to have been married, and i Cor.

  • 7 that Peter was in some special way connected with this appearance of the risen Lord, and this tradition is confirmed by r Cor.

  • This appearance is referred to in r Cor.

  • r Cor.

  • This may represent local tradition or may be an inference from i Cor.

  • II and I Cor.

  • 2; I Cor.

  • It is, of course, uncertainwhether this phenomenon already occurs in 2 Cor.

  • 1; 2 Cor.

  • 6-9; r Cor.

  • To this he conformed his own conduct as a Jew, so far as his Gentile apostolate was not involved (i Cor.

  • A similar interpretation has sometimes been claimed for the third canon of that general council of Nicaea to which we 3 1 Cor.

  • To supplement what has already been pointed out in the article Niidrash, it may be noticed that the familiar penalty of the " forty stripes save one " (2 Cor.

  • shows that they are in part the summits of a submerged Coast mountain chain, a continuation southward of the Cor dillera Maritima.

  • 13 re) 7rp6mpov), though broken down by illness (2 Cor.

  • i (Eµoi v ovK orcvripov, vviv S' a r aXs) may well be, like that in i Cor.

  • in i Cor.

  • Paul is our earliest witness, as just cited; also in 1 Cor.

  • 23), if not also Barnabas (1 Cor.

  • II), rested part of their claim to superiority over Paul on (b), possibly even as having done service to Christ when on earth (2 Cor.

  • There is no sign in 2 Cor.

  • as sent forth on mission work by certain Jerusalem leaders with letters of introduction,(2 Cor.

  • 19); and further, that "the Lord's brethren" seem to have ranked above "apostles" generally, being named between them and Peter in 1 Cor.

  • Though he could claim, on occasion, to satisfy the old test of having seen the risen Lord (1 Cor.

  • 8 f.; 1 Cor.

  • 1 f.; 2 Cor.

  • But this new criterion of apostleship was capable of wider application, one dispensing altogether with vision of the risen Lord-which could not even in Paul's case be proved so fully as in the case of the original apostles-but appealing to the "signs of an apostle" (1 Cor.

  • 2; 2 Cor.

  • 12), the tokens of spiritual gift visible in work done, and particularly in the planting of the Gospel in fresh fields (2 Cor.

  • It may be in this wide charismatic sense that Paul uses the term in 1 Cor.

  • 2 Cor.

  • That he used it in senses differing with the context is proved by r Cor.

  • 15-20, and see i Cor.

  • Yet such as shared the spiritual gift (charisma) of missionary power in sufficient degree, were in fact apostles of Christ in the Spirit (i Cor.

  • The exercise of his spiritual authority is not absolute, lest he "lord it over their faith"; consent of conscience or of "faith" is ever requisite (2 Cor.

  • 23) and Erastus, both of whom were Corinthians (1 Cor.

  • He is in all probability the Silvanus 1 who is associated with Paul in the letters to the Thessalonians, mentioned again in 2 Cor.

  • This page gives an overview of all articles in the 1911 Brittanica which are alphabetized under Coo to Cor.

  • But it rested with us to develop it, and it is this responsibility which is referred to in the words - " that we may not be condemned with the world " (1 Cor.

  • But if indeed you truly wish to work along with Reading with Schmiedel aSoKiµov Evros (from 1 Cor.

  • Now here, we are told, there is a malicious allusion to the " messenger of Satan to buffet me " of 2 Cor.

  • 65) with St Paul's claim to have been " caught up even to the third heaven " (2 Cor.

  • The miracles which St Paul claims for himself in 2 Cor.

  • 21; 2 Cor.

  • The climax of absurdity seems to be reached when we are informed that the story of Simon offering money to the Apostles for the gift of the Holy Ghost arose out of Jewish-Christian scandal about Paul's " collection for the Saints " (1 Cor.

  • 43) or of dissension in the church (1 Cor.

  • 54-26, which would lay open the author to the bitter accusations launched against the interlopers of 2 Cor.

