This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

compost

compost

compost Sentence Examples

  • This is effected by raising up a small mound of rich compost around it, a contrivance which induces the graft to emit roots into the surface soil.

    176
    50
  • But a compost of peat, loam and leaf-soil suits L.

    152
    52
  • The chief point to be borne in mind in making these mixtures is not to combine in the same compost any bodies that are antagonistic in their nature, as for example lime and ammonia.

    46
    25
  • It was of small dimensions, with a peaked cottage roof, and not much else to be seen, the dirt being raised five feet all around as if it were a compost heap.

    45
    31
  • The ball is to be set on the new soil just high enough that when finished the base of the stem may be somewhat below the pot-rim, and the space between the old ball and the sides of the pot is to be filled in gradually with the prepared compost, which is from time to time to be pressed down with a blunt-ended flat piece of wood called a potting-stick, so as to render the new soil as solid as the old.

    39
    26
  • The composition of Portland cement varies within comparatively narrow limits, and for given raw materials the variations are tending = to become smaller as regularity and skill in manufacture Compost increase.

    35
    19
  • For pot culture, the soil should consist of three parts turfy loam to one of leaf-mould and thoroughly rotted manure, adding enough pure grit to keep the compost porous.

    26
    18
  • It should be laid up in ridges of good loamy soil in alternate layers to form a compost, which becomes a valuable stimulant for any very choice subjects if cautiously used.

    25
    17
  • On this should be laid at least a foot thick of coarse, hard, rubbly material, a layer of rough turf, grass side downwards, being spread over it to prevent the compost from working down.

    24
    14
  • The urine should be allowed to putrefy, as in its decomposition a large amount of ammonia is formed, which should then be fixed by sulphuric acid or gypsum; or it may be applied to the growing crops after being freely diluted with water or absorbed in a compost heap. Liquid manures can be readily made from most of the solid manures when required, simply by admixture with water.

    24
    18
  • When repotting is adopted as a temporary expedient, as in the case of bedding-out plants which it is required to push forward as much as possible, it will suffice if provision is made to prevent the drainage hole from getting blocked, and a rich light compost is provided for the encouragement of the roots.

    24
    23
  • Peat soil is largely employed for the culture of such plants as rhododendrons, azaleas, heaths, &c. In districts where heather and gritty soil predominate, the peat soil is poor and unprofitable, but selections from both the heathy and the richer peat soils, collected with judgment, and stored in a dry part of the compost yard, are essential ingredients in the cultivation of many choice pot plants, such as the Cape heaths and many of the Australian plants.

    23
    18
  • It is well, therefore, to burn the tops of the plants in the fall, rather than to plough them under or to throw them on the compost heap.

    20
    16
  • The eyes being selected from well-ripened shoots of the previous year are planted about the end of January, singly, in small pots of light loamy compost, and after standing in a warm place for a few days should be plunged in a propagating bed, having a bottom heat of 75°, which should be increased to 85° when they have produced several leaves, the atmosphere being kept at about the same temperature or higher by sun heat during the day, and at about 75° at night.

    19
    17
  • The soil should be a light and fairly rich compost, comprising about 2 parts loam, I part decayed manure or horse droppings that have been thoroughly sweetened, I part leaf mould and half a part of sand.

    19
    22
  • The frame ground, including melon and pine pits, should occupy some well-sheltered spot in the slips, or on one side of the garden, and adjoining to this may be found a suitable site for the compost ground, in which the various kinds of soils are kept in store, and in which also composts may be prepared.

    17
    11
  • The frame ground, including melon and pine pits, should occupy some well-sheltered spot in the slips, or on one side of the garden, and adjoining to this may be found a suitable site for the compost ground, in which the various kinds of soils are kept in store, and in which also composts may be prepared.

    17
    11
  • In contrast with the farmers of the 'sixties, the southern planter of the 10th century appreciates the value of his cotton seed, and farmers, too remote from the mills to get it pressed, now feed to their stock all the cotton seed they conveniently can, and use the residue either in compost or directly as manure.

    17
    14
  • In the second case all roots that have struck downwards into a cold uncongenial subsoil must be pruned off if they cannot be turned in a lateral direction, and all the lateral ones that have become coarse and fibreless must also be shortened back by means of a clean cut with a sharp knife, while a compost of rich loamy soil with a little bone-meal, and leaf-mould or old manure, should be filled into the trenches from which the old sterile soil has been taken.

    16
    18
  • Layers of comfrey can be placed on the compost heap from time to time to act as a compost accelerant.

    1
    0
  • The compost is then aerated by regular turning of the material.

    1
    0
  • After removing the arils from the seed they should be sown onto a standard potting compost.

    1
    0
  • Shredded bark, left in a pile will eventually break down and become great compost.

    1
    0
  • While simply making a pile of your compost is certainly an option, keeping it contained within some sort of bin, box or fencing material is neater and keeps the wind from spreading it about your property.

    1
    0
  • Typically, compost is made from leftover food, grass clippings, leaves, and other natural materials that can be broken down by fungi and bacteria.

    1
    0
  • In addition to serving good food, this establishment does good for the planet by making a conscious effort to recycle, compost and offset all their energy usage through purchasing carbon offsets.

    1
    3
  • Washed sand is best for all plants like heaths, which need a pure and lasting peaty compost.

    0
    0
  • In the case of outdoor crops, if the soil is inclined to be heavy, it is a good plan to cover all the smaller seeds with a light compost.

    0
    0
  • In other cases they are planted in open baskets of wood or wire, using the porous peat and sphagnum compost.

    0
    0
  • bark mulch near my compost bins.

    0
    0
  • The first job was to empty the kitchen waste bin into the compost bin on the plot.

    0
    0
  • You can purchase compost bin from the Council at a cost of £ 14.

    0
    0
  • Do not compost potato tops they may carry potato blight.

    0
    0
  • The cardboard boxes can be recycled or added to your compost heap.

    0
    0
  • cardboard boxes can be recycled or added to your compost heap.

    0
    0
  • Even humble hedge clippings can become tomorrow's compost.

    0
    0
  • Your roots: How to get the right composition of coir compost If you use coir, do not overwater.

    0
    0
  • coir compost and bark mix and keep damp.

    0
    0
  • comfrey Cut the small comfrey patch for the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • In nearly all cases this anomaly is caused by progressive root growth causing compaction of the compost.

    0
    0
  • Insert the potting compost in seed trays or shallow pots.

    0
    0
  • Mulching with bark, rotted compost or the like will do a good job in keeping weeds at bay.

    0
    0
  • The mulching in the form of a layer of New Horizon peat-free compost.

    0
    0
  • I have put said Blueberry in a smallish pot of ericaceous compost.

    0
    0
  • After pruning apply a generous 5-7cm mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant.

