How to use Continental congress in a sentence

continental congress
  • He was one of Maryland's representatives in the Continental Congress in1784-1785and in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 at Philadelphia, but.

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  • He was a member of the New York Assembly in 1759-1769, a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress of 1765, a member of the Continental Congress from 1774 until his death and as such a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and in1777-1778was a member of the first state senate.

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  • He was a member of the Virginia committee of correspondence in 1773, in 1774 was president of the Virginia provincial convention, and a member of the first Continental Congress.

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  • Jefferson began his public service as a justice of the peace and parish vestryman; he was chosen a member of the Virginia house of burgesses in 1769 and of every succeeding assembly and convention of the colony until he entered the Continental Congress in 1775.

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  • Prevented by illness from attending, Jefferson sent to the convention elaborate resolutions, which he proposed as instructions to the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress that was to meet at Philadelphia in September.

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  • He was sent as a delegate from New York City to the Continental Congress at Philadelphia in September 1774, and though almost the youngest member, was entrusted with drawing up the address to the people of Great Britain.

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  • As a member of the fourth provincial congress he drafted a resolution by which the delegates of New York in the Continental Congress were authorized to sign the Declaration of Independence.

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  • In 1777, largely, it seems, because he refused to treat the electors with rum and punch, after the custom of the time, he was not reelected, but in November of the same year he was chosen a member of the privy council or council of state, in which he acted as interpreter for a few months, as secretary prepared papers for the governor, and in general took a prominent part from the, 4th of January 1778 until the end of 1779, when he was elected a delegate to the Continental Congress.

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  • By the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union adopted by the Continental Congress in 1777, and in effect in 1781-1789, the states bound themselves in a league of common defence.

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  • When the Continental Congress issued the famous Declaration Virginia had already assembled in convention to draft a new Constitution.

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  • The Continental Congress sat here on the 27th of September 1777 after being driven from Philadelphia by the British; and subsequently, after the organization of the Federal government, Lancaster was Jne of the places seriously considered when a national capital was to be chosen.

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  • Lee was one of the delegates from Virginia to the first Continental Congress at Philadelphia in 1774, and prepared the address to the people of British America, and the second address to the people of Great Britain, which are among the most effective papers of the time.

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  • His father was long prominent in Virginia politics, and became a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1764, opposing Patrick Henry's Stamp Act resolutions in the following year; he was a member of the Continental Congress in 1774-1777, signing the Declaration of Independence and serving for a time as president of the Board of War; speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1 7771782; governor of Virginia in 1781-1784; and in 1788 as a member of the Virginia Convention he actively opposed the ratification of the Federal Constitution by his state.

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  • He was soon made president of the South Carolina council of safety, and in 1776 vice-president of the state; in the same year he was sent as a delegate from South Carolina to the general continental congress at Philadelphia, of which body he was president from November 1777 until December 1778.

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  • In 1776 the thirteen colonies united in the continental congress issued their Declaration of Independence.

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  • The grandfather, Arthur Middleton (1681-1737), was president of the Council in 1721-1730 and as such was acting governor in 1725-1730, and the father, Henry Middleton (1717-1784), was speaker of the Assembly in 1745-1747 and again in 1 7541 755, a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1774-1776, and its president from October 1774 to May 1775, a member of the South Carolina Committee of Safety, and in 1775 president of the South Carolina Provincial Congress.

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  • He was a member of the provincial Council of Safety in 1775-1776, and a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1776-1777.

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  • On the approach of the War of Independence he identified himself with the patriot or whig element in the colony, and in 1776 and 1777 he was a delegate to the Continental Congress.

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  • The arsenal was established by the Continental Congress during the War of Independence and began to be used as a repository for arms and ammunition about 1777.

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  • Thomas Lynch (c. 1720-1776), Christopher Gadsden (1724-1805), and John Rutledge (1739-1800) attended the Stamp Act Congress of 1765, an intercolonial committee of correspondence was appointed in 1773, and delegates were sent to the Continental Congress in 1774 and 1775.

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  • He was a member of the continental congress in1783-1784and again in 1786-1787, of the constitutional convention at Philadelphia in 1787, and of the state convention which ratified the Federal constitution for North Carolina in 1789.

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  • He was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1781 and a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1782-1785.

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  • For a single-chamber, executive and legislative, Continental Congress of the peoples of Europe, elected by universal suffrage and proportional representation.

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  • In Milton, on the 9th of September 1774, at the house of Daniel Vose, a meeting, adjourned from Dedham, passed the bold "Suffolk Resolves" (Milton then being included in Suffolk county), which declared that a sovereign who breaks his compact with his subjects forfeits their allegiance, that parliament's repressive measures were unconstitutional, that tax-collectors should not pay over money to the royal treasury, that the towns should choose militia officers from the patriot party, that they would obey the Continental Congress and that they favoured a Provincial Congress, and that they would seize crown officers as hostages for any political prisoners arrested by the governor; and recommended that all persons in the colony should abstain from lawlessness.