  • What he really opposes is the same ultra-Pauline moral laxity which Paul himself had found occasion to rebuke among would-be adherents in Corinth (I Cor.

  • The non-charismatic conception of healing, no longer the "gift" of some layman in the community (1 Cor.

  • In 2 Cor.

  • 3, 4; I Cor.

  • - Paul, in i Cor.

  • St Paul himself recognizes (z Cor.

  • 9, and the exercise of discipline is referred to in 1 Cor.

  • and 2 Cor.

  • 16-23; r Cor.

  • The fastings to which the apostle Paul alludes in 2 Cor.

  • The words which appear to encourage fasting in i Cor.

  • But all things are of God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ " (2 Cor.

  • 16; with 2 Cor.

  • Himself through and through animated with the joyful hope, even when prepared to surrender (2 Cor.

  • 19.2 There are traces in the New Testament of a baptismal confession simply of the name of Christ (I Cor.

  • We may take it as well established that St Paul (2 Cor.

  • The command of that island was of the utmost importance to them; for, if Aegina could rightly be called "the eyesore of the Peiraeus," Euboea was quite as truly a thorn in the side of Attica; for we learn from Demosthenes (De Cor.

  • 1), where the officers of the Church are described as "bishops and deacons" - though it is not unlikely that earlier allusions are to be found in 1 Cor.

  • He asserted that the suppression of the sexual impulse was emphatically the new revelation brought by the Logos, and appealed to 1 Cor.

  • Earavas, or laTall, 2 Cor.

  • 5; Cor.

  • 20; 2 Cor.

  • Paul's own "stake in the flesh" is Satan's messenger (2 Cor.

  • The motto that he adopted for use with the arms emblazoned for him as cardinal - Co p ad cor loquitur, and that which he directed to be engraved on his memorial tablet at Edgbaston - Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem - together seem to disclose as much as can be disclosed of the secret of a life which, both to contemporaries and to later students, has been one of almost fascinating interest, at once devout and inquiring, affectionate and yet sternly self-restrained.

  • The Lais which may be definitely attributed to Marie are: Guigemar, Equitan, Le Feene, Le Bisclavret (the werewolf), Les Deux amants, Laustic, Chaitivel, Lanval, Le Chevrefeuille, Milon, Yonec and Eliduc. The other similar lays are anonymous except the Lai d'Ignaure by Renant and the Lai du cor of Robert Biket, two authors otherwise unknown.

  • 25; 2 Cor.

  • It is probable that the duty of instructing converts was assigned to "the teachers," who are ranked by Paul immediately after the Apostles and prophets (1 Cor.

  • THEREFORE let no man glory in men, " says the apostle (i Cor.

  • He uses Paul's expression ' lest I be found a castaway ' (I Cor. ix.

  • His birth, it was a great step from God's bosom into the virgin's lap; a great condescension: 2 Cor.

  • conic section orbits is sketched in Cor.

  • consummation of the process (I Cor.

  • cor anglais, violin, viola & cello.

  • cor pulmonale.

  • At the moment a Computer Club for children and adults, and percussion and dance cor both community and school pupils are available.

  • Don't miss Natalie Spicer performing Elliot Carter's Pastoral - a rare opportunity to hear the cor anglais in a solo setting.

  • eyewitness testimony of 1 Cor.

  • If he had known the lover of Nina he would have changed the line into ' Amor ChE fa villan un cor gentile ' .

  • fourfold division and 1 Cor.

  • incorruptible crown, enslaved his body (I Cor.

  • With growing maturity will come an increased power of judgment (I Cor.

  • concordatum, agreed upon, from con-, together, and cor, heart), a term originally denoting an agreement between ecclesiastical persons or secular persons, but later applied to a pact concluded between the ecclesiastical authority and the secular authority on ecclesiastical matters which concern both, and, more specially, to a pact concluded between the pope, as head of the Catholic Church, and a temporal sovereign for the regulation of ecclesiastical affairs in the territory of such sovereign.