    0
    0
  • Spread some soil-less compost over the grass using the back of a rake.

    0
    0
  • compost heap in your living room.

    0
    0
  • compost bin from the Council at a cost of £ 14.

    0
    0
  • compost loos, benders and clay oven.

    0
    0
  • compost pile 's performance is less than optimal.

    0
    0
  • compost activator, the dust should be applied at the start of the process.

    0
    0
  • A good recipe for compost is a mix of John Innes No. 2 and normal multi-purpose compost.

    0
    0
  • Add plenty of well-rotted organic matter, such as farmyard manure or spent mushroom compost.

    0
    0
  • Under glass grow in direct sun in a free draining compost.

    0
    0
  • Use a soil-based compost with a good handful of broken crocks in the bottom of the pot to aid drainage.

    0
    0
  • crumbly compost.

    0
    0
  • It is freshly crushed to release over 78 minerals and trace elements to remineralise soil and compost heaps.

    0
    0
  • insert several cuttings into pots of Seed & Cutting compost.

    0
    0
  • degraded soils with Rockdust and compost.

    0
    0
  • Grow the plants, cut them down, anaerobically digest them to produce methane and good quality compost.

    0
    0
  • drainage holes, you must find ways of avoiding the compost being washed out of them!

    0
    0
  • You know you have finished compost when it is dark in color, crumbly but not powdered and smells earthy.

    0
    0
  • If you start with a good compost you'll have a versatile elixir for all your garden needs.

    0
    0
  • ericaceous compost with plenty of extra grit.

    0
    0
  • Fourth, no mineral fertilizers are used, only liberal application of organic compost.

    0
    0
  • finished compost will be used on the school garden.

    0
    0
  • Mulch with spent mushroom compost in July-August when the new flower buds are being formed.

    0
    0
  • Water retaining granules can be added into the compost.

    0
    0
  • These can be natural fertilizers such as compost or dried cow manure granules, or an artificial fertilizer.

    0
    0
  • Warm compost promotes the rapid germination of most herb seeds and is particularly useful for gardeners who raise their plants in an unheated greenhouse.

    0
    0
  • gritty compost instead.

    0
    0
  • To the left you can see the haulm over the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • All through keeping a compost heap in your living room.

    0
    0
  • hedge clippings can become tomorrow's compost.

    0
    0
  • heeled cuttings in July in a sandy compost.

    0
    0
  • just hoe through them, leave them to dry or collect them for the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • Local authorities should encourage householders to compost at home.

    0
    0
  • humus content of a compost mix increases to a nearly constant value.

    0
    0
  • humus material or spent compost, peat if nothing else to hand.

    0
    0
  • DIY hydroponics and Compost Tea maker build plans Build your own hydroponics and compost tea maker diy plans and video.

    0
    0
  • Without completion of all the processes, the compost remains immature.

    0
    0
  • Having trimmed the leeks, I decided to tidy up the compost bin area on plot 5 a little.

    0
    0
  • litrere is also a larger 700 liter compost bin available at £ 20, which normally retails at up to £ 106.

    0
    0
  • loam based compost, which is then seeded.

    0
    0
  • Compost It is advisable to use a loam based compost in you containers.

    0
    0
  • An oil drum dug into the ground is my long drop compost loo.

    0
    0
  • Dig a large hole and fork the base incorporating large amounts of organic mater such as garden compost, farmyard or stable manure.

    0
    0
  • Measuring for compost maturity: A test for oxygen consumption.

    0
    0
  • microorganisms in a soil or compost cannot absorb the large polymers through their cell walls.

    0
    0
  • Consider adding mulch or compost to help keep the soil moist.

    0
    0
  • moist compost.

    0
    0
  • Fill the bottom of the hole with compost or peat moss.

    0
    0
  • Once planted, give your plants a very generous mulch of garden compost every spring to keep improving that soil.

    0
    0
  • Instead of leaf mulch we can return compost to the soil.

    0
    0
  • mulch of compost or bark is best here.

    0
    0
  • mulch of manure or good garden compost during the autumn.

    0
    0
  • mulch with manure and compost around the top.

    0
    0
  • mulch with homemade compost and lots of bark.

    0
    0
  • multipurpose compost.

    0
    0
  • mushroom compost.

    0
    0
  • nu jazz stuff out there - Bugz In the Attic, Compost?

    0
    0
  • nutritious compost for your garden that would cost pounds at a garden center.

    0
    0
  • overwintered crops; put them on the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • Make a propagating compost from three parts sphagnum moss peat to one part perlite, sieved bark or acid sand.

    0
    0
  • potato peelings instead of whole potatoes may be used in any method Compost.

    0
    0
  • pierced with small holes into the compost.

    0
    0
  • poplar leaves can raise soil pH if used in compost -- this may not be beneficial if your soil is already alkaline.

    0
    0
  • Fill your pots to the top with potting compost leaving a 25mm rim.

    0
    0
  • putrescible waste from a variety of sources to develop a marketable compost.

    0
    0
  • The empty planter has a reservoir to capture rainwater in the base, gel crystals are added along with the compost.

    0
    0
  • recycled into compost.

    0
    0
  • Jane Ennis - Sun, 22 October 12:57 Further developments in the compost bin saga!

    0
    0
  • You can also make your own sandbags by filling compost or rubbish bags with earth.

    0
    0
  • At the most basic level, you can compost by simply burying kitchen scraps in your garden.

    0
    0
  • scrunched up paper or cardboard to allow air in to the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • By now the green shaws will be coming through, so top up with spare compost.

    0
    0
  • If you have a garden shredder you can also grind and compost twigs and branches left from the summer pruning of trees and bushes.

    0
    0
  • sieved compost, up to the rim of the tray.

    0
    0
  • Put on a pair of gloves and carefully sift through the compost before you stick a fork into it.

    0
    0
  • Place wooden slats on top of the sand or gravel, to separate the drainage material from the compost you are going to produce.

    0
    0
  • The contents of my compost bin have turned slimy My compost bin does not seem to heat up Why does my compost bin smell?

    0
    0
  • Water them with a copper fungicide solution until the compost is damp, not sodden.

    0
    0
  • Lesley suggests enriching the soil with well rotted manure, or mushroom compost and adding blood, fish and bone before planting the hedge.

    0
    0
  • soil conditioner or compost.

    0
    0
  • Keep pot size increase to a minimum - too much compost unoccupied by roots can turn the soil sour.

    0
    0
  • Own compost is created and kept in wind rows, turned twice with a manure spreader.

    0
    0
  • Small hollows can be dealt with by adding a light sprinkling of sifted soil or potting compost onto the surface of the grass.

    0
    0
  • stagnant water, gutters, sinks, the kitchen & bathroom, ruins, compost heaps, dark or secret places.

