This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

consecrate

consecrate

consecrate Sentence Examples

  • The little company of seven determined to consecrate their union by vows.

    82
    24
  • But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.

    35
    21
  • and Urban II., not only refused to perform homage to the king (11oo), but also refused to consecrate newly-chosen bishops who had received investiture from Henry.

    23
    12
  • He resolved to consecrate his life to maintaining the cause of the freedom of the Church from the control of the State.

    19
    16
  • of Denmark; and in the early part of the 19th century it was twice the residence of Pius VII., - in 1804 when he came to consecrate the emperor Napoleon, and in 1812-1814, when he was his prisoner.

    16
    10
  • " With the cross, " he declares, " we put our foes to flight, we extort money, we consecrate God, we shake hell, we work miracles."

    12
    7
  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.

    12
    11
  • It was subsequently decided to consecrate the holy oil in Rumania instead of procuring it from Russia or Constantinople; but the Greek patriarch protested.

    11
    12
  • It was subsequently decided to consecrate the holy oil in Rumania instead of procuring it from Russia or Constantinople; but the Greek patriarch protested.

    11
    12
  • Robertson Smith, on the other hand, a new era was reached, in which the recently recognized existence of Totemism was made the basis of an attempt to give a 1 Scipione de Ricci, bishop of Pistoia from 1780 to 1791, on the ex-Jesuits requesting him to consecrate a bell dedicated to this object, issued a pastoral letter (3rd June 1784) in which he pointed out that the spirit of true religion was "far removed from fetichism," and warned his flock against "cardiolatry."

    10
    8
  • Fons Bleaudi) are equally unknown, but the older château was used in the latter part of the 12th century by Louis VII., who caused Thomas Becket to consecrate the Chapelle St Saturnin, and it continued a favourite residence of Philip Augustus and Louis IX.

    10
    8
  • It is for you, Ministers, to consecrate him to the glory of the republic."

    9
    7
  • Early in 1292 the same pope, himself a Franciscan, summoned Jacobus to Rome, intending to consecrate him archbishop of Genoa with his own hands.

    8
    6
  • He was one of the bishops elect whom Anselm refused to consecrate (1101) as having been nominated and invested by the lay power.

    8
    8
  • When, on the conclusion of peace, the church-people of Connecticut sent Dr Samuel Seabury to England, with a request to the archbishop of Canterbury to consecrate him, it is not surprising that Archbishop Moore refused.

    7
    4
  • He also refused to consecrate Henrys nominees to certain bishoprics and abbacies on the ground that they had not been chosen by free election by their chapters or their monks.

    6
    3
  • Besides the full functions of the presbyterate, or priesthood, bishops have the sole right (I) to confer holy orders, (2) to administer confirmation, (3) to prepare the holy oil, or chrism, (4) to consecrate sacred places or utensils (churches, churchyards, altars, &c.), (5) to give the benediction to abbots and abbesses, (6) to anoint kings.

    6
    5
  • Archbishop Ralph of Canterbury refused to consecrate him unless he made a profession of obedience to the southern see; this Thurstan refused and asked the king for permission to go to Rome to consult Pope Paschal II.

    6
    7
  • Archbishop Ralph of Canterbury refused to consecrate him unless he made a profession of obedience to the southern see; this Thurstan refused and asked the king for permission to go to Rome to consult Pope Paschal II.

    6
    8
  • Thus we consecrate a king, a priest, a deacon; a temple or a church and any part of church furniture; we also consecrate water for use in lustrations, bread and wine in the sacrament; a season or day is consecrated, as a feast or fast.

    5
    4
  • For the Jews, however, who came to John, his baptism could not have the significance of the proselyte's baptism, but rather accorded with another baptism undergone by Jews who wished to consecrate their lives by stricter study and practice of the law.

    5
    4
  • consecrate him in Notre-Dame.

