Confectionery sentence example

confectionery
  • The industries include flour-milling, the manufacture of confectionery, iron-ware and hats, and the distillation of olive-oil.

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  • Shoppers will also get the chance to sample some traditional continental confectionery.

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  • Great fun was had by all involved with making the confectionery with sundry accidents occurring.

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  • The principal industries are brewing, iron-founding and the manufacture of cloth, boots, leather, cigarettes, matches, pottery, preserved meat and confectionery.

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  • The syrup is used chiefly as a substitute for jam or preserved fruits, and the sugar is used in country homes for sweetening, for cooking purposes and for the making of confectionery.

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  • The boxes were intended to hold bonbons or confectionery delicacies at a time when sugar was quite expensive.

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  • Square Favor Box with Jewels These gorgeous favor boxes have jewels on gold color wires on the lids and contain confectionery of your choice.

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  • The shop sells a large range of goods including confectionery, toiletries, stationery and clothing.

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  • I believe she made a lot of the other confectionery on the premises.

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  • These berries make great pies or other confectionery treats, and can be frozen, canned or dried.

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  • Syra is the seat of several industries, ship-building, tanneries, flour and cotton mills, rope-walks, factories for confectionery ("Turkish delight"), hats, kerchiefs, furniture, pottery and distilleries.

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  • Shoe-making, tanning, agricultural trade, tin-plating, and the manufacture of confectionery and cider have superseded the former large woollen and serge industries.

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  • The principal manufactures are slaughtering and meat-packing products, foundry and machine-shop products, rubber boots and shoes, rubber belting and hose, printing and publishing products, carpentering, pianos and organs, confectionery and furniture.

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  • He enjoyed placing a raised silver bowl with sugar confectionery or a loaf of marzipan in the center.

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  • Results A summary of the concentrations of pulegone and menthol found in mint confectionery and other mint products is given in Table 1.

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  • You will also feel constant indignation at the dire shortage of confectionery.

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  • In 1905 the census reports did not include manufactures outside the actual city limits; the total value of the factory product of the city proper in 1905 was $11,573,720; besides slaughtering and packing the other manufactures in 1905 included men's factory-made clothing (valued at $1,556,655) flour and grist-mill products (valued at $683,464), saddlery and harness (valued at $524,918), confectionery ($437,096), malt liquors ($407,054), boots and shoes ($350,384) and farm implements.

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  • Among the products are cotton goods (the product value of which in 1905 was 1 4% of the total value of the city's manufactures), foundry and machine-shop products, lumber, patent medicines, confectionery, men's clothing, mattresses, spring-beds and other furniture.

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  • The metallurgical works of the Societe de la Franche-Comte are established in the city and there are saw-mills, printing-works, paperfactories, distilleries, and manufactories of boots and shoes, machinery, hosiery, leather, elastic fabric, confectionery and artificial silk.

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  • The trade of Alicante consists chiefly in the manufacture of cotton, linen and woollen goods, cigars and confectionery; the importation of coal, iron, machinery, manures, timber, oak staves and fish; and the exportation of lead, fruit, farm produce and red wines, which are sent to France for blending with better vintages.

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  • Nor is their employment less considerable in the manufacture of confectionery and in the preparation of many dietetic articles.

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  • Iron and copper founding, brewing, tanning, and the manufacture of gunpowder, confectionery, heavy iron goods, gloves, boots and shoes and cotton goods are also carried on.

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  • The chief industrial establishments are iron foundries, railway and motor engineering works, breweries, flour-mills, tanneries and manufactories of confectionery, artificial manure, &c. There is water communication by the Ouse with the Humber, and by the Foss Navigation to the N.E.

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  • The chief manufactures are silk, confectionery and earthenware; and there is besides a considerable trade in fruit, grain and cattle.