    0
    0
  • stringy woody bits in the final compost mixture.

    0
    0
  • It is solar powered and has compost toilet and reed bed gray water system.

    0
    0
  • tonne compost facility can except 24,000 tons of green waste only per annum.

    0
    0
  • trailblazer projects to demonstrate the use of compost to the brownfield sector.

    0
    0
  • trimmed the leeks, I decided to tidy up the compost bin area on plot 5 a little.

    0
    0
  • rotate the compost tumbler half a dozen times once a day.

    0
    0
  • When you have well oxygenated compost you automatically get rid of 3/4 of the bad varmints.

    0
    0
  • Compost is called rotting vegetation, which is on its way to becoming rich, fertile soil.

    0
    0
  • For those seeds needing to be covered use fine vermiculite instead of compost.

    0
    0
  • Consign spent annual bedding plants to the compost heap and plant wallflowers, forget-me-nots and other spring flowerers in their place.

    0
    0
  • They also compost organic household waste for use in the garden.

    0
    0
  • Compost improves the texture of your soil, helps the soil to retain moisture and smothers weeds around plants.

    0
    0
  • wheelbarrow loads a year of lovely dry compost from the bins.

    0
    0
  • In this system, the compost feedstock is formed into long windrows, in the open air.

    0
    0
  • windrow composting involved several large heaps ranging from fresh garden cuttings to brown compost.

    0
    0
  • You can make an excellent compost in a small container and enlist the help of the brandling worms.

    0
    0
  • I even spotted a jenny wren on the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • The one we most often find in compost or manure pile is the red wriggler (Eisenia foetida ).

    0
    0
  • wringsture in the compost heap should be similar to a wrung out sponge.

    0
    0
  • yurt camp has compost toilets and cold water on tap, and there is a hot shower at the Green Kitchen.

    0
    0
  • This is effected by raising up a small mound of rich compost around it, a contrivance which induces the graft to emit roots into the surface soil.

    0
    0
  • In contrast with the farmers of the 'sixties, the southern planter of the 10th century appreciates the value of his cotton seed, and farmers, too remote from the mills to get it pressed, now feed to their stock all the cotton seed they conveniently can, and use the residue either in compost or directly as manure.

    0
    0
  • On this should be laid at least a foot thick of coarse, hard, rubbly material, a layer of rough turf, grass side downwards, being spread over it to prevent the compost from working down.

    0
    0
  • The eyes being selected from well-ripened shoots of the previous year are planted about the end of January, singly, in small pots of light loamy compost, and after standing in a warm place for a few days should be plunged in a propagating bed, having a bottom heat of 75°, which should be increased to 85° when they have produced several leaves, the atmosphere being kept at about the same temperature or higher by sun heat during the day, and at about 75° at night.

    0
    0
  • But a compost of peat, loam and leaf-soil suits L.

    0
    0
  • For pot culture, the soil should consist of three parts turfy loam to one of leaf-mould and thoroughly rotted manure, adding enough pure grit to keep the compost porous.

    0
    0
  • The soil should be a light and fairly rich compost, comprising about 2 parts loam, I part decayed manure or horse droppings that have been thoroughly sweetened, I part leaf mould and half a part of sand.

    0
    0
  • Washed sand is best for all plants like heaths, which need a pure and lasting peaty compost.

    0
    0
  • Peat soil is largely employed for the culture of such plants as rhododendrons, azaleas, heaths, &c. In districts where heather and gritty soil predominate, the peat soil is poor and unprofitable, but selections from both the heathy and the richer peat soils, collected with judgment, and stored in a dry part of the compost yard, are essential ingredients in the cultivation of many choice pot plants, such as the Cape heaths and many of the Australian plants.

    0
    0
  • The chief point to be borne in mind in making these mixtures is not to combine in the same compost any bodies that are antagonistic in their nature, as for example lime and ammonia.

    0
    0
  • It should be laid up in ridges of good loamy soil in alternate layers to form a compost, which becomes a valuable stimulant for any very choice subjects if cautiously used.

    0
    0
  • The urine should be allowed to putrefy, as in its decomposition a large amount of ammonia is formed, which should then be fixed by sulphuric acid or gypsum; or it may be applied to the growing crops after being freely diluted with water or absorbed in a compost heap. Liquid manures can be readily made from most of the solid manures when required, simply by admixture with water.

    0
    0
  • In the case of outdoor crops, if the soil is inclined to be heavy, it is a good plan to cover all the smaller seeds with a light compost.

    0
    0
  • In other cases they are planted in open baskets of wood or wire, using the porous peat and sphagnum compost.

    0
    0
  • When repotting is adopted as a temporary expedient, as in the case of bedding-out plants which it is required to push forward as much as possible, it will suffice if provision is made to prevent the drainage hole from getting blocked, and a rich light compost is provided for the encouragement of the roots.

    0
    0
  • The ball is to be set on the new soil just high enough that when finished the base of the stem may be somewhat below the pot-rim, and the space between the old ball and the sides of the pot is to be filled in gradually with the prepared compost, which is from time to time to be pressed down with a blunt-ended flat piece of wood called a potting-stick, so as to render the new soil as solid as the old.

    0
    0
  • In the second case all roots that have struck downwards into a cold uncongenial subsoil must be pruned off if they cannot be turned in a lateral direction, and all the lateral ones that have become coarse and fibreless must also be shortened back by means of a clean cut with a sharp knife, while a compost of rich loamy soil with a little bone-meal, and leaf-mould or old manure, should be filled into the trenches from which the old sterile soil has been taken.

    0
    0
  • It is well, therefore, to burn the tops of the plants in the fall, rather than to plough them under or to throw them on the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • Potatoes, beets, turnips or other roots in pits, the spinach crop in the ground, or any other article in need of protection, should be attended to before the end of the month; manure and compost heaps should be forwarded as rapidly as possible, and turned and mixed so as to be in proper condition for spring.

    0
    0
  • The composition of Portland cement varies within comparatively narrow limits, and for given raw materials the variations are tending = to become smaller as regularity and skill in manufacture Compost increase.

    0
    0
  • It takes putrescible waste from a variety of sources to develop a marketable compost.

    0
    0
  • The empty planter has a reservoir to capture rainwater in the base, gel crystals are added along with the compost.

    0
    0
  • As much as 30% of our household rubbish can be recycled into compost.

    0
    0
  • Part two of the Compost remix competition has arrived !

    0
    0
  • Jane Ennis - Sun, 22 October 12:57 Further developments in the compost bin saga !

    0
    0
  • You can also make your own sandbags by filling compost or rubbish bags with earth.

    0
    0
  • At the most basic level, you can compost by simply burying kitchen scraps in your garden.

