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  • Sarah and Giddon both seemed content with the arrangement, but she felt guilty about the money she earned... or didn't earn.

  • Tammy was finally allowed to swim to her heart's content... apparently for the first time.

  • He had been perfectly content to step back and let her bear the brunt of Giddon's anger, even knowing that he had arrived uninvited.

  • It was plain that Cade was content with things the way they were, but she wanted more.

  • Pregnant Martha abstained, content with an iced tea.

  • Howie remained silent during verbal our exchange, looking form one of us to the other, content to let us orchestrate the production.

  • He remained content to leave such criminal havoc in the hands of the police.

  • I'm content to just move forward.

  • Only baby Claire who slept soundly in her file cabinet crib was truly content.

  • Quinn and Martha perpetually had their hands full with their baby and Betsy stayed home, content to have extra time with our expanding garden.

  • It wasn't the open road wanderers I envied but the home town golfers; they seemed so content in their pastoral surroundings.

  • We were content to allow him this small title of uniqueness knowing it was killing him to be so close to a scientific miracle with hands tied and mouth gagged against announcing his findings to the world.

  • I doubt the trip will ever come about as each of us seems content with our hands-off, albeit revered, relationship.

  • Darian looked at her, content with cookies resting on one thigh and the cat on the other.

  • Healing his scars made her feel a familiar sense of exhaustion, and she retreated to the couch in front of the TV, content to doze and recover.

  • He was content with his life, and yet, at her words, he remembered what it was like when he truly was happy.

  • Yully met his gaze, utterly relaxed and content with his heat and power moving through her.

  • The sense of peace descended upon her again, and she relaxed against him, content to her soul to be surrounded by his scent and heat.

  • Her stomach was content, and she hadn't thrown up.

  • He seemed content to study her.

  • But I've always been content to let someone else wait on me.

  • Most of the guests seemed content in the parlor, listening to Pumpkin Green ramble away about his upcoming Fourth of July water fight.

  • Instead, he rose—a suggestion they go inside—but Cynthia and Mrs. Lincoln were content together, as if oblivious to Pumpkin and Westlake.

  • Dean was content to let them chat and concentrate on his driving.

  • Dean sensed Fred had finished his own web business before unhooking and was content to let the waiting line of users cool their respective heels.

  • As the afternoon dwindled, the Deans were content to rock and ruminate.

  • He was far too content holding the petite woman he didn't dare trust.

  • She lay there for a few minutes, content.

  • For now, he was content to make her life miserable while she fed him information about Gabriel.

  • Gabriel followed them out obediently, content to hang around them while bored.

  • Sasha sipped blood from a goblet, content.

  • She sighed, content to rest atop him.

  • Rhyn was content to let them fight when he thought she was winning, like she normally did.

  • Jade couldn.t help the flash of anger he felt at the sight of such a creature comfortable and content.

  • He would.ve been content to stay in his cottage for another hundred years or never again visit the mortal world.

  • If he took down the Council, too, he would be all the more content.

  • She closed her eyes, content.

  • Afterwards, she snuggled into his arms, content with the sound of his heartbeat and the feel of his arms around her.

  • She smiled up at him, content to be with her mate.

  • Kiera nodded, content to hide from the crowd.

  • He knew what she was, and he was content to call her nishani, the title given to a warrior's lifemate.

  • Evelyn knew she didn't deserve to feel at peace after the mess she dragged Kiera into, but she did feel it, and it made her genuinely content for the first time since she'd kidnapped her best friend.

  • She either hadn't completed the art form, or she didn't know what he looked like when he was content.

  • I'm content to give them fair value for their bucks and try my best to see that they enjoy themselves.

  • I'd guess she was real content here in Ouray.

  • They said little as they skied, content to enjoy their surroundings.

  • He was more than content to spend his first day of skiing on the bunny slope.

  • Dean found the deep powder beyond his limited abilities and Donald Ryland seemed content to stay with him and ski the packed trails, sometimes cutting off to test the moguls and deeper snow at the trail's edge.

  • She added, We didn't know the content of the notebook at that time.

  • Well, I'm sure Fred wasn't a hooker but I'm content to accept him on a present day basis, regardless of why he's so protective of his past.

  • Used to being alone, she was content with her own company.