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  • The leading manufacturing industries in 1905, with the product-value of each in this year, were slaughtering and meat-packing ($4,040,162), foundry and machine shop work ($3,146,914), flour and grist milling ($ 2, 79 8, 74 0), lumber manufacturing and planing ($2,519,081), printing and publishing (newspapers and periodicals, $2,097,339 and book and job printing, $1,278,841), car construction and repairing ($1,549,836) - in 1910 there were railway shops here of the Southern Pacific, Pacific Electric, Los Angeles Street, Salt Lake and Santa Fe railways - and the manufacture of confectionery ($953,915), furniture ($879,910) and malt liquors ($789,393).

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  • The town, apart from its transit trade and the industries connected therewith, has some manufactures - jam and confectionery works; oil, candle and explosive works; saw and flour mills; tanneries, &c. It has an excellent water supply.

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  • A large business is carried on in wooden furniture, tobacco and cigars, paper, ribbons, leather wares, chemicals, liqueurs, confectionery and biscuits.

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  • Besides the foregoing there are cocoa, chocolate, confectionery and baking-powder factories, coffee-roasting and ham-curing and smoking establishments, lard refineries, margarine manufactories and fish-curing, preserving and packing factories.

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  • The industries include the manufacture of woollens and confectionery, tanning and engineering, and there is a considerable agricultural trade.

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  • A great variety of industries is carried on, the chief being the manufacture of semolina and other farinaceous foods, confectionery, preserved fruit and jams, chemicals and rubber goods.

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  • Its main use in England was to colour pastry and confectionery, and it is still used for this purpose in some parts of the country (notably Cornwall).

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  • The finer varieties are used as an emollient and demulcent in medicine, and in the manufacture of confectionery; the commoner qualities are used as an adhesive paste, for giving lustre to crape, silk, &c., in cloth finishing to stiffen the fibres, and in calico-printing.

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  • The city also manufactures large quantities of cotton-seed oil and cake, lumber, flour and grist-mill products, foundry and machine-shop products, confectionery, carriages and wagons, paints, furniture, bricks, cigars, &c. The Illinois Central and the St Louis & San Francisco railways have workshops here.

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  • Baltimore is also a well-known centre for the manufacture of clothing, in which in 1905 ($22,684,656) it ranked fourth among the cities of the United States; for cigar and cigarette-making (1905, $4,360,366); for the manufacture of foundry and machine shop products (1905, $6,572,925), of tinware (1905, $5,705,980), of„shirts (1905, $5,710,783), of cotton-duck (the output of sailduck being about three-fourths of the total for the United States), bricks (about 150,000,000 annually), and fertilizers; it also manufactures furniture,malt liquors,and confectionery, and many other commodities in smaller amounts.

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  • Among the leading and more distinctive items were printing and publishing ($21,023,855 in 1905); sugar and molasses refining ($ 1 5,74 6, 547 in 1900; figures not published in 1905 because of the industry being in the hands of a single owner); men's clothing (in 1900, $8,609,475, in 1905, $11,246,004); women's clothing (in 1900, $3,258,483, in 1905, $5,705,470); boots and shoes (in 1900, $3,882,655, in 1905, $5,575,927); boot and shoe cut stock (in 1905, $5, 211, 445); malt liquors (in 1900, $7,518,668, in 1905, $6,715,215); confectionery (in 1900, $4,455,184, in 1905, $6,210,023); tobacco products (in 1900, $3,504,603, in 1905, $4,59 2, 698); pianos and organs ($3,670,771 in 1905); other musical instruments and materials (in 1905, $231,780); rubber and elastic goods (in 1900, $3,139,783, in 1905, $2,887,323); steam fittings and heating apparatus (in 1900, $2,876,327, in 1905, $3,354, 020); bottling, furniture, &c. Art tiles and pottery are manufactured in Chelsea.

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  • It is largely replacing brass and copper in all departments of industry - especially where dead weight has to be moved about, and lightness is synonymous with economy - for instance, in bed-plates for torpedo-boat engines, internal fittings for ships instead of wood, complete boats for portage, motor-car parts and boiling-pans for confectionery and in chemical works.

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