Confidence sentence example

confidence
  • Confidence returned with a warm rush.
    1005
    303
  • He wasn't a tall man, but he walked with the confidence of one.
    310
    160
  • His confidence was worth the risk.
    238
    110
  • The big question was, would her confidence last?
    204
    111
  • Maybe it was simply his confidence that impressed people.
    140
    61
    Advertisement
  • Their confidence in him would fall further.
    134
    74
  • Then, with a rush of confidence, she added, But I'm not a moron either.
    66
    31
  • If it was so simple, Andre wouldn't be trying to drop a hint without betraying the confidence of Deidre.
    69
    47
  • But as Barclay did not inspire confidence his power was limited.
    36
    16
  • Dr. Bell said "No!" with great confidence, and the kite was sent up.
    52
    35
    Advertisement
  • Something about her voice gave me enough confidence to continue.
    49
    33
  • She likes your confidence and tenacity.
    34
    18
  • Katie would probably say it was the way he took control, but in actuality, it was the confidence he exuded.
    47
    33
  • Jared asked, the confidence in his voice replaced by unease.
    63
    50
  • Over time, we will feel that kind of confidence in this kind of system.
    28
    16
    Advertisement
  • People often do not contribute to discussions if they lack confidence.
    23
    12
  • He looked as calm as he sounded, and she wondered how he could face his own possible death with such confidence and poise.
    41
    32
  • That was best until the men gained a little confidence riding.
    27
    20
  • His air of cool confidence was more than likely the result of frequent business contacts - one of Denton's colleagues?
    22
    15
  • That was fact, not lack of confidence speaking.
    13
    7
    Advertisement
  • All you need is a little confidence.
    6
    0
  • He drove with skill and confidence - which was no surprise.
    96
    90
  • But when he came across a man of position his instinct immediately told him that this man could be useful, and without any premeditation Prince Vasili took the first opportunity to gain his confidence, flatter him, become intimate with him, and finally make his request.
    17
    11
  • Mr. Dean wished he felt a modicum of confidence in himself as the three drifted off to sleep—David and Cynthia Dean, with SB, the Bird Song owl, snuggled next to them.
    19
    14
  • He had no regard for the sentimental value of the farm where she grew up, nor any confidence that she was capable of running it.
    16
    11
    Advertisement
  • Was it merely a facade, or did he always have a clear view of where he was headed and the confidence to get him there?
    33
    28
  • In any case, the house rental was her business and she needed to gain the confidence of running it without his direction.
    12
    7
  • Katie accused her of allowing Alex to make decisions because she had no confidence in herself – and that Alex was taking advantage of her because he had a controlling personality.
    84
    79
  • On the other hand, Alex exuded confidence.
    4
    0
  • One of the most appealing things about Alex was his confidence.
    4
    0
    Advertisement
  • While her romance session failed to reveal his problem, it did wonders for her confidence.
    5
    1
  • His confidence was too strong to shake, and she suspected he knew just how damned good in bed he was and how unlikely any woman who'd had him would choose another man over him.
    25
    21
  • Then again, if she gained more confidence, maybe it would make both Alex and Katie feel that she wasn't a lost cause.
    10
    6
  • Jonny glanced around the room, his hesitation giving more than one vamp confidence to draw their weapons openly.
    3
    0
  • She squeezed his hand and smiled at him with feigned confidence.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • Nearly seventy-five Colorado winters rusting away at the structure did not breed confidence.
    3
    0
  • This light banter was one of the things she had missed most about him - that and his confidence.
    3
    0
  • He walked like he was the White God, with confidence and command.
    3
    0
  • In fact, the two most important people had been left out of their confidence.
    3
    0
  • Under Katie's tutelage, she was gaining confidence.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • I think part of the appeal when I first met him was the mystery – and his confidence.
    3
    0
  • I love the way you take charge; your confidence and the way you're so fastidious about everything.
    11
    8
  • When he spoke again, it was with the old confidence.
    3
    0
  • He strode to his rental car with new confidence.
    3
    0
  • His fine character and conscience earned him universal respect and confidence.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • By the public he was always regarded as reserved, but within his own inner circle he gave and received perfect confidence.
    3
    0
  • Either house may pass a vote of no confidence in the government, and in practice the government resigns in face of the passing of such a vote by the deputies, but not if it is passed by the Senate only.
    3
    0
  • After the second of these insurrections, Bethlen attempted a rapprochement with the court of Vienna on the basis of an alliance against the Turks and his own marriage with one of the Austrian archduchesses; but Ferdinand had no confidence in him and rejected his overtures.
    3
    0
  • As usual with him, however, he failed to retain the confidence of his coadjutors to the end.
    3
    0
  • Robertson, who laboured in the country for many years, gaining the confidence both of Panda and Cetywayo.
    3
    0
    Advertisement
  • Full confidence was not placed in Jerome's recantation.
    3
    0
  • At least I obtained his promise of confidence.
    3
    1
  • Gabe drew a breath, expecting Andre wouldn't betray the confidence of his mate.
    12
    10
  • Confidence returned to Alex with his voice and the nightmares stopped.
    17
    15
  • His confidence in finding a way to make the relationship work grew with each passing moment.
    37
    35
  • Mendelssohn soon won the confidence of Bernhard, who made the young student successively his book-keeper and his partner.
    3
    1
  • His principal characteristic was perfect confidence in any result obtained by the treatment of symbols in accordance with their primary laws and conditions, and an almost unrivalled skill and power in tracing out these results.
    2
    0
  • Seward himself, apparently sharing these views, although not out of vanity, at first possessed an unbounded confidence in his ability to influence the president and his cabinet.
    2
    0
  • On the 12th of March 1849, he denounced the armistice, and, owing to the want of confidence in Piedmontese strategy after 1848, gave the chief command to the Polish General Chrzanowski.
    2
    0
  • The men of the Left believed themselves subtle enough to retain the confidence and esteem of all foreign powers while coquetting at home with elements which some of these powers had reason to regard with suspicion.
    2
    0
  • While excitement over Tunisia was at its height, but before the situation was irretrievably compromised to the disadvantage of Italy, Cairoli had been compelled to resign by a vote of want of confidence in the Chamber.
    2
    0
  • The chief advantage derived by Italy from Crispis foreign policy was the increase of confidence in her government on the part of her allies and of Great Britain.
    2
    0
  • King Humbert, who, from lack of confidence in Rudini, had declined VIM lull!
    2
    0
  • On the 29th of June Rudini was succeeded in the premiership by General Luigi Pelloux, a Savoyard, whose only title to office was the confidence of the king.
    2
    0
  • Although both abroad and at home his policy had generally embodied the wishes of the ascendant party in the state, Danby had never obtained the confidence of the nation.
    2
    0
  • At the two Diets held by him, at Kassa and Talya, in 1683, the estates, though not uninfluenced by his personal charm, showed some want of confidence in him, fearing lest he might sacrifice the national independence to the Turkish alliance.
    2
    0
  • Little confidence can, however, be placed in the identification of Proteaceous or, indeed, of any distinctively Australian plants in Tertiary deposits in the northern hemisphere.
    2
    0
  • In these African campaigns Sulla showed that he knew how to win the confidence of his soldiers, and throughout his career the secret of his success seems to have been the enthusiastic devotion of his troops, whom he continued to hold well in hand, while allowing them to indulge in plundering and all kinds of excess.
    2
    0
  • To foreigners, especially Christians, he showed a spirit of tolerance; two Englishmen, Sir Anthony and Sir Robert Shirley, or Sherley, were admitted to his confidence.