    0
    0
  • It is also a good idea to add some layers of scrunched up paper or cardboard to allow air in to the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • By now the green shaws will be coming through, so top up with spare compost.

    0
    0
  • If you have a garden shredder you can also grind and compost twigs and branches left from the summer pruning of trees and bushes.

    0
    0
  • Then cover this layer with sieved compost, up to the rim of the tray.

    0
    0
  • Put on a pair of gloves and carefully sift through the compost before you stick a fork into it.

    0
    0
  • Place wooden slats on top of the sand or gravel, to separate the drainage material from the compost you are going to produce.

    0
    0
  • The contents of my compost bin have turned slimy My compost bin does not seem to heat up Why does my compost bin smell?

    0
    0
  • A good way is to layer the bottom of your compost unit with some twigs or slivers of wood.

    0
    0
  • Water them with a copper fungicide solution until the compost is damp, not sodden.

    0
    0
  • Lesley suggests enriching the soil with well rotted manure, or mushroom compost and adding blood, fish and bone before planting the hedge.

    0
    0
  • The fiber is a much dryer material which would be applied as a soil conditioner or compost.

    0
    0
  • Keep pot size increase to a minimum - too much compost unoccupied by roots can turn the soil sour.

    0
    0
  • Small hollows can be dealt with by adding a light sprinkling of sifted soil or potting compost onto the surface of the grass.

    0
    0
  • Near muddy or stagnant water, gutters, sinks, the kitchen & bathroom, ruins, compost heaps, dark or secret places.

    0
    0
  • Smaller pieces also rot quicker and you do n't get long stringy woody bits in the final compost mixture.

    0
    0
  • Preliminary tests in pots have indicated that garden compost, when added to soil can suppress diseases such as white rot.

    0
    0
  • It is solar powered and has compost toilet and reed bed gray water system.

    0
    0
  • The compost facility can except 24,000 tons of green waste only per annum.

    0
    0
  • The purpose of the work is to use 20 trailblazer projects to demonstrate the use of compost to the brownfield sector.

    0
    0
  • Rotate the compost tumbler half a dozen times once a day.

    0
    0
  • When you have well oxygenated compost you automatically get rid of 3/4 of the bad varmints.

    0
    0
  • Compost is called rotting vegetation, which is on its way to becoming rich, fertile soil.

    0
    0
  • For those seeds needing to be covered use fine vermiculite instead of compost.

    0
    0
  • Consign spent annual bedding plants to the compost heap and plant wallflowers, forget-me-nots and other spring flowerers in their place.

    0
    0
  • Compost improves the texture of your soil, helps the soil to retain moisture and smothers weeds around plants.

    0
    0
  • We have had around 6 wheelbarrow loads a year of lovely dry compost from the bins.

    0
    0
  • In this system, the compost feedstock is formed into long windrows, in the open air.

    0
    0
  • Windrow composting involved several large heaps ranging from fresh garden cuttings to brown compost.

    0
    0
  • You can make an excellent compost in a small container and enlist the help of the brandling worms.

    0
    0
  • I even spotted a jenny wren on the compost heap.

    0
    0
  • The one we most often find in compost or manure pile is the red wriggler (Eisenia foetida).

    0
    0
  • Moisture in the compost heap should be similar to a wrung out sponge.

    0
    0
  • The yurt camp has compost toilets and cold water on tap, and there is a hot shower at the Green Kitchen.

    0
    0
  • It will disintegrate in a commercial compost system within 80 days.

    0
    0
  • Start a compost pile to dispose of food waste.

    0
    0
  • Household recycling initiatives such as recycling kitchen waste into compost also helps save money as this reduces the need to buy compost from garden stores.

    0
    0
  • Starting a backyard compost pile or bin is a great way to repurpose food scraps and other household waste so that it doesn't end up in the garbage can.

    0
    0
  • Household recycling initiatives such as recycling kitchen waste into compost also helps save money as this reduces the need to buy compost from garden stores.

    0
    0
  • Continual process systems continue to compost waste and need to be harvested, or cleaned out, every six to twelve months.

    0
    0
  • For the homeowner, reducing trash volume while gaining a rich soil supplement are some of the powerful advantages of a compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Once a landfill can no longer be used, compost along with other materials is used to cover the landfill.

    0
    0
  • Compost is an excellent way to enhance soil quality.

    0
    0
  • Farmers can use compost as a way to boost crop production, and landscapers often use compost in projects that create parks, golf courses and athletic fields.

    0
    0
  • A well built compost pile should not smell and will produce usable compost in twelve to sixteen weeks.

    0
    0
  • While there are many ways of creating compost, one of the easiest methods is to use the three barrel method.

    0
    0
  • This method uses three distinct piles to manage compost in differing states of decay.

    0
    0
  • To use this method, you must create three distinct areas for compost.

    0
    0
  • Each area should be large enough to house two to three months worth of waste that you will use to create compost and located in a shady area.

    0
    0
  • Start by filling the first area with green and brown compost materials.

    0
    0
  • Turn over the compost once a week with a pitchfork or shovel.

    0
    0
  • When the first section is full of compost, start adding the materials you have been collecting to the second area.

    0
    0
  • Keep turning over both areas of compost.

    0
    0
  • When the second area is full, start filling the third section of compost.

    0
    0
  • If you have continually turned over the compost in the three sections and watered it regularly, the compost in the first section should be ready for use when the third section is half full with waste.

    0
    0
  • Empty the first container of the fully decomposed compost for use around the yard and cycle through the rest of the containers in a similar fashion, filling the emptied containers with the new waste.

    0
    0
  • A homeowner that knows how to build a compost tumbler can easily use one in even the smallest yard or garden.

    0
    0
  • These self contained units break down and dehydrate human waste to a compost product that can be added to the soil, sanitized and compacted by the drying and composting process.

    0
    0
  • Some units speed composting with aerators, stirring the compost, while others use heat to move the process along.

    0
    0
  • One of the easiest ways to reduce household trash as well as yard waste is to build a compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Everything of value needs a good foundation, and the compost pile is no exception to that rule.

    0
    0
  • A simple enclosure of wire mesh fencing, two to four feet high, will do, or one can use recycled pallets to construct a shallow box to corral that compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Of course, if you prefer, you can purchase pre-made composting bins from most any garden supply store to house your compost heap.

    0
    0
  • Layering is the key to the most successful composting, beginning with a layer of sticks, boards, or an old pallet to allow air to reach the bottom of your compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Then you are ready to begin layering your compost materials on top of that base.

    0
    0
  • For optimal composting, it is important to alternate layers of green materials with layers of brown compost material, striking the right chemical balance to feed the composting process.

    0
    0
  • These two chemicals, combined in proper proportions, help to break down the materials into the rich compost that is your end goal.