  • I have to drink a real lot to get a hangover, so, with no downsides and a whole lot of up, why wouldn't I drink to my heart's content, plus it tastes awesome and warms my soul.

  • He felt as if they were melting in to each other, and rather than anticipating what could come next, he was content to just stay in this moment.

  • Lori would be content with things the way they were.

  • It was so peaceful and she felt so content with his arms around her.

  • The feds ignored the newcomers after a few looks, content to stroll and chat as if nothing were amiss anywhere.

  • Arnie tripped, the content of his fist flying free over the boulders to the cliff's edge.

  • Jeff Byrne had worked for World Wide for 15 years and seemed at least content with the work he was doing.

  • You're saying he was content at his job?

  • Yeah, ol' Jeff was content.

  • An unusual number of people were enjoying the unseasonable weather, spending the last few hours out of doors; fathers playing catch with sons, youngsters riding trikes or skipping rope, and others content to just drink in the springtime evening.

  • Dean began to float back to sleep, half content in the thought that the storm might wash out the steamy, unseasonable humidity.

  • The beautiful sounds of The Coleman Hawkins Quartet doing "The Man I Love" as it ought to be done were playing and Mrs. Lincoln never looked more content.

  • They silently spooned up Italian ice cream, content in this measure of understanding that was growing between them.

  • Dean answered the obvious—he had no idea of the content of the missive.

  • Still, Alex seemed at home in her old house – and she would have been perfectly content to keep him there.

  • Come to think of it, would he have been content to live in her house?

  • Would he be content to live with the farmer's daughter or would he expect her to change?

  • I want to wake up tomorrow feeling content, not guilty.

  • She relaxed in the luxury of leather seat covers and a smooth ride, content simply to watch him drive.

  • Well, tomorrow she could look to her hearts' content and it wouldn't be indecent.

  • Instead, she felt wonderfully content.

  • "Wise, content leaders with bloodlines as good as ours will," Darian said with a smile.

  • He'd been content to play around with the Others and test his magic.

  • Until she recovered, he was content to feed her.

  • We are … content here now.

  • I'm not content with you here.

  • That might explain why Carmen was content with so little, but some people brought up in those circumstances would be even more determined not to live that way.

  • Lately he wasn't content – or maybe she was letting Katie stir that thought.

  • His black cat leapt from the ottoman onto her chest, content to curl up and sleep.

  • He spent most of the night up with the woman in his bed then fell asleep after he fed from her, content and sated, as usual.

  • For some reason, the idea Eden was content after so short a time irritated him.

  • When he drank his fill, he withdrew, content to be full again.

  • Like the vamp-cat, Jessi's cousins had gone from panicked at being kidnapped in the middle of the night to content on the compound.

  • He encouraged the cities, and not content with issuing proclamations against private war, formed alliances with the princes in order to enforce his decrees.

  • Kossuth, indeed, was not content with advocating those reforms - the abolition of entail, the abolition of feudal burdens, taxation of the nobles - which were demanded by all the Liberals.

  • Here we must be content with a statement of some of the results.

  • He was content that ecclesiastical supremacy should be with the civil power, and he believed that the work of the Reformation would in that way be best preserved and furthered.

  • Ecclesiastical affairs were, as a matter of course, wholly under the management of the cantonal and municipal authorities, and Zwingli was content that it should be so.

  • But the Spanish government was not content with the prohibition of sea-borne commerce.

  • Causes of friction still remained, but they did not develop into open quarrels, for Mitre was content to leave Urquiza in his province of Entre Rios, and the other administrators (caudillos) in their several governments, a large measure of autonomy, trusting that the position and growing commercial importance of Buenos Aires would inevitably tend to make the federal capital the real centre of power of the republic. In 1865 the Argentines were forced into war with Paraguay through the overbearing attitude of the president Francisco Solano Lopez.

  • (formamide excepted) which are at first soluble in water, the solubility, however, decreasing as the carbon content of the molecule increases.

  • The atomic weight of boron has been determined by estimating the water content of pure borax (J.

  • All we can do in such cases is to place the system under certain conditions of transformation, and be content with the amount of work which it is, as it were, willing to render up under those conditions.

  • (A project of Wagner's which instrumentmakers found impracticable, so that Wagner had to content himself with a kind of valve trombone shaped like a trumpet.) 3 trombones and i double-bass trombone.