    2
    0
  • Though outside foreign affairs he played but a small part in the period of Liberal opposition between 1895 and 1905, he retained public confidence as one who was indispensable to a Liberal administration.
    2
    0
  • He owed his success to the confidence placed in him by Queen Victoria, to his wide knowledge of European politics, to his intimate friendship with Guizot, and not least to his own conciliatory disposition.
    2
    0
  • The universal expression of respect and admiration at the time of Webster's death showed that he had retained the confidence of his people.
    2
    0
  • Of the propositions of sectarian theologians he said that confidence was the first, and the second, and the third part.
    2
    0
  • The success of the Hussite raids in Germany gave fresh confidence to the Sla y s of Poland.
    2
    0
  • He had the full confidence of Queen Caroline, whom he prejudiced against Carteret.
    2
    0
  • Semonville, who enjoyed a great measure of Louis XVIII.'s confidence, took no part in the Hundred Days.
    2
    0
  • The Admiralty was naturally anxious to secure the services of trustworthy flag officers, and having confidence in Hood promoted him rear-admiral out of the usual course on the 26th of September 1780, and sent him to the West Indies to act as second in command under Rodney, to whom he was personally known.
    2
    0
  • Intelligence of these events reached Bolivar while in the north of Colombia, and he lost no time in preparing to march against the refractory troops, who formerly had placed such implicit confidence in him.
    2
    0
  • Upon one famous occasion in 1892 he succeeded in bringing to a peaceful solution a long and bitter strike which had divided the masters and men in the Durham collieries; and his success was due to the confidence which he inspired by the extraordinary moral energy of his strangely "prophetic" personality, at once thoughtful, vehement and affectionate.
    2
    0
  • Although he wrote a letter to Queen Elizabeth remonstrating against the alienation of church property, Whitgift always retained her special confidence.
    2
    0
  • He possessed the special confidence of William and Mary, and was made clerk of the closet to the king in March 1689.
    2
    0
  • The work of restoring true Hebrew readings may proceed with more confidence now that we have considerable portions of the Hebrew text to serve as a model.
    2
    0
  • He enjoyed the entire confidence of Abdalmalik with Walid, but Suleiman, the appointed successor, regarded him with disfavour.
    2
    0
  • Rene had the confidence of Charles VII., and is said to have initiated the reduction of the men-at-arms set on foot by the king, with whose military operations against the English he was closely associated.
    2
    0
  • Instead of the once powerful confidence in the immediate presence of God there grew up a mass of speculation regarding on the one hand the distant future, on the other the distant past.
    2
    0
  • Probably this was due entirely to the fact that he had come under the influence of two able men who had won his confidence and had promised him revenge for the murdered Gaveston.
    2
    0
  • As Burke had wished the British parliament to be supreme over the colonies, in confidence that this supremacy would not be abused, so he wished the great landowning connection resting on the rotten boroughs to ruie over the unrepresented people, in confidence that this power would not be abused.
    2
    0
  • The guy exud­ed confidence to the point where Dean felt as if he had just dropped a plateful of mashed potatoes in his lap while this tall, dark stranger was toasting the queen.
    10
    9
  • Then you must have a lot of confidence in Gerald.
    14
    13
  • From the first Mr Hart gained the entire confidence of the members of the Chinese government, who were wise enough to recognize his loyal and able assistance.
    16
    15
  • He declared, when answering a complaint that a certain captain in his regiment was a better preacher than fighter, that he who prayed best would fight best, and that he knew nothing could" give the like courage and confidence as the knowledge of God in Christ will."The superiority of these men - more intelligent than the common soldiers, better disciplined, better trained, better armed, excellent horsemen and fighting for a great cause - not only over the other parliamentary troops but over the royalists, was soon observed in battle.
    2
    1
  • At the same time he mitigated the Francophil tendencies of some of his colleagues, accompanied King Humbert and Queen Margherita on their visit to Homburg in September 1897, and, by loyal observance of the spirit of the triple alliance, retained for Italy the confidence of her allies without forfeiting the goodwill of France.
    1
    0
  • Geological History The classification just given has been drawn up with reference to existing insects, but the great majority of the extinct forms that have been discovered can be referred with some confidence to the same orders, and in many cases to recent families.
    1
    0
  • So widely have most of the higher orders of the Hexapoda now diverged from each other, that it is exceedingly difficult in most cases to trace their relationships with any confidence.
    1
    0
  • He then draws a positive demonstration of the truth of his religion from the effects of the new faith, and especially from the excellence of its moral teaching, and concludes with a comparison of Christian and Pagan doctrines, in which the latter are set down with naïve confidence as the work of demons.
    1
    0
  • The Liberals only retained the confidence of the king by postponing the realization of almost all their democratic and reforming programme, and limiting their efforts to financial reorganization and treaties of commerce.
    1
    0
  • Their representation of the moral character, the religious consciousness, the teaching of Jesus, inspires confidence.
    1
    0
  • After the death of `Abd ul `Aziz he resided at Fez, enjoying the patronage and confidence of the regent.
    1
    0
  • He was at Warsaw when his master died in 1733, and he secured a hold on the confidence of the electoral prince, Frederick Augustus, who was at Dresden, by laying hands on the papers and jewels of the late ruler and bringing them promptly to his successor.
    1
    0
  • Nothing could shake the confidence of his master, which survived the ignominious flight into Bohemia, into which he was trapped by Briihl at the time of the battle of Kesseldorf, and all the miseries of the Seven Years' War.
    1
    0
  • The favourite abused the confidence of his master shamelessly.
    1
    0
  • Sherman's confidence in Thomas and his troops was, however, justified.
    1
    0
  • He was soon in the service of Edward, the eldest son of King Henry III., and was constantly in attendance on the prince, whose complete confidence he appears to have enjoyed.
    1
    0
  • They, however, had no confidence in the arch, which, as the Hindu says, "never sleeps but is always tending to its own destruction," so that the pointed arch, which had almost become the emblem of the Mahommedan religion, had to be dispensed with for the covered aisles which surrounded the great court, and in the triple entrance gateway the form of an arch only was retained, as it was constructed with horizontal courses of masonry for the haunches, and with long slabs of stone resting one against the other at the top. A similar construction was employed in the great mosque at Ajmere, built A.D.1200-1211at the same time as the Delhi mosque.
    1
    0
  • This won him the confidence of Bonaparte, and he was henceforth employed in drawing up many of the more important documents.
    1
    0
  • Berg, who had obtained his captaincy during the campaign, had gained the confidence of his superiors by his promptitude and accuracy and had arranged his money matters very satisfactorily.
    10
    9
  • So long as the reserve was available it was drawn upon to supply the void; but when that also was exhausted recourse was had to expedients, such as the borrowing, or rather seizure, of the vakuf revenues (1622) and the sale of crown properties; then ensued a period of barefaced confiscation, until, to restore public confidence in some measure, state budgets were published at intervals, viz.
    0
    0
  • This was summarily considered by the council of ministers and then referred to the budget commission, which was to be composed not only of State functionaries, but of private persons " worthy of confidence, and well versed in financial matters, " and which was invested with the fullest powers of investigation and inquiry.
    0
    0
  • This was regarded as an expression of confidence in the reformed parliament, which had laid the foundation of the important financial and administrative reforms already described.
