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contact

contact

contact Sentence Examples

  • Her step was too long, making contact with his foot.

  • She opened the door and slid her legs out one by one, trying to avoid contact with the car.

  • It would be best to contact Connie tomorrow and tell her not to send mail.

  • He picked at his food, and avoided eye contact with Adrienne.

  • While my relationship with Martha LeBlanc, nee Rossi, dated back to our play pen years and kindergarten days, lately we've hiked different paths, reducing our contact to Christmas cards and once a month phone calls.

  • You've been in contact with him?

  • Somehow, between her and Martha, Quinn and Howie agreed to run a trip back while we remained in New York in phone contact.

  • Arguments concerning contact with tip lines became heated as well.

  • Better that we have some contact and hopefully quell any investigation.

  • I suggest you have no contact with the organization what-so-ever.

  • I performed all the infrequent and minimal tasks of Econ Scrutiny and handled any direct contact with Daniel Brennan.

  • When we first accepted Mr. Cooms' generous funding, we established this secure connection in case he ever had a need to contact us.

  • He kept trying, and we learned later, he maintained contact for nearly a mile.

  • Does that put us out of contact?

  • Should I inform Merrill Cooms I'd been in contact with After, the investigative baby he himself had started?

  • I won't contact you directly.

  • He asked for a contact phone number and gave me an emergency number to call.

  • Now I was the one to anxiously await contact.

  • I've got a contact for you but protect this like your girlfriend at a drunken frat party.

  • Knowing the local police included Detective Jackson, I suggested he contact the Simi Valley attorney first to find out if the vehicle I saw was in fact his.

  • I'll give the man credit for direct eye contact as he answered.

  • I assure you, I have managed to contact all but three and if I located them I would get down on my knees before them and beg forgiveness, just like I've done with the others .

  • Any chance you have a contact number?

  • My wife and I had promised each other to remain constantly in phone contact after the close calls in New Hampshire.

  • I just hoped and prayed somehow his contact of Ben or Howie could be used to locate us.

  • I check the web site of After occasionally but have refrained from direct contact.

  • All of them wore eerie red contact lenses.

  • Her words fueled the sense of dread he'd felt the past two weeks, since he'd lost contact with his closest friends.

  • Why can't I contact Damian or Jule?

  • We seem to be the emergency points of contact for anything that goes wrong anywhere in the western hemisphere.

  • "I'll contact his station chief," Dusty said, pulling out his phone.

  • Linda is putting me in contact with the support group she belongs to.

  • His memories flashed as they made contact.

  • She shuddered at the contact.

  • They were spinning out of control, fed by the direct contact with him and the elusive scent that was making her mouth water.

  • As if sensing she'd noticed, he straightened and moved away, breaking contact to stand a few feet away.

  • They had given Martha a telephone card and asked she contact them as soon and as often as she could.

  • There had been no mention of the lack of contact from the girl, but all three were disappointed no call had been received.

  • He hummed, a feeling of mild accomplishment sandwiched between the failure to contact Martha and the trepidation of potentially being made a fool by Seymour "Fitz" Fitzgerald, sheriff candidate.

  • Cynthia Dean, in hoping for further confirmation that the bones had been switched, tried to contact the parents of Caleb Jones, Martha's friend who was with her in the mine.

  • If anyone knows the whereabouts of Josh, last name unknown, contact Miss Edith Plotke on 6th Street.

  • He knows radio contact should have been made when Billy died.

  • Paul was aware of who we were but had no contact over the years—he had no reason to.

  • Grandfather Ed was the one who made contact with Paul.

  • When you're sheriff you can contact all the West coast authorities and try and convince them to chase your bones.

  • "I'll be in contact," was all the message said.

  • Before Dean could contact Lydia to offer his congratulations, she visited Bird Song the day after Cynthia returned.

  • The egg fell, and she gasped as it exploded on contact with the floor.

  • She pushed her shirt down and moved away to break contact, facing him again when half the bed was between them.

  • His thick body was at her back, and he shifted close enough to remain in contact while his large hands settled on her arms.

  • I'll contact a lawyer tomorrow.

  • You finally got in contact with the owner?

  • They stayed in remote contact with someone while they worked, attaching an IV and doing something with the knife wound.

  • But she had left no contact – no trail.

