How to use Connecticut in a sentence

connecticut
  • In the old statehouse, the wise men of Connecticut were sitting.

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  • Presbyterianism was stronger in Connecticut than in Massachusetts.

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  • Foote (1780-1846) of Connecticut of a resolution of inquiry into the expediency of restricting the sales of the Western lands.

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  • The people of Connecticut still remember Abraham Davenport, because he was a wise judge and a brave lawmaker.

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  • The olive green syenite found on Mount Ascutney, near the Connecticut river, in Windsor county, is a hornblendeaugite.

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  • New Hampshire claimed that her territory extended as far to the west as those of Massachusetts and Connecticut, whereas New York, under the charter of 1664, claimed eastward to the Connecticut river.

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  • The first legislature of the state met at Windsor in March 1778, and voted to admit sixteen towns east of the Connecticut river which were dissatisfied with the rule of New Hampshire.

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  • The difficulties with New Hampshire were adjusted in 1782, the west bank of the Connecticut being accepted as the final boundary, but New York refused to abandon her claims until 1790.

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  • In 1631 he converted his landed property into money, and John Hampden, his cousin, a patentee of Connecticut in 1632, was on the point of emigrating.

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  • The imprints in the enormously older new red sandstone or Lower Trias of Connecticut, and originally named Ornithichnites, belong to Dinosaurian Reptiles.

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  • His father, Alphonso Taft (1810-1891), born in Townshend, Vermont, graduated at Yale College in 1833, became a tutor there, studied law at the Yale Law School, was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1838, removed to Cincinnati in 1839, and became one of the most influential citizens of Ohio.

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  • His boyhood was spent with a grandmother in Middletown, Connecticut; and prior to his entering college he had read widely in English literature and history, had surpassed most boys in the extent of his Greek and Latin work, and had studied several modern languages.

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  • Graduating at the university of North Carolina in 1816, he studied law in the famous Litchfield (Connecticut) law school, and in 1819 was admitted to practice in Southampton county, Virginia.

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  • His first contributions to mathematical physics were two papers published in 1873 in the Transactions of the Connecticut Academy on "Graphical Methods in the Thermodynamics of Fluids," and "Method of Geometrical Representation of the Thermodynamic Properties of Substances by means of Surfaces."

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  • The Deerfield, West, Williams, White, Passumpsic and Nulhegan rivers are the largest of the many streams which are tributary to the Connecticut.

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  • Biennial appropriations are made for the support of the deaf and dumb, the blind and imbecile children at various institutions in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

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  • Among the public buildings and places of interest are the three churches on the Green, built in 5854; Center Church (Congregational), in the rear of which is the grave of John Dixwell (1608-1689), one of the regicides; United (formerly known as North) Church (Congregational), and Trinity Church, which belongs to one of the oldest Protestant Episcopal congregations in Connecticut.

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  • Among the newspapers of New Haven are the Morning Journal and Courier (1832, Republican), whose weekly edition, the Connecticut Herald and Weekly Journal, was established as the New Haven Journal in 1766; the Palladium (Republican; daily, 1840; weekly, 1828); the Evening Register (Independent; daily, 1840; weekly, 1812); and the Union (1873), a Democratic evening paper.

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  • In 1900 New Haven was the most important manufacturing centre in Connecticut, and in 1905 it was second only to Bridgeport in the value of its factory product.

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  • Hoosick Falls was settled about 1688 by Dutch settlers - settlers from Connecticut and Massachusetts came after 1763 - and it was first incorporated in 1827.

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  • South Hadley Falls are connected with Holyoke by a bridge across the Connecticut river.

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  • He then studied law for a short time at Wrentham, Massachusetts; was tutor in Latin and Greek (1820-1822) and librarian (1821-1823) at Brown University; studied during 1821-1823 in the famous law school conducted by Judge James Gould at Litchfield, Connecticut; and in 1823 was admitted to the Norfolk (Mass.) bar.

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  • He took an active part in the movements in Connecticut preceding the War of Independence, and from 1774 to 1776 was a delegate from Connecticut to the Continental Congress.

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  • The measure soon met with strong opposition in the northern states, and Personal Liberty Laws were passed to hamper officials in the execution of the law; Indiana in 1824 and Connecticut in 1828 providing jury trial for fugitives who appealed from an original decision against them.

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  • A trading post was established at the mouth of the Cuyahoga river as early as 1786, but the place was not permanently settled until 1796, when it was laid out as a town by Moses Cleaveland (1754-1806), who was then acting as the agent of the Connecticut Land Company, which in the year before had purchased from the state of Connecticut a large portion of the Western Reserve.

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  • In 1766 the region was visited by the Connecticut traveller Jonathan Carver (1732-1780).

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  • An old Indian trail between the Hudson and Connecticut valley ran through the township, and was once a leading outlet of the Berkshire country.

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  • He graduated at Yale in 1767, studied theology under the Rev. John Smalley (1734-1820) at Berlin, Connecticut, and was licensed to preach in 1769.

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  • Huntington, named in honour of Samuel Huntington (1736-1796), of Connecticut, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was first settled about 1829, was incorporated as a town in 1848 and was chartered as a city in 1873.

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  • Worsted cloths for men's wear seem to have been made first about 1870 at nearly the same time in the Washington mills here, in the Hockanum mills of Rockville, Connecticut, and in Wanskuck mills, Providence, Rhode Island.

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  • Pittston, named in honour of William Pitt, earl of Chatham, was one of the five original towns founded in the Wyoming Valley by the Susquehanna Company of Connecticut; it was first settled about 1770 and was incorporated as a borough in 1803.

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  • Kewanee was settled in 1836 by people from Wethersfield, Connecticut, and was first chartered as a city in 1897.

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  • In 1689 Was held here the first inter-colonial convention in America, when delegates from Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, Connecticut and New York met to treat with representatives of the Five Nations and to plan a system of colonial defence.

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  • In June 1754, in pursuance of a recommendation of the Lords of Trade, a convention of representatives of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland met here for the purpose of confirming and establishing a closer league of friendship with the Iroquois and of arranging for a permanent union of the colonies.

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  • He was first president of Wesleyan University from the opening of the university in 1831 until his death on the 22nd of February 1839 in Middletown, Connecticut.

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  • Six years later Greenwich was one of the first towns of the New Haven Colony to submit to Connecticut.

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  • The U.S.A. Department of Agriculture, in co-operation with local growers, devoted a great deal of attention and money to the problem, and Sumatra tobacco of very high quality is now produced in Florida and Connecticut.

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  • The following analyses of upper leaves made at the Connecticut state station, and recorded in Report No.

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  • Leaving the Democratic party on the Kansas-Nebraska issue, he assisted in the formation of the Republican party in Connecticut, and was its candidate for governor in 1856; he was a delegate to the Republican national conventions of 1856 and 1860.

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  • He died at Hartford, Connecticut, on the with of February 1878.

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  • From 1773 to 1775 he represented the town of Windsor in the general assembly of Connecticut, and in the latter year became a member of the important commission known as the "Pay Table," which supervised the colony's expenditures for military purposes during the War of Independence.

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  • From 1780 to 1785 he was a member of the governor's council of Connecticut, which, with the lower house before 1784 and alone from 1784 to 1807, constituted a supreme court of errors; and from 1785 to 1789 he was a judge of the state superior court.

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  • In 1787, with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson (1727-1819), he was one of Connecticut's delegates to the constitutional convention at Philadelphia, in which his services were numerous and important.

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  • In particular, when disagreement seemed inevitable on the question of representation, he, with Roger Sherman, proposed what is known as the "Connecticut Compromise," by which the Federal legislature was made to consist of two houses, the upper having equal representation from each state, the lower being chosen on the basis of population.

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  • From 1789 to 1796 he was one of the first senators from Connecticut under the new Constitution.

