Consonants sentence example

consonants
  • Two consonants are not allowed to stand together at the beginning of a word,; hence vowels are frequently inserted or prefixed, e.g.

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  • Agglomerations of consonants are often met with as initials, giving the appearance of telescoped words - an appearance which historical etymology often confirms. IVlany of these initial consonants are silent in the dialects of the central provinces, or have been resolved into a simpler one of another character.

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  • In order to avoid the uncertainty arising from the lack of vowels to distinguish forms consisting of the same consonants (for the vowel-points were not yet invented), the aramaising use of the reflexive conjugations (Hithpa`el, Nithpa`el) for the internal passives (Pu'al, Hoph`al) became common; particles were used to express the genitive and other relations, and in general there was an endeavour to avoid the obscurities of a purely consonantal writing.

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  • The remaining consonants have the same phonetic values as in English.

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  • The consonants are for the most part reproduced pretty distinctly, but not the vowels as yet in an equal degree."

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  • This fragment contains only 20 Greek consonants (whole or damaged) on five lines.

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  • If you don't know how to key the dotted consonants, you can find out here.

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  • Its consonants are k, g, ng, ch, j, n, t, d, n, p, b, m, y, r, l, w, s, h.

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  • For the sake of euphony, a vowel is frequently interpolated between two consonants; e.g.

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  • In this feature, and in its almost universal conservation of the final vowels e, i, u (o), Castiian comes very near Italian, while it separates from it and approaches the Gallo-Roman by its modification of the consonants.

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  • The Old Testament Jehovah is the traditional translation of the Hebrew consonants YHWH - the special name for the one true God.

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  • The evidence is that the phonetic symbolism is not based on similarity of initial consonants.

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  • In the first experiment, two relatively distinct vowels were compared with two confusable stop consonants.

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  • It possesses seven vowels; among the consonants are the aspirated d and t, as in Greek, and many other sounds, such as b, d, sh, zh (French j), and hard g, which are wanting in Greek, but exist in the Slavonic languages.

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  • The text of the Old 'Testament consists of consonants only, for the alphabet of the ancient Hebrews, like that of their Moabite, Aramaean and Phoenician neighbours, contained no vowels; the text of the interpretation consists of vowels and accents only - for vowel signs and accents had been invented by Jewish scholars between the 5th and 9th centuries A.D.; the text of the Old Testament -is complete in itself and intelligible, though ambiguous; but the text of the interpretation read by itself is unintelligible, and only becomes intelligible when read with the consonants (under, over, or in which they are inserted) of the text of the Old Testament.

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  • Thus intransitive bases seem to have begun only with soft consonants, and it is doubtful whether the parent tongue possessed hard consonants at all; while transitive bases were formed by hardening of the initial consonants and at the same time pronouncing the words in a higher tone, and these two latter changes are supposed to have been indicated by a prefix to the base-word.

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  • The ya-tag and ra-tag, or y and r subscript, and the s after vowels and consonants, were still in force.

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  • My hearing does not have problems with volume as much as frequency, in particular unvoiced consonants.

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  • In Hebrew, a vowel always follows a consonant, unlike English where you can have double consonants or double vowels together in a word.

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  • Detailed phonics games focus on certain aspects like short and long vowels, hard consonants, or suffixes ending in 'Y' for example.

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  • Blends-merge consonants together to make the beginning sound of a word.

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  • Lisping is a speech disorder characterized by the inability to correctly pronounce the sounds of s or z, known as the sibilant consonants.

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  • The term "hard" pertains to words that have hard consonants and vowel sounds.

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  • Unlike the English alphabet where letters have one or two associated sounds and follow a fairly basic structure, the Elven alphabet follows the Hebrew pattern of placing vowels over consonants, as one example.

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  • Interestingly, vowels never appear on the same line as consonants.

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  • Some individual consonants, such as "s" and "r" have certain intricacies that require a variation on style depending on how or where they are used within a word or sentence.

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  • The consonants in the word are conveyed by short sentences, each beginning with one of the consonants in the word are conveyed by short sentences, each beginning with one of the consonants.

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  • According to the Hebrew consonants it might simply be read "the king" (melek), an appellation for the supreme deity of a Semitic state or tribe.