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  • His elder brother, Woodbury Langdon (1739-1805), was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1779-1780, a member of the executive council of New Hampshire in 1781-1784, judge of the Supreme Court of the state in 1782 and in1786-1790(although he had had no legal training), and a state senator in 1784-1785.

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  • The last-named statesman, at the first Continental Congress after the evacuation by the British forces, proposed a draft ordinance (March ist 1784) for the government of the North-West Territory, in which it was provided that "after the year 1800 there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in any of the said states, otherwise than in punishment of crime."

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  • The moderate Loyalists joined in the election of delegates to the first Continental Congress; but the great body of Loyalists in New York strongly disapproved of the " dangerous and extravagant " measures adopted by that body, and the assembly, in January 1 775, refused to approve its acts or choose delegates to the second Continental Congress.

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  • The American Revolutionary War lasted from1775-1783, and when it started, the Continental Congress moved fast to adopt brown as the official color of the Continental Army uniform, but that didn't last long.

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  • With the unexpected start to the war, the Continental Congress moved quickly to determine a uniform color, but the color brown was never really embraced by the troops.

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  • The Continental Congress gave George Washington the privilege of creating the first "official" Continental Army uniform, and in 1979 the Continental Army accepted the design for its national uniform.

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  • The Marine Corps was instituted back in the Revolutionary War on November 10, 1775, when a committee of the Continental Congress drafted a resolution asking that two battalions of Marines be formed.

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  • A court of arbitration appointed by the Continental Congress met at Trenton, New Jersey, in 1782, and on December 30th gave a unanimous decision in favour of Pennsylvania.

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  • He was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Royal .Assembly of New Hampshire and then to the second Continental Congress in 1775, and was a member of the first Naval Committee of the latter, but he resigned in 1776, and in June 1776 became Congress's agent of prizes in New Hampshire and in 1778 continental (naval) agent of Congress in this state, where he supervised the building of John Paul Jones's "Ranger" (completed in June 1777), the "America," launched in 1782, and other vessels.

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  • The first Provincial Congress met at Newbern on the 25th of August 1774 and elected delegates to the Continental Congress.

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  • Several aged men also testified that they had heard a declaration of_independence read at Charlotte, the county-seat, in May 1775; and one of them stated that he had carried it to the Continental Congress.

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  • The first and the second provincial congress did little except choose delegates to the Continental Congress and the management of affairs passed in large measure from the royal government to the several county committees.

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  • He was a descendant of Francis Higginson (1588-1630), who emigrated from Leicestershire to the colony of Massachusetts Bay and was a minister of the church of Salem, Mass., in 1629-1630; and a grandson of Stephen Higginson (1743-1828), a Boston merchant, who was a member of the Continental Congress in 1783, took an active part in suppressing Shay's Rebellion, was the author of the "Laco" letters (1789), and rendered valuable services to the United States government as navy agent from the 11th of May to the 22nd of June 1798.

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  • John Adams was a member of the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1778.

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  • In July 1774 he wrote for a convention in Fairfax county a series of resolutions known as the Fairfax Resolves, in which he advocated a congress of the colonies and suggested non-intercourse with Great Britain, a policy subsequently adopted by Virginia and later by the Continental Congress.

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  • He took an active part in the movements in Connecticut preceding the War of Independence, and from 1774 to 1776 was a delegate from Connecticut to the Continental Congress.

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  • He was a member of the Massachusetts executive council from 1776 to 1780, and a delegate to the continental congress from 1776 to 1778.

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  • He took an active part in the resistance to the Stamp Act, and from 1 774 to 1778 and 1784 to 1785 was a member of the Continental Congress.

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  • He was a member of the South Carolina legislature almost continuously from 1760 to 1780, and represented his province in the Stamp Act Congress of 1765 and in the Continental Congress in 1774-1776.

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  • He was an ardent leader of the opposition to the Stamp Act, advocating even then a separation of the colonies from the mother country; and in the Continental Congress of 1774 he discussed the situation on the basis of inalienable rights and liberties, and urged an immediate attack on General Thomas Gage, that he might be defeated before receiving reinforcements.

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  • He was a delegate to the second Continental Congress in May 1775, and on the 19th of June was chosen one of the four major-generals in the Continental service.

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  • He was a delegate from New York to the Continental Congress in 1779-1781, and state senator in 1781-1784,1786-1790and 1792-1797.

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  • His grandfather, Frederick Frelinghuysen (1753-1804), was an eminent lawyer, one of the framers of the first New Jersey constitution, a soldier in the War of Independence, and a member (1778-1779 and 1782-1783) of the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and in 1793-1796 of the United States senate; and his uncle, Theodore (1787-1862), was attorney-general of New Jersey from 1817 to 1829, was a United States senator from New Jersey in 1829-1835, was the Whig candidate for vice-president on the Clay ticket in 1844, and was chancellor of the university of New York in 1839-1850 and president of Rutgers College in 1850-1862.

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  • Its site was originally included in the so-called "Bingham Patent," a tract on both sides of the Susquehanna river owned by William Bingham (1751-1804), a Philadelphia merchant, who was a member of the Continental Congress in 1787-1788 and of the United States Senate in 1795 - 1801, being president pro tempore of the Senate from the 16th of February to the 3rd of March 1797.

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  • To promote the ends he had in view he suggested non-importation, instituted the Boston committees of correspondence, urged that a Continental Congress be called, sought out and introduced into public service such allies as John Hancock, Joseph Warren and Josiah Quincy, and wrote a vast number of articles for the newspapers, especially the Boston Gazette, over a multitude of signatures.

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  • On the 6th of May, the day after his arrival in Philadelphia, he was elected by the assembly of Pennsylvania a delegate to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

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  • Lee, from the beginning of the mission to Paris, seems to have been possessed of a mania of jealousy toward Franklin, or of misunderstanding of his acts, and he tried to undermine his influence with the Continental Congress.

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  • Drafts were being drawn on him by all the American agents in Europe, and by the Continental Congress at home..

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  • Washington, chosen by the Continental Congress to command the army, arrived in Cambridge in July 1775, and stretching his lines around Boston, forced its evacuation in March 1776.

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  • He served in the Continental Congress in 1 7771 779, and was enthusiastic in his support of Washington.

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  • His half-brother, Lewis Morris (1726-1798), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was educated at Yale, served in the Continental Congress from 1775 until early in 1777, and went on a mission to the western frontier in 1775 to win over the Indians from the British to the American side.

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  • Hancock was a member of the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1780, was president of it from May 1775 to October 1 777, being the first to sign the Declaration of Independence, and was a member of the Confederation Congress in 1785-1786.

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  • He was a member of the New Hampshire Provincial Assembly in 1774, and in1774-1775was a delegate to the Continental Congress.

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  • It was in this house that Lord Howe on the nth of September 1776 held a peace conference with Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Edward Rutledge representing the Continental Congress.

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  • As the contest against the proprietor had been nearly won, the majority of the best citizens desired the continuance of the old government and it was not until the Maryland delegates in the Continental Congress were found almost alone in holding back that their instructions not to vote for independence were rescinded.

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  • In 1768 he was a delegate to the provincial convention which was called to meet in Boston, and conducted the prosecution of Captain Thomas Preston and his men for their share in the famous " Boston Massacre of the 5th of March 1770., He served in the Massachusetts General Court in 1773-1774, in the Provincial Congress in 177 4-1775, and in the Continental Congress in 1 7741778, and was speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1777, a member of the executive council in 1779, a member of the committee which drafted the constitution of 1780, attorney-general of the state from 1777 to 1790, and a judge of the state supreme court from 1790 to 1804.

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  • The governor and council appoint all judicial ' The constitution of 1776 provided that the Congress which framed it " assume the name, power and authority of a House of Representatives "; that said house choose twelve persons to be " a distinct and separate branch of the legislature by the name of a Council that the Council appoint a president; that civil officers for the colony and for each county (except clerks of court, county treasurers and recorders) should be appointed by the two houses; and that " if the present unhappy dispute with Great Britain should continue longer than this present year, and the Continental Congress give no instruction or direction to the contrary, the Council be chosen by the people of each respective county in such manner as the Council and House of Representatives shall order."

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  • As a member of the Pennsylvania house of representatives in 1772-1775, he was an ardent Whig, and in 1774 was a member of the first Continental Congress.

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  • He was once more a member of the Connecticut Assembly in 1764-1766, was one of the governor's assistants in 1766-1785, a judge of the Connecticut superior court in 1766-1789, treasurer of Yale College in 1765-1776, a delegate to the Continental Congress in1774-1781and again in 1783-1784, a member of the Connecticut Committee of Safety in1777-1779and in 1782, mayor of New Haven in 1784-1793, a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787 and to the Connecticut Ratification Convention of the same year, and a member of the Federal House of Representatives in 1789-1791 and of the United States Senate in 1791-1793.

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  • He was a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress in 1765, and to the Continental Congress in 1774-77 and 1782-83; he was chairman of the committee which framed the state constitution of 1776, and the first "president" (governor) of South Carolina in 1776-78.

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  • He served in the Continental Congress in 1774-77, and was sent.

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  • A territorial dispute with Connecticut over the Wyoming Valley was settled in favour of Pennsylvania in 1782 by a court of arbitration appointed by the Continental Congress.

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  • He was one of the signers of the White Plains protest of April 1775 against "all unlawful congresses and committees," in many other ways proved himself a devoted loyalist, and wrote the Free Thoughts on the Proceedings of the Continental Congress (1774) by "A.

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  • Samuel Huntington (1731-1796) removed to Norwich about 1758, was a member of the Continental Congress in1776-1783and its president in 1779-1781, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a justice of the supreme court of Connecticut in 1774-1784, and governor of Connecticut in 1786-1796.

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  • Carolina in 1726, and was a delegate to the Continental Congress from Georgia, but opposed independence and was banished from Savannah in 1777.

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  • He served in the Continental Congress in 1 779 and again in 1780-82.

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