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  • In 1803 he was again elected to the governor's council, and in 1807, on the reorganization of the Connecticut judiciary, was appointed chief justice of the new Supreme Court.

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  • The Pawcatuck river is the largest stream in the western half of the state, and along the lower part of its course it forms the boundary between Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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  • They were easily repulsed in an attack upon the Providence town arsenal, and Dorr, after a brief period of exile in Connecticut, was convicted of high treason on the 26th of April 1844, and was sentenced to imprisonment for life.

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  • The leading current monthlies include the New York Forum (1886), Arena (1890), Current Literature (1888), and Bookman, the Chicago, Dial (1880), and the Greenwich, Connecticut, Literary Collector.

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  • He preached in the Presbyterian church at East Hampton, Long Island (1798-1810, being ordained in 1 799); in the Congregational church at Litchfield, Connecticut (1810-1826), in the Hanover Street church of Boston (1826-1832), and in the Second Presbyterian church of Cincinnati, Ohio (1833-1843); was president of the newly established Lane Theological Seminary at Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, and was professor of didactic and polemic theology there (1832-1850), being professor emeritus until his death.

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  • She was educated at Litchfield Seminary, and from 1822 to 1832 conducted a school for girls at Hartford, Connecticut, with her sister Harriet's assistance, and from 1832 to 1834 conducted a similar school in Cincinnati.

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  • Charles Beecher (1815-1900), another of Lyman's sons, was born at Litchfield, Connecticut, on the 7th of October 1815.

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  • Thomas Kinnicutt Beecher (1824-1900), another son, born at Litchfield, Connecticut, on the 10th of February 1824, was pastor of the Independent Congregational church (now the Park church), at Elmira, New York, one of the first institutional churches in the country, from 1854 until his death at Elmira on the 14th of March 1900.

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  • Norwalk was settled in 1817 and was named from Norwalk, Connecticut; it was incorporated as a town in 1829 and chartered as a city in 1881.

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  • The Connecticut grantees were incorporated in 1803 as "the proprietors of the half-million acres of land lying south of Lake Erie."

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  • Derby, Ansonia and Shelton form one of the most important manufacturing communities in the state; although their total population in 1900 (23, 448) was only 2.9% of the state's population, the product of their manufactories was 7.4% of the total manufactured product of Connecticut.

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  • Just above Holyoke the Connecticut leaves the rugged highlands through a rift between Mt Tom (1214 ft.; ascended by a mountain-railway from Holyoke) and Mt Holyoke (954 ft.), and begins a meandering valley course, falling (in the Hadley Falls) in great volume some 60 ft.

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  • He opposed over-centralization of government and favoured the Connecticut Compromise, and after the work of the Convention was done used his influence to secure the adoption of the Constitution.'

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  • Bordering on the lowlands of the Connecticut, Mt Tom (1214 ft.) and a few other hills (Mt Holyoke, 954 ft.; Mt Toby, 1275) form conspicuous landmarks.

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  • But in the derivant valley peneplains developed in the present cycle of denudation, and there are residual summits also; in the Connecticut Valley trap ridges, of which Mt Tom and Mt Holyoke are the best examples; at Mt Holyoke, lava necks; occasionally in the lowlands, ridges of resistant sandstone, like Deerfield Mountain near Northampton; in the Berkshire Valley, summits of resistant schists, like Greylock, the highest summit in the state.

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  • The Connecticut lowland is cut from 5 to 18 m.

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  • The Connecticut is the most considerable stream, and is navigable by small craft.

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  • Parallel to this shrinkage was the decrease in ranging sheep (82.0% from 1850-1900; 34.2% from 1890-1900), and cattle, once numerous in the hill counties of the west, and in the Connecticut Valley; Boston, then ranking after London as the second wool market of the world, and being at one time the chief packing centre of the country.

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  • Tobacco, which has been cultivated since colonial times, especially since the Civil War, is grown exclusively in the Connecticut Valley or on its borders.

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  • Vast water-power is developed on the Merrimac at Lawrence and Lowell, and on the Connecticut at South Hadley, and to a less extent at scores of other cities on many streams and artificial ponds; many of the machines that have revolutionized industrial conditions since the beginning of the factory system have been invented by Massachusetts men; and the state contains various technical schools of great importance.

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  • More patents are issued, relatively, to citizens of Massachusetts than to those of any other state except Connecticut.

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  • In the extreme north-west of the state, at Williamstown, is Williams College (1793), and in the Connecticut Valley is Amherst College (1821), both of these unsectarian.

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  • Others, discontented with Massachusetts autocracy and wishing, too, " to secure more room," went to Connecticut (q.v.) where they established a bulwark against the Dutch of New York.

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  • A witchcraft scare (at its worst in 1691-1697, though the earliest Connecticut case was in1646-1647and the earliest in Boston in 1648) led to another tragedy of ignorance.

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  • The early history was rendered unquiet at times by wars with the Indians, the chief of which were the Pequot War in 1637, and King Philip's War in 16 75-7 6; and for better combining against these enemies, Massachusetts, with Connecticut, New Haven and New Plymouth, formed a confederacy in 1643, considered the prototype of the larger union of the colonies which conducted the War of American Independence (1 7758 3).

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  • Of the 231,791 troops sent by all the colonies into the field, reckoning by annual terms, Massachusetts sent 67,9.07, the next highest being 31,939 from Connecticut, Virginia furnishing only 26,678; and her proportion of sailors was very much greater still.

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  • In 1901 he delivered a series of lectures at Hartford Theological Seminary, Connecticut, U.S.A., published under the title The Evolution of Congregationalism.

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  • Discontent with the religious policy of New Haven, however, caused a number of the Stamford citizens to withdraw and to found Hempstead, Long Island, and for the same reason many of the people of Stamford approved of the union of the New Haven colony and Connecticut by the charter of 1662; and in October 1662 Stamford submitted to Connecticut.

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  • On the New York side of the Hudson the rocks are crystalline, the surface a region of low hills, a continuation of the crystalline area of Connecticut, and comparable with the Piedmont plateau of the Southern states.

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  • Arriving at Manhattan early in May, a few of the men remained there, another small party established a temporary post (Fort Nassau) on the Delaware river, and still another began a fortified settlement on the site of the present Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • The Dutch had long claimed the whole coast from Delaware Bay to Cape Cod, but by the treaty of Hartford (1650), negotiated between himself and the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England, Stuyvesant agreed to a boundary which on the mainland roughly determined the existing boundary between New York and Connecticut and on Long Island extended southward from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • The Connecticut Charter of 1662 included in that colony some settlements acknowledged by the treaty of Hartford to belong to New Netherland, and strife was renewed.

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  • At his call, delegates from Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and Maryland met in New York City with delegates from New York on the 1st of May 1690 to consider concerted action against the enemy, and although the expedition which they sent out was a failure it numbered 855 men, New York furnishing about one-half the men, Massachusetts one of the two commanders and Connecticut the other.

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  • Therefore, in response to their repeated complaints of the weakness of the English arising from disunion, Governor Fletcher, in 1694, called another intercolonial conference consisting of delegates from New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Jersey, and urged the necessity of more united feelings.

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  • When they had assumed a neutral attitude, he persuaded a number of them to join troops from New York, New Jersey and Connecticut in the unsuccessful expeditions of 1709 and 1711 against the French at Montreal.

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  • A few days after the fight at Lexington and Concord, Connecticut authorized an expedition under Ethan Allen which surprised and captured Ticonderoga and Crown Point.

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  • This firm prospered for a while, and issued in 1889 Mark Twain's own comic romance, A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court, and in 1892 a less successful novel, The American Claimant.

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  • He died at Redding, Connecticut, on the 21st of April 1910.