  • The following is Bach's fullest orchestra: the string-band, consisting (as at the present day) of violins in two parts, violas, violoncellos, doubled (where the contrary is not indicated) by double basses; the wind instruments (generally one to each part, as the string-band was never large)-2 flutes, 2 or 3 oboes, or oboe d'amore (a lower-pitched and gentler type), taille or oboe da caccia (some kind of alto oboe corresponding to the cor anglais), bassoon, generally doubling the string basses, 2 horns, with parts needing much greater practice in high notes than is customary to-day, 3 (occasionally 4) trumpets, of which at least the first 2 were played by players especially trained to produce much higher notes than are compatible with the power to produce the lower notes (the high players were called Clarin-Blaser; and the others Principal-Blaser); a pair of kettle-drums, tuned to the tonic and dominant of the piece.

  • Ultimately e two governments concluded a convention on the 15th of cor ptember 1864, whereby France agreed to withdraw her troops thi m Rome so soon as the papal army should be reorganized, tre at the outside within two years, Italy undertaking not to to Lack it nor permit others to do so, and to transfer the capital pe:

  • The last words echo I Cor.

  • It is possible, though not certain, that even those judaizing missionaries at Corinth whom Paul styles "false-apostles" or, ironically, "the superlative apostles" (2 Cor.

  • He was interred in his cathedral at midnight on the 22nd of October, in the same coffin as Stella, with the epitaph, written by himself, "Hic depositum est corpus Jonathan Swift, S.T.P., hujus ecclesiae cathedralis decani; ubi saeva indignatio cor ulterius lacerare nequit.

  • Why should your pet products take away from one's décor when they can add to the ambience?

  • Even if you're relatively new to the woodworking hobby, there are plans available for all levels of skill and in styles that will suit almost any décor.

  • When it comes to great room designs for living room and dining rooms, it isn’t as much about picking the “right” look as it is matching the décor to your lifestyle.

  • With so many options, you are sure to find the perfect fit for your décor.

  • Floral vine rugs are widely available in home décor stores, home improvement stores and dedicated rug shops.

  • The Amazon Marketplace is a great source for affordable home décor items, including vine rugs.

  • My Contemporary Rugs: My Contemporary Rugs has an ever changing selection of floral vine rugs to suit every budget and décor.

  • Retro style is typically classified as anything reminiscent of fashion and décor from the mid-twentieth century.

  • Retro designs add an air of nostalgia to any décor.

  • It is the original interactive duvet that is intended to help kids learn how to make their beds in three easy steps and create fun, interactive changes in their décor.

  • It seems Christmas apparel and décor show up earlier each year.

  • The modern wine cellar is compact, fits into your home décor and has a number of self-monitoring features that help you store your wine correctly.

  • These children, if not controlled, will eat until they suffer from life-threatening obesity, including respiratory failure with hypoxia (low blood oxygen levels), cor pulmonale (right-sided heart failure), and death.

  • Thanksgiving: Cream, tan and rust colored accents make for lovely Thanksgiving décor.

  • You can buy models in this series in onyx black, white, gloss cinnamon, blue willow, buttercup or empire red to coordinate with your kitchen décor.

  • Scan the reviews and you'll find places with outdoor patios or intimate dining rooms, New York-style décor or Southern charm.

  • Pottery Barn offers fun and functional décor units that any child will love.

  • Pottery Barn Kids provides décor for girls, boys, babies, and playrooms.

  • Pottery Barn Kids offers décor boys love including an airplane rug, robotic sheets, and a dinosaur hanging lamp.

  • Pottery Barn Kids offers storage units for baby paraphernalia, as well as changing tables and adorable little décor touches such as a farmyard mobile, silver keepsake frames and wall letters.

  • cor touches include personalized chairs that every child loves, pretend washer and dryer and pegboards.

  • Kid's Surplus is an outlet store specializing in children's clothing, toys, book, and room décor.

  • Overstock.com is an online outlet that features a number of electronic items, as well as discount furniture, home décor, and apparel.

  • 6; I Cor.

  • Cor anglais.

  • cor M -.

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