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comprehensiveness

comprehensiveness Sentence Examples

  • The comprehensiveness of his legal and judicial reforms is very striking.

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  • But it is necessary in practice, for historical comprehensiveness, to keep the wider meaning in view.

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  • He died in 956, and was known, from the comprehensiveness of his survey, as the Pliny of the East.

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  • The distinctive feature of the Spanish-Jewish culture was its comprehensiveness.

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  • Of these one of the most notable is Cyril Horvath, whose treatises published in the organs of the academy display a rare freedom and comprehensiveness of imagination.

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  • It abounds with remarks of extraordinary fertility and comprehensiveness; but it is often arbitrary; and its views of the past are strained into in the coherence with the statical views of the preceding volume.

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  • A more commanding figure is that of Aurelius Augustinus or St Augustine (354-430), bishop of Hippo, who for comprehensiveness and dialectical power stands out in the same way as Hieronymus or St Jerome (c.33 I or 340-420), a native of Stridon in Dalmatia, does for manysided learning and scholarship.

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  • Lightfoot, indeed, dwells on the all-round "comprehensiveness" with which Clement, as the mouthpiece of the early Roman Church, utters in succession phrases or ideas borrowed impartially from Peter and Paul and James and the Epistle to Hebrews.

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  • There is a want of depth in Christian experience, in the power of realizing relative spiritual values in the light of the master principle involved in the distinctively Christian consciousness, such as could raise Clement above a verbal eclecticism, rather than comprehensiveness, in the use of Apostolic language.

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  • It was this characteristic quality of comprehensiveness that also gave him so much influence as a teacher.

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  • This impartiality in his early studies is the key of his philosophic work, the dominant characteristic of which is comprehensiveness rather than originality.

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  • With Professor Pickering's usual comprehensiveness, the inquiry was so arranged as to cover the whole sky; and with four telescopes - two at Cambridge for the northern hemisphere, and two at Arequipa in Peru for the southern - to which a fine 24-in.

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  • He had specially prepared himself, as he thought, for "teaching imaginative men, and political men, and legal men, and scientific men who bear the world in hand"; and he did not attempt to win their attention to abstract and worn-out theological arguments, but discussed the opinions, the poetry, the politics, the manners and customs of the time, and this not with philosophical comprehensiveness, not in terms of warm eulogy or measured blame, but of severe satire varied by fierce denunciation, and with a specific minuteness which was concerned primarily with individuals.

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  • Probably the religious opinions of Irving, originally in some respects more catholic and truer to human nature than generally prevailed in ecclesiastical circles, had gained breadth and comprehensiveness from his intercourse with Coleridge, but gradually his chief interest in Coleridge's philosophy centred round that which was mystical and obscure, and to it in all likelihood may be traced his initiation into the doctrine of millenarianism.

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  • In correctness of detail and comprehensiveness of view it was greatly superior to every work of the same kind that had hitherto appeared in France.

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  • Bacher, Berlin, 1888), was marked by methodical comprehensiveness, and introduced into the theory of the verbs a new classification of the stems which has been retained by later scholars.

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  • Mornington was the friend and favourite of Pitt, from whom he is thought to have derived the comprehensiveness of his political vision and his antipathy to the French name.

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  • Attempts at comprehensiveness end in the compromises of eclecticism.

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  • At each step there is a gain in itccu racy and comprehensiveness; and the conviction is cherishei that some system of rectangular axes exists with respeci to which the Newtonian scheme holds with all imaginabb accuracy.

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  • The latter is perhaps preferable to the former on the score of comprehensiveness.

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  • In grandeur of conception, comprehensiveness of treatment, and breadth of learning, this apology surpasses all other similar works of antiquity.

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  • This broad comprehensiveness, which to outsiders looks like ecclesiastical anarchy, is the characteristic note of the Church of England; it may be, and has been, defended as consonant with Christian charity and suited to the genius of a people not remarkable for logical consistency; but it makes it all the more difficult to say what the religion of Englishmen actually is, even within the English Church.