  • His hand slipped under hers, his palm making warm contact with hers, and then his fingers found their way to lace with hers.

  • No telling how long he had been in contact with Alex – maybe ever since he moved to Arkansas.

  • Her sense of self-consciousness grew as the physical contact made her appreciative of the size and heat of his body.

  • She moved to face him, distracted by the fact he shifted his body to keep from breaking their physical contact.

  • She broke the contact.

  • She passed through the throng without making eye contact for fear of leers or judging looks and reached the entrance foyer.

  • He'd contact Jetr when they were clear of Qatwal to let him know everything had gone as he predicted.

  • Only when she turned did she break eye contact, but she felt him watch her.

  • She took a few steps back and flinched at the first silent contact of his sword with another's.

  • Contact me when you're safe, Jetr said.

  • Maybe some spirit is trying to contact us to set things straight.

  • But perhaps you should contact an attorney.

  • You should consider taking steps to assure your husband understands that you've left him for good and want no further contact with him.

  • Shipton would kill her if he knew I had any contact.

  • You don't suppose Annie is trying to contact us, do you?

  • He didn't have any significant contact with them that I could see.

  • No. But when they can't contact you by phone, they'll come back to me.

  • Instead, he returned to Bird Song to once more try to contact his wife.

  • Dean asked Weller to contact Shipton concerning disposition.

  • Jackson managed to stand tall and keep eye contact, although, he was a breath away from begging for their lives.

  • His voice, in a word, sounded 'haughty'. Connor finally made eye contact, and in a thin whisper said, "I'm really scared."

  • I would make eye contact with you, and then influence you to do what I want.

  • Most of Sarah's boyfriends gave him a wide berth and avoided contact at all cost.

  • Jackson needed to make eye contact.

  • She headed straight for him, so he assumed Sarah hadn't made contact or was unable to influence her.

  • Jackson could not bring himself to make eye contact, being certain he would lose it if he did.

  • Jackson stared at Elisabeth, who still avoided eye contact.

  • He avoided eye contact with everyone.

  • When she returned with the drinks, Jackson made eye contact.

  • "Who do you need to contact?" she asked.

  • You need me to contact any of your companions or anyone else from the office?

  • Don't contact anyone once we're done talking.

  • He hadn't issued an emergency order over the nets of those who worked for him, and he'd asked someone in the regular military to contact her rather than calling out his special security forces.

  • I've asked the Guardian to remain in contact with you.

  • Tim, his government contact and the highest-ranking individual in the PMF, was already on screen when Brady entered the comms center.

  • Just contact me when you need me.

  • "I'll contact the helo," Dan said with a wink and left.

  • I'll contact you later.

  • She'd tried to contact Mrs. Watson several times the first week at the Peak before giving up.

  • He tapped his personal net implant and murmured "Angel" to direct the implant in his brain to contact her.

  • He replaced his weapons and pulled on new boots, pausing when the net beeped, indicating someone was trying to contact him.

  • I'll check their location and contact you.

  • "I'll contact you when she wakes," the doctor replied, unfazed.

  • Lana, contact the central and western centers.

  • When he broke contact, Lana pulled his head back to hers, her hands skimming over his shoulders before she undid the top two buttons on his uniform.

  • Lana eased back without breaking contact.

  • His personal net vibrated, indicating someone was trying to contact him.

  • Greene was in contact with different people in the West Coast Center.

  • Can you contact us if you find anything else?

  • No contact, unless there's an emergency.

  • She could move between worlds as he could, and he'd no longer be at risk of destroying everything he came into contact with.

  • Dean had already over­stayed his visit, so with promises to return if he had any more questions and to keep in telephone contact, he took his leave, shaking Cynthia Byrne's hand and waving to Janice Riley, who was again on the phone.

  • Because of his 10:00 court date, he asked Harrigan to contact Byrne's doctor and try to run down any additional life insurance the missing man might have purchased.

  • He was a loner and no one could recall him having contact with anyone else during his short stay.

  • These guys aren't subtle and you were the only contact to Vinnie they knew about.

  • Arthur recognized Dean but avoided eye contact until Dean stared him down and forced a glum nod.

  • Fred wasn't able to contact the seller.

  • While Dean was out of contact with Cynthia Byrne during the first two weeks of June, it didn't mean she was out of his thoughts.

  • He asked a few questions to make sure she would be able to contact him when she was ready to leave and then stood.

  • Retaining eye contact, she challenged him.

  • The brief visual contact was like a caress, warming her cheeks and heart.

  • Yes, I have a contact in Texas.

  • If you ever want to know anything – or, if something should happen to me, just contact her.

  • Retaining eye contact, she walked over to him and put a hand on his leg, gazing up at his somber features.

  • Do you have relatives I could contact for you?

  • Probably so, but you need to contact your doctor and let him know about this.

  • If something happens, I'll contact you, he said and handed her his phone.

  • His magic warmed her from the inside out, the gentle current spreading through her body the longer they remained in contact.

  • If Damian needed something, he'd contact him.

  • The contact of their skin was causing a raging fire within him.

  • She'd lost contact with her mate before being taken to the immortal world.

  • "If anything happens, contact me," Darian ordered.

  • Maybe it was the continued contact with Alfonso.

  • She lifted the phone and searched the contact list, pausing on Alex's name.

  • They would know where to contact him.

  • Of course, they wouldn't be that far apart, and Dad would know how to contact him.

  • When I couldn't contact you by calling the number you gave him, he suggested I come out and check on you.

  • Her breath caught at the direct contact of their bodies and the effect it had on hers.

  • She'd responded to him when his fangs were in her neck, and his power was in direct contact with her, but she still hadn't broken down into a mewling mess like every other woman did when first he touched them.

  • Jessi texted Ashley and Brandon to contact her right away then retreated into the apartment and paced.

  • If you need anything, you know how to contact me.

  • Jessi watched her program a new contact into it.

  • I can assume you'll do what you need to and contact me if needed, or I can interfere now and take something I'm not sure I should.

  • There was no way out and no way to contact anyone.

  • Of course, she no longer had anyone to contact, now that Xander was out to make her number seven.

  • Storing an email address enables people to contact you through the website without you having to reveal your email address to them, and it can be used to send you a new password if you forget it.Your real name, if you choose to provide it, will be used for giving you attribution for your work.

  • Those cells are accurately marked, the position of which is such that the colonies, to which they give rise, can grow to their full size without coming into contact with other colonies.

  • of Macedon, occurred sporadically even before Alexander's conquests brought Greek life into contact with oriental traditions.

  • Each movable web must pass the other without coming in contact with it or the fixed wire, and without rubbing on any part of the brasswork.

  • It is practically impossible to work with the sensitive film in contact with the reseau-film, not only because dust particles and contact would injure the silver film, but also because the plate-glass used for the photographic plates is seldom a perfect plane.

  • 620) he came in contact with Pulakesin II., the greatest of the Chalukya dynasty, who made himself lord of the south, as Harsha was lord of the north.

  • It was chiefly in the way of matrimonial alliances that it was brought into contact with other states.

  • After crossing the Hydra - 6 tes (Ravi) he once more came into contact with hostile tribes, and the work of storming petty towns began again.

  • The jobars superintend the execution of the laws, collect fines and administer capital punishment; they are in contact with the buluk-bashi, or resident representative of the tribe at Scutari, who forms the only link between the mountaineers and the Turkish government.

  • The properties of podophyllin resin vary with the reaction of the tissue with which it is in contact; where this is acid the drug is inert, the picro-podophyllin being precipitated.

  • i shows the slips corresponding to the numbers 2, o, 8, 5 placed side by side in contact with one another, and next to them is placed another slip containing, in squares without diagonals, the first nine digits.

  • The low stage of culture of the Australians when they reached their new home is thus accounted for, but their stagnation is remarkable, because they must have been frequently in contact with more civilized peoples.

  • During the three years he held this position he carried out researches on the contact of elastic solids, hardness, evaporation and the electric discharge in gases, the last earning him the special commendation of Helmholtz.

  • It is essential that the paper covering be loose, so as to ensure that each wire is enclosed in a coating not of paper only, but also of air; the wires in fact are really insulated from each other by the dry air, the loose paper acting merely as a separator to prevent them from coming into contact.

  • It is important to observe that the risk is in no way obviated by the increasing slack paid out, except in so far as the amount of sliding which the strength of the cable is able to produce at the points of contact with the ground may be thereby increased.