    0
    0
  • Their artillery was numerous and for the most part of heavy calibre - 18and 24-pounders were common - but the strength of the army lay in its infantry, with its incomparable tenacity in defence and its blind confidence in the bayonet in attack.
    0
    0
  • The material loss inflicted on the French was not very great, but its effect in raising the moral of the raw Prussian cavalry and increasing their confidence in their old commander was enormous.
    0
    0
  • Confidential notes are directed to inspiring confidence by giving an explicit account of the views and intentions of the plenipotentiaries and their governments.
    0
    0
  • The king thereupon reverted to the Russian faction and the Confederation lost the confidence of Europe.
    0
    0
  • Glanvill's first work (a passage in which suggested the theme of Matthew Arnold's Scholar Gipsy), The Vanity of Dogmatizing, or Confidence in Opinions, manifested in a Discourse of the shortness and uncertainty of our Knowledge, and its Causes, with Reflexions on Peripateticism, and an Apology for Philosophy (1661), is interesting as showing one special direction in which the new method of the Cartesian philosophy might be developed.
    0
    0
  • With his wife Russell always lived on terms of the greatest affection and confidence.
    0
    0
  • He promoted the amalgamation of the different races, and sought to conciliate the Portuguese by the confidence he reposed in them.
    0
    0
  • The Conqueror reposed much confidence in two prelates, Lanfranc of Canterbury and Geoffrey of Coutances.
    0
    0
  • Unfortunately his firmness developed into obstinacy, and exhibited itself in continued confidence in officers who had proved to be failures, and in dislike of some of his ablest generals.
    0
    0
  • In general it may be said that Duns shows less confidence in the power of reason than Aquinas, and to that extent Erdmann and others are right in looking upon his system as the beginning of the decline of Scholasticism.
    0
    0
  • Nor was their confidence misplaced.
    0
    0
  • This feeling of confidence found due expression at the diet of 1446, which deliberately passing over the palatine Laszlo Garai elected Hunyadi governor of Hungary, and passed a whole series of popular measures intended to be remedial, e.g.
    0
    0
  • In less than three years the young king had justified their confidence, and delivered his country from its worst embarrass ments.
    0
    0
  • The Obligatory Civil Marriage Bill, the State Registries Bill and the Religion of Children of Mixed Marriages Bill, were finally adopted on the 21st of June 1894, after fierce debates and a ministerial interregnum of ten days (June 10-20); but on the 25th of December, Wekerle, who no longer possessed the king's confidence,' resigned a second time, and was succeeded by Baron Dersb (Desiderius) Banffy.
    0
    0
  • He was imposed upon by speculators in whom he placed confidence, and was reduced to destitution by the failure of a scheme in which they engaged him.
    0
    0
  • But the truth was that the Boers thought they stood to gain by fighting, while the British, though not expecting war, and acting up till the last month or so on the assumption that serious military preparations were either unnecessary or sufficiently unlikely to be necessary to make them politically inexpedient, had with no less confidence committed themselves to a policy which was impracticable on peaceful terms.
    0
    0
  • Thus in the early days of December confidence was considerably restored.
    0
    0
  • The confidence restored by the lull during the early part of December was destined to be roughly shattered.
    0
    0
  • Bloemfontein, President Kruger himself arriving on the scene to give confidence to his burghers; but the demoralization was so great that neither the military genius of the few nor the personal influence of the president could bolster up an adequate resistance, and on the 13th of March 1900 Lord Roberts's army marched into the Free State capital.
    0
    0
  • The occasion for war was engineered entirely by Bismarck; and it is doubtful how far Moltke was in Bismarck's confidence, though as a far-seeing general he took advantage of every opening which the latter's diplomacy secured for him.
    0
    0
  • It is customary to ascribe their successes to the power of the breech-loader, but there were actions in which it played no part, cavalry versus cavalry encounters, and isolated duels between batteries which gave the Prussian gunners a confidence they had not felt when first crossing the frontier.
    0
    0
  • Gylippus was felt to be the representative of Sparta, and of the Peloponnesian Greeks generally, and his arrival inspired the Syracusans with the fullest confidence.
    0
    0
  • The naval preparations of the Syracusans, under the advice of Hermocrates, had led them, too, to confidence in their powers of giving battle to the Athenian fleet.
    0
    0
  • The despatch of this expedition seems to prove an almost blind confidence in Nicias, whose request to be superseded the Athenian people refused to grant.
    0
    0
  • In the description of surgical operations the vagueness of the language seems sometimes to show that the author had not performed such himself; but in other parts, and especially in his historical introduction, he speaks with more confidence; and everywhere he compares and criticizes with learning and judgment.
    0
    0
  • The abdomen is still "full of surprises"; and he who has most experience of this deceptive region will have least confidence in expressing positive opinions in particular cases of disease without operative investigation.
    0
    0
  • Pamela was entrusted with all her husband's secrets and took an active part in furthering his designs; and she appears to have fully deserved the confidence placed in her, though there is reason to suppose that at times she counselled prudence.
    0
    0
  • The result of the two years was undoubtedly to revive the confidence of the Opposition, who found that they had outlived the criticisms of the general election, and both on the question of tariff reform and on matters of general politics were again holding their own.
    0
    0
  • They are repelled by the dryness of much of the matter, the unsuitableness of many of the topics discussed for poetic treatment, the arbitrary assumption of premises, the entire failure to establish the connexion between the concrete phenomena which the author professes to explain and these assumptions, and the erroneousness of many of the doctrines which are stated with dogmatic confidence.
    0
    0
  • Osborn was succeeded as resident commissioner by Sir Marshal Clarke,' who gained the confidence and good will of the Zulu.
    0
    0
  • If the deposit is regular and uniform, the value of undeveloped areas may sometimes be predicted with confidence.
    0
    0
  • But in the absence of a general demonstration of that principle, his results did not command the confidence which they would otherwise have deserved, and it became desirable to have a theory more certain, and depending solely on the fundamental laws of mechanics.
    0
    0
  • It was necessary for Gustavus to have an agent thoroughly in the confidence of the French royal family, and, at the same time, sufficiently able and audacious to help them in their desperate straits, especially as he had lost all confidence in his accredited minister, the baron de Stael.
    0
    0
  • Ignorant, brutal, grasping and corrupt as he was, he deserved the confidence of his master.
    0
    0
  • In their previous travels in Syria they had gained the confidence and friendship of a young sheikh whose family, though long settled at Tadmur, came originally from Nejd, and who was anxious to renew the connexion with his kinsmen by seeking a bride among them.
    0
    0
  • His facility in giving his confidence to unworthy people was now to be visited with dire calamity.
    0
    0
  • The power of the priesthood rests upon special knowledge of man and nature; but to this intellectual eminence must also be added moral power and a certain greatness of character, without which force of intellect and completeness of attainment will not receivethe confidence they ought to inspire.
    0
    0
  • Brought up in the nurture and admonition of Canning, he defended Roman Catholic emancipation, and thought the duke of Wellington's government unworthy of national confidence.
    0
    0
  • The prime minister, Lord Melbourne, submitted to the king a choice of names for the chancellorship of the exchequer and leadership of the House of Commons; but his majesty announced that, having lost the services of Lord Althorp as leader of the House of Commons, he could feel no confidence in the stability of Lord Melbourne's government, and that it was his intention to send for the duke of Wellington.
    0
    0
  • As soon as the new parliament met a vote of want of confidence in the ministry was moved in the House of Commons.
    0
    0
  • To vote confidence in an imperilled ministry, and on its defeat to take office with the rivals who have defeated it, is a manoeuvre which invites the reproach of tergiversation.