    5
    4
  • Deacons may conduct any of the ordinary services in the church, but are not permitted to pronounce the absolution or consecrate the elements for the Eucharist.

    5
    5
  • The momentous question was discussed at a meeting of the opponents of the Vatican decrees, and it was resolved to elect a bishop and ask the Dutch bishops to consecrate him.

    5
    5
  • The student may read Homer or Æschylus in the Greek without danger of dissipation or luxuriousness, for it implies that he in some measure emulate their heroes, and consecrate morning hours to their pages.

    5
    5
  • He was elected on the 1st of August 1559; but it was difficult to find the requisite four bishops willing and qualified to consecrate him, and not until the 17th of December did Barlow, Scory, Coverdale and Hodgkins perform that ceremony at Lambeth.

    5
    7
  • The three Dutch Old Catholic bishops declared themselves ready to consecrate a bishop, if it were desired.

    5
    7
  • The crown, having made choice of one of such persons, is empowered to present him by letters patent under the great seal to the metropolitan, requiring him to consecrate him to the same name, title, style and dignity of a bishop; and the person so consecrated is thereupon entitled to exercise, under a commission from the bishop who has nominated him, such authority and jurisdiction, within the diocese of such bishop, as shall be given to him by the commission, and no other.

    5
    7
  • The Lombard sect went farther in (3) and (4), holding that no one in mortal sin could consecrate the sacrament, and that the Roman Church was the scarlet woman of the Apocalypse, whose precepts ought not to be obeyed, especially those appointing fast-days.

    4
    3
  • At the beginning of 1123 he was chosen from among several candidates to be archbishop of Canterbury, and as he refused to admit that Thurstan, archbishop of York, was independent of the see of Canterbury, this prelate refused to consecrate him, and the ceremony was performed by his own suffragan bishops.

    4
    3
  • For according to the Pontifical, the episcopate is the " summum sacerdotium "; the bishop in consecration receives " the sacerdotal grace "; it is " his office to consecrate, ordain, offer, baptize, confirm."

    4
    4
  • Formosus himself shared this view; but he was forced to yield to circumstances and to consecrate as emperor Lambert, the young son of Guy of Spoleto.

    4
    4
  • Its episcopate in the 10th century still numbered thirty members, but in 1076 the Church could not provide three bishops to consecrate a new member of the episcopate, and for that purpose Gregory VII.

    4
    5
  • The first class hold (1) that oaths are forbidden by the gospel, (2) that capital punishment is not allowed to the civil power, (3) that any layman may consecrate the sacrament of the altar, and (4) that the Roman Church is not the Church of Christ.

    4
    6
  • To leave the locks unshorn during an arduous undertaking in which the divine aid was specially implored, and to consecrate the hair after success, was a practice among various ancient nations, but the closest parallel to the Hebrew custom is found in Arabia?

    4
    6
  • The momentous question was discussed at a meeting of the opponents of the Vatican decrees, and it was resolved to elect a bishop and ask the Dutch bishops to consecrate him.

    4
    6
  • Evelyn's friendship with Mary Blagge, afterwards lvIrs Godolphin, is recorded in the diary, when he says he designed "to consecrate her worthy life to posterity."

    4
    6
  • 1-15 Moses was commanded to set up the Tabernacle and to consecrate the priests, and the succeeding verses (16-38) describe how the former command was carried out.

    4
    6
  • Their behaviour excites the anger of Moses on his return, and in response to his appeal the sons of Levi arm themselves and slay a large number of the people: as a reward for their services they are bidden to consecrate themselves to Yahweh.

    3
    3
  • In May 1659 he brought a command from Charles in Brussels, directing the bishop of Salisbury to summon all those bishops, who were then alive, to consecrate clergymen to various sees "to secure a continuation of the order in the Church of England," then in danger of becoming extinct.'

    3
    3
  • Their behaviour excites the anger of Moses on his return, and in response to his appeal the sons of Levi arm themselves and slay a large number of the people: as a reward for their services they are bidden to consecrate themselves to Yahweh.

    3
    3
  • Sacerdotal benedictions are not indeed sacraments - means of grace ordained by Christ himself, but sacramentals (sacramenta minora) ordained by the authority of the Church and exercised by the priests, as the plenipotentiaries of God, in virtue of the powers conferred on them at their ordination; "that whatever they bless may be blessed, and whatever they consecrate may be consecrated."

    3
    5
  • those on Patience and Penitence, read as though they had been spoken, and it is hard to believe that this brilliant rhetorician did not consecrate his powers of address to his new faith.

    3
    5
  • It is only the serious eye peering from and the sincere life passed within it which restrain laughter and consecrate the costume of any people.

    3
    5
  • We consecrate ourselves either in a ritual act, as of baptism or ordination, vows or monkish initiation; or, without any implication of particular ceremonies, a man is said to consecrate himself to good works or learning.

    3
    6
  • Similarly William of Paris held that degradation deprived a priest of power to consecrate.

    1
    0
  • 441, which allowed a bishop, who had built a church in the diocese of another bishop, to nominate the clerk, but not to consecrate the church.

    1
    0
  • There are five archbishoprics and five bishoprics under the patriarch, who alone can consecrate.

    1
    0
  • created him archbishop of Peking, and despatched seven bishops to consecrate and assist him; three only of these arrived (1308).

    1
    3
  • consecrate yourselves for tommorrow the Lord will do wonders among you.

    0
    0
  • We could not consecrate our sinful lives to God - there is nothing acceptable to God about our old lives.

    0
    0
  • I offer and consecrate my person and all my interests to your care and maternal solicitude.

    0
    0
  • Robertson Smith, on the other hand, a new era was reached, in which the recently recognized existence of Totemism was made the basis of an attempt to give a 1 Scipione de Ricci, bishop of Pistoia from 1780 to 1791, on the ex-Jesuits requesting him to consecrate a bell dedicated to this object, issued a pastoral letter (3rd June 1784) in which he pointed out that the spirit of true religion was "far removed from fetichism," and warned his flock against "cardiolatry."

    0
    0
  • Fons Bleaudi) are equally unknown, but the older château was used in the latter part of the 12th century by Louis VII., who caused Thomas Becket to consecrate the Chapelle St Saturnin, and it continued a favourite residence of Philip Augustus and Louis IX.

    0
    0
  • of Denmark; and in the early part of the 19th century it was twice the residence of Pius VII., - in 1804 when he came to consecrate the emperor Napoleon, and in 1812-1814, when he was his prisoner.

    0
    0
  • He was elected on the 1st of August 1559; but it was difficult to find the requisite four bishops willing and qualified to consecrate him, and not until the 17th of December did Barlow, Scory, Coverdale and Hodgkins perform that ceremony at Lambeth.

    0
    0
  • It is for you, Ministers, to consecrate him to the glory of the republic."

    0
    0
  • Thus the bishop of the important see of Seleucia (Bagdad), though subordinate to the patriarch of Antioch, had the title of Catholicus and power to consecrate even archbishops; and on the division of the see there were two Catholici under the patriarch of Antioch.

    0
    0
  • But it was an easier thing to consecrate the fighting instinct than to curb it; and the institution of chivalry represents such a clerical consecration, for ideal ends and noble purposes, of the martial impulses which the Church had hitherto endeavoured to check.

    0
    0
  • The little company of seven determined to consecrate their union by vows.

    0
    0
  • Sacerdotal benedictions are not indeed sacraments - means of grace ordained by Christ himself, but sacramentals (sacramenta minora) ordained by the authority of the Church and exercised by the priests, as the plenipotentiaries of God, in virtue of the powers conferred on them at their ordination; "that whatever they bless may be blessed, and whatever they consecrate may be consecrated."

    0
    0
  • Similarly William of Paris held that degradation deprived a priest of power to consecrate.

    0
    0
  • For according to the Pontifical, the episcopate is the " summum sacerdotium "; the bishop in consecration receives " the sacerdotal grace "; it is " his office to consecrate, ordain, offer, baptize, confirm."

    0
    0
  • Its episcopate in the 10th century still numbered thirty members, but in 1076 the Church could not provide three bishops to consecrate a new member of the episcopate, and for that purpose Gregory VII.

    0
    0
  • According to the medieval canon law, based on the decretals, and codified in the 13th century in the Corpus juris canonici, by which the earlier powers of metropolitans had been greatly curtailed, the powers of the archbishop consisted in the right (i) to confirm and consecrate suffragan bishops; (2) to summon and preside over provincial synods; (3) to superintend the suffragans and visit their dioceses, as well as to censure and punish bishops in the interests of discipline, the right of deprivation, however, being reserved to the pope; (4) to act as a court of appeal from the diocesan courts; (5) to exercise the jus devolutionis, i.e.

    0
    0
  • He is entitled to consecrate all the bishops within his province and was formerly entitled, upon consecrating a bishop, to select a benefice within his diocese at his option for one of his chaplains, but this practice was indirectly abolished by 3 and 4 Vict.

    0
    0
  • those on Patience and Penitence, read as though they had been spoken, and it is hard to believe that this brilliant rhetorician did not consecrate his powers of address to his new faith.

    0
    0
  • " With the cross, " he declares, " we put our foes to flight, we extort money, we consecrate God, we shake hell, we work miracles."

    0
    0
  • The first class hold (1) that oaths are forbidden by the gospel, (2) that capital punishment is not allowed to the civil power, (3) that any layman may consecrate the sacrament of the altar, and (4) that the Roman Church is not the Church of Christ.

    0
    0
  • The Lombard sect went farther in (3) and (4), holding that no one in mortal sin could consecrate the sacrament, and that the Roman Church was the scarlet woman of the Apocalypse, whose precepts ought not to be obeyed, especially those appointing fast-days.

    0
    0
  • To leave the locks unshorn during an arduous undertaking in which the divine aid was specially implored, and to consecrate the hair after success, was a practice among various ancient nations, but the closest parallel to the Hebrew custom is found in Arabia?

    0
    0
  • The three Dutch Old Catholic bishops declared themselves ready to consecrate a bishop, if it were desired.

    0
    0
  • Evelyn's friendship with Mary Blagge, afterwards lvIrs Godolphin, is recorded in the diary, when he says he designed "to consecrate her worthy life to posterity."

    0
    0
  • Thus we consecrate a king, a priest, a deacon; a temple or a church and any part of church furniture; we also consecrate water for use in lustrations, bread and wine in the sacrament; a season or day is consecrated, as a feast or fast.

    0
    0
  • We consecrate ourselves either in a ritual act, as of baptism or ordination, vows or monkish initiation; or, without any implication of particular ceremonies, a man is said to consecrate himself to good works or learning.

    0
    0
  • 11-v1.8), and which, in its blindness to the full work of Jesus, amounts to counting His blood as devoid of divine efficacy to consecrate the life (x.

    0
    0
  • Besides the full functions of the presbyterate, or priesthood, bishops have the sole right (I) to confer holy orders, (2) to administer confirmation, (3) to prepare the holy oil, or chrism, (4) to consecrate sacred places or utensils (churches, churchyards, altars, &c.), (5) to give the benediction to abbots and abbesses, (6) to anoint kings.

    0
    0
  • Upon the election being reported to the crown, a mandate issues from the crown to the archbishop and metropolitan, requesting him and commanding him to confirm the election, and to invest and consecrate the bishop-elect.

    0
    0
  • 441, which allowed a bishop, who had built a church in the diocese of another bishop, to nominate the clerk, but not to consecrate the church.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1292 the same pope, himself a Franciscan, summoned Jacobus to Rome, intending to consecrate him archbishop of Genoa with his own hands.