  • The god and his viceregent, the king, had long ceased to disturb tenancy, and were content with fixed dues in naturalia, stock, money or service.

  • Writers on the ethnology of Italy have been hitherto content with the first, namely, the broad distinction.

  • Cesare dEste had to content himself with Modena and Reggio, where his descendants reigned, as dukes till 1794.

  • There was no feeling of nationality, but the people were prosperous, enjoyed profound peace and were placidly content with the existing order of things.

  • The directcrs of Paris, not content with overrunning and plundering Switzerland, had outraged German sentiment in many ways.

  • But Victor Emmanuel on this occasion proved the greater statesman of the two; he understood that, hard as it was, he must content himself with Lombardy for the present, lest all be lost.

  • Mancini had therefore to be content with a declaration that the allies would act in mutually friendly intelligence.

  • At least, it would be hard to name any school of theists which was content to affirm that there " happened " to be a God.'

  • (The senses are so far from truth that we must be content with reaching probability.) In Cicero's De Natura Deorum the burden of theism rests mainly on the Stoic interlocutor.

  • It is content to explain the origin and course of development of the world, the solar or, at most, the sidereal system which falls under our own observation.

  • Thus he was in some cases, as in that of St James's, Piccadilly, content to make the exterior of an almost barnlike plainness.

  • In fleshy leaves which contain a great bulk of tissue in relation to their chlorophyll content, the central mesophyll contains little or no chlorophyll and acts as waterstorage tissue.

  • The water content of the soil, its mineral content, its humus content, its temperature, and its physical characteristics, such as its depth and the size of its component particles are all edaphic factors.

  • Soil temperature is partly dependent on the direct rays of the sun, partly on the color and constitution of the soil, and partly on the water content of the soil.

  • The same year peace was concluded with Mithradates on condition that he should be put back to the position he held before the war; but, as he raised objections, he had in the end to content himself with being simply a vassal of Rome.

  • In the first place, the content of the word "knowledge" is never properly developed.

  • But with this result 'some of Huss's followers, who wished to preserve his spiritual teaching, were not content.

  • In short, it became only too evident that there was no royal road to national prosperity, and that Russia, like other nations, must be content to advance slowly and laboriously along the rough path of painful experience.

  • The next important development in rail design originated in America, which, for the few lines that had been laid up to 1830, remained content with wooden bars faced with iron.

  • Those who travelled at the cheaper rates had at the beginning to be content with open carriages having little or no protection from the weather.

  • Others, while not going so far as this, admit that the content of the communications does occasionally exceed the medium's.

  • Waiting for professional business, he was content to act as court crier for two dollars and a half a day; but he soon gave indications of his talent, and his studious habits and attention to his cases rapidly brought him clients.

  • The more important question is the date of the laws in their present form and content.

  • But while such men went out into the world and brought back wealth of one kind or another to Palestine, other Jews were content to make their homes in foreign parts.

  • His lineage was (in the opinion of one of them at least) of doubtful purity; and so it was his duty to lay down the high-priesthood and be content to rule the nation.

  • But Hyrcanus was well content to forgo the title to political power, which he could not exercise in practice, and Antony had been a friend of Antipater.

  • So long as the Law was not deliberately outraged and so long as the worship was established, most of the religious leaders of the Jews were content to wait.

  • Their Venetian masters at least secured to the islanders external tranquillity, and it is singular that the Turks were content to leave them in undisturbed possession of this opulent and important island for nearly two centuries after the fall of Constantinople.

  • was content to leave to the patriarch.

  • Augustus, who showed neither talent nor inclination for government, was content to leave Poland under the influence of Russia, and Saxony to the rule of his ministers.

  • Scholasticism aims, it is true, in its chief representatives, at demonstrating that the content of revelation and the teaching of reason are identical.

  • In that case, all who accept a revelation without professing to understand its content would require to be ranked as mystics; the fierce sincerity of Tertullian's credo quia ab-' surdum, Pascal's reconciliation of contradictions in Jesus Christ, and Bayle's half-sneering subordination of reason to faith would all be marks of this standpoint.

  • He was not content with laying the blame at the door of the effete War Office, but deplored the apathetic way in which the Tsar passed the time at headquarters, without any clear political plan, holding on supinely to formalism and routine, yielding to the spasmodic interference of the Empress.