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  • Cheney, a Connecticut school teacher, whom he had met in a Grahamite (vegetarian) boarding-house in New York.

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  • He delivered episcopal charges to the clergy of Connecticut and New York entitled The Churchman (5859) and The High Churchman Vindicated (1826), in which he accepted the name "high churchman," and stated and explained his principles "in distinction from the corruptions of the Church of Rome and from the Errors of Certain Protestant Sects."

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  • The Bellows Falls bridge over the Connecticut (built 1785-1792) had 2 spans of 184 ft.

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  • Kingston (at first called "Kingstown," from Kings Towne, Rhode Island) was commonly known in its early days as the "Forty Township," because the first permanent settlement was made by forty pioneers from Connecticut, who were sent out by the Susquehanna Company and took possession of the district in its name in 1769.

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  • In 1686 he became governor, with Boston as his capital, of the "Dominion of New England," into which Massachusetts (including Maine), Plymouth, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire were consolidated, and in 1688 his jurisdiction was extended over New York and the Jerseys.

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  • Newark was settled in 1666 by about thirty Puritans from Milford, Connecticut, who were followed in the next year by about the same number of their sect from Branford and Guilford.

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  • Because of the union of the towns of the New Haven Jurisdiction with Connecticut, in 1664, and the consequent admission of others than church members to civil rights, these Puritans resolved to remove and found a new town, in which, as originally in the New Haven towns, only church members should have a voice in the government.

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  • The son graduated from the College of New Jersey in 1772, and two years later began the study of law in the celebrated law school conducted by his brother-in-law, Tappan Reeve, at Litchfield, Connecticut.

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  • Hartford is served by two divisions of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by the Central New England railway, by the several electric lines of the Connecticut Company which radiate to the surrounding towns, and by the steamboats of the Hartford & New York Transportation Co., all of which are controlled by the N.Y., N.H.

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  • A stone arch bridge, with nine arches, built of granite at a cost of $1,700,000 and dedicated in 1908, spans the Connecticut (replacing the old Connecticut river bridge built in 1818 and burned in 1895), and connects Hartford with the village of East Hartford in the township of East Hartford (pop. 1900, 6406), which has important paper-manufacturing and tobacco-growing interests.

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  • Its exterior is adorned with statues and busts of Connecticut statesmen and carvings of scenes in the history of the state.

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  • The elaborately carved chair of the lieutenant-governor in the senate chamber, made of wood from the historic Charter Oak, and the original charter of 1662 (or its duplicate of the same date) are preserved in a special vault in the Connecticut state library.

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  • In this group of buildings are the Hartford public library (containing 90,000 volumes in 1908), the Watkinson library of reference (70,000 volumes in 1908), the library of the Connecticut historical society (25,000 volumes in 1908) and a public art gallery.

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  • Gallaudet; the retreat for the insane (opened for patients in 1824); the Hartford hospital; St Francis hospital; St Thomas's seminary (Roman Catholic); La Salette seminary (Roman Catholic); Trinity college (founded by members of the Protestant Episcopal church, and now non-sectarian), which was chartered as Washington College in 1823, opened in 1824, renamed Trinity College in 1845, and in 1907-1908 had 27 instructors and 208 students; the Hartford Theological seminary, a Congregational institution, which was founded at East Windsor Hill in 1834 as the Theological Institute of Connecticut, was removed to Hartford in 1865, and adopted its present name in 1885; and, affiliated with the last mentioned institution, the Hartford School of Religious Pedagogy.

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  • In 1909 Hartford was the home city of six fire insurance and six life insurance companies, the principal ones being the Aetna (fire), Aetna Life, Phoenix Mutual Life, Phoenix Fire, Travelers (Life and Accident), Hartford Fire, Hartford Life, National Fire, Connecticut Fire, Connecticut General Life and Connecticut Mutual Life.

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  • The first settlement on the site of Hartford was made by the Dutch from New Amsterdam, who in 1633 established on the bank of the Connecticut river, at the mouth of the Park river, a fort which they held until 1654.

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  • The township of Hartford was one of the first three original townships of Connecticut.

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  • In 1636 Hartford was the meeting-place of the first general court of the Connecticut colony; the Fundamental Orders, the first written constitution, were adopted at Hartford in 1639; and after the union of the colonies of New Haven and Connecticut, accomplished by the charter of 1662, Hartford became the sole capital; but from 1701 until 1873 that honour was shared with New Haven.

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  • The legislatures of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and town meetings in Cheshire and Grafton counties (New Hampshire) and in Windham county (Vermont) accepted the invitation, and the convention, composed of 12 delegates from Massachusetts, 7 from Connecticut, 4 from Rhode Island, 2 from New Hampshire and 1 from Vermont, all Federalists, met on the 15th of December 1814, chose George Cabot of Massachusetts president and Theodore Dwight of Connecticut secretary, and remained in secret session until the 5th of January 1815, when it adjourned sine die.

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  • The legislatures of Massachusetts and Connecticut approved of these proposed amendments and sent commissioners to Washington to urge their adoption, but before their arrival the war had closed, and not only did the amendments fail to receive the approval of any other state, but the legislatures of nine states expressed their disapproval of the Hartford Convention itself, some charging it with sowing "seeds of dissension and disunion."

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  • In national affairs Maryland early took a stand of perhaps farreaching consequences in refusing to sign the Articles of Confederation (which required the assent of all the states before coming into effect), after all the other states had done so (in 1779), until those states claiming territory between the Alleghany Mountains and the Mississippi and north of the Ohio - Virginia, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut - should have surrendered such claims. As those states finally yielded, the Union was strengthened by reason of a greater equality and consequently less jealousy among the original states, and the United States came into possession of the first territory in which all the states had a common interest and out of which new states were to be created.

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  • In September 1650 he came to an agreement with the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England at Hartford upon the boundary between New Netherland and Connecticut, involving the sacrifice of a large amount of territory, the new boundary crossing Long Island from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, and on the mainland north from a point west of Greenwich Bay, 4 m.

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  • Copies of the resolutions were sent to the governors of the various states, to be laid before the different state legislatures, and replies were received from Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia, but all except that from Virginia were unfavourable.

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  • Steel seems to have been made here from native iron in 1727, and in 1740 the General Court of Connecticut granted three Connecticut citizens who sought to make steel in "Symsbury" a fifteen years' monopoly of making steel in the colony.

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  • The word "awakening" in this sense was frequently (and possibly first) used by Jonathan Edwards at the time of the Northampton revival of 1734-1735, which spread through the Connecticut Valley and prepared the way for the work in Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut (1740-1741) of GeorgeWhitefield, who had previously been preaching in the South, especially at Savannah, Georgia.

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  • Fertile soil in New Hampshire is confined largely to the bottom-lands of the Merrimac and Connecticut rivers, where on deposits of glacial drift, which are generally quite deep in the southern half of the state, there is considerable alluvium.

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  • In the bottom lands of the Merrimac and of the Connecticut, south of the White Mountains, a large part of the Indian corn and vegetables is grown.

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  • But there was a reluctance to incur the expense of a contest with so powerful a neighbour as New York, and in 1764 that province procured from the king in council a royal order declaring the western boundary of New Hampshire to be the western bank of the Connecticut river.

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  • Thus Long Island (fronting Connecticut, but belonging to New York state), Block Island (part of the small state of Rhode Island), Marthas Vineyard and Nantucket (parts of Massachusetts) may be best explained.

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  • In New York, New Jersey and Connecticut the city element also exceeded half of the population.

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  • A few years later attempts were made to work mines of lead and cobalt in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

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  • It is believed that the first steel made in the United States was made in Connecticut in 1728.

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  • In two colonies, Rhode Island and Connecticut, the colonial charter was substantially maintained as the constitution of the state for many years, in the former case till 1842, in the latter till 1818.