  • When signals are to be sent from either station the operator turns the switch c out of contact with the stop b, and then operates precisely as in open circuit send '" i ing.

  • Suppose the arm c of the switch S to be in contact with 2; thin when the key is manipulated it sends alternately positive and negative currents into the line.

  • cut off, sets up an induced current of high tension, which causes a spark to jump across the contact points of the relay, and by oxidizing them makes it necessary for them to be frequently cleaned.

  • Suppose, for instance, the paper ribbon to be soaked in a solution of iodide of potassium and a light contact spring made to press continuously on its surface as it is pulled forward by the mechanism.

  • For the dot the armature is deflected by the first current, the ink-wheel being brought into contact with the paper and after a short interval pulled back by the reverse current.

  • In the case of the dash the ink-wheel is brought into contact with the paper by the first current as before and is pulled back by the reverse current after three times the interval.

  • The armature acts on an inking disk on the principle described above, save only that the disk is supplied with ink from a groove in a second wheel, on which it rolls: the grooved wheel is kept turning with one edge in contact with ink in an ink-well.

  • The difficulty experienced is that of securing a good electrical contact under the very slight pressure obtainable from an instrument excited by attenuated arrival-currents.

  • The instrument consists of two cams, the form of which regulates the components of the curbed signal, one cam being for the dot element and the other for the dash element, which by their sequence give the letter signals; these cams, by means of clutches controlled by the relay, are mechanically rotated by clockwork, the speed of rotation being approximately adjusted to the rate of transmission of a single element, so that the requisite number of consecutive elements is transmitted corresponding to the duration of contact of the relay arm with the side controlling that particular element.

  • Lodge particularly studied the action of electric waves in reducing the resistance of the contact between two metallic surfaces such as a plate and a point, or two balls, and named the device a coherer."

  • He constructed one form of his coherer of a glass tube a few inches long filled with iron borings or brass filings, having contact plates or pins at the end.

  • perfect electrical contact between the steel and mercury for low voltage currents, but when electric oscillations were passed through the junction it was pierced and good electrical contact established as long as the oscillations continued.

  • An innumerable number of forms of coherer or wave detector depending upon the change in resistance produced at a loose or imperfect contact have been devised.

  • Fleming 5 invented special forms of the metallic contact or metallic filings sensitive tube.

  • The other pair of platinum wires are connected by a tellurium-bismuth thermo-couple, the junction of which just makes contact with the centre of the fine wire.

  • At the receiving station the differences in these systems depend chiefly upon variations in the actual form of the oscillation detector used, whether it be a loose contact or a thermal, electrolytic or magnetic detector.

  • Neither of them seemed to recognize anything as important except pitch and amplitude, and Reis thought the amplitude was to some extent obtained by the varying length of contact in the transmitting instrument.

  • This might possibly be true to a small extent; but, considering the small capacity of the circuits he used and the nature of his receiving instrument, it is hardly probable that duration of contact sensibly influenced the result.

  • The quality of the sounds was to some extent also reproduced; but, judging from the results of later telephone investigation, it is highly probable that this was due, not to the varying duration, but to the varying firmness of the contact.

  • The receiver was based on the change of friction produced by the passage of an electric current through the point of contact of certain substances in relative motion.

  • This seems to have been the first transmitter in which it was proposed to use the resistance at the contact of two conductors.

  • Acting upon this discovery, he constructed an instrument which he called a " microphone," 6 and which consisted essentially of two hard carbon electrodes placed in contact, with a current passing through the point of contact and a telephone included in the same circuit.

  • One of the electrodes was attached to a sounding board capable of being vibrated by sound-waves and the other was held either by springs or weights in delicate contact with it.

  • When the sounding board was spoken to or subjected to sound-waves, the mechanical resistance of the loose electrode, due to its weight, or the spring, or both, served to vary the pressure at the contact, and this gave to the current a form corresponding to the sound-waves, and it was therefore capable of being used as a speaking-telephone transmitter.'

  • The space enclosed between the front and rear faces of the box is filled about three-quarters full of finely granulated hard carbon, which therefore lies in contact with the front and rear carbon disks of the apparatus, and also fills up the space lying between the lower edge of these disks and the curved surface of the case.

  • The spring-jack used was a form of switch with two contact springs which pressed against each other, one being connected to the subscriber's line wire and the other to the annunciator, which was also earthed.

  • This shaft, which carries a set of " wipers " connected to the incoming circuit, is susceptible of a vertical and a rotational movement, so that the wipers may be brought, first opposite any particular horizontal series of contacts, and then into actual contact with any particular set in the series.

  • Such rigidity of principle need not be extended to the affairs of everyday contact between the Vatican and the Italian authorities, with regard to which, indeed, a tacit modus vivendi was easily attainable.

  • Here he came into contact with the Magyar refugees, who had great hopes of the high-born, high-gifted youth who was also a fellow sufferer, a large portion of his immense estates having been confiscated by the emperor.

  • He believes that the capsule contains a substance which swells very rapidly when brought into contact with water, and that in the undischarged condition the capsule has its.

  • The next step is the gradual obliteration of the sub-umbral cavity by disappearance of which the sub-umbral ectoderm comes into contact with the ectoderm of the manubrium.

  • In some hydroids the founder-polyp, developed from a planula after fixation, throws out numerous outgrowths from the base to form the hydrorhiza; these outgrowths may be radially arranged so as to form by contact or coalescence a flat plate.

  • 4 While 2 Both Lewes and du Bois Reymond have brought out the points of contact between Leibnitz's theory of monads and modern biological speculations (Hist.

  • In the quiet of a country town, far removed from actual contact with painful scenes, but on the edge of the whirlwind raised by the Fugitive Slave Bill, memory and imagination had full scope, and she wrote for serial publication in The National Era, an anti-slavery paper of Washington, D.C., the story of "Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life among the Lowly."

  • In the monastic period pharmacy was to a great extent under the control of the religious orders, particularly the Benedictines, who, from coming into contact with the Arabian physicians, devoted themselves to pharmacy, pharmacology and therapeutics; but, as monks were forbidden to shed blood, surgery fell largely into the hands of barbers, so that the class of barber-surgeons came into existence, and the sign of their skill in blood-letting still appears in provincial districts in England in the form of the barber's pole, representing the application of bandages.

  • 2, A), which has distinct upper and lower faces, are placed mainly or exclusively on the lower side of the leaf, where the water vapour that escapes from them, being lighter than air, cannot pass away from the surface 01 the leaf, but remains in contact with it and thus tends to check further transpiration.

  • As a secondary function we may recognize, in certain cases, the power of closing wounds, which results from the rapid coagulation of exuded latex in contact with the air.

  • The cambium in the root, which is found generally in those plants which possess a cambium in the stem, always begins in the conjunctive tissue internal to the primary phloems, and Camblum forms new (secondary) phloem in contact with the In Roots primary, and secondary xylem internally.

  • The naked cells which have been alluded to live in water, and call therefore for no differentiation in connection with this necessity; but those which are surrounded by a cell-wall always develop within themselves a vacuole or cavity which occupies the greater part of their interior, and the hydrostatic pressure of whose contents keeps tha protoplasm in contact with the membrane, setting up a condition of turgidity.

  • The most constantly occurring changes that beset a plant are connected with illumination, temperature, moisture, and contact with foreign bodies.

  • The root is made to press its way into the darker cracks and crannies of the soil, so bringing its root-hairs into better contact with the particles round which the hygroscopic water hangs.

  • When a root comes in contact at its tip with scme hard body, such as might impede its progress, a curvature of the growing part is set up, which takes the young tip away from the stone, or what-not, with which it is in contact.

  • When a sensitive tendril comes into contact with a foreign body, its growth becomes so modified that it twines round it.

  • When the pinnate leaf of a Mimosa pudica, the so-called sensitive plant, is pinched or struck, the leaf droops rapidly and the leaflets become approximated together, so that their upper surfaces are in contact.

  • Six sensitive hairs spring from the upper surface of the lobes, three from each; when one of these is touched the two lobes rapidly close, bringing their upper surfaces into contact and imprisoning anything which for the moment is between them.

  • The protoplasm is sensitive to particular influences, perhaps of vibraticn, or of contact or of chemical action.

  • It has been shown that if the organ containing them is shaken for some time, so that the contact between them and the protoplasm of the cells is emphasized, the stimulus becomes more efficient in producing movement.