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  • Few men, if any, have ever acquired a settled mental habit of surveying human affairs broadly, of watching the play of passion, interest, circumstance, in all its comprehensiveness, and of applying the instruments of general conceptions and wide principles to its interpretation with respectable constancy, unless they have at some early period of their manhood resolved the greater problems of society in independence and isolation.

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  • It is equally admirable in the depth of its wisdom, the comprehensiveness of its views, the sagacity of its reflections, and the fearlessness, patriotism, liantly and effectively exhibited than they were by Hamilton in the New York convention of 1788, whose vote he won, against the greatest odds, for the ratification of the Constitution.

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  • The remarkable quality of his mind lay in the rare combination of acute analysis and grasp of detail with great comprehensiveness of thought.

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  • parity comprehensiveness analysis of strong an increase in.

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  • Another monumental work for which he was responsible was Die Lehre von der Elektricitdt, or, as it was called in the first instance, Lehre von Galvanismus and Elektromagnetismus, a book that is unsurpassed for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

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  • The comprehensiveness of his legal and judicial reforms is very striking.

    0
    0
  • He died in 956, and was known, from the comprehensiveness of his survey, as the Pliny of the East.

    0
    0
  • The distinctive feature of the Spanish-Jewish culture was its comprehensiveness.

    0
    0
  • Of these one of the most notable is Cyril Horvath, whose treatises published in the organs of the academy display a rare freedom and comprehensiveness of imagination.

    0
    0
  • His true greatness can only be estimated by a consideration of the fact that he was a great teacher not only of human and comparative anatomy and zoology but also of physiology, and that nearly all the most distinguished German zoologists and physiologists of the period 1850 to 1870 were his pupils and acknowledged his leadership. The most striking feature about Johann Miller's work, apart from the comprehensiveness of his point of view, in which he added to the anatomical and morphological ideas of Cuvier a consideration of physiology, embryology and microscopic structure, was the extraordinary accuracy, facility and completeness of his recorded observations.

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  • But it is necessary in practice, for historical comprehensiveness, to keep the wider meaning in view.

    0
    0
  • It abounds with remarks of extraordinary fertility and comprehensiveness; but it is often arbitrary; and its views of the past are strained into in the coherence with the statical views of the preceding volume.

    0
    0
  • A more commanding figure is that of Aurelius Augustinus or St Augustine (354-430), bishop of Hippo, who for comprehensiveness and dialectical power stands out in the same way as Hieronymus or St Jerome (c.33 I or 340-420), a native of Stridon in Dalmatia, does for manysided learning and scholarship.

    0
    0
  • Lightfoot, indeed, dwells on the all-round "comprehensiveness" with which Clement, as the mouthpiece of the early Roman Church, utters in succession phrases or ideas borrowed impartially from Peter and Paul and James and the Epistle to Hebrews.

    0
    0
  • There is a want of depth in Christian experience, in the power of realizing relative spiritual values in the light of the master principle involved in the distinctively Christian consciousness, such as could raise Clement above a verbal eclecticism, rather than comprehensiveness, in the use of Apostolic language.

    0
    0
  • It was this characteristic quality of comprehensiveness that also gave him so much influence as a teacher.

    0
    0
  • This impartiality in his early studies is the key of his philosophic work, the dominant characteristic of which is comprehensiveness rather than originality.

    0
    0
  • With Professor Pickering's usual comprehensiveness, the inquiry was so arranged as to cover the whole sky; and with four telescopes - two at Cambridge for the northern hemisphere, and two at Arequipa in Peru for the southern - to which a fine 24-in.

