How to use Concedes in a sentence

concedes
  • That Plato was not careful to distinguish the Megarians and the Cynics from the eristical sophists, and that the disputants of the 4th century affected some of the mannerisms of the greatest disputant of the 5th century, he willingly concedes.

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  • At the same time the author concedes that he was not deeply pious.

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  • Virgin would also like to develop a biofuel suitable for aircraft engines, although it concedes this could be a decade away.

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  • For estate planning phone in by concedes chapman was.

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  • Crookes had a good match and hopefully will bring some solidity to the back four which still concedes too many goals.

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  • Beatrice concedes that Divine Justice is a matter for faith, and may appear unjust to human beings.

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  • Slightly exasperated, he concedes they share some sensibilities.

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  • It has been doubted whether Cicero,' in his short criticism in the letter already referred to, concedes to Lucretius both the gifts of genius and the accomplishment of art or only one of them.

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  • The present writer leans to the earlier alternative in each case, 47, 58, 61; but he willingly concedes that the evidence, as he understands it, is not inconsistent with the later alternative.

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  • The fourth stage concedes to the prisoner a mattress every night, and the privilege, if well conducted, to communicate by letter or through visits with his friends outside.

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  • Despagnet the term suzerain is applicable to a case in which a state concedes a fief, in virtue of its sovereignty (Essai sur le protectorat international, p. 46), reserving to itself certain rights as the author of this concession.

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  • Hume concedes that a compact is the natural means of peace fully instituting a new government, and may therefore be properly regarded as the ground of allegiance to it at the outset; but he urges that, when once it is firmly established the duty of obeying it rests on precisely the same combination of private and general interests as the duty of keeping promises; it is therefore absurd to base the former on the latter.

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  • Littre, by far the most eminent of the scientific followers of Comte, concedes a certain force to Spencer's objections, and makes certain secondary modifications in the hierarchy in consequence, while still cherishing his faith in the Comtist theory of the sciences.

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