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  • In colonial days the superior judges were appointed by the governors, except in Rhode Island and Connecticut, where the legislatures elected them.

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  • Three of the original thirteen have their judges elected by the legislatures, and in five others, together with Maine and Mississippi among the newer states, they are appointed by the governor, subject to the approval of the executive council, the Senate, or (in Connecticut) the General Assembly.

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  • Although local affairs do nut now enlist, even in New England, so large a measure of interest and public spirit as the town system used to evoke in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut in the thirties, still, broadly speaking, the rural local government of America may be deemed satisfactory.

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  • Painesville was founded in1800-1802by settlers from Connecticut and New York, conspicuous among whom was General Edward Paine (1746-1841), an officer from Connecticut in the War of Independence; it was incorporated as a village in 1832, and became a city in 1902 under the new Ohio municipal code.

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  • No railway enters this township; the Ledyard Free Bridge (the first free bridge across the Connecticut) connects it with Norwich,Vt., which is served by the Boston & Maine railway.

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  • He removed with his parents to Stoughton in 1723, attended the country school there, and at an early age learned the cobbler's trade in his father's shop. Removing to New Milford, Connecticut, in 1743, he worked as county surveyor, engaged in mercantile pursuits, studied law, and in 1754 was admitted to the bar.

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  • He represented New Milford in the Connecticut Assembly in 1 7551 75 6 and again in 1758-1761.

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  • He was once more a member of the Connecticut Assembly in 1764-1766, was one of the governor's assistants in 1766-1785, a judge of the Connecticut superior court in 1766-1789, treasurer of Yale College in 1765-1776, a delegate to the Continental Congress in1774-1781and again in 1783-1784, a member of the Connecticut Committee of Safety in1777-1779and in 1782, mayor of New Haven in 1784-1793, a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention of 1787 and to the Connecticut Ratification Convention of the same year, and a member of the Federal House of Representatives in 1789-1791 and of the United States Senate in 1791-1793.

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  • Their share in bringing about the final settlement, which provided for equal representation in one house and proportional representation in the other, was so important that the settlement itself has come to be called the "Connecticut Compromise."

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  • With the resumption of peaceful enterprise, the stimulus of bounties was again applied - first by Connecticut in 1783; and such efforts have been continued sporadically down almost to the present day.

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  • On the 31st of March 1820 missionaries of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions - two clergymen, two teachers, a physician, a farmer, and a printer, each with his wife - and three Hawaiians educated in the Cornwall (Connecticut) Foreign Missionary School, arrived from America and began their labours at Honolulu.

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  • A territorial dispute with Connecticut over the Wyoming Valley was settled in favour of Pennsylvania in 1782 by a court of arbitration appointed by the Continental Congress.

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  • He was arrested in November 1775 by a mob o¢ lawless Whigs, and was kept in prison in Connecticut for six weeks; his parochial.

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  • On the 25th of March 1783 he was chosen their bishop by ten episcopal clergymen of Connecticut, meeting in Woodbury; as he could not take the British oath of allegiance, Seabury was shut out from consecration by the English bishops, and he was consecrated by Scotch bishops at Aberdeen on the 14th of November 1784.

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  • He returned to Connecticut in 1785 and made New Haven his home, becoming rector of St James's Church there.

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  • Norwich was settled in 1659 by colonists from Saybrook under the leadership of Captain John Mason (1600-1672), who had crushed the power of the Pequot Indians in Connecticut in 1637, and the Rev. James Fitch (1622-1702), who became a missionary to the Mohegans."

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  • Samuel Huntington (1731-1796) removed to Norwich about 1758, was a member of the Continental Congress in1776-1783and its president in 1779-1781, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a justice of the supreme court of Connecticut in 1774-1784, and governor of Connecticut in 1786-1796.

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  • Mitchell (" Ik Marvel ") was also born here; and Norwich was the home after 1825 of William Alfred Buckingham (1804-1875), war governor of Connecticut.

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  • Mount Vernon is in the township of Eastchester, which was settled from Connecticut in 1664, possibly in the hope of pushing Connecticut's boundary nearer the Hudson.

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  • In 1700 it was incorporated as a township. The "old Connecticut path," the Boston-to-Worcester turnpike, was important to the early fortunes of Framingham Center, while the Boston & Worcester railway (1834) made the greater fortune of South Framingham.

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  • Foote (1780-1846) of Connecticut, calling for the restriction of the sale of public lands to those already in the market, but was con cerned primarily with the relation to one another and the respective powers of the federal government and the individual states, Hayne contending that the constitution was essentially a compact between the states, and the national government and the states, and that any state might, at will, nullify any federal law which it considered to be in contravention of that compact.

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  • His father, Thomas (1778-1851), was born in Rockingham (then Augusta) county, Virginia; he was hospitable, shiftless, restless and unsuccessful, working now as a carpenter and now as a farmer, and could not read or write before his marriage, in Washington county, Kentucky, on the 12th of June 1806, to Nancy Hanks (1783-1818), who was a native of Virginia, who is said to have been the illegitimate daughter of one Lucy Hanks, and who seems to have been, in 1 Lincoln's birthday is a legal holiday in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

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  • First settled in 1679, Enfield was a part of the township of Springfield, Massachusetts, until 1683, when it was made a separate township; in 1749 it became a part of Connecticut.

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  • When, on the conclusion of peace, the church-people of Connecticut sent Dr Samuel Seabury to England, with a request to the archbishop of Canterbury to consecrate him, it is not surprising that Archbishop Moore refused.

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  • The Scottish bishops, however, being hampered by no such legal restrictions, were more amenable; and on the 11th of November 1784 Seabury was consecrated by them to the see of Connecticut.

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  • The burying-ground includes the tomb of Robert Treat (1622-1710), commander of the Connecticut troops in King Philip's War, leader of the company that founded Newark, New Jersey, governor of Connecticut (from 1683 to 1698) at the time its charter was demanded by Governor Andros in 1686-1687, and deputy-governor in1676-1683and 1698-1708; and also that of Jonathan Law (1674-1751), governor of Connecticut from 1742 to 1751.

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  • In 1664 Milford, with the other members of the Jurisdiction, was absorbed by Connecticut; this caused considerable dissatisfaction and some of the inhabitants under the lead of Robert Treat removed to New Jersey and assisted in the founding of Newark.

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  • A mythology reminiscent of Italy is the "Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds" in the Germanic Museum at Nuremberg, founded directly upon the "Hercules and Centaur Nessus" of Pollaiuolo, now at New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A. Of portraits, besides that of his father already mentioned as done in 1497, there is his own of 1498 at Madrid.

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  • The father returned to Connecticut in 1837 and the son graduated at Hamilton College (Clinton, N.Y.)in 1847.

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  • In 1856 he took a leading part in organizing the Republican party in Connecticut, and in 1857 became editor of the Hartford Evening Press, a newly established Republican newspaper.

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  • From April 1866 to April 1867 he was governor of Connecticut, and in 1867 he bought the Hartford Courant, with which he combined the Press, and which became under his editorship the most influential newspaper in Connecticut and one of the leading Republican papers in the country.

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  • The Virginia plan was opposed by the smaller states, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland, which demanded equal representation in the legislature.

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  • In 1771 the people of the Illinois country, through a meeting at Kaskaskia, demanded a form of self-government similar to that of Connecticut.

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  • Connecticut received wampum for taxes in 1637 at four a penny.

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  • In 1640 Massachusetts adopted the Connecticut standard, "white to pass at four and bleuse at two a penny."

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  • It was current with silver in Connecticut in 1704.

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  • There do not appear to be any men in his line of descent given to scholarly or intellectual pursuits till we get back to the 17th century, when we come to Abijah Whitman, a clergyman, settled in Connecticut.