    0
    0
  • Once you have added your layers of green and brown materials and mixed them a bit, a shovelful of garden soil or finished compost will help ensure that the proper microbes are in place to begin breaking down the compost material mixture.

    0
    0
  • Once you build a compost pile, some care and maintenance will be necessary to ensure that the materials break down efficiently.

    0
    0
  • Your compost pile will require a bit of moisture to keep the process moving along, but just enough to make it feel damp, not soaking wet.

    0
    0
  • Your compost should be turned once a week to ensure even decomposition and good air flow and keep the pile from becoming compacted.

    0
    0
  • Knowing how to build a compost tumbler can remove some of the largest objections to composting such as smell and lack of space.

    0
    0
  • While compost tumblers are available for purchase at many different price points, a compost tumbler can also be built from a few basic materials.

    0
    0
  • A well cared for compost pile should never smell, but harried homeowners may find that a compost tumbler is easier to turn over and maintain regularly than the standard compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Compost tumblers also discourage wild animals from foraging in the compost you are trying to create.

    0
    0
  • Compost tumblers also increase the chances that you will be able to maintain compost that is neither too wet nor too dry.

    0
    0
  • Compost tumblers are available in many variations.

    0
    0
  • The size and elaborateness of your tumbler will depend on the amount of waste you have to compost as well as your construction skill.

    0
    0
  • Cut a hole in the side of the barrel large enough to accommodate a shovel to mix the compost.

    0
    0
  • This basic tumbler can be rolled around after new compost has been added and every few days to increase the decomposition rate.

    0
    0
  • However, this modest compost tumbler may not satisfy homeowners with large amounts of compost or those who regularly use their compost tumbler.

    0
    0
  • For these homeowners, they should consider building a compost tumbler with a few extra features.

    0
    0
  • Compost tumblers should be filled with a wide variety of organic matter.

    0
    0
  • Lawn clippings, vegetable and fruit scraps, even newspaper can be added to create compost.

    0
    0
  • Chop waste such as bush trimmings into small pieces before adding it to your compost tumbler.

    0
    0
  • The compost tumbler should drain quickly if you over water it, but try to avoid wasting water in this manner.

    0
    0
  • Gardeners with a lot of experience and space for composting may find that a compost tumbler is inadequate for their needs.

    0
    0
  • In these cases, the advantages of a compost pile may outweigh a few drawbacks.

    0
    0
  • Building a compost bin may also be better than a tumbler for some homeowners.

    0
    0
  • For gardeners that still appreciate the ease of use that compost tumblers offer, they may consider using several tumblers that are all in different states of decay.

    0
    0
  • Once you learn how to build a compost tumbler, constructing several is a quick and inexpensive job for most homeowners.

    0
    0
  • Build a compost bin to recycle organic waste and produce wonderful nutritious compost that is both cheap to make and good for the garden.

    0
    0
  • Sturdy sacks can be filled with compost and used as grow bags and hanging baskets are suitable for small plants such as herbs or chillies.

    0
    0
  • Chicken droppings are good for your compost and the chickens themselves are excellent for insect control.

    0
    0
  • Compost that is produced with school garden and kitchen waste, for instance, can be used in community gardening schemes.

    0
    0
  • Compostable salad containers will quickly biodegrade into compost after use.

    0
    0
  • Unlike traditional salad containers, compostable containers can be placed in a compost bin where, over time, they will break down and will not harm the environment.

    0
    0
  • Beyond making your own compost out of all sorts of waste products, eco composters are a great way to be green and share with your neighbors and friends another environmentally friendly tip!

    0
    0
  • Have everyone donate waste and scrap and share in the excitement of making your own compost in just four to six weeks.

    0
    0
  • Even youth groups and schools have jumped on board the composting wagon and use these composters to make the richest compost and then sell it to fund trips and other activities.

    0
    0
  • This type of compost adds needed nutrients to your garden and reduces weeds.

    0
    0
  • The Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA offers great tips on making your own compost.

    0
    0
  • Compost can help stop the contamination process and clean up the soil.

    0
    0
  • Pollution Fighter - Instead of waste material being shipped off to landfills, using them to make compost turns composting into a pollution fighter.

    0
    0
  • During storm water runoff, compost stops pollutants from forming.

    0
    0
  • Economics - Beyond being a great green idea, making your own compost with an eco composter reduces water, fertilizer, and pesticide use, saving money.

    0
    0
  • The more compost produced, the lower the cost to clean up contamination present in landfills.

    0
    0
  • Educate - Making compost and teaching others, including children, is an educational experience.

    0
    0
  • You'll all reap the rewards of making your own compost and rejuvenating your soil!

    0
    0
  • Homemade compost bins are surprisingly easy to make and are a great way to produce nutritious compost for your garden.

    0
    0
  • The process of making compost is very easy.

    0
    0
  • When it has all decomposed, the remaining compost can be used as a soil enhancer.

    0
    0
  • While making a compost pile is very straightforward, many people like to use a compost bin.

    0
    0
  • This helps to keep the garden or yard neat and tidy while also ensuring that the compost is kept in optimum conditions.

    0
    0
  • A compost pile may dry out or pieces of compost may blow around the garden, so a compost bin will be a worthwhile investment.

    0
    0
  • An alternative to buying a compost bin is to build your own.

    0
    0
  • A homemade compost bin can be created from a wide variety of materials.

    0
    0
  • Old pieces of wood and wire netting are ideal for making a homemade compost bin.

    0
    0
  • Compost bins are best sited in the shade.

    0
    0
  • Compost needs to be damp and at a relatively constant temperature, therefore a corner of your garden will be fine.

    0
    0
  • Because compost bins are generally positioned in a corner of a garden and away from the house, functionality is more important than aesthetics.

    0
    0
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a useful compost guide that looks in detail at all aspects of home composting.

    0
    0
  • Convenience - if the compost bin is to be well used, then siting it so that it is relatively convenient to access is important.

    0
    0
  • People will not want to traipse across a muddy patch of garden to place waste in the compost bin, therefore it is also useful to ensure that there is a path leading to it.

    0
    0
  • Smell - a well maintained compost bin should not smell.

    0
    0
  • However, this is an obvious concern that many people have, therefore siting the compost bin away from the house will help to dispel any fears.

    0
    0
  • Materials - be careful of the materials that you use to build your compost bin.

    0
    0
  • Building a compost bin and making your own compost is a simple way to help the environment.

    0
    0
  • Even if you have no need for the finished compost, you are bound to have plenty of neighbors who are keen gardeners or local organizations who will be pleased to take it from you.

    0
    0
  • Home produced compost is much cheaper than buying fertilizer or soil nutrients and is an important way of reducing the amount of waste that is placed in landfills.

    0
    0
  • Homemade compost bins can be perfect for someone who is looking to make their own compost.