    0
    0
  • But just in proportion as Gladstone advanced in favour with the Radical party he lost the confidence of his own constituents.
    0
    0
  • As soon as the new parliament met a vote of want of confidence in Lord Salisbury's government was moved and carried.
    0
    0
  • His rule was noted for firmness, moderation and high political sagacity, and he succeeded for a long time in retaining the friendship and confidence of his master the shah, although his career was beset with political intrigues and jealousy on the part of rival and court favourites, and with internal turbulence.
    0
    0
  • The Aga Khan reciprocated the British commander's confidence and friendship by giving repeated proofs of his devotion and attachment to the British government, and when he finally settled down in India, his position as the leader of the large Ismailiah section of Mahommedan British subjects was recognized by the government, and the title of His Highness was conferred on him, with a large pension.
    0
    0
  • Even this, however, understates the case, seeing that a really inscrutable Unknowable would destroy all confidence in the order of nature and render all knowledge entirely precarious.
    0
    0
  • Swedenborg was a man who won the respect, confidence and love of all who came into contact with him.
    0
    0
  • Adjacent to the town are the two Augustus Cleveland monuments, one erected by government, and the other by the Hindus, to the memory of the civilian, who, as collector of Bhagalpur at the end of the 18th century, "by conciliation, confidence and benevolence, attempted and accomplished the entire subjection of the lawless and savage inhabitants of the Jungleterry of Rajmahal."
    0
    0
  • Therefore when he came into collision with the will of the king he failed to secure the confidence of the nation which was his only support.
    0
    0
  • On the 14th of February 1783 he formed a coalition with Lord North, based as they declared on "mutual goodwill and confidence."
    0
    0
  • The disgust aroused by the anti-national policy of Antony, and the danger to the empire which was averted by the result of the battle of Actium, combined with the confidence inspired by the new ruler to reconcile the great families as well as the great body of the people to the new order of things.
    0
    0
  • By his conduct in many stubborn fights with these foes, Robert thoroughly earned his surname and gained the confidence of the king, who gave him the counties of Nevers and Auxerre.
    0
    0
  • It was noted with anxiety by his enemies that he was succeeded in the king's confidence by his nephew the count of Haro.
    0
    0
  • The Thugs were a well-organized confederacy of professional assassins, who in gangs of whom 10 to 200 travelled in various guises through India, wormed themselves into the confidence of wayfarers of the wealthier class, and, when a favourable opportunity occurred, strangled them by throwing a handkerchief or noose round their necks, and then plundered and buried them.
    0
    0
  • There are phrases in the writings of Vincentius of Lerins and of Faustus, bishop of Riez, which are parallel to the teaching of the creed, though they cannot with any confidence be called quotations.
    0
    0
  • This Grand Master had gained the confidence of Philip of Spain, the friendship of the viceroy of Sicily, of the pope and of the Genoese admiral, Doria.
    0
    0
  • A few scattered units managed to escape, and the left wing retreated unmolested, but at the cost of about 3000 casualties the Allies inflicted a loss of 6000 killed and wounded and 9000 prisoners on the enemy, who were, moreover, so shaken that they never recovered their confidence to the end of the campaign.
    0
    0
  • Nevertheless, the Assyriologist speaks with a good deal of confidence of dates as remote as 3800 B.C.,the time ascribed to King Sargon, who was once regarded as a mythical person, but is now known to have been an actual monarch.
    0
    0
  • This is only one of many cases where the investigations of the archaeologist have proved not iconoclastic but reconstructive, tending to restore confidence in classical traditions which the scientific historians of the age of Niebuhr and George Cornewall Lewis regarded with scepticism.
    0
    0
  • And now, thanks to the efforts of a large company of workers, notably Dr Arthur Evans and his associates in Cretan exploration, we are coming to speak with some confidence not merely of a Mycenaean but of a pre-Mycenaean Age.
    0
    0
  • We have seen that written documents have been preserved in Mesopotamia to which such a date as 4500 B.C. may be ascribed with a good deal of confidence; and that from the third millennium B.C. a flood of contemporary literary records comes to us both from Egypt and Mesopotamia.
    0
    0
  • In The Mystery of Mary Stuart the evidence for an early forged letter was presented with confidence; the interpolation of forgeries based on Crawford's declaration was more dubiously suggested.
    0
    0
  • Bolivar had, no doubt, regained the personal confidence of the officers and soldiers of the third division; but the republican party, with Santander at their head, continued to regard with undisguised apprehension his ascendancy over the army, suspecting him of a desire to imitate the career of Napoleon.
    0
    0
  • The confidence which existed between Trajan and his army finds expression in some of the coins of his reign.
    0
    0
  • He was still felt by many of his clergy and by candidates for ordination to be a rather terrifying person, and to enforce almost impossible standards of diligence, accuracy and preaching efficiency, but his manifest devotion to his work and his zeal for the good of the people rooted him deeply in the general confidence.
    0
    0
  • The national militia in which he placed unbounded confidence had proved inefficient to protect Florence in the hour of need.
    0
    0
  • He was slow to withdraw the confidence he had once given.
    0
    0
  • Those who had most of the king's confidence afterwards were Colbert for home affairs; Lionne for diplomacy; Louvois for war; but as his reign proceeded he became more self-confident and more intolerant of independence of judgment in his ministers.
    0
    0
  • Jacques Charmier, a priest in Servetus's confidence, was condemned to three years' imprisonment in Vienne.
    0
    0
  • As if to show his entire confidence in both these noblemen, the king created the former duke of Hereford and the latter duke of Norfolk.
    0
    0
  • They procured confidence in their actual predictions by appealing to the literal fulfilment of such antedated prophecy.
    0
    0
  • Speaking generally, we may say with confidence that water predominates in the unexplored north polar area, and that it is very unlikely that new land of any great extent exists there.
    0
    0
  • Marie Antoinette soon won the affection and confidence of the dauphin and endeared herself to the king, but her position was precarious, and both Mercy and Maria Theresa had continually to urge her to conquer her violent dislike for the favourite and try to conciliate her.
    0
    0
  • But the queen was violently prejudiced against him, believing him among other things to be responsible for the events of the 5th and 6th of October, and he never gained her full confidence.
    0
    0
  • Her difficulties were increased by the departure of Mercy for the Hague in September 1790, for Montmorin who now took his place in the negotiations had not her confidence to the same extent..
    0
    0
  • At length Louis Philippe, anxious to free himself from the hampering control of the agents of his fortune, thought it safe to parade his want of confidence in the man who had made him king.
    0
    0
  • His logical mind and determined support of the autocratic principle gained the tsar's entire confidence.
    0
    0
  • For Franklin this was a great triumph, and the news of it filled the colonists with delight and restored him to their confidence and affection.
    0
    0
  • The most striking coincidence is Jebel Usdum, by some equated with confidence to Sodom.
    0
    0
  • He replaced the earlier favourites, members of the "unofficial committee," in the tsar's confidence, becoming practically sole minister, all questions being laid by him alone before the emperor and usually settled at once by the two between them.
    0
    0
  • Lugard then endeavoured to settle some of the burning disputes relative to the division of lands and chiefships, &c., and to gain the confidence of both parties.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Major Thruston - a man justly loved by his soldiers, in whom he had complete confidence - hurried to the garrison at Luba's, near the Ripon Falls, relying on his personal influence to control the men, and risking his life in the heroic attempt.