  • in 1386, Witowt was at first content with the principality of Grodno; but jealousy of Skirgiello, one of Jagiello's brothers, to whom Jagiello committed the government of Lithuania, induced Witowt to ally himself once more with the Teutonic Order (treaty of Konigsberg, 24th of May 1390).

  • At the peace of Westphalia they claimed the duchy, in opposition to the elector of Brandenburg, and the result was that the latter was obliged to content himself with eastern Pomerania (Hinterpommern), and to see the western part (Vorpommern) awarded to Sweden.

  • The difference in form and content suggests that the Polygonal Numbers was not part of the larger work.

  • The bishops, now increasingly absorbed in secular affairs, were content with a somewhat theoretical power of control, while the archdeacons rigorously asserted an independent position which implied great power and possibilities of wealth.

  • He realized that with the enclosure of the waste lands and the absorption of small into large ho] dings, the commonfield farmer must migrate to the town or become a hired labourer; but he also realized that to feed a rapidly growing industrial population, the land must be improved by draining, marling, manuring and the use of better implements, in short by the investment of the capital which the yeoman farmer, content to feed himself and his own family, did not possess.

  • He intended to leave Asia to Antiochus and content himself for the remainder of his days with the Macedonian kingdom in its old limits.

  • Mill apparently is not content with the confusion between " law " and " agency " or " force," but opposes the one to the other.

  • No one believed that he would be content with the "ancient limits."

  • This (obviously valid) distinction logically involves the consequence that the object, or content, of knowledge, viz.

  • As the result of this analysis, combined with an investigation into the surroundings man lives in, a "content" - a moral code - becomes gradually evolved.

  • Besides this, Belon disposed the birds known to him according to a definite system, which (rude as we now know it to be) formed a foundation on which several of his successors were content to build, and even to this day traces of its influence may still be discerned in the arrangement followed by writers who have faintly appreciated the principles on which modern taxonomers rest the outline of their schemes.

  • 5 He recognized sixteen Orders of Birds, while Vieillot had been content with five, and Iliiger with seven.

  • 3 Passing onward to Switzerland, we must content ourselves by referring to the list of works, forming a Bibliographia ornithologica Helvetica, drawn up by Dr Stolker for Dr Fatio's Bulletin de la Societe Ornithologique Suisse (ii.

  • So far from that being the case, its distinguished author was content to adopt, as he tells us, the arrangement proposed by Kirby in the Seventh Bridgewater Treatise (ii.

  • The Peterborough Chronicle, not content with voicing this sentiment, gives Eustace a bad character.

  • But Contarini was not content to leave the marbles as they were.

  • Tanks of various types are employed in storing the oil, those at the wells being circular and usually made of wood, with a content of 250 barrels and upwards.

  • At the same time, if our text is thus late, it must be remembered that its content gives us the earliest and purest exposition of French feudalism, and describes for us the organization of a kingdom, where all rights and duties were connected with the fief, and the monarch was only a suzerain of feudatories.

  • At the council of Tours (1054) he found a protector in the papal legate, the famous Hildebrand, who, satisfied himself with the fact that Berengar did not deny the real presence of Christ in the sacramental elements, succeeded in persuading the assembly to be content with a general confession from him that the bread and wine, after consecration, were the body and blood of the Lord, without requiring him to define how.

  • A high class soap, which after framing contains about 30% of water, is brought down to a water content of 11-14% by drying in chambers through which warm air is circulated.

  • Whilst other Christians, following St Paul, were content to do all things for the glory of God, Ignatius set himself and his followers to strive after the greater glory.

  • Not content with the 67,000 talers a month which he drew as salary for his innumerable offices, he was found when an inquiry was held in the next reign to have abstracted more than five million talers of public money for his private use.

  • Having thus hemmed in the Gond states, however, they made no efforts to assert any effective sovereignty over them; the Gond rajas for their part were content with practical independence within their own dominions.

  • It is found that isomers have nearly the same critical volume, and that equal differences in molecular content occasion equal differences in critical volume.

  • We may therefore conclude that the molecular volume depends more upon the internal structure of the molecule than its empirical content.

  • The following table gives a comparative view of the specific heats and the ratio for molecules of variable atomic content.

  • Then the fishery was neglected by the natives, who were content to use the "sixerns," or six-oared fishing boats, till the last quarter of the 19th century, when boats of modern type were introduced.