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  • These letters were issued in compliance with the second recommendation (1906) of the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, viz.: that " Letters of business should be issued to the Convocations with instructions: (a) to consider the preparation of a new rubric regulating the ornaments (that is to say, the vesture) of the ministers of the church, at the times of their ministrations, with a view to its enactment by parliament; and (b) to frame, with a view to their enactment of parliament, such modifications in the existing law relating to the conduct of Divine Service, and to the ornaments and fittings of churches as may tend to secure the greater elasticity which a reasonable recognition of the comprehensiveness of the Church of England and of its present needs seems to demand."

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  • He had specially prepared himself, as he thought, for "teaching imaginative men, and political men, and legal men, and scientific men who bear the world in hand"; and he did not attempt to win their attention to abstract and worn-out theological arguments, but discussed the opinions, the poetry, the politics, the manners and customs of the time, and this not with philosophical comprehensiveness, not in terms of warm eulogy or measured blame, but of severe satire varied by fierce denunciation, and with a specific minuteness which was concerned primarily with individuals.

    0
    0
  • Probably the religious opinions of Irving, originally in some respects more catholic and truer to human nature than generally prevailed in ecclesiastical circles, had gained breadth and comprehensiveness from his intercourse with Coleridge, but gradually his chief interest in Coleridge's philosophy centred round that which was mystical and obscure, and to it in all likelihood may be traced his initiation into the doctrine of millenarianism.

    0
    0
  • In correctness of detail and comprehensiveness of view it was greatly superior to every work of the same kind that had hitherto appeared in France.

    0
    0
  • Bacher, Berlin, 1888), was marked by methodical comprehensiveness, and introduced into the theory of the verbs a new classification of the stems which has been retained by later scholars.

    0
    0
  • Mornington was the friend and favourite of Pitt, from whom he is thought to have derived the comprehensiveness of his political vision and his antipathy to the French name.

    0
    0
  • Attempts at comprehensiveness end in the compromises of eclecticism.

    0
    0
  • At each step there is a gain in itccu racy and comprehensiveness; and the conviction is cherishei that some system of rectangular axes exists with respeci to which the Newtonian scheme holds with all imaginabb accuracy.

    0
    0
  • The latter is perhaps preferable to the former on the score of comprehensiveness.

    0
    0
  • In grandeur of conception, comprehensiveness of treatment, and breadth of learning, this apology surpasses all other similar works of antiquity.

    0
    0
  • This broad comprehensiveness, which to outsiders looks like ecclesiastical anarchy, is the characteristic note of the Church of England; it may be, and has been, defended as consonant with Christian charity and suited to the genius of a people not remarkable for logical consistency; but it makes it all the more difficult to say what the religion of Englishmen actually is, even within the English Church.

    0
    0
  • Few men, if any, have ever acquired a settled mental habit of surveying human affairs broadly, of watching the play of passion, interest, circumstance, in all its comprehensiveness, and of applying the instruments of general conceptions and wide principles to its interpretation with respectable constancy, unless they have at some early period of their manhood resolved the greater problems of society in independence and isolation.

    0
    0
  • It is equally admirable in the depth of its wisdom, the comprehensiveness of its views, the sagacity of its reflections, and the fearlessness, patriotism, liantly and effectively exhibited than they were by Hamilton in the New York convention of 1788, whose vote he won, against the greatest odds, for the ratification of the Constitution.

    0
    0
  • The remarkable quality of his mind lay in the rare combination of acute analysis and grasp of detail with great comprehensiveness of thought.

    0
    0
  • Few institutions can afford the comprehensiveness and intensity of services required to support and change a child's whole system of behavior.

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  • His true greatness can only be estimated by a consideration of the fact that he was a great teacher not only of human and comparative anatomy and zoology but also of physiology, and that nearly all the most distinguished German zoologists and physiologists of the period 1850 to 1870 were his pupils and acknowledged his leadership. The most striking feature about Johann Miller's work, apart from the comprehensiveness of his point of view, in which he added to the anatomical and morphological ideas of Cuvier a consideration of physiology, embryology and microscopic structure, was the extraordinary accuracy, facility and completeness of his recorded observations.

    0
    1
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