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  • Tungsten trioxide, W0 31 occurs in nature as wolframine, a yellow mineral found in Cumberland, Limoges, Connecticut and in North Carolina.

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  • Among the principal residence streets are Massachusetts, especially between Dupont and Sheridan circles, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Vermont Avenues and 16th Street, all in the N.W.

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  • Connecticut was founded in the same year by emigrants from Massachusetts without any other authority than that given by the mother colony.

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  • A separate colony was founded at New Haven in 1638 by emigrants from England who had stayed for a time in Boston and other Massachusetts towns, but this was annexed to Connecticut in 1664 under the Connecticut charter of 1662.

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  • Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut and New Haven constituted in their early years a group of neighbouring colonies, substantially independent of the mother country, and possessing a unity of purpose and similar institutions but in need of mutual protection from the Indians, the Dutch and the French, and also needing an arbiter to whom they might refer their own disputes, especially those relating to boundaries and trade.

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  • The commissioners met regularly until 1684 - annually until New Haven submitted to Connecticut in 1664, and triennially from 1664 to 1684, when Massachusetts lost its first charter.

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  • This done, the home government set to work to organize the royal domain which should be known as New England, or the Dominion of New England, and its plan for this provided for the annulment of the charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut, and the inclusion in the Dominion of these colonies, and New Hampshire, Maine, New York and the Jerseys, thereby restoring to New England all the territory, with the exception of Pennsylvania, that was included in the grant to the New England Council in 1620.

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  • A temporary government was established at Boston in May 1686, with Joseph Dudley as president, and in December of the same year Edmund Andros arrived with a commission and instructions which were a copy of those to the governor of New York and made him governor of all New England except Rhode Island and Connecticut.

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  • Connecticut successfully baffled the royal servants for a time, but when threatened with a division of its territory agreed not to resist the royal purpose, and on the last day of October 1687 it passed under the general government of New England.

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  • Under William and Mary no attempt was made to preserve the Dominion of New England, but Rhode Island and Connecticut were permitted to resume government under their old charters, Massachusetts received a new one, and New Hampshire again became a separate royal province.

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  • The surviving church became involved in Socinianism and Universalism, but maintained a somewhat vigorous life and, through Wickenden and others, exerted considerable influence at Newport, in Connecticut, New York and elsewhere.

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  • From 1711 onward Valentine Wightman (1681-1747) of Connecticut (General Baptist) made occasional missionary visits to New York at the invitation of Nicolas Eyres, a business man who had adopted Baptist views, and in 1714 baptized Eyres and several others, and assisted them in organizing a church.

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  • The General (Six Principles) Baptists of Rhode Island and Connecticut had increased their congregations and membership, and before the beginning of the 18th century had inaugurated annual associational meetings.

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  • She preached in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.

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  • The states which lead in the quantity of oysters taken are Maryland, Virginia, New York, New Jersey and Connecticut; the annual value of the output in each of these is over $ I, 000,000.

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  • Mdbius estimates that for every oyster brought to 1 Connecticut has greatly benefited its oyster industry by giving to oyster-culturists a fee simple title to the lands under control by them.

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  • A similar though ruder device is used in the Poquonock river in Connecticut.

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  • In 1824-1828 he was professor of belles-lettres in Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut, and at this time he was one of the editors of the Episcopal Watchman.

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  • The first settlement in the township was made in 1653; in1662-1664Huntington was under the government of Connecticut.

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  • From the Connecticut to the Raritan the savages rose in arms, laid waste the farms, massacred the settlers and compelled those who escaped to take refuge on Manhattan Island.

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  • The duke of York commissioned Sir Edmund Andros as governor of his dominions, including " all ye land from ye West side of Connecticut River to ye East side of Delaware Bay."

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  • By its orders the royal governor, William Franklin (the natural son of Benjamin Franklin) was arrested and deported to Connecticut, where he remained a prisoner for two years, until exchanged and taken to New York under British protection.

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  • This merely federal plan, reported from a Conference attended by the delegates from Connecticut, New York and Delaware, as well as those from New Jersey (and by Luther Martin of Maryland), consisted of nine resolutions; the first was that " the Articles of Confederation ought to be so revised, corrected and enlarged as to render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of government and the preservation of the Union "; and the actual " plan " was for a single legislative body, in which each state should be represented by one member, and which should elect the supreme court and have power to remove the executive (a Council), to lay taxes and import duties, to control commerce, and even, if necessary, to make requisitions for funds from the states.

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  • He graduated at Union College in 1826, was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, was rector for several months in Saco, Maine, and in 1828-1833 was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • The treaty of 1783 (Article II.) had defined the north-east boundary of the United States as extending along the middle of the river St Croix " from its mouth in the bay of Fundy to its source " and " due north from the source of St Croix river to the highlands; along the said highlands which divide those rivers that empty themselves into the river St Lawrence from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the north-westernmost head of Connecticut river; thence down along the middle of that river to the forty-fifth degree of north latitude."

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  • His grand-nephew, Hosea Ballou (1796-1861), born in Halifax, Vermont, on the 18th of October 1796, preached _to Universalists in Stafford, Connecticut (1815-1821); and in Massachusetts, in Roxbury (1821-1838) and in Medford (1838-1853); and in 1853 was elected first president of Tufts College at Medford, serving in that office until shortly before his death, which took place at Somerville, Massachusetts, on the 27th of May 1861.

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  • But the relapse was brief, and the Northampton revival, which had spread through the Connecticut valley and whose fame had reached England and Scotland, was followed in1739-1740by the Great Awakening, distinctively under the leadership of Edwards.

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  • The particular reason for this seems to lie in a single sermon preached at Enfield, Connecticut, in July 1741 from the text, " Their foot shall slide in due time," and commonly known from its title, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.

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  • He lived in Stockbridge in1751-1755and spoke the language of the Housatonic Indians with ease, for six months studied among the Oneidas, graduated at Princeton in 1765, studied theology at Bethlehem,Connecticut, under Joseph Bellamy,was licensed to preach in 1766, was a tutor at Princeton in 1766-1769, and was pastor of the White Haven Church, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1769-1795, being then dismissed for the nominal reason that the church could not support him, but actually because of his opposition to the Half-Way Covenant as well as to slavery and the slave trade.

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  • He preached at Colebrook, Connecticut, in1796-1799and then became president of Union College, Schenectady, New York, where he died on the 1st of August 1801.

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  • Money had to be earned, and he now secured an editorial post at Hartford, Connecticut, which he sustained until forced by ill-health, early in his twenty-fifth year, to re-seek the Haverhill farm.

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  • Other notable dates in history are 1637 and 1647, when general synods of New England churches met at Cambridge to settle disputed doctrine and define orthodoxy; the departure for Connecticut of Thomas Hooker's congregation in 1636; the meeting of the convention that framed the present constitution of the commonwealth, 1779-1780; the separation of the Congregationalists and Unitarians of the first parish church, in 1829; and the grant of a city charter in 1846.

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  • At last, in July 1781, Rochambeau's force was able to leave Rhode Island and, marching across Connecticut, joined Washington on the Hudson.

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  • Springfield is served by the Springfield division of the New York & New England, the Hartford division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the Connecticut River division of the Boston & Maine, and the Athol division and the main line of the Boston & Albany railways, and by inter-urban electric railway lines.

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  • In its extreme eastern part is the small village of Sixteen Acres; north-west of the main part of the city on the Connecticut river is another village, Brightwood (on the Boston & Maine railway) and on the Chicopee river, north-east of the business part of the city, is the village of Indian Orchard, served by the Athol division of the Boston & Albany railway.

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  • On a trip to the Connecticut Valley he selected a spot for a new colony which should have a limited membership and in which his ideas as to government might be put into execution.

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  • For some time the political affiliation was with the Connecticut river towns in Connecticut, but later the authority of the Massachusetts General Court was recognized.

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  • The first permanent white settlement on the site of Warren (then owned by Connecticut) was made in 1799 by settlers from Washington (disambiguation)|Washington county, Pennsylvania.

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  • Warren was named in honour of a surveyorMoses Warren, of New Lyme, Connecticut - employed by the Connecticut Land Company, which sold the land to the first settlers.

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  • The county was named in honour of Governor Jonathan Trumbull of Connecticut.

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  • In 1633 Captain William Holmes, of the Plymouth Colony, established near the mouth of the Farmington river a trading post, the first settlement by Englishmen in Connecticut; a more important and a permanent settlement (until 1637 called New Dorchester) was made in 1635 by immigrants from Dorchester, Massachusetts, led by the Rev. John Wareham, Roger Ludlow and others.

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  • In 1639 representatives from Windsor, with those from Wethersfield and Hartford, organized the Connecticut Colony.

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  • These two volumes dealt with Maryland and Virginia, while two later ones (1863-1864) were devoted to Connecticut.

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  • He died at New Haven, Connecticut, on the 13th of May 1859.

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  • Its surface is in general that of a gently undulating upland divided near the middle by the lowland of the Connecticut valley, the most striking physiographic feature of the state.

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  • The Connecticut river is navigable as far as Hartford, and the Thames as far as Norwich.

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  • The climate of Connecticut, though temperate, is subject to sudden changes, yet the extremes of cold and heat are less than in the other New England states.

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  • Connecticut is not an agricultural state.

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  • The accounts of the fertility of the Connecticut valley were among the causes leading to the English colonization, and until the middle of the nineteenth century agriculture was the principal occupation.

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  • The total value of Connecticut tobacco in 1907 was $2,501,000 (1906, $4,4 1 5,9 22; 1905, $3,9 11, 933), and the average farm price was 11 5 cents per lb (in 1906, 18 cents; 1905, 17 cents).

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  • But the cultivation of tobacco is confined almost exclusively to the valleys of the Connecticut and Housatonic rivers, and these lands are constantly and expensively treated with nitrogenous fertilizers; the grades raised are the broad-leaf and the Habana seed-leaf wrappers, which, excepting the Florida growth from Sumatra seed, are the nearest domestic approach to the imported Sumatra.

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  • The manufacture of cigars was begun in South Windsor, Connecticut, in 1801.

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  • About 1730 the production of iron became an important industry in the vicinity of Salisbury, and from Connecticut iron many of the American military supplies in the War of Independence were manufactured.

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  • Gold, silver and lead have also been produced, but the discovery of larger deposits of these metals in other states has caused the abandonment of all metal mines in Connecticut, except those of iron and tungsten.

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  • Manufactures form the principal source of Connecticut's wealth, - manufacturing gave occupation in 1900 to about one-fifth of the total population, and the products in that year ranked the state eleventh among the states of the American Union.

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  • Indeed, manufacturing in Connecticut is notable for its early beginning and its development of certain branches beyond that of the other states.

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  • Iron products were manufactured throughout the 18th century, nails were made before 1716 and were exported from the colony, and it was in Connecticut that cannon were cast for the Continental troops and the chains were made to block the channel of the Hudson river to British ships.

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  • Tinware was manufactured in Berlin, Hartford county, as early as 1770, and tin, steel and iron goods were peddled from Connecticut through the colonies.

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  • In 1732 the London hatters complained of the competition of Connecticut hats in their trade.

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  • In 1900 Connecticut led the United States in the manufacture of ammunition, bells, brass and copper (rolled), brass castings and finishings, brass ware and needles and pins.

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  • Connecticut has long ranked high in textile manufactures, but the product of cotton goods in 1900 ($15,489,442) and in 1905 ($ 18, 2 39, 1 55) had not materially advanced beyond that of 1890 ($ 1 5,4 0 9,476), this being due to the increase in cotton manufacturing in the South.

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  • Between 1890 and 1900 Connecticut's products in dyeing and finishing of textiles, industries which have as yet not developed in the South, increased 21 7.3% from $7 1 5,3 88 in 1890 to $2,269,967 in 1900; in 1905 their value was $2,215,314.

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  • Of the 359 manufactured products classified by the United States census, 249, or almost seven-tenths, were produced in Connecticut.

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  • In the two decades 1880-1900 more patents were secured in Connecticut in proportion to its population than in any other state.

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  • Hence Connecticut became known as the " Land of Yankee Notions "; and small wares are still manufactured, the patents granted to inventors in one city ranging from bottle-top handles, bread toasters and lamp holders, to head-rests for church pews and scissors-sharpeners.

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  • The population of Connecticut in 1880 was 622,700; in 1890 it was 746,258, - an increase of 19.8%; and in 1900 it had become 908,420, - an increase of 21.7% over that of 1890.

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  • The present constitution of Connecticut is that framed and adopted in 1818 with subsequent amendments (33 up to 1909).

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  • The jurisprudence of Connecticut, since the 17th century, has been notable for its divergence from the common law of England.

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  • The government of Connecticut is also notable for the variety of its administrative boards.

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  • The state almost entirely supports the Connecticut school for imbeciles, at Lakeville; the American school for the deaf, in Hartford; the oral school for the deaf, 1 The constitution prescribes that " the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited by a conviction of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, theft or other offense for which an infamous punishment is inflicted," but this disability may in any case be removed by a two-thirds vote of each house of the general assembly.

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  • Education has always been a matter of public interest in Connecticut.

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  • Soon after the foundation of the colonies of Connecticut and New Haven, schools similar to the English Latin schools were established.

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  • The Connecticut Code of 1650 required all parents to educate their children, and every township of 50 householders (later 30) to have a teacher supported by the men of family, while the New Haven Code of 1656 also encouraged education.

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  • Supplementing the educative influence of the schools are the public libraries (161 in number in 1907); the state appropriates $200 to establish, and $100 per annum to maintain, a public library (provided the town in which the library is to be established contributes an equal amount), and the Public Library Committee has for its duty the study of library problems. Higher education is provided by Yale University; by Trinity College, at Hartford (nonsectarian), founded in 1823; by Wesleyan University, at Middletown, the oldest college of the Methodist Church in the United States, founded in 1831; by the Hartford Theological Seminary (1834); by the Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs (founded 1881), which has a two years' course of preparation for rural teachers and has an experiment station; by the Connecticut Experiment Station at New Haven, which was established in 1875 at Middletown and was the first in the United States; and by normal schools at New Britain (established 1881), Willimantic (1890), New Haven (1894) and Danbury (1903).

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  • The first settlement by Europeans in Connecticut was made on the site of the present Hartford in 1633, by a party of Dutch from New Netherland.

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  • In the same year a trading post was established on the Connecticut river, near Windsor, by members of the Plymouth Colony, and John Oldham (1600-1636) of Massachusetts explored the valley and made a good report of its resources.

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  • Encouraged by Oldham's account of the country, the inhabitants of three Massachusetts towns, Dorchester, Watertown and New Town (now Cambridge), left that colony for the Connecticut valley.

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  • In the meantime another migration to the Connecticut country had begun in 1638, when a party of Puritans who had arrived in Massachusetts the preceding year sailed from Boston for the Connecticut coast and there founded New Haven.

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  • In 1643 the jurisdiction of the New Haven colony was extended by the admission of the townships of Milford, Guilford and Stamford to equal rights with New Haven, the recognition of their local governments, and the formation of two courts for the whole jurisdiction, a court of magistrates to try important cases and hear appeals from " plantation " courts, and a general court with legislative powers, the highest court of appeals, which was similar in composition to the general court of the Connecticut Colony.

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  • But the Connecticut authorities in their effort to establish a legal claim to the country and to thwart the efforts of the Hamilton family to assert its claims to the territory between the Connecticut river and Narragansett Bay - claims derived from a grant of the Plymouth Company to James, marquess of Hamilton (1606-1649) in 1635 - elaborated the theory that the Plymouth Company had made a grant to Warwick, and that consequently his quit claim conferred jurisdiction upon the Say and Sele Company; but even in this event, Fenwick had no right to make his sale, for which he never secured confirmation.

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  • The next step in the formation of modern Connecticut was the union of the New Haven colony with the older colony.

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  • This was accomplished by the royal charter of 1662, which defined the boundaries of Connecticut as extending from Massachusetts south to the sea, and from Narragansett bay west to the South Sea (Pacific Ocean).

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  • This charter had been secured without the knowledge or consent of the New Haven colonists and they naturally protested against the union with Connecticut.

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  • But on account of the threatened absorption of a part of the Connecticut territory by the Colony of New York granted to the duke of York in 1664, and the news that a commission had been appointed in England to settle intercolonial disputes, they finally assented to the union in 1665.

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  • It created a corporation under the name of the Governor and Company of the English Colony of Connecticut in New England in America, sanctioned the system of government already existing, provided that all acts of the general court should be valid upon being issued under the seal of the colony, and made no reservation of royal or parliamentary control over legislation or the administration of justice.

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  • Consequently there developed in Connecticut an independent, self-reliant colonial government, which looked to its chartered privileges as the supreme source of authority.

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  • Although the governmental and religious influences which moulded Connecticut were similar to those which moulded New England at large, the colony developed certain distinctive characteristics.

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  • Its policy "was to avoid notoriety and public attitudes; to secure privileges without attracting needless 1 A collection of these laws was published in his General History of Connecticut (London, 1781), by the Rev. Samuel Peters (1735-1826), a Loyalist clergyman of the Church of England, who in 1774 was forced by the patriots or Whigs to flee from Connecticut.

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  • Soon after the first settlements were made, a dispute arose with Massachusetts regarding the boundary between the two colonies; after the brief war with the Pequot Indians in 1637 a similar quarrel followed regarding Connecticut's right to the Pequot lands, and in the New England Confederation (established in 1643) friction between Massachusetts and Connecticut continued.

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  • Difficulty with Rhode Island was caused by the conflict between that colony's charter and the Connecticut charter regarding the western boundary of Rhode Island; and the encroachment of outlying Connecticut settlements on Dutch territory, and the attempt to extend the boundaries of New York to the Connecticut river, gave rise to other disputes.

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  • The attempts of Governors Joseph Dudley (1647-1720), of Massachusetts, and Thomas Dongan (1634-1715) of New York, to unite Connecticut with their colonies also caused difficulty.

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  • The relations of Connecticut and New Haven with the mother country were similar to those of the other New England colonies.

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  • The Code of 1650 (Connecticut) taxed all persons for its support, provided for the collection of church taxes, if necessary, by civil distraint, and forbade the formation of new churches without the consent of the general court.

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  • Throughout the remaining years of the 18th 1 Johnston, Connecticut, p. 130.

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  • The tree was blown down in August 1856; in June 1907 a marble shaft was unveiled on its site by the Society of Colonial Wars, of Connecticut.

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  • In the War of American Independence Connecticut took a prominent part.

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  • The patriot sentiment was so strong that Loyalists from other colonies were sent to Connecticut, where it was believed they would have no influence; and the copper mines at Simsbury were converted into a military prison; but among the nonconforming sects, on the other hand, there was considerable sympathy for the British cause.

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  • Connecticut volunteers were among the first to go to Boston after the battle of Lexington and more than one-half of Washington's army at New York in 1776 was composed of Connecticut soldiers.

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  • Yet with the exception of isolated British movements against Stonington in 1775, Danbury in 1777, New Haven in 1779 and New London in 1781 no battles were fought in Connecticut territory.

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  • In 1776 the government of Connecticut was reorganized as a state, the charter of 1662 being adopted by the general court as " the Civil Constitution of this State, under the sole authority of the people thereof, independent of any King or Prince whatever."

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  • In the Civil War Connecticut was one of the most ardent supporters of the Union cause.

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  • For information concerning industries, &c., see the Twelfth Census of the United States, and the Census of Manufactures of 1905, and a chapter in Johnston's Connecticut.

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  • Johnston's Connecticut is well written, but his theories regarding the relationship between the townships and the state are not generally accepted by historical scholars.

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  • Perhaps the most satisfactory historical work is that of Benjamin Trumbull, A Complete History of Connecticut from 1630 to 1764 (New Haven, 1804-1818).

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  • Andrews " The River Towns of Connecticut " in The Johns Hopkins University Studies (Baltimore, 1886 and1889) should be consulted for the institutions of the colonial period.

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  • For the sources, see Colonial Records of Connecticut (15 vols., Hartford, 1850-1890); The Records of the Colony and the Plantation of New Haven (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858) and Records of the State of Connecticut (2 vols., Hartford, 1894-1895).

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  • The Collections (Hartford 1860 et seq.) of the Connecticut Historical Society contain valuable material, especially the papers of Governor Joseph Talcott; and the Papers (New Haven, 1865 et seq.) of the New Haven Colony Historical Society are extremely valuable for local history; but a vast number of documents relating to the colonial and state periods, now in the state library at Hartford, have never been published.

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  • Winston, the son of a Connecticut congressman, admitted modestly after some prod­ding he was educated at Yale on a sports scholarship and had played both baseball and football for four years.

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  • Dr. Percy is also adjunct Professor of Theology at Hartford Seminary, Connecticut.

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  • The complacency of Connecticut at the time was ready made to rail against, it was so deathly unoriginal and sticky with republican fear.

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  • Connecticut compare car insurance quote Delaware florida in developing services authority in approving not only did.

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  • We live in a beautiful upscale neighborhood in Connecticut and are only about 1 hour train ride to NYC.

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  • In 1950 he became a senator, representing the state of Connecticut.

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  • She had suffered various illnesses in recent years, including Parkinson's disease and died at her Connecticut home at 6pm British time yesterday.

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  • The township of Plymouth was settled in 1769 by immigrants from New England - many originally from Plymouth, Litchfield (disambiguation)|Litchfield county, Connecticut, whence the name - under the auspices of the Susquehanna Company, which claimed this region as a part of Connecticut, and Plymouth became a centre of the contest between the "Pennamites" and the "Yankees" (representing respectively Pennsylvania and Connecticut), which grew out of the conflict of the royal charter of Pennsylvania (granted in 1681) with the royal charter of Connecticut (granted in 1662), a matter which was not settled until 1799.

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  • In 1655 he and Davenport drew up the code of laws, popularly known as the "Connecticut Blue Laws," which were published in London in 1656 under the title New Haven's Settling in New England and some Lawes for Government published for the Use of that Colony.

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  • On the 3rd of July 1778, while a considerable number of the able-bodied men were absent in the Connecticut service, a motley force of about 400 men and boys under Colonel Zebulon Butler were attacked and defeated near Kingston in the "battle of Wyoming" by about I 100 British, Provincial (Tory) and Indian troops under Major John Butler, and nearly three-fourths were killed or taken prisoners and subsequently massacred.

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  • He graduated from Yale in 1735, studied theology for a time under Jonathan Edwards, was licensed to preach when scarcely eighteen years old, and from 1740 until his death, on the 6th of March 1790, was pastor of the Congregational church at Bethlehem, Connecticut.

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  • In 1837 the Old Side obtained the majority in the General Assembly for the second time only in seven years; they seized their opportunity and abrogated the "Plan of Union of 1801 with the Connecticut Congregationalists," cut off the synod of Western Reserve and then the synods of Utica, Geneva and Genesee, without a trial, and dissolved the third presbytery of Philadelphia without providing for the standing of its ministers.

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  • He was principal of the Latin school of Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1879-1883, and was professor of jurisprudence and political economy in the College of New Jersey (Princeton University) from 1884 until his death in Princeton, N.J., on the 21st of July 1889.

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  • The Correspondence of Silas Deane was published in the Connecticut Historical Society's Collections, vol.

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  • The severity of this measure led to gross abuses and defeated its purpose; the number of abolitionists increased, the operations of the Underground Railroad became more efficient, and new Personal Liberty Laws were enacted in Vermont (1850), Connecticut (1854), Rhode Island (1854), Massachusetts (1855), Michigan (1855), Maine (1855 and 1857), Kansas (1858) and Wisconsin (1858).

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  • At Hartford occurred in 1687 the meeting of Edmund Andros and the Connecticut officials (see Connecticut).

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  • He offered to purchase for himself the Connecticut title to a farm, and in the following year he was appointed a member of a commission to settle claims according to the terms of an act, of which he was the author, confirming the Connecticut titles (see Wyoming Valley and Wilkes-BARRfi).

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  • In the same year, with Oliver Ellsworth of Connecticut, Nathaniel Gorham of Massachusetts, Gunning Bedford of Delaware, and John Rutledge of South Carolina, he was a member of the committee which reported on the Virginia proposal as to the terms of cession to the Confederation of the "back lands," or unoccupied Western territory, held by several of the states; the report was a skilful compromise made by Madison, which secured the approval of the rather exigent Virginia legislature.

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  • In 1748 a Protestant Episcopal Church was organized, and before and during the War of Independence its members belonged to the Loyalist party; their rector, Rev. James Nichols, was tarred and feathered by the Whigs, and Moses Dunbar, a member of the church, was hanged for treason by the Connecticut authorities.

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  • The Connecticut clock maker and clock peddler was the 18th-century embodiment of Yankee ingenuity; the most famous of the next generation of clock makers were Eli Terry (1772-1852), who made a great success of his wooden clocks; Chauncey Jerome, who first used brass wheels in 1837 and founded in 1844 the works of the New Haven Clock Co.; Gideon Roberts; and Terry's pupil and successor, Seth Thomas (1786-1859), who built the factory at Thomaston carried on by his son Seth Thomas (1816-1888).

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  • It acquiesced in the loss of western lands through a decision (1782) of a court appointed by the Confederation (see Wyoming Valley); favoured the levy of taxes on imports by federal authority; relinquished (1786) its claims to all western lands, except the Western Reserve (see Ox10); and in the constitutional convention of 1787 the present system of national representation in Congress was proposed by the Connecticut delegates as a compromise between the plans presented by Virginia and New Jersey.

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  • The opposition to the growth of American nationality which characterized the later years of that party found expression in a resolution of the general assembly that a bill for incorporating state troops in the Federal army would be " utterly subversive of the rights and liberties of the people of the state, and the freedom, sovereignty and independence of the same," and in the prominent part taken by Connecticut in the Hartford Convention (see Hartford) and in the advocacy of the radical amendments proposed by it.

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  • All this happened many years ago in New Britain, Connecticut.

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  • Listen, and I will tell you of the famous dark day in Connecticut.

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  • But " The Connecticut Yankee " is a wonderful tonic for those prone to romanticizing the past.

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  • Vermont and Connecticut recognize same-sex civil unions while Massachusetts has legalized gay marriage.

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  • A firsthand account suggests that the state of Connecticut is now totally overrun with whitetail deer.

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  • She had suffered various illnesses in recent years, including Parkinson 's disease and died at her Connecticut home at 6pm British time yesterday.

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  • Once such lawsuit, Griswold vs. Connecticut, ruled that "Breastfeeding is the most elemental form of parental care.

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  • For example, certain states have been found to have a higher incidence of twin births, such as Connecticut and Massachusetts.

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  • They include Virginia, Arkansas, Nebraska, Connecticut, Minnesota, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Illinois and Louisiana.

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  • Each cup is handmade in Woodbury, Connecticut from the highest quality pewter and crafted with techniques used in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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  • They are not available in certain states including Connecticut and Hawaii.

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  • This was a banner day for the Girard family of Voluntown, Connecticut.

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  • The remaining team headed to Connecticut to implement Temple's plan, but not without extreme reservations.

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  • Turkey Hill was named after Martha's 1805 Connecticut farmhouse where she has lived for over thirty years and from which many Martha Stewart television shows were produced.

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  • The Mark Twain House & Museum is located in Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • The store list includes stores in Oregon, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, California, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Missouri, Michigan, Kansas, Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Connecticut, Colorado, and Alabama.

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  • The Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services has a questionnaire for adult gamblers, teenagers and friends and families of addictive gamblers.

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  • They also display it in a room that would be delightful anywhere from Florida to New York, and California to Connecticut.

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  • October 12, 2007, was declared "50 Cent Curtis Jackson Day" by the mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

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  • Ivanka Trump attended prestigious Choate Rosemary Hall high school in Connecticut and The Chapin School in Manhattan.

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  • Titled "Pearl," episode two took place at Norwich State Hospital in Norwich, Connecticut.

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  • The family moved to Virginia and later to Denver, Colorado, eventually settling in New Canaan, Connecticut.

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  • When Natalie was eight, her family moved again, this time to Connecticut, until making the final move to Long Island, New York when Natalie was nine years old.

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  • Born in the heart of the Midwest in Ely, Minnesota, the young Miss Biel and her parents and younger brother moved often, landing in Texas, Illinois and Connecticut before permanently relocating to Boulder, Colorado.

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  • Back when Jessica Biel was eight years old and living in Connecticut, the movie Annie came out.

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  • Her daughter Alexis was born in 1965 and in 1972 the family moved to Westport, Connecticut.

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  • After the move to Connecticut, Stewart gave up her career as a stock broker and focused instead on the renovations needed in the family's new home.

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  • If you're wondering where is Gene Wilder now, he lives in Stamford, Connecticut with his wife.

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  • Yale University was founded in 1701 in New Haven, Connecticut.

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  • Yale University is located in New Haven, Connecticut.

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  • The NEASC only accredits schools and colleges within Rhode Island, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Connecticut.

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  • Charter Oak State College has accreditation from The New England Association of Schools and Colleges and the Connecticut Board of Governors for Higher Education.

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  • Around the same time, the company's headquarters were relocated from the Netherlands to Stamford, Connecticut.

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  • In the U.S., Connecticut has its own dark dog legend.

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  • Originally founded in 1942, Connecticut based Bravo began as a meat distributor for restaurants.

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  • North East Rottweiler Rescue and Referral finds homes for Rotties in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.

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  • The Dress Barn first opened its doors in 1962 in Stamford, Connecticut.

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  • Independent retirement living in Connecticut and New England can give seniors a relaxing and comfortable option in a supportive community.

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  • There are 14 locations throughout Connecticut.

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  • Seniors who want independent retirement living in Connecticut will enjoy the active communities and proximity to a host of cities and events.

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  • For more information about living and traveling in this area, visit The Official Connecticut State Vacation Guide, or contact one of the homes listed above for more information and to arrange a visit.

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  • Retirement living communities in Connecticut bring together seniors who are typically over the age of 55 in a comfortable, affordable, and beautiful setting.

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  • Even though Connecticut is a small state, its proximity to big cities like Boston and New York make it an excellent choice when it comes to picking a place for retirement.

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  • This town in Connecticut is filled with retirement villages and senior-friendly amenities.

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  • This community is located along the Connecticut River near the center of the state.

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  • With many choices for seniors in Connecticut across the state, be sure to tour facilities and do your research before making a final decision.

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  • Due to laws in New York and Connecticut, food and wine is shipped separately.

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