  • Even the emperor had to be content to be treated by the sultan as an inferior and tributary prince; while France had to suffer, with no more than an idle protest, the insult of the conversion of Catholic churches at Constantinople into mosques.

  • He was the principal author of the law of separation, but, not content with preparing it, he wished to apply it as well, especially as the existing Rouvier ministry allowed disturbances to occur during the taking of inventories of church property, a clause of the law for which Briand was not responsible.

  • The pope, no longer possessing any more power than other bishops (though Marsilius recognizes that the supremacy of the Church of Rome goes back to the earliest times of Christianity), is to content himself with a pre-eminence mainly of an honorary kind, without claiming to interpret the Holy Scriptures, define dogmas or distribute benefices; moreover, he is to be elected by the Christian people, or by the delegates of the people, i.e.

  • paas, black), substances which differ very considerably in composition, the sulphur and iron content being by no means constant; they do not give the reactions of albumins.

  • The officers of the Church during the first few centuries of its existence were content to officiate in the dress of civil life, though their garments were expected to be scrupulously clean and of decent quality.

  • Formally to legalize the minimum enjoined by the rubrics of 1549 would, on the other hand, offend the "Protestant" section of the Church, without reconciling those who would be content with nothing short of the Catholic maximum.

  • This character is the base of the plan of adding glucose to wine and beer wort before fermenting, the alcohol content of the liquid after fermentation being increased.

  • at once sued for peace; and, yielding to the persuasions of the English and French ministers, Charles finally agreed to be content with mutilating instead of annihilating the Danish monarchy (treaties of Taastrup, February 18th, and of Roskilde, February 26th, 1658).

  • They added "that the public at large have only to know that their rights are imaginary to induce them also to be content with the extant system under which permission is very freely granted by owners of fisheries to the public for angling on the more frequented parts of the Thames."

  • In skimming the crust from the surface of the lead some unalloyed lead is also drawn off, and has to be separated by an additional operation (liquation), as, running lower in silver than the crust, it would otherwise reduce its silver content and increase the amount of lead to be cupelled.

  • We must be content to point out that it seems that the spiders, the pedipalps, and erit Pdv' stir' After Beck, Trans.

  • As the carbon content of the molecule increases, they become less soluble in water, and their smell becomes less marked with the increase in boiling point, the highest members of the series being odourless solids, which can only be distilled without decomposition invacuo.

  • The Anglican Church is content with the threefold ministry of bishops, priests and deacons, but in recent times the bishops have appointed lay-readers, licensed to read prayers and preach in buildings which are not consecrated.

  • Nevertheless Hugo, by the composition of his Summa sententiarum, endeavoured to give a methodical or rational presentation of the content of faith, and was thus the first of the so-called Summists.

  • Geza, in short, regarded the whole matter from a statesman's point of view, and was content to leave the solution to time and his successor.

  • He had to be content with armistices, reconciliations and matrimonial contracts, because the great dignitaries of the state, men like the palatine Laszlo Garai, Count Ulrich of Cilli, and the voivode of Transylvania, Mihaly Ujlaky, thwarted in every way the novas homo whom they hated and envied.

  • His astounding energy and resource curbed all his enemies during his lifetime, but they were content to wait patiently for his death, well aware that the collapse of his empire would immediately follow.

  • Unfortunately the court of Vienna was not content with winning back the Magyars to the Church.

  • What is not quite so generally known is the fact that Leopold slackened at once and would have been quite content with the results of these earlier victories had not the pope stiffened his resistance by forming a Holy League between the Emperor, Poland, Venice, Muscovy and the papacy, with the avowed object of dealing the Turk the coup de grace (March 5, 1684).

  • like Conde was content to draw aside the curtains for him to pass, and to sue for the hand of Richelieu's niece for his son, the "Great Conde."

  • Any obscurity that may hang over Huygens's principle is due mainly to the indefiniteness of thought and expression which we must be content to put up with if we wish to avoid pledging ourselves as to the character of the vibrations.

  • The conspiracy, however, was put down and Bestia had to content himself with delivering a violent attack upon the consul on the expiration of his office.

  • How far Nansen was content with the result of the Revolution - absolute monarchy - it is impossible to say.

