Consonance sentence example

consonance
  • In a few ances this may have come about by the emphasizing of a ly primitive trait; as when the wolf Ophois, in consonance I the predatory nature of that animal, developed into a of war.

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  • Sedley Taylor, Sound and Music (1882), contains a simple and excellent account of Helmholtz's theory of consonance and dissonance.

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  • So far his published views had been in complete consonance with those of the older Tractarians.

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  • We can see, too, at once how the octave is such a smooth consonance.

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  • There is a total consonance of views on that also.

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  • Some of these statements are so much in consonance with the indirect evidence afforded by the satires that they may be a series of conjectures based upon them.

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  • Suppose that we start with two simple tones in unison; there is perfect consonance.

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  • Therefore on international, regional issues, we have consonance of views.

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  • This is in consonance with the facts already mentioned that zoospores germinate forthwith, and that the sexually-produced cell or zygote enters upon a period of rest.

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  • His theory is in consonance with the interpretation of the structure of protoplasm as having behind it a long historical architecture and leads to the obvious conclusion that if protoplasm be constructed artificially it will be by a series of stages and that the product will be simpler than any of the existing animals or plants.

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  • The effect of chemical agents in producing coagulation are in consonance with what is known of other instances of polymeric or condensation changes, whilst the fact that the collection of globules separated by creaming after thorough washing, and therefore removal of all proteid, is susceptible of solidification into caoutchouc by a merely mechanical act such as churning, strongly supports the view that the character of the change is distinct from that of any alteration which may occur in the proteid constituents of the latex.

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  • In consonance with this name, its authors propose to re-name the Conjugatae; Akontae and Oedogoniaceae with a chaplet of cilia become Stephanokontae, and the algae remaining over in the three series from which the Heterokontae and Stephanokontae are withdrawn become Isokontae.

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  • After 1727 Rumanian was recognized as the language of the law-courts, and through the annexation of Bukovina by Austria (1774) and of Bessarabia by Russia (1812), codes for the civil and political administration of those provinces were drawn up in Rumanian, either in accordance with the established law of the land or in consonance with the laws of Austria and Russia.

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  • And in pursuing this thought he found that those consonances which beat faster than six times in a second are the very same that musicians treat as concords; and that others which beat slower are the discords; and he adds that when a consonance is a discord at a low pitch and a concord at a high one, it beats sensibly at the former pitch but not at the latter."

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