How to use Conjunctivitis in a sentence

conjunctivitis
  • In such cases, a small sore develops on the palpebral conjunctiva (the membrane lining the inner eyelid) and is often accompanied by conjunctivitis (inflammation of the membrane) and swollen lymph nodes in front of the ear.

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  • The laboratory testing for inclusion conjunctivitis begins with swabbing a sample from the inside of the eyelids to test for the presence of the characteristic inclusion bodies made only by chlamydia.

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  • Any parent who suspects their newborn baby has conjunctivitis should contact their GP, health visitor or midwife.

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  • The infusion may be used as an eye wash or compress to treat conjunctivitis and inflammation of the eyelids (blepharitis ).

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  • Affected birds may show conjunctivitis, runny eyes, sinusitis and swollen dark blue heads.

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  • Pain and reduced vision are not features of common infective conjunctivitis - tell your doctor if these or other worrying symptoms develop.

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  • Chlamydial conjunctivitis Both eyes will be red with a sticky discharge.

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  • There are two main types of allergic conjunctivitis according to whether the symptoms occur for part, or all of, the year.

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  • Only 56% of the patients with bacterial conjunctivitis were treated.

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  • Topical treatments for seasonal allergic conjunctivitis Clinical bottom line There is insufficient evidence to be sure which is the best treatment.

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  • Conjunctivitis and serious visual changes of unknown etiology have been reported.

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  • Conjunctivitis and a partially generalized pustular eruption followed handling vanilla pods (Hiley 1909).

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  • In contact with the eye, it may cause swelling of the eyelid and conjunctivitis.

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  • However, in severe cases of vernal conjunctivitis systemic steroids may be needed.

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  • If severe, these problems can lead to sinus or throat infections and conjunctivitis.

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  • These can include a runny nose, cough, congestion, hoarseness, conjunctivitis, and fever.

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  • Trachoma, also called granular conjunctivitis or Egyptian ophthalmia, is a contagious, chronic inflammation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis.

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  • They are also used to stop superficial bleeding by contracting the capillaries and for relief of conjunctivitis.

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  • Adenoviruses are small infectious agents that cause upper respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis, and other infections in humans.

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  • Children with acute pharyngoconjunctival fever usually show signs of conjunctivitis, fever, sore throat, runny nose, and inflammation of the lymph glands in the neck (certical adenitis).

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  • Measles is a very contagious disease primarily characterized by cough, runny nose, red eyes (conjunctivitis), and a characteristic rash on the skin and inside of the cheeks.

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  • Conjunctivitis, which appears as redness in the white of the eye, is a serious condition that must have a doctor's attention.

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  • Conjunctivitis is the inflammation of the conjunctiva, a thin, delicate membrane that covers the eyeball and lines the eyelid.

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  • Conjunctivitis is an extremely common eye disease because the conjunctiva is continually exposed to microorganisms and environmental agents that can cause infections or allergic reactions.

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  • Conjunctivitis can be acute or chronic depending on how long the condition lasts, the severity of symptoms, and the type of organism or agent involved.

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  • Other names for conjunctivitis include pink eye and red eye.

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  • Conjunctivitis is the most common eye infection of childhood.

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  • Conjunctivitis may be caused by a viral infection, such as a cold; acute respiratory infection; or other disease such as measles, herpes simplex, or herpes zoster.

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  • Bacterial conjunctivitis can occur in adults and children and is caused by organisms such as Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Hemophilus.

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  • Symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis include a pus-like discharge and crusty eyelids after awakening.

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  • Persons with symptoms of conjunctivitis who are sexually active may possibly be infected with the bacteria that cause either gonorrhea or chlamydia.

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  • Conjunctivitis may also be caused by environmental hazards, such as wind, smoke, dust, and allergic reactions caused by pollen, dust, or grass.

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  • Persons who wear contact lenses may develop allergic conjunctivitis caused by various eye solutions used and the foreign proteins contained in them.

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  • Other less common causes of conjunctivitis include exposureto sun lamps or the electrical arcs used during welding and problems with inadequate drainage of the tear ducts.

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  • The treatment of conjunctivitis depends on what caused the condition.

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  • Conjunctivitis due to a viral infection, particularly those due to adenoviruses, are usually treated by applying warm compresses to the affected area and using topical antibiotic ointments to prevent secondary bacterial infections.

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  • Viral conjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex should be referred to an ophthalmologist.

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  • In cases of bacterial conjunctivitis, a physician may prescribe an antibiotic eye ointment or eye drops containing sodium sulfacetamide (Sulamyd) to be applied daily for seven to 14 days.

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  • Allergic conjunctivitis can be treated by removing the allergic substance from a person's environment, if possible; by applying cool compresses to the eye; and by administering eye drops four to six times daily for four days.

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  • If treated properly, the prognosis for conjunctivitis is good.

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  • Conjunctivitis caused by an allergic reaction should clear up once the allergen is removed.

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  • However, allergic conjunctivitis will likely recur if the individual again comes into contact with the particular allergen.

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  • Conjunctivitis caused by bacteria or a virus, if treated properly, is usually resolved in ten to 14 days.

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  • If untreated or if treatment fails and is not corrected, conjunctivitis may cause visual impairment by spreading to other parts of the eye, such as the cornea.

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  • Inclusion conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, or white of the eye.

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  • In the neonate this condition is part of a larger group of eye diseases called neonatal conjunctivitis.

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  • Inclusion conjunctivitis is also called a chlamydial conjunctivitis.

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  • Neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis develops within five to 12 days after birth and is contracted as the child passes through the mother's cervix.

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  • The exact number of individuals with adult inclusion conjunctivitis is not known.

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  • But adult inclusion conjunctivitis, which is seen only if one is infected with chlamydia, affects 3 million annually in the United States.

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  • Up to 6 percent of newborns develop neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis.

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  • Forty percent of neonatal conjunctivitis is due to chlamydia.

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  • Between 35 and 50 percent of newborns infected with chlamydia develop neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis.

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  • Neonatal chlamydial or inclusion conjunctivitis is 10 times more common than neonatal gonorrheal conjunctivitis.

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  • Inclusion conjunctivitis is caused by an intracellular organism called Chlamydia trachomatis.

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  • The signs and symptoms of adult inclusion conjunctivitis appear two to 19 days after contact with an individual who harbors the chlamydia parasite.

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  • The symptoms of adult inclusion conjunctivitis are a foreign body sensation, watery eyes, and eyelids that stick together upon awakening.

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  • The signs of neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis appear five to 14 days after birth.

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  • There are many causes of eye problems, and appropriate treatment should be instituted as soon as possible if inclusion conjunctivitis is the cause of the ocular problem.

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  • The Giemsa stain is used often to diagnose neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis.

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  • This technique has a high rate of false positives for the adult with inclusion conjunctivitis.

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  • Immunofluorescence monoclonal antibody testing is very sensitive technique that gives a rapid diagnosis of inclusion conjunctivitis.

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  • Since inclusion conjunctivitis can mimic other diseases, it is important to rule out other types of conjunctivitis, such as those of viral etiology or allergy or those caused by gonorrhea.

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  • Neonatal inclusion conjunctivitis may resolve spontaneously within nine months without treatment.

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  • Finally, the sexual partners of individuals with inclusion conjunctivitis must also be receive antibiotic treatment.

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  • Rarely does inclusion conjunctivitis lead to blindness, unless it has been left untreated for months or longer.

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  • In the infant, inclusion conjunctivitis may persist for several years.

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  • Antibiotic eye drops only may not be sufficient to prevent inclusion conjunctivitis in the newborn if the mother is infected with chlamydia.

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  • The incidence of neonatal conjunctivitis can be reduced by applying erythromycin ointment to the newborn's eyes shortly after delivery.

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  • In the newborn, inclusion conjunctivitis may resolve spontaneously, but there are chlamydial infections which can cause blindness if not treated.

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  • When inclusion conjunctivitis is diagnosed in an adolescent, it is almost always has been contracted through sexual activity.

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  • Haemophilus influenzae-An anaerobic bacteria associated with human respiratory infections, conjunctivitis, and meningitis.

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  • Sometimes, a red inflammation of the lining of the eye (conjunctivitis) is present.

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  • H. influenzae can also produce inflammations of the eye (conjunctivitis) in newborn children.

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  • Haemophilus influenzae type B-An anaerobic bacteria associated with human respiratory infections, conjunctivitis, and meningitis.

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  • Airborne allergens can also affect the lining of the lungs, causing asthma, or the conjunctiva of the eyes, causing allergic conjunctivitis.

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  • Inflammation of the thin membrane covering the eye (allergic conjunctivitis) causes redness, irritation, and increased tearing in the eyes.

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  • Ocular lesions are common, including mild conjunctivitis, burning and grittiness.

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  • Allergens that doctors most commonly use in immunotherapy treatments for allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic asthma include extracts of inhalant allergens from tree, grass, and weed pollens; mold spores; and dust mites.

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  • If there is no relief of symptoms in 48 to 72 hours, or there is moderate to severe eye pain, changes in vision, or the conjunctivitis is suspected to be caused by herpes simplex, a physician should be notified immediately.

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  • The diagnosis of inclusion conjunctivitis cannot be made definitively without laboratory testing, but the signs of inclusion conjunctivitis can be seen by the eye care provider, even if a patient is not symptomatic.

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  • Since in the United States adult inclusion conjunctivitis is primarily a sexually transmitted disease, the incidence of inclusion conjunctivitis can be decreased either through abstinence or through the use of condoms.

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  • The organism sometimes invades localized areas of tissue, producing meningitis, infectious arthritis, conjunctivitis, cellulitis, epiglottitis, or inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart.

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  • Up to 80 percent of female adults and adolescents with inclusion conjunctivitis are asymptomatic, and almost half of those with adult inclusion conjunctivitis do not have a systemic infection of chlamydia.

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