    0
    0
  • One of these is recycling garden and kitchen waste to make compost.

    0
    0
  • The second is that producing compost at home gives you a ready supply of nutritious garden fertilizer.

    0
    0
  • Creating your own compost also saves having to buy fertilizer and this helps to reduce the energy used to prepare, pack and deliver compost for you to use in your garden.

    0
    0
  • While it is possible to make compost using a compost pile, many people prefer to use a compost bin.

    0
    0
  • A compost bin keeps compost together in one spot and stops any risk of it blowing around the garden.

    0
    0
  • It also helps to keep the compost in ideal conditions.

    0
    0
  • There are many different types of compost bins available and these range from cheap and low cost bins through to custom made bins which can be very expensive.

    0
    0
  • A low cost alternative to shop bought compost bins are homemade compost bins.

    0
    0
  • Cost - homemade compost bins can be built for little or no cost.

    0
    0
  • Many of the materials that are required to build a compost bin at home can be found around the home.

    0
    0
  • Old bed frames and other items of furniture, floor boards and even unwanted building materials can be used to create compost bins at home.

    0
    0
  • Custom built - another advantage of homemade compost bins is that they can be custom made to fit into a garden.

    0
    0
  • Some gardens may be better served by a corner compost bin, for instance, while others may be better with a long thin bin that is fitted to a shady wall.

    0
    0
  • Compost bins are easy to make at home with just a few basic DIY skills required.

    0
    0
  • Compost bin plans - if you are new to DIY or to making compost bins, then compost bin plans can help you with your project.

    0
    0
  • Materials - while many materials can be used to make your own compost bin, be watchful for materials that may be a hazard.

    0
    0
  • Advice - many gardeners are happy to share their experience and this includes their experience of building and maintaining a compost area as well as sharing their knowledge of growing plants.

    0
    0
  • Building your own homemade compost bins can be a great way to recycle garden and kitchen waste while also providing you with a ready supply of nutritious garden compost.

    0
    0
  • Compost bin plans can be useful if you are thinking about building your own compost bin.

    0
    0
  • Having a compost bin is a great way to recycle garden and kitchen waste.

    0
    0
  • There are a lot of places where you can find compost bin plans, including gardening and DIY clubs.

    0
    0
  • Before starting on a project using compost bin plans, it is important to completely read the plans and instructions through and make sure that you are comfortable with the process.

    0
    0
  • The size, for instance, can be changed in order to make a compost bin that fits a specific area in the garden or yard.

    0
    0
  • Make sure that the compost bin is well situated in the garden.

    0
    0
  • Most compost bins are best situated out of direct sunlight.

    0
    0
  • The compost bin should be easy to access.

    0
    0
  • Make the compost bin big enough to contain the family waste.

    0
    0
  • If you don't use all your freshly made compost then share it with family and friends.

    0
    0
  • Fellow gardeners are always delighted to receive good compost.

    0
    0
  • Compost bin plans are a convenient way to build compost bins.

    0
    0
  • If you make your own compost then this can be used to help grow the plants.

    0
    0
  • Making a compost bin or pile is easy to do and many organic items of waste can be recycled this way.

    0
    0
  • In the fall and winter, your yard becomes littered as trees discard, leaving you wondering what is the best way to compost leaves.

    0
    0
  • Clean up your yard, give your spring garden a head start, and do something good for the environment by starting your own compost pile.

    0
    0
  • However, if you plan to compost your leaves, consider breaking them down first to speed up the process.

    0
    0
  • Some people use the terms "mulch" and "compost" interchangeably.

    0
    0
  • Compost, on the other hand, is decomposed organic material.

    0
    0
  • Now that you've mulched your leaves, you must take the next step to turn them into compost.

    0
    0
  • However, to speed up the process, the best way to compost leaves is by adding other organic matter to the mix.

    0
    0
  • Also, choose materials that contain nitrogen to balance out your compost pile.

    0
    0
  • There are other supplements you can add to your compost pile which can be purchased and lawn and garden centers.

    0
    0
  • Many people find compost bins unattractive or simply do not have space to accommodate them.

    0
    0
  • There are a variety of compost bins on the market, ranging from utilitarian to aesthetically pleasing.

    0
    0
  • Another option is to leave your compost pile on the ground.

    0
    0
  • Be sure to turn the leaves in your compost pile regularly to mix the contents, using a rake or pitchfork.

    0
    0
  • Some people choose to compost leaves within plastic bags.

    0
    0
  • Your compost should be ready in around six months, depending on the environmental conditions.

    0
    0
  • When you are considering starting a compost pile, you should research what types of compost containers are available to choose the one that best suits your needs.

    0
    0
  • To develop properly, compost should be contained so that you can easily perform regular maintenance, such as adding more organic materials and turning the compost.

    0
    0
  • You can even compost indoors with the right container.

    0
    0
  • Prices vary from around $20 for a simple kitchen compost container, up to over $500 for a large capacity outdoor compost tumbler.

    0
    0
  • Compost tumblers are cylindrical in shade and look like sideways drums supported by a base.

    0
    0
  • The drum is rotated in order to aerate the compost materials.

    0
    0
  • It can be rolled across the yard to deliver compost to different garden spots, and its whimsical shape is ideal for getting kids involved in the composting process.

    0
    0
  • If you choose this type of compost container, you will most likely need to turn the compost manually using a shovel or pitchfork.

    0
    0
  • "Vermiculture," or the breeding of worms, can result in rich compost when placed in a bin.

    0
    0
  • If you have a compost kitchen container, then you have no excuses for not composting food waste.

    0
    0
  • These interior compost containers come in various sizes, and some can sit right on your kitchen counter.

    0
    0
  • To save money while saving the environment, build your own compost container.

    0
    0
  • You can also section off an area of your yard, typically around four by four feet, to create a compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Also, it is much easier to turn compost that is contained than a free-form pile.

    0
    0
  • While you may be able to purchase compost containers at your local home improvement store or nursery, a plethora of containers are available for purchase online.

    0
    0
  • Once you've chosen the right compost container for your needs, you must determine where to place it.

    0
    0
  • Do not build a compost bin right next to your home.

    0
    0
  • With the right conditions, you will soon be enjoying the benefits of home produced compost which will add nutrients to your garden while also reducing garden waste.

    0
    0
  • Whether you are environmentally conscious or an avid gardener, starting a compost pile can be a rewarding experience.

    0
    0
  • One of the major factors in choosing a location for your compost pile is convenience.

    0
    0
  • If you decide to use an open container or heap for your compost, scent might also become an issue, so be considerate of your neighbors.

    0
    0
  • Another factor to consider is how much sun and shade your compost pile will receive.

    0
    0
  • If you plan to use your compost to fertilize a garden, make sure it is located close enough that you don't spend hours hauling compost across your yard.

    0
    0
  • Next, select the appropriate container for your compost.

    0
    0
  • The easiest method for starting a compost pile is to choose an open area in your yard and start piling materials directly on the ground.

    0
    0
  • There are a variety of compost containers to choose from, including tumblers, bio orbs, as well as standard compost bins.

    0
    0
  • If you live in an apartment, a kitchen compost container is a viable option.

    0
    0
  • Now that you have decided where to start your compost pile and selected a container, follow these tips to let the composting process begin.

    0
    0
  • Collect waste from the kitchen to compost including vegetable and fruit trimmings, coffee grounds and egg shells.

    0
    0
  • Be sure to keep your compost pile moist.

    0
    0
  • Some containers have mechanisms to turn the compost for you, but heaps and bins will need to be turned using a rake or pitchfork.

    0
    0
  • Your compost is ready when it is brown and crumbly with an earthy aroma.

    0
    0
  • If you are currently making compost, growing vegetables in containers or looking to start growing your own fruit and vegetables, then a greenhouse can be a sound investment.

    0
    0
  • Making compost at home is a good way to recycle garden and kitchen waste and also saves money through removing the need to purchase expensive soil fertilizers and conditioners.

    0
    0
  • Homemade compost bins are easy to make and require little in the way of special equipment or knowledge.

    0
    0
  • These offer the convenience of disposable packaging while being easy to compost.

    0
    0
  • This includes corn based products that are simple to compost and bagasse items that are made from sugar cane.

    0
    0
  • Look for the word compostable right on the front of the box to avoid having plastic build up in your compost heap.

    0
    0
  • This means if you maintain your own compost pile, you can throw this bag right in there with the rest of your compostable matter and it will disintegrate naturally without any detrimental effects to the environment.

    0
    0
  • One of the most important obstacles is educating compost collection drivers and farmers about the different materials so they will not continue to remove biodegradable bags from their collected compostables.

    0
    0
  • Frito-Lay is addressing this with a wide-scale television marketing effort to promote their new compostable bags with real, time-lapsed footage of the bag as it actually breaks down in a compost pile.

    0
    0
  • If the idea of eating your plate doesn't appeal to you, then simply compost these materials in your backyard.

    0
    0
  • Cyclamen Daffodil (Hybrid Narcissi Cyclamineus) - A dainty but not showy species, easily grown in a peat-earth rock garden or in pots of peaty compost.

    0
    0
  • They like a compost of loam, leafmould, and peat, mixed in about equal proportions, with the addition of some sharp sand.

    0
    0
  • Where the soil is naturally poor, light, and sandy, it should be taken out to a depth of 18 inches, and replaced with the compost above mentioned, or some fine well-enriched mould.

    0
    0
  • Where soil is prepared for the choicer varieties, any good loam with a free addition of sand, well-rotted leaf-mould, and decomposed cow manure will form an admirable compost.

    0
    0
  • A large hole, about 6 by 4 feet deep, should be dug out, a good layer of drainage material put at the bottom, and the hole filled with a rich compost of loam and manure.

    0
    0
  • The compost should consist mainly of good loam, to which a small proportion of peat may be added, and which should be free from calcareous matter.

    0
    0
  • First, you will need a compost bin, a container or structure in which to build your compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Compost bins can be homemade from chicken wire, wood, bricks, or plastic.

    0
    0
  • You can also buy compost bins, often at low costs through municipal recycling programs.

    0
    0
  • To start your pile, put alternate layers of browns (carbon-rich materials) and greens (nitrogen-rich materials) into your compost bin.

    0
    0
  • If your compost pile is mostly browns, decomposition will be slow.

    0
    0
  • Do not put meat, fats, oils, dairy products or pet waste into your compost bins.

    0
    0
  • Don't put garden clippings from diseased or mildewed plants in your compost bin.

    0
    0
  • Toss your compost every week or so to increase air flow through the pile.

    0
    0
  • Some gardeners do this by keeping two bins side by side and forking the half-made compost from one to the other regularly.

    0
    0
  • If you find worms or saprophytic fungi -- a network of fine, white threads in a clump of compost - that is a sign that your compost pile is "working" nicely.

    0
    0
  • It's also important to keep your compost pile moist.

    0
    0
  • If you have a long period without rain, water the compost bin when you water the garden.

    0
    0
  • Expert composters often use special thermometers to monitor the temperature at the center of the compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Most compost piles will turn to finished compost in three to six months.

    0
    0
  • When your compost is black and earthy-smelling, with a soft, crumbly texture, it's ready to use.

    0
    0
  • It saves you time and money - no more bagging and hauling leaves and grass clippings to the city compost site or paying someone to pick up your yard waste.

    0
    0
  • Adding compost to the soil increases its organic matter, which enhances the soil's ability to hold nutrients and water.

    0
    0
  • Thus, using compost in your lawn and garden reduces dependence on other fertilizers.

    0
    0
  • Compost also makes good mulch for protecting and establishing new plants.

    0
    0
  • And best of all, it's so easy to make compost!

    0
    0
  • To feed plants, top-dress the soil with compost at the beginning of the season before mulching.

    0
    0
  • Unhealthy material should only be composted if you manage your compost pile with strict controls and can be sure that the compost pile will reach a temperature of at least 120 F and remain at that temperature for two to three weeks.

    0
    0
  • A "hot" compost pile will kill disease organisms and insect larvae.

    0
    0
  • Put them on your compost pile, and look forward to next year's healthful compost.

    0
    0
  • Top it up with good garden soil mixed with compost.

    0
    0
  • The top four inches or so should be compost.

    0
    0
  • The soil around newly constucted homes is often poor; consider bringing in new topsoil and amending it with loads of compost before planting.

    0
    0
  • For existing lawns, you can add an inch of compost over the grass every spring and fall.

    0
    0
  • Shredded leaves can be used as mulch in flower beds, or they can be added to the compost pile, where they will decompose and can help nourish the flower or vegetable garden later on.

    0
    0
  • Put the healthy stuff in your compost box.

    0
    0
  • Consider starting a "dirty" compost box for diseased plant stuff, which you could then use on plants that aren't for eating.

    0
    0
  • If you don't have a compost pile already, now is the perfect time to start one.

    0
    0
  • Compost is a wonderful addition to your beds, making the soil and the plants healthier while promoting beneficial insects.

    0
    0
  • Amend soil with compost to ensure good drainage.

    0
    0
  • Amend the soil with compost and place the plant in the hole, placing soil only along the crown line.

    0
    0
  • Organic gardeners use compost to improve soil health and structure.

    0
    0
  • All of these soil conditions benefit from the addition of compost.

    0
    0
  • Compost is simply the decaying matter and rich remains from other plants.

    0
    0
  • If you don't have a compost pile, they're easy to start and maintain, and the benefits of adding compost to the soil are legendary.

    0
    0
  • Nearly all plant material can be added to a compost pile, including leaves, grass clippings, carrot and potato peels, and more.

    0
    0
  • Avoid adding weeds, since they may carry seeds, and the seeds will get into your compost.

    0
    0
  • You don't want to seed ragweed among your lettuce every time you add compost to your soil.

    0
    0
  • If you're starting a new vegetable garden or you don't choose to make your own compost, bags of compost may be purchased at garden centers and home improvement stores.

    0
    0
  • If you have a big section of soil to amend, some bulk carriers deliver truckloads of compost to your doorstep.

    0
    0
  • Allow the manure to age or compost naturally, or turn it into the soil of your vegetable garden in the spring and give it a few weeks to mellow before planting vegetables.

    0
    0
  • If you can, add compost or other amendments to the soil to add nutrients to it.

    0
    0
  • After building an enclosure or wall of some sort, gardeners fill in the area with soil and compost and plant the flowers of their choice.

    0
    0
  • Just by adding soil and compost, you automatically build up a bed with fertile, well drained soil.

    0
    0
  • If you are planting strawberries in the ground and you are dealing with a heavy clay soil, compost or peat moss not only enriches the soil but improves drainage as well.

    0
    0
  • You can use an organic fertilizer such as kelp meal, compost, or a commercial fertilizer.

    0
    0
  • Use an organic fertilizer such as seaweed or compost tea, or try a balanced fertilizer such as a 5-10-5.

    0
    0
  • When all of the seeds are out of the seed head, compost or discard the seed head.

    0
    0
  • Adding fertilizer such as compost adds nutrients and enhances soil.

    0
    0
  • Fill the container with a mixture of potting soil and compost.

    0
    0
  • Once you are ready to plant your crowns, apply a three inch layer of compost and manure on top of the soil.

    0
    0
  • As with any planting task, amend the soil with compost and water well after planting.

    0
    0
  • Rake and compost or dispose of properly.

    0
    0
  • If your soil is clay or has poor drainage, add compost and other amendments to improve drainage.

    0
    0
  • Prevention: It's important to rake up all the fallen leaves each fall and compost them or burn them (if your area permits burning.

    0
    0
  • Raised bed gardening consists of boxes made from lumber, concrete or other materials that are filled with soil and compost.

    0
    0
  • Instead of rototilling or hand tilling the soil, adding compost, fertilizer, lime or other amendments, raised bed gardens can be filled with bagged soil from the garden center and bagged or home-made compost or mushroom compost.

    0
    0
  • These are boxes created with boards, stones or other material, then filled with soil and compost.

    0
    0
  • Once you've planned and built your garden, you can add compost, manure and other amendments to make the soil rich and fertile.

    0
    0
  • You may want to add compost to your dirt before you refill the hole and work it into the loosened soil.

    0
    0
  • Adding compost or humus to your soil prior to planting may be all the fertilizer you need, aside from occasional dressings of compost tea (a mixture of compost and water.

    0
    0
  • Work a good, rich compost into the soil.

    0
    0
  • Strawberries don't require much fertilizer, but compost and composted manures help increase soil fertility.

    0
    0
  • Adding compost to the garden soil is always a good idea.

    0
    0
  • Organic gardeners can add well rotted manures or make a compost tea to water into the ground.

    0
    0
  • Hydrangeas do prefer a rich, loamy soil, so work in some good well rotted manure of compost into the soil before planting.

    0
    0
  • While hydrangeas need more water than most shrubs, they also do not like to sit in soggy soil, so be sure to add compost prior to planting to give them the nutrient boost they need as well as improve drainage naturally.

    0
    0
  • Choose a rich compost type of soil for the best results.

    0
    0
  • Mow: Instead of bagging grass and leaf clippings, mow them into the lawn by allowing your mower to shred everything into compost.

    0
    0
  • Add compost, soil amendments and specialized tomato fertilizer to prevent this disease and be sure to water tomato plants regularly and evenly throughout the growing season.

    0
    0
  • Feed Organically: Next, add some organic compost to your lawn.

    0
    0
  • Outdoors, amend the soil with plenty of compost to ensure adequate drainage.

    0
    0
  • The soil is pliable, making it easy to turn over and add compost, and plants added to the garden now have several weeks to establish their roots before going dormant in the winter.

    0
    0
  • Add compost to the soil so nutrients can be absorbed.

    0
    0
  • Instead of buying compost, you may opt to add your own kitchen scraps such as egg shells or coffee grounds.

    0
    0
  • This will insure the compost is completely incorporated and will also provide air circulation.

    0
    0
  • If you don't have sufficient amounts of kitchen waste to use as compost, you may also want to add a bit of fertilizer while you are turning the soil to make sure it is properly amended.

    0
    0
  • It acts like a very slow-release compost.

    0
    0
  • Garden compost or well rotted manure also enhances the asparagus bed.

    0
    0
  • Instead, add twice as much compost and manure as you normally would and turn it under, mixing it into the soil.

    0
    0
  • Add compost annually, and avoid working the soil when it is wet, which can harm its structure.

    0
    0
  • Allow organic materials such as manure, shredded leaves and kitchen scraps to thoroughly compost before adding them to the garden beds.

    0
    0
  • Adding compost or manure to the soil gives plants more of the nutrients they need to remain vigorous and healthy.

    0
    0
  • For container-grown vegetables, a commercial potting mix enriched with fertilizer or compost works well.

    0
    0
  • Before planting a new strawberry bed, amend the soil generously with composted manure or garden compost.

    0
    0
  • Reduced pollution: Pollution from the production of commercial fertilizers is also reduced when more farmers opt to use organic methods like spreading compost, manure, and using cover crops.

    0
    0
  • Manure and compost are two of the most common choices for organic fertilizer.

    0
    0
  • Blood meal can also be used in your compost pile.

    0
    0
  • Clear Air Gardening offers a variety of fertilizers, compost bins, and informative articles on mixing your own fertilizers.

    0
    0
  • Place compost in burlap or another leaching bag.

    0
    0
  • Compost: Organic plant and animal materials are biologically broken down into more usable materials and used to enrich the soil of an organic farm.

    0
    0
  • If you don't have that kind of soil right now, consider getting some better soil dumped onto your yard, or simply add a heavy layer of compost at the end of the growing season each year until your soil is nice and thick.

    0
    0
  • You can make your own compost fertilizer.

    0
    0
  • Compost, manure and even some types of mulch will all add nutrients to your soil.

    0
    0
  • If you're planning to try your hand at organic gardening, compost is something you're going to need.

    0
    0
  • Compost is natural fertilizer made from decomposed organic waste material.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →