This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

connotation

connotation

connotation Sentence Examples

  • The word can have a different connotation in different contexts. 

    739
    143
  • No negative connotation was intended by using the word "short." 

    568
    126
  • To avoid the connotation of correctness, I would use the word principles rather than rules. 

    148
    92
  • Typically, the word "home" has a positive and warm connotation.

    126
    67
  • By using a word with a negative connotation, Jenny's graduation speech took an unpleasant tone.

    90
    70
  • To make her excuse sound better, Alexandra used a word with a positive connotation.

    75
    53
  • Using a word with a negative connotation causes your writing to sound opinionated.

    65
    54
  • The word nasty has such a negative connotation; you probably don't want to use it when describing your sister-in-law.

    64
    44
  • This use of the word "prince" - which has in England so lofty a connotation - to translate foreign titles of such varying importance and significance naturally leads to a good deal of confusion in the public mind.

    61
    57
  • If you are writing an informative article, try not to use words with a negative connotation.

    54
    50
  • When texting, it is best to not use a word that carries a negative connotation so that you do not start an argument unintentionally.

    51
    51
  • The verb is se promener and the connotation is that this is a leisurely walk around the neighborhood.

    4
    2
  • 6 By Caphtor the Septuagint has sometimes understood Cappadocia, which indeed may be valid for its age, but the name is to be identified with the Egyptian K(a)ptar, which in later Ptolemaic times seems to mean Phoenicia, although Keftiu had had another connotation.

    4
    3
  • The rendering" preacher "has a misleading connotation.

    3
    2
  • 2 And historically it seems plain that - since the age of Protestant scholasticism - there has been nothing in Protestant church life to which the name " dogma " can be assigned, without dropping a good deal of its original connotation.

    3
    2
  • There is a marked disposition on the part of critics of hedonism to confuse "pleasure" with animal pleasure or "passion," - in other words, with a pleasure phenomenon in which the predominant feature is entire lack of self-control, whereas the word "pleasure" has strictly no such connotation.

    3
    2
  • The word thus acquired an official connotation.

    3
    2
  • There's an unfortunate social connotation sometimes attached to tramp stamp tattoos by certain segments of the population.

    3
    2
  • For it was not possible for Kant to avoid the misleading connotation of the terms employed by him.

    3
    3
  • Most semioticians argue that no sign is purely denotative - lacking connotation.

    3
    3
  • negative connotation, which is why it has not been much used in this paper.

    3
    3
  • The history of the title in this connotation is somewhat obscure.

    3
    3
  • It is especially necessary to make clear that the language known as Umbrian is that of a certain limited area, which cannot yet be shown to have extended very far beyond the eastern half of the Tiber valley (from Interamna Nahartium to Urvinum Mataurense), because the term is often used by archaeologists with a far wider connotation to include all the Italic, pre-Etruscan inhabitants of upper Italy; Professor Ridgeway, for instance, in his Early Age of Greece, frequently speaks of the "Umbrians" as the race to which belonged the Villanova culture of the Early Iron age.

    2
    2
  • It is plain that we have moved far from the connotation and denotation of the word species at the time when Darwin began to discuss the origin of species, and that the movement, on the one hand, tends to simplify the problem philosophically, and, on the other, to make it difficult for the amateur theorist.

    2
    2
  • This at one time seems to have meant "for the sake of," carrying with it some idea of supplication; but it has now lost this connotation, seeing that it can be used not merely after the name of a god, but after that of any sacred object or incident held capable of imparting magic efficacy to the formula.

    2
    2
  • Thus the connotation of the term "boat," being the sum of those qualities in respect of which all boats are regarded as alike, whatever their individual peculiarities may be, is described as a "concept."

    2
    2
  • The word has never quite lost this connotation of standing on the defensive and rebutting criticism; e.g.

    2
    2
  • Yet to concede this claim and surrender without qualification the word " Catholic " to a connotation which is at best only universal in theory, is to beg several very weighty questions.

    2
    2
  • The rendering" preacher "has a misleading connotation.

    2
    2
  • political rhetoric, but at the same time hints that, though r04cy-ruoi and S fM oXoyuu may be discriminated, they are nevertheless near akin, the one being the ape of philosophy, the other the ape of statesmanship. In short, Plato traces the changes which, in less than a century, had taken place in the meaning of the term, partly through changes in the practice of the sophists, partly through changes in their surroundings and in public opinion, so as to show by a familiar instance that general terms which do not describe natural kinds cannot have a stable connotation.

    1
    1
  • But the title of emperor was also used in the middle ages, and is still used, in a loose and vague sense, without any ecclesiastical connotation or hint of connexion with Rome (the two attributes which should properly distinguish an emperor), and merely in order to designate a non-European ruler with a large extent of territory.

    1
    1
  • Thus, in Germany, with the decay of the empire the title "prince " received a sovereign connotation, though it ranks, as in France, below that of "duke."

    1
    1
  • The pejorative connotation of an optical illusion is a visual malfunction.

    1
    1
  • Perhaps a connotation will take the place of the original denotation.

    1
    1
  • However, somewhere along the way, tattoos became a popular method of branding criminals, and so they tended to take on a negative connotation among the populace, even if the tattoo design wasn't related to either crime or punishment.

    1
    1
  • Asian dragon tattoos carry a very different connotation than their western cousins.

    1
    1
  • The design probably didn't take on a firmer Christian connotation for many years.

    1
    1
  • The renderings" eternity "and" future "in the present passage are unsatisfactory; the former has an inappropriate metaphysical connotation, and yields no distinct sense; the latter does not suit the connexion, though there is reference to the future elsewhere (ix.

    1
    2
  • 5 The phrase "pious work" probably had a precise technical connotation like the English "benefaction."

    1
    2
  • The English versions often render the word by stranger; " but though distinguished from the home-born 'ezrah (=one rising from the soil), the person denominated ger became the equal of the native Israelite, and, when the meaning of ger passed from a mainly civil to a religious connotation, enjoyed many rights.

    1
    2
  • The Hebrew and Greek terms, however, lost the connotation of a change of residence, and both ger and " proselyte " came to apply to a convert without regard to his nationality.

    1
    2
  • Throughout the middle ages, however, the original official and personal connotation of the title was never wholly lost; or perhaps it would be truer to say, with Selden, that it was early revived with the study of the Roman civil law in the 12th century.

    1
    2
  • The Greeks used it loosely of various parts of the shores of the Euxine, and the term did not get a definite connotation till after the establishment of the kingdom founded beyond the Halys during the troubled period following the death of Alexander the Great, about 301 B.C., by Mithradates I., Ktistes, son of a Persian satrap in the service of Antigonus, one of Alexander's successors, and ruled by a succession of kings, mostly bearing the same name, till 64 B.C. As the greater part of this kingdom lay within the immense region of Cappadocia, which in early ages extended from the borders of Cilicia to the Euxine, the kingdom as a whole was at first called "Cappadocia towards the Pontus" (irpos TW H6vro), but afterwards simply "Pontus," the name Cappadocia being henceforth restricted to the southern half of the region previously included under that title.

    1
    2
  • " Philistine " thus became the name of contempt applied by the cultured to those whom they considered beneath them in intellect and taste, and was first so used in English by Carlyle, and Matthew Arnold (Essays in Criticism, " Heinrich Heine," 1865) gave the word its vogue and its final connotation, as signifying " inaccessible to and impatient of ideas."

    1
    2
  • 6 By Caphtor the Septuagint has sometimes understood Cappadocia, which indeed may be valid for its age, but the name is to be identified with the Egyptian K(a)ptar, which in later Ptolemaic times seems to mean Phoenicia, although Keftiu had had another connotation.

    0
    2
  • 2 And historically it seems plain that - since the age of Protestant scholasticism - there has been nothing in Protestant church life to which the name " dogma " can be assigned, without dropping a good deal of its original connotation.

    0
    2
  • The term which expresses the connotation of a word is therefore an abstract term, though it is probably not itself connotative; adjectives are concrete, not abstract, e.g.

    0
    2
  • There is a marked disposition on the part of critics of hedonism to confuse "pleasure" with animal pleasure or "passion," - in other words, with a pleasure phenomenon in which the predominant feature is entire lack of self-control, whereas the word "pleasure" has strictly no such connotation.

    0
    2
  • The term Mass, which has the same connotation, is derived from the Lat.

    0
    2
  • CONNOTATION, in logic, a term (largely due to J.

    0
    2
  • It is clear that as scientific knowledge advances the Connotation or Intension of terms increases, and, therefore, that the Connotation of the same term may vary considerably according to the knowledge of the person who uses it.

    0
    2
  • African elephant), the Connotation obviously increases.

    0
    2
  • General terms such as "Socialism," "Slavery," "Liberty," and technical terms in philosophy and theology are frequently the cause of controversies which would not arise if the disputants were agreed as to the Intension or Connotation of the terms. In addition Connotative terms, as those which imply attributes, are opposed to NonConnotative, which merely denote things without implying attributes.