  • Generally speaking, the lower the nitrogen content of a guncotton, as found by the nitrometer, the higher the percentage of matters soluble in a mixture of ether-alcohol.

  • Now differences in the amount of crystalloids cause alteration in osmotic pressure while the proteid content affects it but little; and of the crystalloids the chlorides appear to be those most liable to variation.

  • - a sensualist but no fool - received the maladroit and almost insolent inquiry Trojan est-il content?

  • The Thames formed the natural barrier on the south, but the Romans do not appear to have been content with this protection, for they built a wall here in addition, which remained for several centuries.

  • 31 attain more dexterity and perfection the better to content her Majesty " (Analytical Index to the Remembrancia).

  • In 1376 an ordinance was made by the mayor and aldermen, with the assent of the whole commons, to the effect that the companies should select men with whom they were content, and none other should come to the elections of mayors and sheriffs; that the greater companies should not elect more than six, the lesser four and the least two.

  • The Ottoman higher command was well content that the troops under its charge should maintain an attitude of passive defence; they were keeping Allied divisions in idleness which, were they to be transferred to some other one of the theatres of war, might prove invaluable assets to the cause of the Entente.

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  • No treaty was obtained or insisted upon, - the British government being content with the tacit acquiescence of the king of Burma without such documents; but its resolution was declared, that any active demonstration of hostility by him would be followed by retribution.

  • The balance of opinion was in favour of those of the first group of writers, who avoided emendations of the figures and were content to follow the Kings' List and to ignore its apparent discrepancies with other chronological data; but it is now admitted that the general principle underlying the third group of theories was actually nearer the truth.

  • Since this book is discussed separately we shall content ourselves here with indicating a few of the conclusions now generally accepted.

  • The sorghum is hardier than the sugar-cane; it comes to maturity in a season; and it retains its maximum sugar content a considerable time, giving opportunity for leisurely harvesting.

  • In the best days of the so-called Jamaica Trains in Demerara, three-quarters of a ton of coal in addition to the megass was burned per ton of sugar made, and with this for many years planters were content, because they pointed to the fact that in the central factories, then working in Martinique and Guadeloupe, with charcoal filters and triple-effect evaporation, 750 kilos of coal in addition to the megass were consumed to make woo kilos of sugar.

  • Soil whose temperature remains low, whether from its northerly aspect or from its high water content or other cause, is unsatisfactory, because the germination of seeds and the general life processes of plants cannot go on satisfactorily except at certain temperatures well above freezing-point.

  • No laboratories were accessible to ordinary students, who had to content themselves with what the universities could give in the lectureroom and the library, and though both at Bonn and Erlangen Liebig endeavoured to make up for the deficiencies of the official instruction by founding a students' physical and chemical society for the discussion of new discoveries and speculations, he felt that he could never become a chemist in his own country.

  • It is curious that the Sabaean inscriptions contain no mention of the Minaeans, though this may be due to the fact that very few of the inscriptions are historical in content.

  • The next higher members of the series are liquids of low boiling point also readily soluble in water, the solubility and volatility, however, decreasing with the increasing carbon content of the molecule, until the highest members of the series are odourless solids of high boiling point and are insoluble in water.

  • But his content speedily changed to horror.

  • Not content with agreeing to all the latter's demands, he further promised large sums of money and the surrender of the strongholds of Pisa and Leghorn.

  • In the Theological and Metaphysical state men seek a cause or an essence; in the Positive they are content with a law.

  • Otto soon showed his intention of breaking with the policy of his father, who had been content with a nominal superiority over the duchies; in 937 he punished Eberhard, duke of Franconia, for an alleged infringement of the royal authority; and in 938 deposed Eberhard, who had recently become duke of Bavaria.

  • - Amid these circumstances there has emerged capacity to make a little go a long way and to be content with the most meagre fare.

  • and their Japanese followers could be admirably and minutely accurate when they pleased; but too many of the latter were content to construct their pictures out of fragmentary reminiscences of ancient Chinese masterpieces, not presuming to see a rock, a tree, an ox, or a human figure, except through Chinese spectacles.

  • Formerly the embroiderer was content to produce a pattern with his needle, now he paints a picture.

  • But at Owari the experts were content with an inferior color, and their blue-and-white porcelains never enjoyed a distinguished reputation, though occasionally we find a specimen of great merit.