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  • The Siamese alphabet consists of 44 consonants, in each of which the vowel sound" aw "is inherent, and of 32 vowels all marked not by individual letters, but by signs written above, below, before or after the consonant in connexion with which they are to be pronounced.

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  • A complication is caused by the fact that the consonants are grouped into three classes, to each of which a special tone applies, and consequently the application of a tonal sign to a letter has a different effect, according to the class to which such letter belongs.

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  • The coeval origin of consonants and vowels had indeed been questioned or denied by the earliest reformers (Luther, Zwingli, Calvin), but later, in the period of Protestant scholasticism and under the influence of one school of Jewish Rabbis, Protestant scholars in particular, and especially those .of the Swiss school, notably the Buxtorfs, had committed themselves to the view that the vowels formed an integral and original part of the text of the Old Testament; and this they maintained with all the more fervency.

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  • For reasons suggested partly by the study of Semitic inscriptions, partly by comparison of passages occurring twice within the Old Testament, and partly by a comparison of the Hebrew text with the Septuagint, it is clear that the authors of the Old Testament (or at least most of them) themselves made some use of these vowel consonants, but that in a great number of cases the vowel consonants that stand in our present text were inserted by transcribers and editors of the texts.

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  • In view of all this, the first requisite for a critical treatment of the text of the Old Testament is to consider the consonants by themselves, to treat every vowel-consonant as possibly not original, and the existing divisions of the text into words as original only in those cases where they yield a sense better than any other possible division (or, at least, as good).

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  • The only consonants are k,1, m, n and p, which with the gently aspirated h, the five vowels, and the vocalic w, make up all the letters in use.

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  • Many of these old soft initial consonants which are now hardened in the modern dialects are preserved in classical Tibetan, i.e.

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  • Soon afterwards, when the language was extended to the western valleys, many of the prefixed and most of the important consonants vanished from the spoken words.

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  • In the modern pronunciation the principal differences are between the Ashkenazim (German and Polish Jews) and the Sephardim (Spanish and Portuguese Jews), and concern not only the vowels but also certain consonants, and in some cases probably go back to early times.

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  • The ancient Arabic alphabet was very imperfect; it not only wanted marks for the short and in part even for the long vowels, but it often expressed several consonants by the same sign, e.g.

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  • The invention of vowel-signs of diacritic points to distinguish similarly formed consonants, and of other orthographic signs, soon put a stop to arbitrary conjectures on the part of the readers.

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  • Many remarkable In the articles referring to matters of Egyptology in this edition, Graecized forms of Old Egyptian names, where they exist, are commonly employed; in other cases names are rendered by their actual equivalents in Coptic or by analogous forms. Failing all such means, recourse is had to the usual conventional renderings of hieroglyphic spelling, a more precise transcription of the consonants in the latter being sometimes added.

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  • The latter acquired the Semitic language imperfectly from their conquerors; they expressed the verbal conjugations by periphrases, mispronounced the consonants, and so changed greatly, the appearance of the vocabulary, which also would certainly contain a large proportion of native nonSemitic roots.

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  • Much of this must have taken place, according to the theory, in the prehistoric period; but the loss of weak consonants, of y, and of one of two repeated consonants, and the development of periphrastic conjugations continued to the end.

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  • Egyptian roots consist of consonants and semi-consonants only, the inflexion being effected by internal vowel-change and the addition of consonants or vowels at the beginning or end.

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  • It has already been explained that the writing expresses only consonants.

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  • Thus, HroXucuoi is spelt Ptwrmys, Antoninus, Ntnynws or Intnyns, &c. &c. Much earlier, throughout the New Kingdom, a special syllabic orthography, in which the alphabetic signs for the consonants are generally replaced by groups or single signs having the value of a consonant followed by a semi-vowel, was used for foreign names and words, e.g.

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  • They are of the Mongol family; their language belongs to the so-called Turanian group, is polysyllabic, possesses an alphabet of 11 vowels and 14 consonants, and a script named En-mun.

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  • The use of double consonants which has been already pointed out in the Messapian inscriptions has been very acutely connected by Deecke with the tradition that the same practice was introduced at Rome by the poet Ennius who came from the Messapian town Rudiae (Festus, p. 293 M).