    0
    2
  • The word thus acquired an official connotation.

    0
    2
  • political rhetoric, but at the same time hints that, though r04cy-ruoi and S fM oXoyuu may be discriminated, they are nevertheless near akin, the one being the ape of philosophy, the other the ape of statesmanship. In short, Plato traces the changes which, in less than a century, had taken place in the meaning of the term, partly through changes in the practice of the sophists, partly through changes in their surroundings and in public opinion, so as to show by a familiar instance that general terms which do not describe natural kinds cannot have a stable connotation.

    0
    2
  • At this stage we are as much concerned with speech-forms as the thought-forms of which they are conventional symbols, with Plato's analysis, for instance, into a noun and a verb, whose connotation of time is as yet a difficulty.

    0
    2
  • " a formal procedure or act in a religious or other solemn function," or any " custom or practice of a formal kind," but the sense in which it is now obsolete in England - except in the religious connotation here used - of " the general or usual custom, habit or practice of a country, people, class of persons, &c."

    0
    2
  • In this connotation the terms "dissenter" and "dissenting," which had acquired a somewhat contemptuous flavour, have tended since the middle of the 19th century to be replaced by "nonconformist," a term which did not originally imply secession, but only refusal to conform in certain particulars (e.g.

    0
    2
  • On the other hand, since the isolation of the sacred, even when originally conceived in the interest of the profane, may be interpreted as self-protection on the part of the sacred as against defiling contact, taboo takes on the connotation of ascetic virtue, purity, devotion, dignity and blessedness.

    0
    2
  • The senate itself might, in the later Republic, invite a victorious general to assume the title; and in these two customs - the salutation of the troops, and the invitation of the senate - we see in the germ the two methods by which under the Empire the princeps was designated; while in the military connotation attaching to the name even under the Republic we can detect in advance the military character by which the emperor and the Empire were afterwards distinguished.

    0
    2
  • But the title of emperor was also used in the middle ages, and is still used, in a loose and vague sense, without any ecclesiastical connotation or hint of connexion with Rome (the two attributes which should properly distinguish an emperor), and merely in order to designate a non-European ruler with a large extent of territory.

    0
    2
  • Thus, in Germany, with the decay of the empire the title " prince " received a sovereign connotation, though it ranks, as in France, below that of " duke."

    0
    2
  • " This use of the word " prince " - which has in England so lofty a connotation - to translate foreign titles of such varying importance and significance naturally leads to a good deal of confusion in the public mind.

    0
    2
  • In its more restricted connotation, denoting the district to which it is usually applied or a part thereof, it is found in Joshua xx.

    0
    2
  • For it was not possible for Kant to avoid the misleading connotation of the terms employed by him.

    0
    2
  • With the chi rho in such a dominant position, it is probable that the remainder of the pavement has a Christian connotation.

    0
    2
  • If you are writing an informative article, try not to use words with a negative connotation.

    0
    2
  • By using a word with a negative connotation, Jenny caused her graduation speech to be a disaster.

    0
    2
  • However, since the retailers did not want such a negative connotation given to the day, soon the term "Black Friday" meant that stores were operating in the black.

    0
    2
  • Though the word fat has taken on a highly negative connotation when it comes to health, fat is actually required in a healthy diet.

    0
    2
  • Because so many people assume it has a sexual connotation, it can be difficult to understand.

    0
    2
  • No negative connotation about wearing a piece of Sexy Secrets....unlike positioning it as a girdle."

    0
    2
  • There's a somewhat negative connotation to the "fake" styles because of the way they're often sold.

    0
    2
  • While you can often find the most extreme, string-style peekaboos for sale at this site, the word "peekaboo" also takes on a slightly different connotation.

    0
    2
  • You can use colors, weather, flowers and the environment as metaphors for your feelings and relationship, but beware the connotation that some people apply to different metaphors.

    0
    2
  • If there is no matrimonial connotation to the ring, however, it may be wiser to wear it on the right hand to avoid any confusion, either by the wearer or other friends noticing the new jewelry.

    0
    2
  • If the new bride-to-be is still uncomfortable with the connotation of a ring that once was part of a defunct relationship, a new, more suitable ring can be chosen at a later time.

    0
    2
  • Although the word "myth" often has a negative connotation, in this case the description is only suitable because sightings are reported around the world, and throughout many different cultures.

    0
    2
  • The other connotation is of a shoe that allows you to feel more in tune with the earth and the natural movements of your feet.

    0
    2
  • Another religious connotation may be an individual's promise to follow the teachings of a particular saint.

    0
    3
Browse other sentences examples →