  • A majority of the artists are content to copy old pictures of Buddhas sixteen disciples, the seven gods of happiness, and other similar assemblages of mythical or historical personages, not only because such work offers large opportunity for the use of striking colors and the production of meretricious effects, dear to the eye of the average Western householder and tourist, but also because a complicated design, as compared with a simple one, has the advantage of hiding the technical imperfections of the ware.

  • Regarding heresy as a crime, the church was not content with inflicting its spiritual penalties.

  • By his practical experiments and by his writings he gained a considerable reputation as an economist; but his ambition was not content with this, and he sought to extend his influence by joining first the Freemasons and afterwards (1779) the Rosicrucians.

  • The king, so long as Wollner was content to condone his immorality (which Bischoffswerder, to do him justice, condemned), was eager to help the orthodox crusade.

  • It was thus his business to revitalize the old forms with a new and more vigorous content.

  • Some persons do not even find a clear deep necessary, and are content to gaze at the palm of the hand, for example, when hallucinatory pictures, as they declare, emerge.

  • yd., are removed monthly, their gold content being from 0.5 to 1 0%, and after folding are melted in reverberatory furnaces to ingots containing 2 to 4% of gold.

  • Notwithstanding the allurements of the subject, such conservative historians as Grote were disposed to regard the problems of early Grecian history as inscrutable, and to content themselves with the recital of traditions without attempting to establish their relationship with actual facts.

  • The individuality of great authors is thus dissipated except when it has been preserved by an occasional sacrifice of the arrangement - and this defect, if it is to be esteemed a defect, is increased by the very sparing references to personal history and character with which Hallam was obliged to content himself.

  • But after a brief stay in the island he returned to Piedmont and left his new possessions to a viceroy, which caused much discontent among the Sicilians; and when the Quadruple Alliance decreed in 1718 that Sicily should be restored to Spain, Victor was unable to offer any opposition, and had to content himself with receiving Sardinia in exchange.

  • The Dutch were content with the injury they had done at Chatham, and dropped down the river.

  • The French king, who knew that his fleet was not as yet capable of meeting the Dutch single-handed, was content to withdraw his ships from the North Sea and the ocean.

  • If, however, the insect were content with this method of reproduction the disease could be isolated by surrounding the infected patches with a deep ditch full of some such substance as coal-tar, which would prevent the insects spreading on to the roots of healthy vines.

  • Practically the difficulty of making these diaphragms for the different powers of the exact required equality is insuperable; but, if the observer is content to lose a certain amount of light, we see no reason why they may not readily be made slightly less.

  • Indirectly, indeed, Kant had indicated a very definite opinion on theology: from the Critique of Pure Reason it was clear that for him speculative theology must be purely negative, while the Critique of Practical Reason as clearly indicated the view that the moral law is the absolute content or substance of any religion.

  • The most remarkable of the works from this period are - (I) the Bestimmung des Menschen (Vocation of Man, 1800), a book which, for beauty of style, richness of content, and elevation of thought, may be ranked with the Meditations of Descartes; (2) Der geschlossene Handelsstaat, 1800 (The Exclusive or Isolated Commercial State), a very remarkable treatise, intensely socialist in tone, and inculcating organized protection; (3) Sonnenklarer Bericht an das grossere Publicum iiber die neueste Philosophie, 1801.

  • It traces the necessary acts by which the cognitive consciousness comes to be what it is, both in form and in content.

  • For a time at least " the drama's patrons " were content with the higher entertainment furnished them; in the end Garrick had to " please " them, like most other managers, by gratifying their love of show.

  • In coming, as at a certain point in its development it does, to the consciousness of an object, the mind does not find itself in the presence of an opponent, or of anything essentially alien to itself but of that which gives content and stability to its own existence.

  • Similarly from the side of logic. It is not the teaching of idealism alone but of the facts which logical analysis has brought home to us that all difference in the last resort finds its ground in the quality or content of the things differentiated, and that this difference of content shows in turn a double strand, the strand of sameness and the strand of otherness - that in which and that by which they differ from one another.

  • In isolation from its object the will is as much an abstraction as though apart from the world of precepts, memories and associations which give it content and stability.

  • It agrees with older forms of libertarianism in taking its stand on the fact of spontaneity as primary and self-evidencing, but it is not content to assert its existence side by side with rigidly determined sequence.

