Convulsions sentence example

convulsions
  • The events of the three years from1820-1823were the beginning of a series of convulsions which lasted till 1874.
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  • At length breathing ceases, with or without convulsions, and the heart slowly stops.
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  • The 11 th century, with its political convulsions, resulting in the establishment of an alien rule and the partial suppression of the language of the conquered race, was unfavourable to literary efforts of any kind in the vernacular.
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  • But financial difficulties, combined with civil and religious convulsions, long delayed the accomplishment of his desires.
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  • Amidst the last convulsions of political Judaism a new spiritual conception of the kingdom of God, of salvation, and of the Saviour of God's anointing, had shaped itself through the preaching, the death, and the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth.
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  • They may represent the gigantic forces of nature which appear in earthquakes and other convulsions, or the multitudinous motion of the sea waves (Mayer, Die Giganten and Titanen, 1887).
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  • The convulsions from which he suffered so much in later years must he partly attributed to this violent shock.
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  • Small doses increase the sensibility of touch, sight and hearing; large doses cause twitching of the muscles and difficulty in swallowing; while in overdose violent convulsions are produced.
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  • The patient is then seized with violent convulsions of a tetanic character; the arms are stretched out, respiration impeded, the muscles are rigid, the body is thrown into opisthotonos, i.e.
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  • SaintJust proposed a dictatorship as the only remedy for the convulsions of society.
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  • He was able, however, to receive the Eucharist, and soon afterwards died in convulsions on the 19th of August.
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  • The history of the next three years is therefore one of complex inter-state intrigues combined with internal political convulsions.
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  • The ruin of the Omayyad empire and the rise of the new dynasty did not take place without mighty convulsions.
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  • In large doses it is a poison causing giddiness, deafness, salivation, sweating and convulsions.
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  • In 1741 Edwards published in its defence The Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God, dealing particularly with the phenomena most criticized, the swoonings, outcries and convulsions.
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  • Leonardo, having remained unmolested at Milan for two months under the new regime, but knowing that Ludovico was preparing a great stroke for the re-establishment of his power, and that fresh convulsions must ensue, thought it best to provide for his own security.
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  • The researches of Renan have refuted the once popular idea that a great part of the original island has disappeared by natural convulsions, though he believes that the remains of a submerged wall at the south end indicate that about 15 additional acres were once reclaimed and have been again lost.
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  • These bodies stimulate the grey matter in the spinal cord and cause tetanic convulsions.
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  • An overdose can cause coma, convulsions or death.
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  • Half of the seizures end with hemi or generalized convulsions.
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  • The movie's aliens were able to induce meteorological convulsions on Earth to warn everyone of their power.
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  • Up to 1 in 50 babies can suffer convulsions.
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  • We had no idea what had caused the convulsions, possible head trauma or an unlikely something he had eaten.
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  • Beyond trying to keep the child's temperature down there is really no other effective way of preventing further convulsions.
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  • The attempt to go back to more " normal " methods will produce further convulsions on a world scale.
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  • If untreated this is followed by convulsions and death.
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  • Black's states that in cases of uraemia ' death may be preceded by convulsions and unconsciousness.
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  • The vast majority of febrile convulsions are not serious.
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  • Of these women, approximately 150,000 have eclamptic convulsions.
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  • Benign epilepsy syndromes include benign infantile encephalopathy and benign neonatal convulsions.
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  • Some consider this syndrome, rather than benign familial neonatal convulsions, as the earliest expression of idiopathic generalized epilepsy.
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  • In December 1995 whilst at work one day I had 2 epileptic convulsions in the space of 5 minutes.
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  • Severe hypoglycaemia may lead to unconsciousness and/or convulsions and may result in temporary or permanent impairment of brain function or even death.
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  • Frequent or prolonged convulsions should be treated with intravenous diazepam.
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  • It seems clear that febrile convulsions make up an extremely heterogeneous group for which there is no single mode of inheritance.
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  • Severe toxicity is frequently accompanied by convulsions, which may also aggravate the potential for heart toxicity by inducing hypoxia.
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  • In larger doses it causes stupor, coma and convulsions.
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  • The clinical signs of lactation tetany are muscular spasms and convulsions, and death due to respiratory failure.
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  • Remittent fevers (as well as intermittents) vary considerably in intensity; some cases are intense from the outset, or pernicious, with aggrava tion of all the symptoms - leading to stupor, delirium, collapse, intense jaundice, blood in the stools, blood and albumen in the urine, and, it may be, suppression of urine followed by convulsions.
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  • His banquets were orgies, his pastimes convulsions.
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  • It is only in very large doses that the voluntary muscles are poisoned, there being induced in them a tremor which may simulate ordinary convulsions.
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  • In a well-marked case there is usually an initial rigor - in children convulsions - followed by a rise of temperature, with vomiting, headache, giddiness, intolerance to light; pain in epigastrium, back and limbs; sleeplessness, apathy or delirium.
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  • Amongst these, the most important is fever with increased protein metabolism, attended with disturbances of the circulatory and respiratory systems. Nervous symptoms, somnolence, coma, spasms, convulsions and paralysis are of common occurrence.
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  • She ceased to communicate, was unable to stand, slipped into unconsciousness, and began to have convulsions.
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  • Strychnine blocks glycine receptors in the brain, causing muscle convulsions and death.
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  • Tonight, he had a half hour of convulsions, and foaming at mouth (after a couple seizures) and then died.
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  • It does sound a lot like some type of poisoning, because of the convulsions.