  • In some cases both the nucleus and the chromatophores may be carried along in the rotating stream, but in others, such as T.Titeila, the chloroplasts may remain motionless iii a non-motile layer of the cytoplasm in direct contact with the cell wall.i Desmids, Diatoms and Oscillaria show creeping movements probably due to the secretion of slime by the cells; the swarmspores and plasmodium of the Myxomycetes exhibit amoehoid movements; and the motile spores of Fungi and Algae, the spermatozoids of mosses, ferns, &c., move by means of delicate prolongations, cilia or flagella cf the protoplast.

  • Starch grains may often be seen in contact with the pigment crystals.

  • Organs which respond to the mechanical stimulus of contact are found to possess special contrivances in certain of their cells(I) sensitive spots, consisting of places here and there on the epidermal cells where the wall is thin and in close contact with protoplasmic projections.

  • Instead of large continuous areas, in which local characteristics sometimes blend, it occupies widely dissevered territories in which specialization, intensified by long se1/2aration, hai mostly effaced the possibility of comparing species hnd even genera and compels us to seek for points of contact in groups of a higher order.

  • The black type is found only in tropical or sub-tropical countries, and is usually in a primitive condition of culture, unless educated by contact with people of the white type.

  • Hyposulphurous acid, H 2 S 2 0 4, was first really obtained by Berthollet in 1789 when he showed that iron left in contact with an aqueous solution of sulphur dioxide dissolved without any evolution of gas, whilst C. F.

  • There is some evidence that the "tradition of the six canoes" does not represent the first contact of the Polynesian race with New Zealand.

  • The system established by the law of 1864 is remarkable in that it set up two wholly separate orders of tribunals, each having their own courts of appeal and coming in contact only in the senate, as the supreme court of cassation.

  • Russian type has thus been maintained from Novgorod to the Pacific, with but minor differentiations on the outskirts - and this notwithstanding the great variety of races with which the Russians have come into contact.

  • The primary distinctions between these branches have been increased during the last nine centuries by their contact with different nationalities - the Great Russians absorbing Finnish elements, the Little Russians undergoing an admixture of Turkish blood, and the White Russians submitting to Lithuanian influence.

  • By coming in contact, while riding on i.

  • By coming in contact with over-bridges or erections on the sides of the line 12.

  • Trains coming in contact with projections from other trains or vehicles on parallel lines 7.

  • Subsequent improvements on the Sessions patent have resulted in a modified form of vestibule in which the housing is made the full width of the platform, though the contact plate and springs and the flexible connexions remain the same as before.

  • They convinced him that by some unknown force tables could be got to move without contact.

  • Joseph Maxwell, of Bordeaux, has published accounts 8 of raps and movements of objects without contact, witnessed with private and other mediums, which he appears to have observed with care, though he does not describe the conditions sufficiently for others to form any independent judgment about them.

  • This they did by sacrificing a victim and effecting communion with the god by the application of its blood to the altar; or, more directly, by the sacrifice of the animal-god and the contact of the sacrificer with its blood.

  • The object of the sacrifice being to bridge the gulf between the sacred and profane worlds, the sacrificer had to remain in contact with the victim, either personally, or, to avoid ritual perils, by the intermediary of the priest.

  • Contact with Babylonia tended to stimulate the 1 Cf.

  • The wood is light, soft, straight-grained and easily worked; it is very durable in contact with the soil, and is used for.

  • represents the heat of neutralization of one gramme-equivalent of caustic soda with nitric acid, each in dilute aqueous solution before being brought into contact.

  • Worship is simpler at the smaller shrines than at the more famous temples; and, as the rulers are the patrons of the religion and are brought into contact with the religious personnel, the character of the social organization leaves its mark upon those who hold religious and judicial functions alike.

  • 70 concludes the period of four centuries, during which the Jews as a nation were in contact with the Greeks and exposed to the influence of Hellenism, not wholly of their own will nor yet against it.

  • Similar evidence Early of Minoan contact, and indeed of wholesale colonization relations with from the Aegean side, recurs in Cyprus.

  • This involved constant contact with officials of the warring countries, especially those of Germany, but he soon showed that the work was entirely neutral.

  • The emergency office of the early and middle Republic has few points of contact, except those of the extraordinary position and almost unfettered authority of its holder, with the dictatorship as revised by Sulla and by Caesar.

  • contact ('nvTaacs et rcaves, 60, Ennead., vi.

  • In such cases the contact of an insect or other body with those processes is sufficient to liberate the pollen often with elastic force, even when the anther itself is not touched.

  • The object of these movements will be appreciated when it is remembered that, if the pollen-masses retained the original direction they had in the anther in which they were formed, they would, when transported by the insect to another flower, merely come in contact with the anther of that flower, where of course they would be of no use; but, owing to the divergences and flexions above alluded to, the pollen-masses come to be so placed that, when transplanted to another flower of the same species, they come in contact with the stigma and so effect the fertilization of that flower.

  • The mountain mass, moreover, is not less important in causing a complete separation between the atmospheric conditions on its opposite flanks, by reason of the extent to which it penetrates that stratum of the atmosphere which is in contact with the earth's surface and is effective in determining climate.

  • While British India has so far avoided actual geographical contact with one great European power in Asia on the north and west, she has touched another on the east.

  • Until the advent of Europeans, the Chinese were always in contact with inferior races.

  • 25), so that Saul's insane fears were constantly exasperated by personal contact with him.

  • The British first came into contact with Tanjore by their expedition in 1749 with a view to the restoration of a deposed raja.

  • What appears the most probable solution is that which regards Lancelot as the hero of an independent and widely diffused folk-tale, which, owing to certain special circumstances, was brought into contact with, and incorporated in, the Arthurian tradition.

  • Of a genuine poetic temperament, fervid and mobile in feeling, and of a prolific fancy, he had also the sense and wit that come of varied contact with men.

  • When Lutheranism arose, it spread rapidly in Prussia; Albert himself came into contact with Luther, and turning Protestant he secularized his territories, and (1526) made them into an hereditary duchy, still held as a fief of the king of Poland.

  • Next he sought to prepare the inactive form of the acid by artificial means; and after great and long-continued labour he succeeded, and was led to the commencement of his classical researches on fermentation, by the observation that when the inactive acid was placed in contact with a special form of mould (Penicillium glaucum) the right-handed acid alone was destroyed, the left-handed variety remained unchanged.

  • After causing the most frightful losses, it was at last stamped out by the resolute slaughter of all affected animals and of all that had been in contact with them.

  • c. 47 power was given to the Board of Agriculture to use the sums voted on account of pleuro-pneumonia for paying the costs involved in dealing with foot-and-mouth disease; under this act the board could order the slaughter of diseased animals and of animals in contact with these, and could pay compensation for animals so slaughtered.

  • It is his contact with the Jews which has chiefly interested later ages, and he is doubtless the monarch described in the pseudoprophetic chapters of Daniel.

  • For piercing-mouthed pests like Aphides no wash is of use unless it contains a basis of soft soap. This softsoap wash kills by contact, and may be prepared in the following way: - Dissolve 6 to 8 lb of the best soft soap in boiling soft water and while still hot (but of course taken off the fire) add 1 gallon of questions involved, under their own headings.

  • It would perhaps be too much to say that the full consideration of this point has revolutionized the theory of value, but it has certainly created what seems almost a new science in close contact with the actual life of the modern.

  • Animal fixed by the shell, the last whorls of which are not in contact with each other; foot small; two anterior pedal tentacles.

  • The other extreme end closes, but the invaginated endoderm cells remain in continuity with this extremity of the blastopore, and form the " rectal peduncle " or " pedicle of invagination " of Lankester, although the endoderm cells retain no contact with the middle region of the now closed-up blastopore.

  • Those rocks which contain andalusite and staurolite are sometimes found in such associations as show that they are due to contact action by intrusive igneous masses.

  • The regions of this cuticle have a markedly segmental arrangement, and the definite hardened pieces (sclerites) of the exoskeleton are in close contact with one another along linear sutures, or are united by regions of the cuticle which are less chitinous and more membranous, so as to permit freedom of movement.

  • They lead into chambers, formed by inpushing of the cuticle, whose delicate inner walls are in contact with air-tubes; on the outer surface of these latter are ridges, along which the special nerveendings are arranged.

  • on the inner surface are two horn-like processes in contact with a After Miall and Denny, The Cockroach, Lovell Reeve & Co.

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