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  • They have the chief characteristics of the Polynesian, with Malay affinities, and peculiarities such as the use of suffixes and inseparable pronouns and, as in Tagal, of the infix to denote changes in the verb; in the west groups there is a tendency to closed syllables and double consonants, and a use of the palatals ch, j, sh, the dental th, and s (the last perhaps only in foreign words), which is alien to the Polynesian.

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  • Greek did not possess so many consonants.

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  • The Phoenician alphabet was an alphabet of consonants only, but all Greek alphabets as yet known agree in employing A, E, I, 0, Y as vowels.

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  • The Greek aspirates were not the sounds which we represent by ph, th, ch (Scotch), but corresponded rather to the sound of the final consonants in such words as lip, bit, lick, the breath being audible after the formation of the consonant.

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  • A series of consonants often disappear in the spirant; thus Old Persian or Zend.

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  • The consonants, b, d, f, k, I, m, n, p, r, v, z, are as in English; g = Eng.

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  • Consonants are freely used, some of the consonantal sounds being difficult to represent by Roman characters.

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  • Just as e before a syllable in ivhich an i occurs is changed into I, so in the same circumstances o becomes u (full, folium;vuil, volio forvoleo)andalsowhentheaccented vowel precedes a group of consonants like ci, p1, and the like (ull, o c 1 u s; escull, Sd 0 p I u s).

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  • The conditions which approximate most closely to our present, perfect, future and imperative are marked either by aspiration of the initial or by one of the five prefix consonants according to the rules of euphony, and the whole looks like a former system thrown into confusion and disorder by phonetic decay.

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  • It is more nearly related to modern Siamese than to modern Shan, but possesses many groups of consonants which have become simplified in both.

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  • He denotes quantities by the letters of the alphabet, retaining the vowels for the unknown and the consonants for the knowns; he introduced the vinculum and among others the terms coefficient, affirmative, negative, pure and adfected equations.

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  • Again, and for similar reasons, it is probable that in many cases, if not in all, the original texts were written without any clear division of the consonants into words.

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  • The other Aryan consonants seem generally to have remained.

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  • Hard consonants were, and indeed still are, very difficult for her to pronounce in connection with one another in the same word; she often suppresses the one and changes the other, and sometimes she replaces both by an analogous sound with soft aspiration.

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  • Where the same root exists in Arabic, Syriac and Hebrew, its fundamental consonants are usually the same in all three languages.

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  • The following simple rules, laid down by a Committee of the Royal Geographical Society, will be found sufficient as a rule; according to this system the vowels are to be sounded as in Italian, the consonants as in English, and no redundant letters are to be introduced.

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  • None of them, in point of fact, has held its ground, and even his proposal to denote unknown quantities by the vowels A, E, I, 0, u, Y - the consonants B, c, &c., being reserved for general known quantities - has not been taken up. In this denotation he followed, perhaps, some older contemporaries, as Ramus, who designated the points in geometrical figures by vowels, making use of consonants, R, S, T, &c., only when these were exhausted.

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  • It may seem at first that so many as 44 consonants can scarcely be necessary, but the explanation is that several of them express each a slightly different intonation of what is practically the same consonant, the sound of" kh,"for instance, being represented by six different letters and the sound of" t "by eight.

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  • The vowel signs have no sound by themselves, but act upon the vowel sound" aw "inherent in the consonants, converting it into" a," i," o," ee," ow,"&c. Each of the signs has a name, and some of them produce modulations so closely resembling those made by another that at the present day they are scarcely to be distinguished apart.

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  • The tongue is so serviceable a member (taking all sorts of shapes, just as is wanted),--the teeth, the lips, the roof of the mouth, all ready to help, and so heap up the sound of the voice into the solid bits which we call consonants, and make room for the curiously shaped breathings which we call vowels!

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  • The consonants of the word to be substituted are ordinarily written in the margin; but inasmuch as Adonay was regularly read instead of the ineffable name Jhvh, it was deemed unnecessary to note the fact at every occurrence.

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  • In such cases of substitution the vowels of the word which is to be read are written in the Hebrew text with the consonants of the word which is not to be read.

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