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  • In the event of an overdose, the individual might experience convulsions where he or she shakes rapidly and has a seizure, heart attack or stroke.
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  • Tremors and/or convulsions are another common effect of this drug.
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  • It can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and convulsions in infants and should not be taken by women who are nursing.
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  • Severity of symptoms can range from headache and nausea to convulsions and death.
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  • Symptoms of plant poisoning range from irritation of the skin or mucous membranes of the mouth and throat to nausea, vomiting, convulsions, irregular heartbeat, and even death.
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  • Drug overdoses cause a range of symptoms, including excitability, sleepiness, confusion, unconsciousness, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, nausea, and changes in blood pressure.
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  • The individual can quickly lose consciousness or have convulsions.
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  • When hypoglycemia is severe, it can lead to convulsions and coma.
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  • Febrile seizures are convulsions of sudden onset due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain that is caused by fever.
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  • Scarlet fever causes a rash and can cause high fever and convulsions.
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  • If a patient with a history of fevers and febrile convulsions is to be given DTP, the patient should receive acetaminophen at the time of the injection and for the following 24 hours.
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  • Allergic reactions have been rarely reported, and very rare cases of convulsions have occurred.
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  • The high fever and convulsions may be fatal.
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  • Eclampsia-Coma and convulsions during or immediately after pregnancy, characterized by edema, hypertension, and proteinuria.
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  • Without treatment, it can progress to a dangerous condition called eclampsia, in which a woman goes into convulsions.
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  • With epilepsy, convulsions and muscle weakness precede the loss of skin color.
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  • Any stimulus, such as noise or light, can set off a round of convulsions.
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  • Up to 80 percent of such women develop toxemia, a disturbance of metabolism that can potentially lead to convulsions and coma.
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  • The result is headache, nausea, convulsions, and finally death by asphyxiation.
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  • In severe cases, the child may have convulsions or go into shock or coma.
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  • Deficiency can lead to convulsions, vision and hearing problems, muscle contractions, tooth-grinding and other problems in children; and atherosclerosis, heart disease, and hypertension in older adults.
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  • Calcium deficiency can also contribute to cognitive problems (confusion, inattention, learning, and memory), convulsions, depression, and hyperactivity.
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  • Symptoms of hypomagnesemia, such as twitching and convulsions, may actually result from the hypocalcemia.
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  • If deficiency is due to prolonged depletion, treatment may include injections of magnesium sulfate; if severe enough to provoke convulsions, intravenous infusions may be given.
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  • The blood levels of the drug must be measured periodically, as too high of a dose can cause an abnormal heart rhythm or convulsions.
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  • Characteristically, a newborn with galactosemia who is fed milk products will have jaundice, vomiting, lethargy, irritability, and convulsions.
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  • All drugs in this class have been associated with convulsions.
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  • Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain characterized by recurrent seizures that may include repetitive muscle jerking called convulsions.
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  • A woman who has eclampsia may appear to have convulsions.
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  • The most common complication is febrile seizures, or convulsions triggered by the high fever.
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  • Unlike the American Indians, who supposed Columbus and his crew to be supernatural beings, and their ships in some way endowed with life, and were thrown into convulsions of terror by the first discharge of firearms which they witnessed, these Australians were neither excited to wonder by the ship nor overawed by the superior number and unknown weapons of the strangers.
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  • These decrees were not, indeed, at once universally enforced; but the convulsions of the Revolutionary epoch and the religious reorganization that followed completed the work.
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  • The symptoms of acute poisoning are pain and diarrhoea, owing to the setting up of an active gastro-enteritis, the foeces being black (due to the formation of a sulphide of lead), thirst, cramps in the legs and muscular twitchings, with torpor, collapse, convulsions and coma.
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  • Further, he had the discernment to see that certain symptoms - such as convulsions and delirium, which were then commonly held always to indicate inflammation - were often really signs of weakness.
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  • The political convulsions of Italy in 1799 brought Breislak to Paris, where he remained until 1802, when, being appointed inspector of the saltpetre and powder manufactories near Milan, he removed to that city.
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  • From the beginning to the end of his career he remained true to the purpose of his life, which was to fight the battle of sound learning and plain common sense against the powers of ignorance and superstition, and amid all the convulsions of that period he never once lost his mental balance."
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  • In cases which recover the convulsions diminish in severity, leaving the patient exhausted.
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  • As a day of judgment it is accompanied by terrible convulsions of nature (not to be taken figuratively, but probably intended literally by the prophets in accordance with their view of the absolute subordination of nature to the divine purpose for man).
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  • David Garrick, who was one of thepupils, used, many years later, to throw the best company of London into convulsions of laughter by mimicking the master and his lady.
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  • In the middle ages Pozzuoli was frequently sacked and also damaged by the natural convulsions of 1198 and 1538.
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  • In Scotland the only one which has survived the convulsions of the i 6th century is that of Aberdeen, a Scottish form of the Sarum Office,' revised by William Elphinstone (bishop 1483-1514), and printed at Edinburgh by Walter Chapman and Andrew Myllar in 1509-1510.
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  • Thus curare may stop strychnine convulsions by paralysing the terminations of motor nerves, and chloroform may exercise the same effect by abolishing the irritability of the spinal cord.
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  • Though the inhabitants bad been arned by the earlier convulsions of the mountain, so swiftly d destruction come upon them that 18,ooo are said to have St their lives.
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  • This year saw the last of the convulsions that threatened to overturn him,a rising in the North headed by the old earl of Northumberland, by Richard Rising of Scrope, archbishop of York, and by Thomas Mowbray the North.
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