    0
    0
  • He was appointed a privy councillor, groom of the stole and first gentleman of the bedchamber, and though merely an irresponsible confidant, without a seat in parliament or in the cabinet, he was in reality prime minister, and the only person trusted with the king's wishes and confidence.
    0
    0
  • He still for a short time retained influence with the king, and intended to employ George Grenville (whom he recommended as his successor) as his agent; but the latter insisted on possessing the king's whole confidence, and on the failure of Bute in August 1763 to procure his dismissal and to substitute a ministry led by Pitt and the duke of Bedford, Grenville demanded and obtained Bute's withdrawal from the court.
    0
    0
  • Luther's gospel was one of love and confidence, not of fear and trembling, and came as an overwhelming revelation to those who understood and accepted it.
    0
    0
  • Long before the Protestant revolt, simple, obscure people, under the influence of leaders whose names have been forgotten, lost confidence in the official clergy and their sacraments and formed secret organizations of which vague accounts are found in the reports of the 13th-century inquisitors, Rainerus Sacchoni, Bernard Gui, and the rest.
    0
    0
  • During the disturbed reigns of Basil's seven immediate successors, Isaac by his prudent conduct won the confidence of the army; in 1057 he joined with the nobles of the capital in a conspiracy against Michael VI., and after the latter's deposition was invested with the crown, thus founding the new dynasty of the Comneni.
    0
    0
  • He soon won the confidence of the emperor Kien-lung and spent the remainder of his life at Pekin, where he died on the 9th of October 1793.
    0
    0
  • Grey was manoeuvred out of office, and Sir John Hall and Sir Harry Atkinson, able opponents, took the reins with a mission to reinstate the finances and restore confidence.
    0
    0
  • Undoubtedly also commercial confidence was restored by the reconstruction in 1895 of the Bank of New Zealand, and activity has been stimulated by large public loans, while more cautious banking and the systems of taxation and rating on land values, adopted in 1891 and 1896, have done something to check land speculation.
    0
    0
  • The burghers generally, however, had not learned the need of discipline, of confidence in their elected rulers, or that to carry on a government taxes must be levied.
    0
    0
  • But little by little he succumbed to his milieu, the atmosphere of false confidence and passivity created around him by Alexeiev.
    0
    0
  • His policy of gaining time had received a severe blow in the failure of his executive officer to realize it, and that officer, though his unpursued troops quickly regained their moral, had himself completely lost confidence.
    0
    0
  • Thus while the armies in Manchuria faced one another with every appearance of confidence, behind them the situation was exceedingly grave for both parties.
    0
    0
  • No American president has done so much to discredit and destroy the old Jacksonian theory of party government that "to the victors belong the spoils," and to create confidence in the practical success as well as the moral desirability of a system of appointments to office which rests upon efficiency and merit only.
    0
    0
  • Bienerth's policy was to confine himself in a purely objective spirit to the execution of the laws until such time as he had gradually gained the confidence of the nation.
    0
    0
  • When Kdrber declined to carry through the Ausgleich with Hungary without consulting Parliament, and made it a question of confidence the young Emperor on Dec. 20 1916 lightly dismissed his best adviser.
    0
    0
  • On the 10th of May she wrote curtly that the course proposed by Sir Robert Peel was contrary to usage and repugnant to her feelings; the Tory leader then had to inform the House of Commons that, having failed to obtain the proof which he desired of her majesty's confidence, it was impossible for him to accept office.
    0
    0
  • The extent of her family connexions, and the correspondence she maintained with foreign sovereigns, together with the confidence inspired by her personal character, often enabled her to smooth the rugged places of international relations; and she gradually became in later years the link between all parts of a democratic empire, the citizens of which felt a passionate loyalty for their venerable queen.
    0
    0
  • From this time, however, he is more or less in view; and, though at least two events of his life - his quarrel with Diderot and his death - are subjects of dispute, its general history can be checked and followed with reasonable confidence.
    0
    0
  • As a politician he on the whole failed, though he retained the confidence of the popular party almost to the last.
    0
    0
  • His attitude contributed greatly to give popular confidence to his cousin Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III.), of whose coup d'etat on the 2nd of December 1851 he disapproved; but he was soon reconciled to the emperor, and accepted the title of prince.
    0
    0
  • With the growth of confidence negotiations with France were reopened, and, after long discussion, the treaty of 1893 was set aside and Chantabun evacuated in return for the cession of the provinces of Bassac, Melupre, and the remainder of Luang Prabang, all on the right bank of the Mekong, and of the maritime district of Krat.
    0
    0
  • From Antioch Nestorius had brought along with him to Constantinople a co-presbyter named Anastasius, who enjoyed his confidence and is called by Theophanes his "syncellus."
    0
    0
  • But though no longer a minister Czartoryski continued to enjoy Alexander's confidence in private, and in 1810 the emperor candidly admitted to Czartoryski that his policy in 1805 had been erroneous and he had not made a proper use of his opportunities.
    0
    0
  • Arakcheev speedily won the entire confidence of Paul by his scrupulous zeal and undeniable technical ability.
    0
    0
  • From this time Alexander's confidence in Arakcheev steadily increased, and the emperor imparted to him, first of all, his many projects of reform, especially his project of military colonies, the carrying out of the details of which was committed to Arakcheev (1824).
    0
    0
  • But a reforming monarch was inconceivable unless he possessed the confidence of the nation, and such confidence, Wladislaus naturally argued, could only be won by striking and undeniable public services.
    0
    0
  • A well-nigh ubiquitous system of espionage, perhaps most fruitful when directed against official corruption, sapped the foundations of public confidence.
    0
    0
  • After the disasters of the Bohemian campaign he wrote in confidence a humble letter to the Austrian general Konigsegg, who immediately published it.
    0
    0
  • Meade, who, besides steadiness and ability, possessed the confidence of Lincoln and Halleck which Hooker had lacked.
    0
    0
  • His enthusiastic confidence knew no obstacles.
    0
    0
  • The story is apocryphal; but Napoleon's confidence in him was evinced by his being appointed to similar duties in the Grand Army, which in the autumn of 1805 overthrew the armies of Austria and Russia.
    0
    0
  • The operations resulted in re-establishing the confidence of the Confederates in their army which Johnston's retreat from Yorktown had shaken, in adding prestige to President Davis and his government, and in rectifying the popular view of General Lee as a commander which had been based upon his failure to recover West Virginia in the autumn of 1861.
    0
    0
  • Her confidence was not misplaced; Cecil was exactly the kind of minister England then required.
    0
    0
  • From all these gentlemen Everett received marks of approbation and confidence.
    0
    0
  • This is not a prominent feature in Plotinus or his immediate disciples, who still exhibit full confidence in the subjective presuppositions of their philosophy.
    0
    0
  • But the later adherents of the, school did not possess this confidence'; they based their philosophy on revelations of the Deity, and they found these in the religious traditions and rites of all nations.
    0
    0
  • He was transparent in character, chivalrous, kindly, firm, eloquent and sagacious; his purity of motive and unselfishness commanded absolute confidence; he had originality and initiative in dealing with new and difficult circumstances, and great aptitude for business details.
    0
    0
  • It advanced steadily under Gregory XVI., and, though it was at first shunned by Pius IX., it secured his entire confidence after his return from Gaeta in 1849, and obtained from him a special breve erecting the staff of its literary journal, the Civiltd Cattolica, into a perpetual college under the general of the Jesuits, for the purpose of teaching and propagating the faith in its pages.
    0
    0
  • Leo XIII., while favouring them somewhat, never gave them his full confidence; and by his adhesion to the Thomist philosophy and theology, and his active work for the regeneration and progress of the older orders, he made another suppression possible by destroying much of their prestige.
    0
    0
  • Statistical returns, however, are somewhat incomplete and conflicting, and cannot be used with confidence.
    0
    0
  • The notes are not legal tender, and it is forbidden to count them as " cash on hand " in bank returns, but ample safeguards both as to issue and redemption inspire full confidence in their employment as a substitute for gold.
    0
    0
  • On May 16th 1877, he was one of the "363" who voted want of confidence in the Broglie ministry (thus paying his debts), and he took considerable part in organizing the subsequent electoral campaign.
    0
    0
  • The charge of dishonesty is one never to be lightly made against men of such distinction as his, especially when their evident confidence in their own infallibility, their faculty of ingenious casuistry, and the strength of will which makes them (unconsciously, no doubt) close and keep closed the eyes of their mind to all inconvenient facts and inferences, supply a more charitable explanation.
    0
    0
  • They are therefore disposed to admit to a greater or less extent and with widely varying degrees of confidence the presence of genuine elements in the new matter.
    0
    0
  • Auguste's death in 1800 (due partly to Schelling's rash confidence in his medical knowledge) drew Schelling and Caroline together, and Schlegel having removed to Berlin, a divorce was, apparently with his consent, arranged.
    0
    0
  • From the very beginning of his reign Eric's morbid fear of the upper classes drove him to give his absolute confidence to a man of base origin and bad character, though, it must be admitted, of superior ability.
    0
    0
  • His desire to retain French confidence was the chief motive of his refusal in July 1882 to share in the British expedition to Egypt, but, finding.
    0
    0
  • Corruption seems to be very rare, but instances of subservience to powerful political groups sometimes shake public confidence.
    0
    0
  • In New YOrk City, where the council had lost public confidence, and in some other places, the only important power still possessed by the council is that of granting franchises to street railways, gas companies and the like.
    0
    0
  • Now and then the Senate has been more influential than the House, now and then it has fallen back, at least so far as the confidence of the people in it is concerned.
    0
    0
  • He holds office for five years, and his powers are strictly limited, as in the case of the sovereign, all executive acts being done on the advice of his cabinet, the members of which hold office only so long as they retain the confidence of the people as expressed by their representatives in parliament.
    0
    0
  • A scribe again who scrupulously records the presence of a lacuna or illegibility in what he is copying, inspires us with confidence in the rest of his work.
    0
    0
  • He distinguished himself by his conciliatory disposition, earned the special confidence of Duke John Albert of Mecklenburg, and took a leading part in 1552 in drawing up the constitution of the Mecklenburg church.
    0
    0
  • In 1539, as representative to the chapter-general of his order he visited Rome; here he was made doctor of theology, and while he mixed with the liberal circle associated with Juan de Valdes, he had also the confidence of Paul III.
    0
    0
  • President Johnson's leading political principles were a reverence of Andrew Jackson, unlimited confidence in the people, and an intense veneration for the constitution.
    0
    0
  • Both armies now rested for some weeks, during which interval Wellington gained the confidence of the inhabitants by his unsparing repression of marauding, his business-like payment for supplies, and the excellent discipline which he maintained.
    0
    0
  • At first he attempted to develop the latter, and to carry on the government by means of loans in such a way as to maintain public confidence in its solvency.
    0
    0
  • But the more liberal government which succeeded did not enjoy his complete confidence, and in 1865 a ministry was once more formed which was more in accord with his own ideas.
    0
    0
  • Though the experimental and theoretical developments were not necessarily dependent on each other, and by far the larger proportion of the subject which we now term " Spectroscopy " could stand irrespective of Gustav Kirchhoff's thermodynamical investigations, there is no doubt that the latter was, historically speaking, the immediate cause of the feeling of confidence with which the new branch of science was received, for nothing impresses the scientific world more strongly than just that little touch of mystery which attaches to a mathematical investigation which can only be understood by the few, and is taken on trust by the many, provided that the author is a man who commands general confidence.
    0
    0
  • But when Christ opened to me how He was tempted by the same devil, and overcame him and bruised his head, and that through Him, and His power, light, grace and spirit, I should overcome also, I had confidence in Him; so He it was that opened to me, when I was shut up and had no hope nor faith.
    0
    0
  • The result was an electoral defeat which indicated, no doubt, a pronounced weakening of Mr Balfour's position in public confidence.
    0
    0
  • Various other provisions were made which increased confidence.
    0
    0
  • Winning the confidence of Charles of Lorraine and of Arnulf, archbishop of Reims, he was restored to his see; but he soon took the opportunity to betray Laon, together with Charles and Arnulf, into the hands of Hugh Capet.
    0
    0
  • He never enjoyed the confidence of the court to which he was accredited, and frittered away his influence in disputes about precedence.
    0
    0
  • His sympathy with men of other ways and thought, and with the truth in other ecclesiastical systems gained for him the confidence and affection of men of varied habits of mind and religious traditions, and was thus a great factor in gaining increasing support for the Episcopal Church.
    0
    0
  • On the basis of his results, as they have been scrutinized by scholars like Schiirer and Geffcken, it is possible to disentangle some of the different strata with a certain degree of confidence.
    0
    0
  • Schmidt won the confidence of the Hottentots, but the Dutch authorities stopped his work.
    0
    0
  • The medical work won the favour of the government, and so wisely did the missionaries act, that during all the turbulent changes since 1884 they escaped entanglement in the political disturbances and yet held the confidence of the people.
    0
    0
  • Elizabeth, fearless almost to a fault in face of physical danger, constant in her confidence even after discovery of her narrow escape from the poisoned bullets of household conspirators, was cowardly even to a crime in face of subtler and more complicated peril.
    0
    0
  • We gather, too, that his restoration to Paul's confidence took place some time earlier, as the Colossians had already been bidden by oral message or letter to welcome him if he should visit them.
    0
    0
  • Such was his popularity and the confidence he inspired that in 1631 his great offices of state were declared hereditary, in favour of his five-year-old son, by the Acte de Survivance.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, the maintenance of the tribal system and the support given to the lawful chiefs did much to win the confidence and respect of a people naturally suspicious, and mindful of their exiled king.
    0
    0
  • It is highly doubtful whether the three powers could have collected more than forty ships of the line - and they would have been hastily manned, destitute of experience, and without confidence.
    0
    0
  • He had Nelson with him as second in command - then a junior admiral but without rival in capacity and in his hold on the confidence of the fleet.
    0
    0
  • During this period of nineteen years the general conduct of public affairs and administration, and especially of foreign affairs, such was the confidence inspired by his talents and industry, was largely placed in his hands.
    0
    0
  • Butler, however, retained, in spite of his destructive theory of knowledge, confidence in the rational proofs for the existence of God, and certainly maintains what may be vaguely described as an a priori view of conscience.
    0
    0
  • The more his life has become known, the more confidence we place in this admirable estimate.
    0
    0
  • After the revolt at Lyons in 1817 he was nominated procureur-general of the city, and by his sense and moderation did much to restore order and confidence.
    0
    0
  • Such instructions were not calculated to promote confidence between Swedish and Danish negotiators.
    0
    0
  • Farnese first won by promises and blandishments the confidence of the Walloons, always jealous of the predominance of the " Flemish " provinces, and then proceeded to make himself master of Brabant and Flanders by force of arms. In succession Ypres, Mechlin, Ghent, Brussels, and finally Antwerp (17th of August 1585) fell into his hands.
    0
    0
  • Leopold now proceeded with vigour to strengthen his position and to' restore order and confidence.
    0
    0
  • He kept on the best of terms, though a Protestant, with the Roman Catholic clergy and nobility, and his subsequent marriage with the daughter of the French king (9th of August 1832), and the contract that the children of the marriage should be brought up in the Roman Catholic faith, did much to inspire confidence in his good intentions.
    0
    0
  • Elijah now stepped forward with the quiet confidence and dignity that became the prophet and representative of the true God.
    0
    0
  • John Hay was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, whose training in diplomacy gave a cool and judicious character to his statesmanship. As secretary of state under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt his guidance was invaluable during a rather critical period in foreign affairs, and no man of his time did more to create confidence in the increased interest taken by the United States in international matters.
    0
    0
  • After taking Grattan into his confidence, it was arranged that the latter should bring in a Roman Catholic emancipation bill, and that it should then receive government support.
    0
    0
  • Confidence in French assurances, and belief that Great Britain would never permit the extension of French influence in North Africa, prevented him, from foreseeing the French occupation of Tunis (iith of May 1881).
    0
    0
  • Fortunately, however, he was singularly open to conviction, and Otto von Bismarck, though not yet in office, was already in his confidence.
    0
    0
  • For twenty years the double office was held by Bismarck, who, supported as he was by the absolute confidence of the emperor, and also of the allied princes, held a position greater than that ever attained by any subject in modern Europe since the time of Richelieu.
    0
    0
  • Edwin von Manteuffel, the first governor, to win the confidence of the people failed; the anti-German feeling increased; the party of protestors continued in full numbers.
    0
    0
  • They offered their resignation, but the king refused to accept it, publicly expressed his confidence in them, and they continued in office during the lifetime of the king, although in 1881 the growing reaction gave a considerable majority to the Ultramontane party.
    0
    0
  • Having obtained their confidence, he sent a messenger to Tarquinius to inquire the next step. His father made no reply to the messenger, but walked up and down his garden, striking off the heads of the tallest poppies.
    0
    0
  • Favras took into his confidence certain officers by whom he was betrayed; and, with his wife, he was arrested on Christmas Eve 1789 and imprisoned in the Abbaye.
    0
    0
  • On the 1st of May the Szell cabinet found itself without supply and governed for a time " ex-lex "; Szell, who had lost the confidence of the crown, resigned and was succeeded (June 26) by Count Khuen-Hedervary, previously ban, or governor, of Croatia.
    0
    0
  • The German Left opposed it; they were compelled to do so by the popular indignation in the German districts; and when the vote was carried against them (12th June 1895) they made it a question of confidence, and formally withdrew their support from the government, which therefore at once resigned.
    0
    0
  • As his viceroy in Delhi he left a Rohilla chief in whom he had all confidence, but scarcely had he crossed the Indus when the Mahommedan wazir drove the chief from the city, killed the Great Mogul and set another prince of the family, a tool of his own, upon the throne.
    0
    0
  • Cobden had the calmness and confidence of the political philosopher, Bright had the passion and the fervour of the popular orator.
    0
    0
  • He gained a hearing before a large popular assembly in London, and won the confidence of those whom he addressed byhisevident earnestness, sincerity and ability.
    0
    0
  • Moreover Alcibiades lost the confidence of the Spartans and passed over to Tissaphernes, at whose disposal he placed his great powers of diplomacy, at the same time scheming for his restoration to Athens.
    0
    0
  • This failure and the refusal of Lysander to fight again destroyed the confidence which Alcibiades had so recently regained.
    0
    0
  • Although Conti did not secure the Polish throne he remained in the confidence of Louis until 1755, when his influence was destroyed by the intrigues of Madame de Pompadour; so that when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756 he was refused the command of the army of the Rhine, and began the opposition to the administration which caused Louis to refer to him as "my cousin the advocate."
    0
    0
  • An epidemic of cholera in the summer of 1883 gave the British officers their first chance of acquiring the esteem and confidence of their men, and the opportunity was nobly utilized.
    0
    0
  • Ihe development of trade in the Mediterranean and contact with new peoples and new civilizations in peace and war had given birth to new ideas among the Egyptians and at the same time to a loss of confidence in their own powers.
    0
    0
  • The Fatimite general Jauhar (variously represented as of Greek, Slav and Sicilian origin), who enjoyed the complete confidence of the Fatimite sovereign, was placed at the head of an army of 100,000 menif Oriental numbers are to be trustedand started from Rakkada at the beginning of March 969 with the view of seizing Egypt.
    0
    0
  • Gradually the tension between natives and foreigners relaxed, and mutual confidence was established.
    0
    0
  • It may be so to worldly eyes, but in the time of danger to Islam the Moslem turns away from the things of this world and thirsts only for the service of his Faith, even though he looks in the face of death To establish confidence in the minds of the Egyptian public that the authorities could maintain order and tranquillity, it was determined to increase permanently the strength of the British garrison.
    0
    0
  • He earned the confidence of the Porte by the cruel discipline he maintained in his own sanjak, and the regular flow of tribute and bribes which he directed to Constantinople; while he bent all his energies to extending his territories at the expense of his neighbours.
    0
    0
  • Th is contest began in 18 2 when a com- g g g %, bination of all the Radical parties, known as the United Left," passed a vote of want of confidence against the government and rejected the budget.
    0
    0
  • Yet owing to the method of composition employed by Hebrew editors, or revisers, it is possible in this case, as in others, not only to determine the source of each individual passage, but also to trace with considerable confidence the various stages in the process by which it reached its final form and position.
    0
    0
  • The result testifies to the confidence inspired by Alfred's character and generalship, and to the efficacy of the military reforms initiated by him.
    0
    0
  • Naturally, a mutual confidence between a king who had conquered his kingdom and a people who had stood in arms against him was not attainable immediately, and the first six years of Christian III.'s reign were marked by a contest between the Danish Rigsraad and the German counsellors, both of whom sought to rule "the pious king" exclusively.
    0
    0
  • As regards the jus vetus, therefore, the judges and practitioners of Justinian's time had two terrible difficulties to contend with - first, the bulk of the law, which made it impossible for any one to be sure that he possessed anything like the whole of the authorities bearing on the point in question, so that he was always liable to find his opponent quoting against him some authority for which he could not be prepared; and, secondly, the uncertainty of the law, there being a great many important points on which differing opinions of equal legal validity might be cited, so that the practising counsel could not advise, nor the judge decide, with any confidence that he was right, or that a superior court would uphold his view.
    0
    0
  • By the exercise of tact, discretion and inviolable good faith, the correspondents gradually won the confidence of the army, so that towards the end of the war officers of all ranks were keen to have them with their troops and to give them every facility permitted by official regulations.
    0
    0
  • Here, in confidence begotten of friendly chats over afternoon tea, the disillusioned autocrat confessed his mistake.
    0
    0
  • After three or four years, fortified with the certificates of his various professors, he seeks a place in a law-court or as a teacher, preacher, cadi, or mufti of a village or minor town, or else one of the innumerable posts of confidence for which the complicated ceremonial of Mahommedanism demands a theologian, and which are generally paid out of pious foundations.
    0
    0
  • Mr Gladstone was attracted by his vigorous ability as a speaker, and his evidence of sound political judgment; and in August 1892, though comparatively unknown to the general public, he was selected to move the vote of want of confidence which overthrew Lord Salisbury's government, and was made home secretary in the new Liberal ministry.
    0
    0
  • He occasionally visited his family, and their unfailing confidence helped to keep up his courage.
    0
    0
  • With Cromwell's help he secured parliamentary support, and its usefulness led him to extend parliamentary representation to Wales and Calais, to defend the privileges of Parliament, and to yield rather than forfeit its confidence.
    0
    0
  • On Mary's recovery, her aversion to Darnley, and her confidence in Bothwell, were unconcealed; and, early in September, she admitted Lethington to her presence.
    0
    0
  • He gained the confidence of Tiberius, and, supported by the praetorians, whom he concentrated in a camp on the Viminal Hill, became virtually ruler of Rome.
    0
    0
  • It may be said that the first duty of a huntsman is to obtain the confidence of his hounds, to understand them and to make himself understood; and the intelligence of hounds is remarkable.
    0
    0
  • In 1889 he was deposed from the management of Commonweal, and gradually lost all confidence in the movement as an active force.
    0
    0
  • Soimonov himself was killed, and the disciplined confidence and steady volleys of the defenders dominated the chaotic élan of the Russians.
    0
    0
  • The trade of the Illinois country was now diverted to the settlements in the lower Mississippi river, but the French, although they were successful in gaining the confidence and friendship of the Indians, failed to develop the resources of the country.
    0
    0
  • No party is formed, no programme is announced, no doctrine is formulated; without assuming the title of Messiah, He offers Himself as the centre of expectation, and seems to invite an unlimited confidence in His person.
    0
    0
  • As a teacher and master Hegel inspired confidence in his pupils, and maintained discipline without pedantic interference in their associations and sports.
    0
    0
  • Goethe was not long in Weimar before he was entrusted with responsible state duties, and events soon justified the duke's confidence.
    0
    0
  • Goethe, the cosmopolitan Weltbierger of the 18th century, had himself no very intense feelings of patriotism, and, having seen Germany flourish as a group of small states under enlightened despotisms, he had little confidence in the dreamers of 1813 who hoped to see the glories of Barbarossa's empire revived.
    0
    0
  • His activity was confined to political and especially diplomatic channels; so long as Morton lived, Fox was his subordinate, but after the archbishop's death he was second to none in Henry's confidence, and he had an important share in all the diplomatic work of the reign.
    0
    0
  • True to his habit of taking the German people into his confidence, he wrote an account of his interview with the Legate, and published it under the title of the Acta Augustana.
    0
    0
  • A sedulous courtier, he was rewarded with the confidence of Augustus, who ordered the procurators of Syria to do nothing without taking his advice.
    0
    0
  • His conduct being attacked, he declined renomination for the governorship, but was unanimously returned by Albemarle as a delegate to the state legislature; and on the day previously set for legislative inquiry on a resolution offered by an impulsive critic, he received, by unanimous vote of the house, a declaration of thanks and confidence.
    0
    0
  • The educated classes characteristically furnished Federalism with a remarkable body of alarmist leaders; and thus it happened that Jefferson, because, with only a few of his great contemporaries, he had a thorough trust and confidence in the people, became the idol of American democracy.
    0
    0
  • In short, his kindness of heart rose above all social, religious or political differences, and nothing destroyed his confidence in men and his sanguine views of life.
    0
    0
  • He owes his position to the good-will of his fellows, receives no remuneration, and resigns as soon as he loses the confidence of the people.
    0
    0
  • His writings sufficiently show that but for this confidence he would have arrived sooner at a discovery for which his mind was fully prepared.
    0
    0
  • Da'ud, who, having insinuated himself into the confidence of the caliph, especially by discovering the hiding places of certain Alids, was afterwards (in 778) made prime minister.
    0
    0
  • The provincial governors in whom his father had placed confidence, Mandi superseded by creatures of his own.
    0
    0
  • Rabi`, with the view of gaining the new caliph's confidence, hastened to call together all the troops of the late caliph and to lead them back to Bagdad, in order to place them in the hands of the new sovereign, Amin.
    0
    0
  • He acted invariably on the advice of those who for the time had his confidence, and occupied himself mainly with the affairs of his harem, with polo, fishing, wine and music. The five years of his reign were disastrous to the empire, and in particular to Bagdad which never entirely recovered its old splendour.
    0
    0
  • He was easy to lead when his mind was in solution; and he gave his confidence freely where he had once placed it.
    0
    0
  • He was not suspicious, but if he withdrew his confidence he was implacable.
    0
    0
  • They felt great confidence in themselves and great independence.
    0
    0
  • As a result Brusati wrote, on April 6, that the reserves given him allowed him " to view with complete confidence even the most unfavourable event."
    0
    0
  • The Italian position looked unfavourable and worse was yet to come, but Cadorna's confidence was justified.
    0
    0
  • Cadorna had confidence in his own estimate of the situation, and confirmed the order for an attack by the XX.
    0
    0
  • With their help he set himself to win the confidence of a public still inclined to distrust the author of the proscriptions of 43 B.C. Brigandage was suppressed in Italy, and the safety of the Italian frontiers secured against the raids of Alpine tribes on the northwest and of Illyrians on the east, while Rome was purified and beautified, largely with the help of Agrippa (aedile in 33 B.C.).
    0
    0
  • Twenty years of civil war and confusion had disorganized the empire, and the strong hand of Augustus, as he must now be called, could alone restore confidence and order.
    0
    0
  • Although the way of the disciple or "chela" is always represented as long and difficult, it is said that as he proceeds, the transcendental faculties which arise to help him enable him to pursue the right course with ever increasing confidence and security.
    0
    0
  • The power of the regents, Adela, the queen-mother, and William, archbishop of Reims, was restricted by a council composed mostly of clerks who had the king's confidence.
    0
    0
  • In the end his confidence proved to be justified.
    0
    0
  • Christianity came as supplying a new power; it freed philosophy from scepticism by giving a definite object to its efforts and a renewed confidence in its mission.
    0
    0
  • The immediate effect was to raise Perez higher than ever in the royal confidence and favour, but, wary though the secretary had been, he had not succeeded in obliterating all trace of his connexion with the crime, and very soon a prosecution was set on foot by the representatives of the murdered man.
    0
    0
  • It may be concluded, with some confidence, from experience and theory alike, that localities where they do not prevail may fail to keep plague out, but have very little to fear from it, except the disturbance of trade caused by the traditional terrors that still cling to the name.
    0
    0
  • Other positions were seriously threatened, and there was no confidence that they would be held.
    0
    0
  • It was this lack of practice, no doubt, and a false confidence based on obsolete experience, which led to the belief that even if the opening phases of the battle were unfavourable to the defence, there would be ample time to restore the situation.
    0
    0
  • It was inevitable that later writers should speculate about the authorship of such a law, and that it should be attributed with more or less confidence to Solon or Peisistratus or Hipparchus.
    0
    0
  • When his father died in 11 4 7 Frederick became duke of Swabia, and immediately afterwards accompanied his uncle, the German king Conrad III., on his disastrous crusade, during which he greatly distinguished himself and won the complete confidence of the king.
    0
    0
  • On the frontiers, thanks chiefly to Corbulo's energy and skill, no disaster occurred serious enough to shake the general confidence, and even the murder of Britannicus seems to have been accepted as a necessary measure of selfdefence.
    0
    0
  • With the view of examining this question, he undertook the reduction of every observation made before 1750 which appeared to be worthy of confidence.
    0