  • As regards Spanish America, England was content to profit by theAsiento treaty, which gave her the monopoly of slavehunting for the Spanish colonies and an opening for contraband trade.

  • Thucydides is content with a single introductory book, forming little more than one-eighth of his work; Herodotus has six such books, forming two-thirds of the entire composition.

  • Perceiving the difficulty of the Socratic dictum he endeavoured to give to the word "knowledge" a definite content by divorcing it absolutely from the sphere of sense and experience, and confining it to a sort of transcendental dialectic or logic. The Eleatic unity is Goodness, and is beyond the sphere of sensible apprehension.

  • Angus Smith determined London air to vary in oxygen content from 20.857 to 20.95, the air in parks and open spaces showing the higher percentage; Glasgow air showed similar results, varying from 20.887 in the streets to 20 92 9 in open spaces.

  • Towards the end of September he fell a victim to the plague which was ravaging the land, and his illness sobered his spirit and brought into his message a deeper note than that merely moral and common-sense one with which, as a polite humanist, he had hitherto been content.

  • Luther was content with changes in one or two fundamental doctrines; Zwingli aimed at a reformation of government and discipline as well as of theology.

  • The rectangle, for instance, has so far been regarded as a plane figure bounded by one pair of parallel straight lines and another pair at right angles to them, so that the conception of " rectangularity " has had reference to boundary rather than to content; analytically, the rectangle must be regarded as the figure generated by an ordinate of constant length moving parallel to itself with one extremity on a straight line perpendicular to it.

  • It was founded under the tolerant Archbishop George Abbot (1562-1633), and would have been content with toleration such as the French and Dutch churches in England enjoyed.

  • His successors, Sir George Bowen, Sir James Ferguson, the marquess of Normanby and Sir Hercules Robinson, were content to be constitutional governors and to respect strictly the behests of the colonial office.

  • And of this elemental mode of apprehension and root-truth, the Johannine Gospel is the greatest literary document and incentive extant: its ultimate aim and deepest content retain all their potency.

  • Zarubayev, who had used only about half his forces in the battle, nevertheless S' retired in the night, fearing to be cut off by a descent of the approaching 4th Army on Haicheng, and well content to have broken the spell of defeat.

  • But we will content ourselves with noticing signs that the reminiscences of some eyewitness are recorded.

  • Since the Poles were at first unyielding, Ruthenian demonstrations and strikes of students arose, and the Ruthenians were no longer content with the reversion of a few separate professorial chairs, and with parallel courses of lectures.

  • Botanists were for a long time content to know that the scattering of the pollen from the anther, and its application to the stigma, were necessary for the production of perfect seed, but the stages of the process of fertilization remained unexplored.

  • 4.6 every one thought that Czartoryski, who more than any other man had prepared the way for it, would be its first governorgeneral, but he was content with the title of senator-palatine and a share in the administration.

  • There he found little religion and less refinement; but no serious difficulty seems to have been made about his reading the classics and the Fathers with his friends to his heart's content.

  • But his ardent spirit could not long be content with monastic life.

  • But Erasmus could not be content with the Bible in Latin.

  • We must be content to treat the aether as a plenum, which places it in a class by itself; and we can thus recognize that it may behave very differently from matter, though in some manner consistent with itself - a remark which is fundamental in the modern theory.

  • They were content with a knowledge of the truth of the principle of gravitation; instead of essaying to explain it further by the properties of a transmitting medium, they in fact modelled the whole of their natural philosophy on that principle, and tried to express all kinds of material interaction in terms of laws of direct mechanical attraction across space.

  • Muller, p. 239) that pilae and effigies viriles et muliebres made of wool were hung at the crossroads to the Lares, the number of pilae equalling that of the slaves of the family, the effigies that of the children; the purpose being to induce the Lares to spare the living, and to be content with the pilae and images.

  • Christianity was essentially a proselytizing religion, not content to appeal simply to one class or race of people, and to be one among many faiths, but believing in the falsity or insufficiency of all others and eager to convert the whole world.

  • The existence of monasticism made it possible at once to hold up a high moral standard before the world and to permit the ordinary Christian to be content with something lower.

  • It was as little original as that of Bede; for on the continent, too, scholars were content to think what those of old had thought before them.

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