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conic

conic

conic Sentence Examples

  • John Casey, professor of mathematics at the Catholic university of Dublin, has given elementary demonstrations founded on the theory of similitude and coaxal circles which are reproduced in his Sequel to Euclid; an analytical solution by Gergonne is given in Salmon's Conic Sections.

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  • It is therefore a conic section having its eccentricity equal to unity.

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  • Cubic equations were solved geometrically by determining the intersections of conic sections.

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  • HYPERBOLA, a conic section, consisting of two open branches, each extending to infinity.

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  • as the conic having an eccentricity greater than unity, is a convenient starting-point for the Euclidian investigation.

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  • In projective geometry it may be defined as the conic which intersects the line at infinity in two real points, or to which it is possible to draw two real tangents from the centre.

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  • The comprehensive scheme of study included mathematics also, in which he advanced as far as the conic sections in the treatise of L'Hopital.

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  • de Traytorrens, went through the elements of algebra and geometry, and the three fi r st books of the Marquis de l'Hopital's Conic Sections.

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  • The same name is also given to the first positive pedal of any central conic. When the conic is a rectangular hyperbola, the curve is the lemniscate of Bernoulli previously described.

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  • If the attraction of a central body is not the only force acting on the moving body, the orbit will deviate from the form of a conic section in a degree depending on the amount of the extraneous force; and the curve described may not be a re-entering curve at all, but one winding around so as to form an indefinite succession of spires.

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  • The northern part of Eure-et-Loir is watered by the Eure, with its tributaries the Vegre, Blaise and Avre, a small western portion by the Huisne, and the south by the Loir with its tributaries the Conic and the Ozanne.

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  • If ai, bx, cx be different forms we obtain, after development of the squared determinant and conversion to the real form (employing single and double dashes to distinguish the real coefficients of bx and cz), a(b'c"+b"c'-2 f'f") +b(c'a"+c"a'-2g'g") +c(a' +a"b'-2h'h")+2f(g'h"+g"h'-a' + 2g (h ' f"+h"f'-b'g"-b"g')+2h(f'g"+f"g'-c'h"-c"h'); a simultaneous invariant of the three forms, and now suppressing the dashes we obtain 6 (abc+2fgh -af t - bg 2 -ch2), the expression in brackets being the S well-known invariant of az, the vanishing of which expresses the condition that the form may break up into two linear factors, or, geometrically, that the conic may represent two right lines.

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  • The Arabians more closely resembled the Hindus than the Greeks in the choice of studies; their philosophers blended speculative dissertations with the more progressive study of medicine; their mathematicians neglected the subtleties of the conic sections and Diophantine analysis, and applied themselves more particularly to perfect the system of numerals, arithmetic and astronomy.

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  • He improved the methods for solving equations, and devised geometrical constructions with the aid of the conic sections.

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  • After his Tables of the Products and Powers of Numbers, 1781, and his Mathematical Tables, 1785, he issued, for the use of the Royal Military Academy, in 1787 Elements of Conic Sections, and in 1798 his Course of Mathematics.

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  • Sca, through,, u rpov, measure), in geometry, a line passing through the centre of a circle or conic section and terminated by the curve; the "principal diameters of the ellipse and hyperbola coincide with the "axes" and are at right angles; " conjugate diameters " are such that each bisects chords parallel to the other.

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  • The founder of the mathematical school was the celebrated Euclid (Eucleides); among its scholars were Archimedes; Apollonius of Perga, author of a treatise on Conic Sections; Eratosthenes, to whom we owe the first measurement of the earth; and Hipparchus, the founder of the epicyclical theory of the heavens, afterwards called the Ptolemaic system, from its most famous expositor, Claudius Ptolemaeus.

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  • Archytas of Tarentum (c. 430 B.C.) solved the problems by means of sections of a half cylinder; according to Eutocius, Menaechmus solved them by means of the intersections of conic sections; and Eudoxus also gave a solution.

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  • It is the inverse of a central conic for the focus, and the first positive pedal of a circle for any point.

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  • This obviously represents a conic intersecting the circle a(3y+bya ca(3=o in points on the common chords la+m(3+ny=o, as+b(3 +cy =o.

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  • The line la+ma+ny is the radical axis, and since as+43 c-y =o is the line infinity, it is obvious that equation (I) represents a conic passing through the circular points, i.e.

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  • This problem, also termed the " Apollonian problem," was demonstrated with the aid of conic sections by Apollonius in his book on Contacts or Tangencies; geometrical solutions involving the conic sections were also given by Adrianus Romanus, Vieta, Newton and others.

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  • The generality of treatment is indeed remarkable; he gives as the fundamental property of all the conics the equivalent of the Cartesian equation referred to oblique axes (consisting of a diameter and the tangent at its extremity) obtained by cutting an oblique circular cone in any manner, and the axes appear only as a particular case after he has shown that the property of the conic can be expressed in the same form with reference to any new diameter and the tangent at its extremity.

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  • Heath, Apollonius, Treatise on Conic Sections (Cambridge, 1896); see also H.

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  • In one solution of the former problem is the first recorded use of the property of a conic (a hyperbola) with reference to the focus and directrix.

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  • The first three books of this treatise were translated into English, and several times printed as The Elements of the Conic Sections.

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  • As extended by Sulla the sanctuary of Fortune occupied a series of five vast terraces, which, resting on gigantic I Thus the Praenestines shortened some words: they said conic for ciconia, tammodo for tantummodo (Plaut.

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  • The most important are :- Euclid's Elements; Euclid's Data; Optical Lectures, read in the public school of Cambridge; Thirteen Geometrical Lectures; The Works of Archimedes, the Four Books of Apollonius's Conic Sections, and Theodosius's Spherics, explained in a New Method; A Lecture, in which Archimedes' Theorems of the Sphere and Cylinder are investigated and briefly demonstrated; Mathematical Lectures, read in the public schools of the university of Cambridge.

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  • There are wonderful stories on record of his precocity in mathematical learning, which is sufficiently established by the well-attested fact that he had completed before he was sixteen years of age a work on the conic sections, in which he had laid down a series of propositions, discovered by himself, of such importance that they may be said to form the foundations of the modern treatment of that subject.

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  • In this way he established the famous theorem that the intersections of the three pairs of opposite sides of a hexagon inscribed in a conic are collinear.

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  • de Traytorrens, went through the elements of algebra and geometry, and the three fi r st books of the Marquis de l'Hopital's Conic Sections.

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  • The line la+ma+ny is the radical axis, and since as+43 c-y =o is the line infinity, it is obvious that equation (I) represents a conic passing through the circular points, i.e.

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  • For the subjects under this heading see the articles CONIC SECTIONS; CIRCLE; CURVE; GEOMETRICAL CONTINUITY; GEOMETRY, Axioms of; GEOMETRY, Euclidean; GEOMETRY, Projective; GEOMETRY, Analytical; GEOMETRY, Line; KNOTS, MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF; MENSURATION; MODELS; PROJECTION; Surface; Trigonometry.

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  • The meteors, whatever their dimensions, must have motions around the sun in obedience to the law of gravitation in the same manner as planets and comets - that is, in conic sections of which the sun is always at one focus.

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  • Apollonius' genius takes its highest flight in Book v., where he treats of normals as minimum and maximum straight lines drawn from given points to the curve (independently of tangent properties), discusses how many normals can be drawn from particular points, finds their feet by construction, and gives propositions determining the centre of curvature at any point and leading at once to the Cartesian equation of the evolute of any conic.

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  • The general relations between the parabola, ellipse and hyperbola are treated in the articles Geometry, Analytical, and Conic Sections; and various projective properties are demonstrated in the article Geometry, Projective.

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  • Similarly, the conditions for the inscribed conic 1/la+1/ ms +'?

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  • Try = o to be a parabola is lbc+mca+nab = o, and the conic for which the triangle of reference is self-conjugate la 2 +143 2 +n7 2 =o is a 2 inn--+b 2 nl+c 2 lm=o.

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  • The various forms in areal co-ordinates may be derived from the above by substituting Xa for 1, µb for m and vc for n, or directly by expressing the condition for tangency of the line x+y+z = o to the conic expressed in areal coordinates.

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  • See the bibliography to the articles Conic Sections; Geometry, Analytical; and Geometry, Projective.

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  • James Gregory, in his Optica Promota (1663), discusses the forms of images and objects produced by lenses and mirrors, and shows that when the surfaces of the lenses or mirrors are portions of spheres the images are curves concave towards the objective, but if the curves of the surfaces are conic sections the spherical aberration is corrected.

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  • Thus Whewell mistook Kepler's inference that Mars moves in an ellipse for an induction, though it required the combination of Tycho's and Kepler's observations, as a minor, with the laws of conic sections discovered by the Greeks, as a major, premise.

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  • If the roof be not horizontal, we may obtain in this way any form of conic section.

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  • viz, the pitch of any screw varies inversely as the square of that diameter of the conic which is parallel to its axis.

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  • 52 it may be shown that an equivalent condition is that the six points A, B, C, D, E, F should lie on a conic (M.

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  • Now in a conic whose focus is at 0 we have where 1 is half the latus-rectum, a is half the major axis, and the upper or lower sign is to be taken according as the conic is an ellipse or hyperbola.

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  • This is recognized as the polar equation of a conic referred to the focus, the half latus-rectum being hf/u.

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  • Thus for a circular orbit with the centre of force at an excentric point, the hodograph is a conic with the pole as focus.

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  • His published mathematical works include: Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions (1862), Treatise on Conic Sections (4th ed., 1863) and Treatise on the Higher Plane Curves (2nd ed., 1873); these books are of the highest value, and have been translated into several languages.

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  • If we write r for PN, then y= r cos a, and equation 9 becomes 13.7,T - I) This relation between y and r is identical with the relation between the perpendicular from the focus of a conic section on the tangent at a given point and the focal distance of that point, provided the transverse and conjugate axes of the conic are 2a and 2b respectively, where a= p, and b 2 = -.

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  • Hence the meridian section of the film may be traced by the focus of such a conic, if the conic is made to roll on the axis.

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  • When the conic is an ellipse the meridian line is in the form of a series of waves, and the film itself has a series of alternate swellings and contractions as represented in figs.

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  • In all these cases the internal pressure exceeds the external by 2T/a where a is the semi-transverse axis of the conic. The resultant of the internal pressure and the surface-tension is equivalent to a tension along the axis, and the numerical value of this tension is equal to the force due to the action of this pressure on a circle whose diameter is equal to the conjugate axis of the ellipse.

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  • In the first volume Of the Entwickelungen he applied the method of abridged notation to the straight line, circle and conic sections, and he subsequently used it with great effect in many of his researches, notably in his theory of cubic curves.

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  • As Apollo Agyieus he was shown by a simple conic pillar; the Apollo of Amyclae was a pillar of bronze surmounted by a helmeted head, with extended arms carrying lance and bow.

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  • (The straight line and the point are not for the moment regarded as curves.) Next to the circle we have the conic sections, the invention of them attributed to Plato (who lived 430-347 B.C.); the original definition of them as the sections of a cone was by the Greek geometers who studied them soon replaced by a proper definition in piano like that for the circle, viz.

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  • a conic section (or as we now say a " conic ") is the locus of a point such that its distance from a given point, the focus, is in a given ratio to its (perpendicular) distance from a given line, the directrix; or it is the locus of a point which moves so as always to satisfy the foregoing condition.

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  • A curve of the second order is a conic, and is also called a quadric curve; and conversely every conic is a curve of the second order or quadric curve.

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  • then if the conic surface moves so that its summit is always in the same plane, the plane of the curve of contact passes always through the same point."

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  • Stating the theorem in regard to a conic, we have a real point P (called the pole) and a real line XY (called the polar), the line joining the two (real or imaginary) points of contact of the (real or imaginary) tangents drawn from the point to the conic; and the theorem is that when the point describes a line the line passes through a point, this line and point being polar and pole to each other.

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  • The points in question have since been called (it is believed first by Dr George Salmon) the circular points at infinity, or they may be called the circular points; these are also frequently spoken of as the points I, J; and we have thus the circle characterized as a conic which passes through the two circular points at infinity; the number of conditions thus imposed upon the conic is = 2, and there remain three arbitrary constants, which is the right number for the circle.

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  • Secondly, as to the inflections, the process is a similar one; it can be shown that the inflections are the intersections of the curve by a derivative curve called (after Ludwig Otto Hesse who first considered it) the Hessian, defined geometrically as the locus of a point such that its conic polar (§ 8 below) in regard to the curve breaks up into a pair of lines, and which has an equation H = o, where H is the determinant formed with the second differential coefficients of u in regard to the variables (x, y, z); H= o is thus a curve of the order 3 (m - 2), and the number of inflections is =3m(m-2).

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  • By means of Pliicker's equations we may form a table - The table is arranged according to the value of in; and we have m=o, n= r, the point; m =1, n =o, the line; m=2, n=2, the conic; of m = 3, the cubic, there are three cases, the class being 6, 4 or 3, according as the curve is without singularities, or as it has 1 node or r cusp; and so of m =4, the quartic, there are ten cases, where observe that in two of them the class is = 6, - the reduction of class arising from two cusps or else from three nodes.

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  • xlv., 1855), in respect to the triads of double tangents which have their points of contact on a conic and other like relations.

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  • The epithets hyperbolic and parabolic are of course derived from the conic hyperbola and parabola respectively.

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  • The two legs of a parabolic branch may converge to ultimate parallelism, as in the conic parabola, or diverge to ultimate parallelism, as in the semi-cubical parabola y 2 = x 3, and the branch is said to be convergent, or divergent, accordingly; or they may tend to parallelism in opposite senses, as in the cubical parabola y = x 3 .

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  • A circuit is met by any right line always in an even number, or always in an odd number, of points, and it is said to be an even circuit or an odd circuit accordingly; the right line is an odd circuit, the conic an even circuit.

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  • We may consider in relation to a curve, not only the line infinity, but also the circular points at infinity; assuming the curve to be real, these present themselves always conjointly; thus a circle is a conic passing through the two circular points, and is thereby distinguished from other conics.

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  • The points called foci presented themselves in the theory of the conic, and were well known to the Greek geometers, but the general notion of a focus was first established by Plucker (in the memoir " Uber solche Puncte die bei Curven einer hdheren Ordnung den Brennpuncten der Kegelschnitte entsprechen " (Crelle, t.

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  • There will be from each circular point X tangents (X, a number depending on the class of the curve and its relation to the line infinity and the circular points, 2 for the general conic, 1 for the parabola, 2 for a circular cubic, or bicircular quartic, &c.); the X tangents from the one circular point and those from the other circular point intersect in X real foci (viz.

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  • A line became continuous, returning into itself by way of infinity; two parallel lines intersect in a point at infinity; all circles pass through two fixed points at infinity (the circular points); two spheres intersect in a fixed circle at infinity; an asymptote became a tangent at infinity; the foci of a conic became the intersections of the tangents from the circular points at infinity; the centre of a conic the pole of the line at infinity, &c. In analytical geometry the line at infinity plays an important part in trilinear co-ordinates.

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  • g XXEC41ts, a deficiency, EXAEinr€tv, to fall behind), in mathematics, a conic section, having the form of a closed oval.

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  • Definitions in piano are generally more useful; of these the most important are: (I) the ellipse is the conic section which has its.

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  • Other geometrical definitions are: it is the oblique projection of a circle; the polar reciprocal of a circle for a point within it; and the conic which intersects the line at infinity in two imaginary points.

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  • The relation of the ellipse to the other conic sections is treated in the articles Conic Section and Geometry; in this article a summary of the properties of the curve will be given.

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  • CONIC SECTION, or briefly Conic, a curve in which a plane intersects a cone.

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  • the circle, and two lines (and also two points, the reciprocal of two lines) under the general title conic. The definition of conics as sections of a cone was employed by the Greek geometers as the fundamental principle of their researches in this subject; but the subsequent development of geometrical methods has brought to light many other means for defining these curves.

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  • One definition, which is of especial value in the geometrical treatment of the conic sections (ellipse, parabola and hyperbola) in piano, is that a conic is the locus of a point whose distances from a fixed point (termed the focus) and a fixed line (the directrix) are in constant ratio.

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  • This ratio, known as the eccentricity, determines the nature of the curve; if it be greater than unity, the conic is a hyperbola; if equal to unity, a parabola; and if less than unity, an ellipse.

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  • In the case of the circle, the centre is the focus, and the line at infinity the directrix; we therefore see that a circle is a conic of zero eccentricity.

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  • In projective geometry it is convenient to define a conic section as the projection of a circle.

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  • The particular conic into which the circle.

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  • A conic may also be regarded as the polar reciprocal of a circle for a point; if the point be without the circle the conic is an ellipse, if on the circle a parabola, and if within the circle a hyperbola.

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  • In analytical geometry the conic is represented by an algebraic equation of the second degree, and the species of conic is solely determined by means of certain relations between the coefficients.

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  • The definitions given above reflect the intimate association of these curves, but it frequently happens that a particular conic is defined by some special property (as the ellipse, which is the locus of a point such that the sum of its distances from two fixed points is constant); such definitions and other special properties are treated in the articles Ellipse, Hyperbola and Parabola.

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  • The invention of the conic sections is to be assigned to the school of geometers founded by Plato at Athens about the 4th century B.C. Under the guidance and inspiration of this philosopher much attention was given to the geometry of solids, and it is probable that while investigating the cone, Menaechrnus, an associate of Plato, pupil of Eudoxus, and brother of Dinostratus (the inventor of the quadratrix), discovered and investigated the various curves made by truncating a cone.

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  • But the greatest Greek writer on the conic sections was Apollonius of Perga, and it is to his Conic Sections that we are indebted for a review of the early history of this subject.

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  • The first book, which is almost entirely concerned with the construction of the three conic sections, contains one of the most brilliant of all the discoveries of Apollonius.

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  • Prior to his time, a right cone of a definite vertical angle was required for the generation of any particular conic; Apollonius showed that the sections could all be produced from one and the same cone, which may be either right or oblique, by simply varying the inclination of the cutting plane.

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  • The fifth book contains properties of normals and their envelopes, thus embracing the germs of the theory of evolutes, and also maxima and minima problems, such as to draw the longest and shortest lines from a given point to a conic; the sixth book is concerned with the similarity of conics; the seventh with complementary chords and conjugate diameters; the eighth book, according to the restoration of Edmund Halley, continues the subject of the preceding book.

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  • His proofs are generally long and clumsy; this is accounted for in some measure by the absence of symbols and technical terms. Apollonius was ignorant of the directrix of a conic, and although he incidentally discovered the focus of an ellipse and hyperbola, he does not mention the focus of a parabola.

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  • This work, the earliest published in Christian Europe, treats the conic sections in relation to the original cone, the procedure differing from that of the Greek geometers.

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  • Since all conics derived from a circular cone appear circular when viewed from the apex, they conceived the treatment of the conic sections as projections of a circle.

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  • Desargues has a special claim to fame on account of his beautiful theorem on the involution of a quadrangle inscribed in a conic. Pascal discovered a striking property of a hexagon inscribed in a conic (the hexagrammum mysticum); from this theorem Pascal is said to have deduced over 400 corollaries, including most of the results obtained by earlier geometers.

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  • The subject of analytical geometry which he virtually created enabled him to view the conic sections as algebraic equations of the second degree, the form of the section depending solely on the coefficients.

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  • John Wallis, in addition to translating the Conics of Apollonius, published in 1655 an original work entitled De sectionibus conicis nova methodo expositis, in which he treated the curves by the Cartesian method, and derived their properties from the definition in piano, completely ignoring the connexion between the conic sections and a cone.

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  • Philippe de la Hire, a pupil of Desargues, wrote several works on the conic sections, of which the most important is his Sectiones Conicae (1685).

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  • In Newton's method, two angles of constant magnitude are caused to revolve about their vertices which are fixed in position, in such a manner that the intersection of two limbs moves along a fixed straight line; then the two remaining limbs envelop a conic. Maclaurin's method, published in his Geometria organica (1719), is based on the proposition that the locus of the vertex of a triangle, the sides of which pass through three fixed points, and the base angles move along two fixed lines, is a conic section.

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  • In modern times the study of the conic sections has proceeded along the lines which we have indicated; for further details reference should be made to the article Geometry.

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  • -For the ancient geometry of conic sections, especially of Apollonius, reference should be made to T.

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  • A copious list of early works on conic sections is given in Fred.

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  • Eagles, Constructive Geometry of Plane Curves (1886); geometric investigations primarily based on the relation of the conic sections to a cone are given in Hugo Hamilton's De Sectionibus Conicis (1758); this method of treatment has been largely replaced by considering the curves from their definition in piano, and then passing to their derivation from the cone and cylinder.

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  • Besant, Geometrical Conic Sections; C. Smith, Geometrical Conics; W.

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  • Drew, Geometrical Treatise on Conic Sections.

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  • conic fountain creates a surprisingly high pillar of sparks.

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  • conic section.

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  • conic projections.

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  • conic sweep.

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  • conic hill is normally quite a challenge rising some 300m just before Balmaha.

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  • conic section orbits is sketched in Cor.

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  • Mar Burn Beyond Burn of Mar the path climbs fairly quickly along the northern flank of Conic Hill.

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  • Silver Pyramid Black Cat's conic fountain creates a surprisingly high pillar of sparks.

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  • (3) On Conoids and Spheroids (Peri konoeideon kai sphairoeideon) is a treatise in thirty-two propositions, on the solids generated by the revolution of the conic sections about their axes, the main results being the comparisons of the volume of any segment cut off by a plane with that of a cone having the same base and axis (Props.

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  • HYPERBOLA, a conic section, consisting of two open branches, each extending to infinity.

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  • as the conic having an eccentricity greater than unity, is a convenient starting-point for the Euclidian investigation.

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  • In projective geometry it may be defined as the conic which intersects the line at infinity in two real points, or to which it is possible to draw two real tangents from the centre.

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  • Analytically, it is defined by an equation of the second degree, of which the highest terms have real roots (see Conic Section).

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  • The comprehensive scheme of study included mathematics also, in which he advanced as far as the conic sections in the treatise of L'Hopital.

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  • The same name is also given to the first positive pedal of any central conic. When the conic is a rectangular hyperbola, the curve is the lemniscate of Bernoulli previously described.

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  • If the law of attraction is that of gravitation, the orbit is a conic section - ellipse, parabola or hyperbola - having the centre of attraction in one of its foci; and the motion takes place in accordance with Kepler's laws (see Astronomy).

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  • If the attraction of a central body is not the only force acting on the moving body, the orbit will deviate from the form of a conic section in a degree depending on the amount of the extraneous force; and the curve described may not be a re-entering curve at all, but one winding around so as to form an indefinite succession of spires.

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  • The northern part of Eure-et-Loir is watered by the Eure, with its tributaries the Vegre, Blaise and Avre, a small western portion by the Huisne, and the south by the Loir with its tributaries the Conic and the Ozanne.

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  • For the subjects under this heading see the articles CONIC SECTIONS; CIRCLE; CURVE; GEOMETRICAL CONTINUITY; GEOMETRY, Axioms of; GEOMETRY, Euclidean; GEOMETRY, Projective; GEOMETRY, Analytical; GEOMETRY, Line; KNOTS, MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF; MENSURATION; MODELS; PROJECTION; Surface; Trigonometry.

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  • If ai, bx, cx be different forms we obtain, after development of the squared determinant and conversion to the real form (employing single and double dashes to distinguish the real coefficients of bx and cz), a(b'c"+b"c'-2 f'f") +b(c'a"+c"a'-2g'g") +c(a' +a"b'-2h'h")+2f(g'h"+g"h'-a' + 2g (h ' f"+h"f'-b'g"-b"g')+2h(f'g"+f"g'-c'h"-c"h'); a simultaneous invariant of the three forms, and now suppressing the dashes we obtain 6 (abc+2fgh -af t - bg 2 -ch2), the expression in brackets being the S well-known invariant of az, the vanishing of which expresses the condition that the form may break up into two linear factors, or, geometrically, that the conic may represent two right lines.

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  • The Arabians more closely resembled the Hindus than the Greeks in the choice of studies; their philosophers blended speculative dissertations with the more progressive study of medicine; their mathematicians neglected the subtleties of the conic sections and Diophantine analysis, and applied themselves more particularly to perfect the system of numerals (see Numeral), arithmetic and astronomy.

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  • Cubic equations were solved geometrically by determining the intersections of conic sections.

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  • He improved the methods for solving equations, and devised geometrical constructions with the aid of the conic sections.

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  • The meteors, whatever their dimensions, must have motions around the sun in obedience to the law of gravitation in the same manner as planets and comets - that is, in conic sections of which the sun is always at one focus.

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  • After his Tables of the Products and Powers of Numbers, 1781, and his Mathematical Tables, 1785, he issued, for the use of the Royal Military Academy, in 1787 Elements of Conic Sections, and in 1798 his Course of Mathematics.

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  • Sca, through,, u rpov, measure), in geometry, a line passing through the centre of a circle or conic section and terminated by the curve; the "principal diameters of the ellipse and hyperbola coincide with the "axes" and are at right angles; " conjugate diameters " are such that each bisects chords parallel to the other.

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  • The founder of the mathematical school was the celebrated Euclid (Eucleides); among its scholars were Archimedes; Apollonius of Perga, author of a treatise on Conic Sections; Eratosthenes, to whom we owe the first measurement of the earth; and Hipparchus, the founder of the epicyclical theory of the heavens, afterwards called the Ptolemaic system, from its most famous expositor, Claudius Ptolemaeus.

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  • Archytas of Tarentum (c. 430 B.C.) solved the problems by means of sections of a half cylinder; according to Eutocius, Menaechmus solved them by means of the intersections of conic sections; and Eudoxus also gave a solution.

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  • It is the inverse of a central conic for the focus, and the first positive pedal of a circle for any point.

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  • This obviously represents a conic intersecting the circle a(3y+bya ca(3=o in points on the common chords la+m(3+ny=o, as+b(3 +cy =o.

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  • This problem, also termed the " Apollonian problem," was demonstrated with the aid of conic sections by Apollonius in his book on Contacts or Tangencies; geometrical solutions involving the conic sections were also given by Adrianus Romanus, Vieta, Newton and others.

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  • John Casey, professor of mathematics at the Catholic university of Dublin, has given elementary demonstrations founded on the theory of similitude and coaxal circles which are reproduced in his Sequel to Euclid; an analytical solution by Gergonne is given in Salmon's Conic Sections.

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  • The generality of treatment is indeed remarkable; he gives as the fundamental property of all the conics the equivalent of the Cartesian equation referred to oblique axes (consisting of a diameter and the tangent at its extremity) obtained by cutting an oblique circular cone in any manner, and the axes appear only as a particular case after he has shown that the property of the conic can be expressed in the same form with reference to any new diameter and the tangent at its extremity.

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  • Apollonius' genius takes its highest flight in Book v., where he treats of normals as minimum and maximum straight lines drawn from given points to the curve (independently of tangent properties), discusses how many normals can be drawn from particular points, finds their feet by construction, and gives propositions determining the centre of curvature at any point and leading at once to the Cartesian equation of the evolute of any conic.

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  • Heath, Apollonius, Treatise on Conic Sections (Cambridge, 1896); see also H.

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  • In one solution of the former problem is the first recorded use of the property of a conic (a hyperbola) with reference to the focus and directrix.

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  • contains also (I), under the head of the de determinate sectione of Apollonius, lemmas which, closely examined, are seen to be cases of the involution of six points; (2) important lemmas on the Porisms of Euclid (see PoRIsM); (3) a lemma upon the Surface Loci of Euclid which states that the locus of a point such that its distance from a given point bears a constant ratio to its distance from a given straight line is a conic, and is followed by proofs that the conic is a parabola, ellipse, or hyperbola according as the constant ratio is equal to, less than or greater than i (the first recorded proofs of the properties, which do not appear in Apollonius).

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  • The first three books of this treatise were translated into English, and several times printed as The Elements of the Conic Sections.

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  • As extended by Sulla the sanctuary of Fortune occupied a series of five vast terraces, which, resting on gigantic I Thus the Praenestines shortened some words: they said conic for ciconia, tammodo for tantummodo (Plaut.

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  • The most important are :- Euclid's Elements; Euclid's Data; Optical Lectures, read in the public school of Cambridge; Thirteen Geometrical Lectures; The Works of Archimedes, the Four Books of Apollonius's Conic Sections, and Theodosius's Spherics, explained in a New Method; A Lecture, in which Archimedes' Theorems of the Sphere and Cylinder are investigated and briefly demonstrated; Mathematical Lectures, read in the public schools of the university of Cambridge.

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  • There are wonderful stories on record of his precocity in mathematical learning, which is sufficiently established by the well-attested fact that he had completed before he was sixteen years of age a work on the conic sections, in which he had laid down a series of propositions, discovered by himself, of such importance that they may be said to form the foundations of the modern treatment of that subject.

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  • In this way he established the famous theorem that the intersections of the three pairs of opposite sides of a hexagon inscribed in a conic are collinear.

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  • It is therefore a conic section having its eccentricity equal to unity.

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  • The general relations between the parabola, ellipse and hyperbola are treated in the articles Geometry, Analytical, and Conic Sections; and various projective properties are demonstrated in the article Geometry, Projective.

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  • The equation to a parabola in triangular co-ordinates is generally derived by expressing the condition that the line at infinity is a tangent in the equation to the general conic. For example, in trilinear co-ordinates, the equation to the general conic circumscribing the triangle of reference is 113y+mya+naf3=o; for this to be a parabola the line as + b/ + cy = o must be a tangent.

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  • Similarly, the conditions for the inscribed conic 1/la+1/ ms +'?

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  • Try = o to be a parabola is lbc+mca+nab = o, and the conic for which the triangle of reference is self-conjugate la 2 +143 2 +n7 2 =o is a 2 inn--+b 2 nl+c 2 lm=o.

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  • The various forms in areal co-ordinates may be derived from the above by substituting Xa for 1, µb for m and vc for n, or directly by expressing the condition for tangency of the line x+y+z = o to the conic expressed in areal coordinates.

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  • See the bibliography to the articles Conic Sections; Geometry, Analytical; and Geometry, Projective.

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  • James Gregory, in his Optica Promota (1663), discusses the forms of images and objects produced by lenses and mirrors, and shows that when the surfaces of the lenses or mirrors are portions of spheres the images are curves concave towards the objective, but if the curves of the surfaces are conic sections the spherical aberration is corrected.

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  • Thus Whewell mistook Kepler's inference that Mars moves in an ellipse for an induction, though it required the combination of Tycho's and Kepler's observations, as a minor, with the laws of conic sections discovered by the Greeks, as a major, premise.

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  • If the roof be not horizontal, we may obtain in this way any form of conic section.

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  • viz, the pitch of any screw varies inversely as the square of that diameter of the conic which is parallel to its axis.

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  • 52 it may be shown that an equivalent condition is that the six points A, B, C, D, E, F should lie on a conic (M.

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  • Now in a conic whose focus is at 0 we have where 1 is half the latus-rectum, a is half the major axis, and the upper or lower sign is to be taken according as the conic is an ellipse or hyperbola.

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  • This is recognized as the polar equation of a conic referred to the focus, the half latus-rectum being hf/u.

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  • Thus for a circular orbit with the centre of force at an excentric point, the hodograph is a conic with the pole as focus.

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  • His published mathematical works include: Analytic Geometry of Three Dimensions (1862), Treatise on Conic Sections (4th ed., 1863) and Treatise on the Higher Plane Curves (2nd ed., 1873); these books are of the highest value, and have been translated into several languages.

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  • If we write r for PN, then y= r cos a, and equation 9 becomes 13.7,T - I) This relation between y and r is identical with the relation between the perpendicular from the focus of a conic section on the tangent at a given point and the focal distance of that point, provided the transverse and conjugate axes of the conic are 2a and 2b respectively, where a= p, and b 2 = -.

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  • Hence the meridian section of the film may be traced by the focus of such a conic, if the conic is made to roll on the axis.

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  • When the conic is an ellipse the meridian line is in the form of a series of waves, and the film itself has a series of alternate swellings and contractions as represented in figs.

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  • In all these cases the internal pressure exceeds the external by 2T/a where a is the semi-transverse axis of the conic. The resultant of the internal pressure and the surface-tension is equivalent to a tension along the axis, and the numerical value of this tension is equal to the force due to the action of this pressure on a circle whose diameter is equal to the conjugate axis of the ellipse.

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  • When the conic is a parabola the meridian line is a catenary (fig.

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  • When the conic is a hyperbola the meridian line is in the form of a looped curve (fig.

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  • In the first volume Of the Entwickelungen he applied the method of abridged notation to the straight line, circle and conic sections, and he subsequently used it with great effect in many of his researches, notably in his theory of cubic curves.

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  • As Apollo Agyieus he was shown by a simple conic pillar; the Apollo of Amyclae was a pillar of bronze surmounted by a helmeted head, with extended arms carrying lance and bow.

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  • The reason for publishing these two tracts in his Optics, from the subsequent editions of which they were omitted, is thus stated in the advertisement: " In a letter written to M Leibnitz in the year 1679, and published by Dr Wallis, I mentioned a method by which I had found some general theorems about squaring curvilinear figures on comparing them with the conic sections, or other the simplest figures with which they might be compared.

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  • (The straight line and the point are not for the moment regarded as curves.) Next to the circle we have the conic sections, the invention of them attributed to Plato (who lived 430-347 B.C.); the original definition of them as the sections of a cone was by the Greek geometers who studied them soon replaced by a proper definition in piano like that for the circle, viz.

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  • a conic section (or as we now say a " conic ") is the locus of a point such that its distance from a given point, the focus, is in a given ratio to its (perpendicular) distance from a given line, the directrix; or it is the locus of a point which moves so as always to satisfy the foregoing condition.

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  • A curve of the second order is a conic, and is also called a quadric curve; and conversely every conic is a curve of the second order or quadric curve.

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  • " Given a surface of the second order and a circumscribed conic surface which touches it ...

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  • then if the conic surface moves so that its summit is always in the same plane, the plane of the curve of contact passes always through the same point."

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  • Stating the theorem in regard to a conic, we have a real point P (called the pole) and a real line XY (called the polar), the line joining the two (real or imaginary) points of contact of the (real or imaginary) tangents drawn from the point to the conic; and the theorem is that when the point describes a line the line passes through a point, this line and point being polar and pole to each other.

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  • The points in question have since been called (it is believed first by Dr George Salmon) the circular points at infinity, or they may be called the circular points; these are also frequently spoken of as the points I, J; and we have thus the circle characterized as a conic which passes through the two circular points at infinity; the number of conditions thus imposed upon the conic is = 2, and there remain three arbitrary constants, which is the right number for the circle.

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  • Secondly, as to the inflections, the process is a similar one; it can be shown that the inflections are the intersections of the curve by a derivative curve called (after Ludwig Otto Hesse who first considered it) the Hessian, defined geometrically as the locus of a point such that its conic polar (§ 8 below) in regard to the curve breaks up into a pair of lines, and which has an equation H = o, where H is the determinant formed with the second differential coefficients of u in regard to the variables (x, y, z); H= o is thus a curve of the order 3 (m - 2), and the number of inflections is =3m(m-2).

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  • By means of Pliicker's equations we may form a table - The table is arranged according to the value of in; and we have m=o, n= r, the point; m =1, n =o, the line; m=2, n=2, the conic; of m = 3, the cubic, there are three cases, the class being 6, 4 or 3, according as the curve is without singularities, or as it has 1 node or r cusp; and so of m =4, the quartic, there are ten cases, where observe that in two of them the class is = 6, - the reduction of class arising from two cusps or else from three nodes.

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  • xlv., 1855), in respect to the triads of double tangents which have their points of contact on a conic and other like relations.

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  • The epithets hyperbolic and parabolic are of course derived from the conic hyperbola and parabola respectively.

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  • The two legs of a parabolic branch may converge to ultimate parallelism, as in the conic parabola, or diverge to ultimate parallelism, as in the semi-cubical parabola y 2 = x 3, and the branch is said to be convergent, or divergent, accordingly; or they may tend to parallelism in opposite senses, as in the cubical parabola y = x 3 .

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  • A circuit is met by any right line always in an even number, or always in an odd number, of points, and it is said to be an even circuit or an odd circuit accordingly; the right line is an odd circuit, the conic an even circuit.

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  • We may consider in relation to a curve, not only the line infinity, but also the circular points at infinity; assuming the curve to be real, these present themselves always conjointly; thus a circle is a conic passing through the two circular points, and is thereby distinguished from other conics.

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  • The points called foci presented themselves in the theory of the conic, and were well known to the Greek geometers, but the general notion of a focus was first established by Plucker (in the memoir " Uber solche Puncte die bei Curven einer hdheren Ordnung den Brennpuncten der Kegelschnitte entsprechen " (Crelle, t.

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  • There will be from each circular point X tangents (X, a number depending on the class of the curve and its relation to the line infinity and the circular points, 2 for the general conic, 1 for the parabola, 2 for a circular cubic, or bicircular quartic, &c.); the X tangents from the one circular point and those from the other circular point intersect in X real foci (viz.

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  • A line became continuous, returning into itself by way of infinity; two parallel lines intersect in a point at infinity; all circles pass through two fixed points at infinity (the circular points); two spheres intersect in a fixed circle at infinity; an asymptote became a tangent at infinity; the foci of a conic became the intersections of the tangents from the circular points at infinity; the centre of a conic the pole of the line at infinity, &c. In analytical geometry the line at infinity plays an important part in trilinear co-ordinates.

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  • g XXEC41ts, a deficiency, EXAEinr€tv, to fall behind), in mathematics, a conic section, having the form of a closed oval.

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  • Definitions in piano are generally more useful; of these the most important are: (I) the ellipse is the conic section which has its.

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  • Other geometrical definitions are: it is the oblique projection of a circle; the polar reciprocal of a circle for a point within it; and the conic which intersects the line at infinity in two imaginary points.

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  • The relation of the ellipse to the other conic sections is treated in the articles Conic Section and Geometry; in this article a summary of the properties of the curve will be given.

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  • (3) If the directrix, focus and eccentricity be given, we may employ the general method for constructing a conic. Let S (fig.

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  • CONIC SECTION, or briefly Conic, a curve in which a plane intersects a cone.

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  • the circle, and two lines (and also two points, the reciprocal of two lines) under the general title conic. The definition of conics as sections of a cone was employed by the Greek geometers as the fundamental principle of their researches in this subject; but the subsequent development of geometrical methods has brought to light many other means for defining these curves.

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  • One definition, which is of especial value in the geometrical treatment of the conic sections (ellipse, parabola and hyperbola) in piano, is that a conic is the locus of a point whose distances from a fixed point (termed the focus) and a fixed line (the directrix) are in constant ratio.

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  • This ratio, known as the eccentricity, determines the nature of the curve; if it be greater than unity, the conic is a hyperbola; if equal to unity, a parabola; and if less than unity, an ellipse.

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  • In the case of the circle, the centre is the focus, and the line at infinity the directrix; we therefore see that a circle is a conic of zero eccentricity.

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  • In projective geometry it is convenient to define a conic section as the projection of a circle.

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  • The particular conic into which the circle.

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  • A conic may also be regarded as the polar reciprocal of a circle for a point; if the point be without the circle the conic is an ellipse, if on the circle a parabola, and if within the circle a hyperbola.

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  • In analytical geometry the conic is represented by an algebraic equation of the second degree, and the species of conic is solely determined by means of certain relations between the coefficients.

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  • The definitions given above reflect the intimate association of these curves, but it frequently happens that a particular conic is defined by some special property (as the ellipse, which is the locus of a point such that the sum of its distances from two fixed points is constant); such definitions and other special properties are treated in the articles Ellipse, Hyperbola and Parabola.

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  • The invention of the conic sections is to be assigned to the school of geometers founded by Plato at Athens about the 4th century B.C. Under the guidance and inspiration of this philosopher much attention was given to the geometry of solids, and it is probable that while investigating the cone, Menaechrnus, an associate of Plato, pupil of Eudoxus, and brother of Dinostratus (the inventor of the quadratrix), discovered and investigated the various curves made by truncating a cone.

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  • But the greatest Greek writer on the conic sections was Apollonius of Perga, and it is to his Conic Sections that we are indebted for a review of the early history of this subject.

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  • The first book, which is almost entirely concerned with the construction of the three conic sections, contains one of the most brilliant of all the discoveries of Apollonius.

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  • Prior to his time, a right cone of a definite vertical angle was required for the generation of any particular conic; Apollonius showed that the sections could all be produced from one and the same cone, which may be either right or oblique, by simply varying the inclination of the cutting plane.

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  • The fifth book contains properties of normals and their envelopes, thus embracing the germs of the theory of evolutes, and also maxima and minima problems, such as to draw the longest and shortest lines from a given point to a conic; the sixth book is concerned with the similarity of conics; the seventh with complementary chords and conjugate diameters; the eighth book, according to the restoration of Edmund Halley, continues the subject of the preceding book.

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  • His proofs are generally long and clumsy; this is accounted for in some measure by the absence of symbols and technical terms. Apollonius was ignorant of the directrix of a conic, and although he incidentally discovered the focus of an ellipse and hyperbola, he does not mention the focus of a parabola.

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  • This work, the earliest published in Christian Europe, treats the conic sections in relation to the original cone, the procedure differing from that of the Greek geometers.

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  • On this is based the great structure of celestial mechanics and the theory of universal gravitation; and in the elucidation of problems more directly concerned with astronomy, Kepler, Sir Isaac Newton and others discovered many properties of the conic sections (see Mechanics).

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  • An important generalization of the conic sections was developed about the beginning of the 17th century by Girard Desargues and Blaise Pascal.

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  • Since all conics derived from a circular cone appear circular when viewed from the apex, they conceived the treatment of the conic sections as projections of a circle.

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  • Desargues has a special claim to fame on account of his beautiful theorem on the involution of a quadrangle inscribed in a conic. Pascal discovered a striking property of a hexagon inscribed in a conic (the hexagrammum mysticum); from this theorem Pascal is said to have deduced over 400 corollaries, including most of the results obtained by earlier geometers.

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  • The subject of analytical geometry which he virtually created enabled him to view the conic sections as algebraic equations of the second degree, the form of the section depending solely on the coefficients.

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  • John Wallis, in addition to translating the Conics of Apollonius, published in 1655 an original work entitled De sectionibus conicis nova methodo expositis, in which he treated the curves by the Cartesian method, and derived their properties from the definition in piano, completely ignoring the connexion between the conic sections and a cone.

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  • Philippe de la Hire, a pupil of Desargues, wrote several works on the conic sections, of which the most important is his Sectiones Conicae (1685).

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  • In Newton's method, two angles of constant magnitude are caused to revolve about their vertices which are fixed in position, in such a manner that the intersection of two limbs moves along a fixed straight line; then the two remaining limbs envelop a conic. Maclaurin's method, published in his Geometria organica (1719), is based on the proposition that the locus of the vertex of a triangle, the sides of which pass through three fixed points, and the base angles move along two fixed lines, is a conic section.

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  • In modern times the study of the conic sections has proceeded along the lines which we have indicated; for further details reference should be made to the article Geometry.

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  • -For the ancient geometry of conic sections, especially of Apollonius, reference should be made to T.

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  • A copious list of early works on conic sections is given in Fred.

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  • Eagles, Constructive Geometry of Plane Curves (1886); geometric investigations primarily based on the relation of the conic sections to a cone are given in Hugo Hamilton's De Sectionibus Conicis (1758); this method of treatment has been largely replaced by considering the curves from their definition in piano, and then passing to their derivation from the cone and cylinder.

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  • Besant, Geometrical Conic Sections; C. Smith, Geometrical Conics; W.

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  • Drew, Geometrical Treatise on Conic Sections.

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