    0
    0
  • But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground.

    0
    0
  • He was one of the bishops elect whom Anselm refused to consecrate (1101) as having been nominated and invested by the lay power.

    0
    0
  • When, on the conclusion of peace, the church-people of Connecticut sent Dr Samuel Seabury to England, with a request to the archbishop of Canterbury to consecrate him, it is not surprising that Archbishop Moore refused.

    0
    0
  • In the opinion of prelates and lawyers alike, an act of parliament was necessary before a bishop could be consecrated for a see abroad; to consecrate one for a foreign country seemed impossible, since, though the bestowal of the potestas ordinis would be valid, the crown, which, according to the law, was the source of the episcopal jurisdiction, could hardly issue the necessary mandate for the consecration of a bishop to a see outside the realm (see Bishop).

    0
    0
  • In 1786, on the initiative of the archbishop, the legal difficulties in England were removed by the act for the consecration of bishops abroad; and, on being satisfied as to the orthodoxy of the church in America and the nature of certain liturgical changes in contemplation, the two English archbishops proceeded, on the 14th of February 1787, to consecrate William White and Samuel Prevoost to the sees of Pennsylvania and New York (see Protestant Episcopal Church).

    0
    0
  • Formosus himself shared this view; but he was forced to yield to circumstances and to consecrate as emperor Lambert, the young son of Guy of Spoleto.

    0
    0
  • At the beginning of 1123 he was chosen from among several candidates to be archbishop of Canterbury, and as he refused to admit that Thurstan, archbishop of York, was independent of the see of Canterbury, this prelate refused to consecrate him, and the ceremony was performed by his own suffragan bishops.

    0
    0
  • He resolved to consecrate his life to maintaining the cause of the freedom of the Church from the control of the State.

    0
    0
  • 1-15 Moses was commanded to set up the Tabernacle and to consecrate the priests, and the succeeding verses (16-38) describe how the former command was carried out.

    0
    0
  • The crown, having made choice of one of such persons, is empowered to present him by letters patent under the great seal to the metropolitan, requiring him to consecrate him to the same name, title, style and dignity of a bishop; and the person so consecrated is thereupon entitled to exercise, under a commission from the bishop who has nominated him, such authority and jurisdiction, within the diocese of such bishop, as shall be given to him by the commission, and no other.

    0
    0
  • created him archbishop of Peking, and despatched seven bishops to consecrate and assist him; three only of these arrived (1308).

    0
    0
  • There are five archbishoprics and five bishoprics under the patriarch, who alone can consecrate.

    0
    0
  • For the Jews, however, who came to John, his baptism could not have the significance of the proselyte's baptism, but rather accorded with another baptism undergone by Jews who wished to consecrate their lives by stricter study and practice of the law.

    0
    0
  • He also refused to consecrate Henrys nominees to certain bishoprics and abbacies on the ground that they had not been chosen by free election by their chapters or their monks.

    0
    0
  • Deacons may conduct any of the ordinary services in the church, but are not permitted to pronounce the absolution or consecrate the elements for the Eucharist.

    0
    0
  • At this juncture Germanus of Auxerre decided to consecrate his pupil Patrick for the purpose of carrying on the work begun by Palladius.

    0
    0
  • and Urban II., not only refused to perform homage to the king (11oo), but also refused to consecrate newly-chosen bishops who had received investiture from Henry.

    0
    0
  • consecrate him in Notre-Dame.

    0
    0
  • In May 1659 he brought a command from Charles in Brussels, directing the bishop of Salisbury to summon all those bishops, who were then alive, to consecrate clergymen to various sees "to secure a continuation of the order in the Church of England," then in danger of becoming extinct.'

    0
    0
  • I offer and consecrate my person and all my interests to your care and maternal solicitude.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →