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common sense

common sense

common sense Sentence Examples

  • The bottom line is that the South Beach diet can be a good, common-sense system if you have the discipline, which has an edge over the competition in that it promotes healthy eating that is realistic for the long haul.

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  • When you purchase fireworks online, you need to follow some common-sense safety rules and regulations.

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  • Despite the sobering statistics on identity theft, there are many common-sense ways to prevent identity theft.

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  • This is a good, common-sense safety move that applies to any apartment search.

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  • The Anger Management Training Institute uses a common-sense approach to help you manage anger in your life.

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  • As with paid dating sites, use common-sense precautions when contacting other members.

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  • You'll also want to search for topics like online dating tips for men or online dating tips for women and get some experienced advice and common-sense tips.

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  • Prices vary quite a bit, and marketing gimmicks abound, but here are some common-sense guidelines for finding the right product for you.

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  • Dave Ramsey's Total Money Makeover offers common-sense tips illustrated with real-life examples of men and women facing a variety of financial issues.

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  • Combined with a common-sense approach to lawn care, you can have the healthy lawn you desire while minimizing the impact on the environment.

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  • I considered telling her the tipster was ill and out of service for a few days but common sense dictated that doing so might encourage someone to commit a crime in the tipster's absence.

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  • We're following a hunger and when it's ripe, all common sense and caution fly out the window.

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  • Not an ounce of common sense in any of you.

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  • When the common sense fairy smacks you upside the head, you know where to find me.

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  • She seemed to have dropped any form of common sense somewhere between Hell and her world.

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  • Just exercise a little caution, have patience, good equipment and lots of common sense.

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  • Somehow, considering Gladys, Effie or Claire seemed to stretch common sense more than an overweight bungee jumper.

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  • A girl that young didn't usually have much common sense.

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  • She's not heavily endowed with common sense or ambition, but she does have attributes.

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  • For once, someone in the chain of command had some common sense.

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  • For the natural realist stands upon the common-sense position that minds and material objects have equally effective existence; while the idealist explains matter by mind and denies that mind can be explained by matter.

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  • Public opinion upheld the government in its attitude, for all persons of common sense realized that the suspension of the public services could not be permitted for a moment in a civilized country.

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  • He is no intuitionalist; but he is a drily common-sense mind, piling up in heaps the ruinous fragments of an idealist system.

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  • Himself an ascetic and a mystic, to whom things spiritual were more real than the visible world, he had the strong common sense which 1 See R.

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  • Thus he was able often to recover the meaning of a passage which had long been buried under a heap of contradictory glosses, and he founded a school in which sobriety and common sense were added to the industry and ingenuity of former commentators.

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  • (1) In the first place, common sense suggests the avoidance, in malarious countries, of unhealthy situations, and particularly the neighbourhood of stagnant water.

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  • In this, indeed, as in other cases, it may be said that the emperor was guided less by any abstract principles than by a common-sense appreciation of the needs and possibilities of the moment.

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  • Amongst his publications may be mentioned The Church in Wales (1888); Common-Sense Patriotism (1894); and Landmarks Welsh Church History (1912).

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  • For the rest, as regards the question of nomenclature, Reid everywhere unites common sense and reason, making the former "only another name for one branch or degree of reason."

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  • Reason is called common sense to distinguish it from ratiocination with uses logic and rational reasoning.

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  • In his Common Sense About Women (1881) and his Women and Men (1888) he advocated equality of opportunity and equality of rights for the two sexes.

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  • They are, indeed, merely the application of a rigorous common sense to the facts of society.

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  • This he was able to do, as a moderate Lutheran, whose calmness and common sense contrasted advantageously with the unbridled violence of his contemporaries.

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  • In 1772 appeared anonymously his Doctrines of a Trinity and the Incarnation of God, examined upon the Principles of Reason and Common Sense.

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  • As a ruler he displayed the same common sense.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • His strong common sense and sound practical judgment led him to adopt a policy of conciliation towards the native princes, and to promote measures tending to the betterment of the condition of the people.

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  • Clifford, The Common Sense of the exact Sciences (London, 1885); H.

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  • The whole question of this duel, however, requires consideration from the point of view of common sense.

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  • Believers in law have put their trust in authority or logic; while believers in disposition chiefly look to our instinctive faculties - conscience, common-sense or sentiment.

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  • But common-sense and conscience are quite as definite guides as logic or authority; and there seems no good reason for refusing to give the name of casuistry to their operations.

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  • But, then, Cicero and Seneca took common-sense as their guide.

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  • Very soon, however, these relics of casuistry were swept away by the rising tide of common-sense.

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  • The great object of 17th-century moralists had been to find some general principle from which the whole of ethics could be deduced; common-sense, by turning its back on abstract principles of every kind, forced the philosophers to come down to the solid earth, and start by inquiring how the world does make up its mind in fact.

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  • It was his mission to introduce a rational, common-sense point of view, and to bring the high matters of divine and human sciences into close and living contact with the everyday world.

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  • he had none of the common sense which had led her Joseph to realize the limits of her power.

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  • The theory of probabilities, which Laplace described as common sense expressed in mathematical language, engaged his attention from its importance in physics and astronomy; and he applied his theory, not only to the ordinary problems of chances, but also to the inquiry into the causes of phenomena, vital statistics and future events.

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  • Clifford, The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences (1885), chapters i.

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  • Mead was the pupil of the equally popular and successful John Radcliffe (1650-1714), who had acquired from Sydenham a contempt for book-learning, and belonged to no school in medicine but the school of common sense.

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  • The third and fourth books give evidence of acuteness in psychological analysis; the fourth and sixth of the most active and varied observation of natural phenomena; the fifth of original insight and strong common sense in conceiving the origin of society and the progressive advance of man to civilization.

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  • The various title-words of the several articles are often the merest stalkinghorses, under cover of which to shoot at the Bible or the church, the target being now and then shifted to the political institutions of the writer's country, his personal foes, &c., and the whole being largely seasoned with that acute, rather superficial, common-sense, but also commonplace, ethical and social criticism which the 18th century called philosophy.

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  • His common sense appears in his rejection of Hutchinson's attempt to prove that the Bible supplies a complete system of physical science, and his shrewdness in his Notes on Scripture Texts (1747).

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  • while Sayce has said roundly that common sense demands the acceptance of all as the work of the Hittites, who were the dominant caste throughout a loosely-knit empire extending at one time from the Orontes to the Aegean, Messerschmidt has stated with equal dogmatism that the Hittites proper were only one people out of many 1 in N.

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  • As soon as we recognize the part of sensation, we have no reason to deny the common-sense position that each piece of experience has its own quality, which is modified indefinitely by the relations in which it stands.

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  • In the Satires we find realistic pictures of social life, and the conduct and opinions of the world submitted to the standard of good feeling and common sense.

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  • Every belief of mankind is in the last analysis amenable to reason, and finds its origin in evidence that can appeal to the arbitrament of common sense.

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  • Both have the feeling that it is inconsistent with the common sense of mankind, which will insist that the very object perceived is the sole reality.

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  • Matthew Arnold, for example, declared this an instance in which Franklin was lacking in his " imperturbable common sense "; and J.

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  • Thus defined, idealism is opposed to ordinary common-sense dualism, which regards knowledge or experience as the result of the more or less accidental relation between two separate and independent entities - the mind and its ideas on one side, the thing with its attributes on the other - that serve to limit and condition each other from without.

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  • On one side of his thought Aristotle represents a reaction against idealism and a return to the position of common-sense.

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  • But with these advances came the danger of falling into error from which common-sense dualism and naturalistic monism were free.

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  • But that space and time, matter and cause should owe their origin to the action of the mind has always seemed paradoxical to common sense.

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  • The diplomatic situation became for the moment very acute, but after a short period of bellicose talk the common-sense of both countries prevailed.

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  • So far too as the Romans were capable of taking interest in speculative questions, the tragic poets contributed to stimulate curiosity on such subjects, and they anticipated Lucretius in using the conclusions of speculative philosophy as well as of common sense to assail some of the prevailing forms of superstition.

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  • Towards the end of September he fell a victim to the plague which was ravaging the land, and his illness sobered his spirit and brought into his message a deeper note than that merely moral and common-sense one with which, as a polite humanist, he had hitherto been content.

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  • Lord John Russell and Lord Palmerston were naturally jealous of the prince's interference - and of King Leopold's and Baron Stockmar's - in state affairs; but Lord Melbourne took the common-sense view that a husband will control his wife whether people wish it or not.

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  • In the words of Drummond: "Erasmus was in his own age the apostle of common sense and of rational religion.

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  • From the beginning to the end of his career he remained true to the purpose of his life, which was to fight the battle of sound learning and plain common sense against the powers of ignorance and superstition, and amid all the convulsions of that period he never once lost his mental balance."

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  • Yet all these obstacles to a good understanding might, perhaps, have been surmounted if only the Polish diet had treated the Cossacks with common fairness and common sense.

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  • The peculiar situation of Sweden, and the circumstances of his time, made his policy necessarily opportunist, but it was an opportunism based on excellent common sense.

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  • In the solution of this problem the common sense of Wellington and of Castlereagh, with whom the duke worked throughout in complete harmony, played a determining part; it was mainly owing to their influence that France escaped the dismemberment for which the German powers clamoured, and which was advocated for a while by Lord Liverpool and the majority of the British cabinet.

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  • Here Wellington supported the proposal for the immediate evacuation of France, and it was owing to his common-sense criticism that the proposal of Prussia, supported by the emperor Alexander and Metternich, to establish an "army of observation" at Brussels, was nipped in the bud.

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  • Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practical common-sense to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of Utopian dreaming.

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  • For some years the emperor, with his sound common-sense and dislike of exaggeration, held the balance fairly between the two extremes; but long years of uninterrupted labour, anxiety and disappointment weakened his zeal for reform, and when radicalism assumed more and more the form of secret societies and revolutionary agitation, he felt constrained to adopt severe repressive measures.

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  • His views imply a cultivated intelligence well versed in practical affairs, opposing to the extremes of both nominalism and realism a practical common sense.

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  • It seems contrary to common sense that neutral ships should be exposed to being detained, taken out of their course, and overhauled on mere suspicion of carrying contraband, when they are so far from the seat of war that there can be no presumption as to their destination.

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  • He had much practical common-sense, and keen sympathy for all who were in distress and for animals.

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  • Common-sense must have shown the leaders of the revolt that they would never be safe while Peter lived, and they had insults to avenge.

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  • 8); and, though common sense and natural good feeling set bounds in most cases to the tyranny of the nobles, yet there was scarcely any injustice too gross to be possible.

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  • Efficient ventilating can only be effected by the exercise of common sense and vigilance, and care must be taken to avoid cold draughts through the houses.

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  • As Archbishop of the Northern Province he took a conspicuous part in the social and economic, as well as the religious, questions agitating an industrial community, while in the House of Lords his eloquence and clear common-sense gave him an influence not confined to ecclesiastical matters.

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  • But, after making all allowances, it remains true that he had a pefect sense of proportion, sound maxims and thorough common-sense.

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  • But in what that vividness (ivap-yaaa) consists is a question which Epicurus does not raise, and which he would no doubt have deemed superfluous quibbling over a matter sufficiently settled by common sense.

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  • A strong sense of duty, genuine piety, and a cautious but by no means pusillanimous common-sense coloured every action of his patient, laborious and eventful life.

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  • In his instructions to Novosiltsov, his special envoy in London, the tsar elaborated the motives of his policy in language which appealed as little to the common sense of Pitt as did later the treaty of the Holy Alliance to that of Castlereagh.

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  • And his unbending common-sense, and sobriety of criticism in matters which deeply interested the less academic Radicals who were enthusiasts for extreme courses, would have made the parliamentary situation difficult but for the exceptional popularity of the prime minister.

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  • His counsels were marred by his reluctance to appeal to arms at the critical moments of action, and by the slenderness of his own resources, but they deserve attention for their broad common sense and spirit of tolerance.

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  • Yet the shrewd common-sense, the biting humour, the power of graphic description and the imaginative " mysticism " give them a unique attraction for many even who do not fully sympathize with the implied philosophy or with the Puritanical code of ethics.

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  • The religious objection was insuperable; opportunities of commercial development were indispensable; war with England was not to be contemplated by the common sense of the country; and thus, as de Foe wrote, " The Union was merely formed by the nature of things."

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  • 3 They are shrewd, intelligent and possess much common sense.

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  • tongue, or in a foreign language, and may be used (as in the examination for entrance to the Osborne Naval College) to test the important qualities (hardly tested in any other examinations at present), readiness of wit, common-sense and nerve.

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  • This defence of the poetic point of view against brute force and common sense was admirably constructed and it proved one of the most popular of his plays.

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  • Among Mr Shaw's later writings on economics are: Socialism for Millionaires (1901), The Common Sense of Municipal Trading (1904), and Fabianism and the Fiscal Question (1904).

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  • A visit to Switzerland in the summer of 1775 may not have weakened his interest in her, but it at least allowed him to regard her objectively; and, without tragic consequences on either side, the passion was ultimately allowed to yield to the dictates of common-sense.

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  • They were addressed to the "common" man and appealed to his common sense of spiritual things.

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  • Nor was he less successful in the larger matters of administration and organization, which brought into play his sound practical judgment and strong common-sense.

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  • He upheld Reid's psychological method and expounded the "common-sense" doctrine, which was attacked by the two Mills.

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  • As a speaker, he was clear, logical and impressive, and on select committees his common sense was most valuable.

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  • God must perforce be satisfied with whatever common sense thinks it fair and reasonable that He should expect.

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  • He must have been a fine specimen of the more cultured Puritans - possessed of a robust common-sense in admirable contrast with some of his contemporaries.

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  • 30), when it constitutes an appeal to common sense.

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  • In the Catholic church, however, common sense prevailed, and those who desired to follow the Encratite ideal repaired to the monasteries.

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  • Paley, though an excellent expositor and full of common sense, had the usual defect of common-sense people in philosophy - that of tame acquiescence in the prejudices of his age.

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  • This change in the attitude of common-sense morality in respect to "anything that is lent upon usury" is one of the most peculiar and instructive features in the economic progress of society.

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  • xxiii.) he answers the question with much common sense.

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  • Fenion assailed him on the religious side, and managed to transform him into a devotee, exceedingly affectionate, earnest and religious, but woefully lacking in tact and common sense.

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  • Bossuet can only be thought of as the high-priest of authority and common-sense; but Fenelon has been made by turns into a sentimentalist, a mystical saint, an 18th-century philosophe, an ultramontane churchman and a hysterical hypocrite.

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  • Smith (1882); and The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences, completed by Professor Karl Pearson (1885).

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  • He was without doubt one of the greatest statesmen of his age, concealing beneath a simple exterior and homely habits a profound political sagacity and an unerring common-sense, and possessing in a high degree those useful qualities of patience, moderation, and tenacity, which characterized nearly all the princes of the house of Jagiello.

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  • His practical common sense recoiled from the amazing conclusions which were drawn from it by many of its more eccentric advocates.

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  • What Cousin finds psychologically in the individual consciousness, he finds also spontaneously expressed in the common sense or universal experience of humanity.

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  • In fact, it is with him the function of philosophy to classify and explain universal convictions and beliefs; but common-sense is not with him philosophy, nor is it the instrument of philosophy; it is simply the material on which the philosophical method works, and in harmony with which its results must ultimately be found.

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  • The common sense of a British jury had preserved, in spite of parliament and ministry, that free right of meeting which was to be one of the strongest instruments of future reform.

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  • It was the triumph of common sense over official arguments.

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  • He was also - like Calvin, if on more narrowly common-sense lines - an admirable exegete.

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  • His own Christian belief, sincere and earnest, was more the outcome of the common sense which, largely through him, moulded the prudential theology of England in the 18th century, than of the nobler elements present in More, Cudworth and other religious thinkers of the preceding age, or afterwards in Law and Berkeley, Coleridge and Schleiermacher.

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  • " He would be thought void of common sense who asked, on the one side, or, on the other, went to give a reason, why ` it is impossible for the same thing to be and not to be.'

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  • For (r), as concrete and transient, it is obviously not the real essential good that the philosopher seeks; (2) the feelings most prominently recognized as pleasures are bound up with pain, as good can never be with evil; in so far, then, as common sense rightly recognizes some pleasures as good, it can only be from their tendency to produce some further good.

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  • p p p Although the Socratic induction forms a striking feature of Plato's dialogues, his ideal method of ethics is purely deductive; he admits common sense only as supplying provisional steps and starting-points from which the mind is to ascend to knowledge of absolute good, through which knowledge alone, as he conceives, the lower notions of particular goods are to be truly conceived.

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  • Aristotle no doubt faithfully represents the common sense of Greece in considering that, in so far as virtue is in itself good to the virtuous agent, it belongs to that species of good which we distinguish as beautiful.

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  • Though common sense will admit that virtues are the best of goods, it still undoubtedly conceives practical wisdom as chiefly exercised in providing those inferior goods which Aristotle, after recognizing the need or use of them for the realization of human well-being, has dropped out of sight; and the result is that, in trying to make clear his conception of practical wisdom, we find ourselves fluctuating continually between the common notion, which he does not distinctly reject, and the notion required as the keystone of his ethical system.

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  • The conflict between these two elements of Common Sense was too profound to be compromised; and the moral consciousness of mankind demanded a more trenchant partisanship than Aristotle's.

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  • The common sense of Christendom gradually shook off these extravagances; but the reluctance to shed blood lingered long, and was hardly extinguished even by the growing horror of heresy.

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  • Wollaston's theory of moral evil as consisting in the practical contradiction of a true proposition, closely resembles the most paradoxical part of Clarke's doctrine, and was not likely to approve itself to the strong common sense of Butler; but his statement of happiness or pleasure as a " justly desirable " end at which every rational being " ought " to aim corresponds exactly to Butler's conception of self-love as a naturally governing impulse; while' the " moral arithmetic " with which he compares pleasures and pains, and endeavours to make the notion of happiness quantitatively precise, is an anticipation of Benthamism.

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  • When, however, we look closer, we find that the principle of order, or obedience to government, is not seriously intended to imply the political absolutism which it seems to express, and which English common sense emphatically repudiates; while the formula of justice is given in the tautological or perfectly indefinite proposition " that every man ought to have his own."

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  • There is, however, in Tucker's theological link between private and general happiness a peculiar ingenuity which Paley's common sense has avoided.

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  • Thus, in his view, not merely natural inclinations towards pleasures, or the desires for selfish happiness, require to be morally resisted; but even the prompting of the individual's conscience, the impulse to do what seems to him right, if it comes into conflict with the common sense of his community.

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  • Of talent there was enough and to spare in the Assembly; what was conspicuously lacking was common sense and a practical knowledge of affairs.

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  • The contradictions he finds in the common-sense conception of inherence, or of "a thing with several attributes," will now become obvious.

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  • But in conceiving A we make, not n positions, still less n+t positions, but one position simply; for common sense removes the absolute position from its original source, sensation.

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  • The common-sense conception of change involves at bottom the same contradiction of opposing qualities in one real.

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  • he was emphatically a modern gentleman, of scrupulous courtesy, sportive gaiety, acquainted with what was going on in the world, taking a real interest in it, giving and getting information, very neatly dressed, with a shrewd common sense always alive about him, in a modern room with modern furniture, plain, it is true, but with no marks of poverty about it - in a word, with all the ease, the gracefulness, the polish of a modern gentleman of good birth, considerable accomplishments, and a very various information."

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  • Between these extreme parties the Roman Church took the middle way of common sense.

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  • The events and ministerial changes of Louis XVIII.'s reign are described under the article France: History, but it may be said here that the king's policy throughout was one of prudence and common sense.

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  • Merivale as a historian cannot be compared with Gibbon for virility, but he takes an eminently common-sense and appreciative view.

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  • Common-sense intuitionalism would deny that man does this, attributing to him immediate knowledge of reality.

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  • I considered telling her the tipster was ill and out of service for a few days but common sense dictated that doing so might encourage someone to commit a crime in the tipster's absence.

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  • We're following a hunger and when it's ripe, all common sense and caution fly out the window.

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  • Not an ounce of common sense in any of you.

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  • When the common sense fairy smacks you upside the head, you know where to find me.

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  • For a reason that facts, circumstances, and common sense didn't dictate, Dean rose early, in a splendid mood, rushed through dawn's-light chores, and still had hours to kill.

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  • She seemed to have dropped any form of common sense somewhere between Hell and her world.

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  • Just exercise a little caution, have patience, good equipment and lots of common sense.

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  • Somehow, considering Gladys, Effie or Claire seemed to stretch common sense more than an overweight bungee jumper.

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  • A girl that young didn't usually have much common sense.

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  • She's not heavily endowed with common sense or ambition, but she does have attributes.

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  • For once, someone in the chain of command had some common sense.

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  • As Gramsci also noted, what people often call ' common sense ' is the unquestioning acceptance of these notions.

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  • airy-fairy nonsense, just common sense translated from proper psychological research.

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  • Such attitudes have been reflected in the predominantly ' common sense ' explanations of pit alignments to date.

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  • In the hurly-burly of debate about iconic space and squiggly landmarks, his voice is a calm bleat of common sense.

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  • bleat of common sense.

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  • bombarded daily with what seem " common sense " images.

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  • This not only defies the logic of what we are taught about spirits in Church, it defies common sense.

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  • If you have the opportunity to see a rare bird, enjoy it, but don't let your enthusiasm override common sense.

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  • The ministry of the Holy Spirit in interpretation does not mean interpreters can ignore common sense and logic.

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  • It's not as dangerous as some people make it out to be, as long as you use common sense.

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  • Professional tips and ideas blend with basic common sense to covering every room in the house, top to bottom, inside and out.

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  • Then he recovered himself with perfect common sense and answered: ` I am sorry, Mr Montmorency.

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  • Some sophisticated common sense is therefore called for.' This isn't a story of sophisticated common sense.

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  • Finally, the Referee uses the condiments of common sense (Law 18!

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  • contributory negligence arising in your case is just to use your common sense.

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  • His paintings, with their unexpected juxtaposition of objects, are a deliberate defiance of common sense.

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  • Modern American economists have dignified this common sense insight with the name of rational ignorance.

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  • I mean really, if you're not going to use ANY common sense we might as well dunk you in the straight away!

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  • It is, then, common sense to collect public Land Rent to fund the needs of the public exchequer.

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  • I am a self starter; I exceed expectations through quick intelligent thinking & common sense.

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  • political expediency is being allowed to take the place of common sense.

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  • floundering in the face of common sense is expected of whichever political party is in charge.

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  • She felt almost giddy with her own common sense.

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  • govern with the common sense instincts of a proud people who believe in Britain.

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  • How you get the heft back onto the hills in a common sense way.

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  • I believe that this common sense intuition is basically sound.

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  • But there is reason (they say) in planting kale, and even in ethic and religion, room for common sense.

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  • The new Northern Ireland Assembly will need to institutionalize what we might term an inclusivist lingua franca, or common-sense.

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  • The new Northern Ireland Assembly will need to institutionalize what we might term an inclusivist lingua franca, or common-sense.

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  • This not only defies the logic of what we are taught about spirits in Church, it defies common sense.

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  • In this case, I refer you to common sense and, possibly, some form of anti-psychotic medication.

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  • modicum of common sense you will have a really good time.

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  • It's the most obvious kind of common sense to attempt to rein in the factors which are making us an increasingly obese nation.

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  • pigheaded bureaucrats have refused to use any common sense whatsoever.

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  • When I read Utopia on Trial it all seemed such common sense yet common sense that had been ignored by planners and architects alike.

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  • It contains practical, common sense information about how to prepare for and what to do in the event of an emergency.

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  • refreshing to hear a politician put common sense ahead of dogma.

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  • resonate with the common sense of the British people.

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  • It is requested that all helmsmen act with common sense and display good seamanship, thus enabling everyone to enjoy their sailing.

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  • Can't have political correctness and political self-preservation compromised by common sense in the pursuit of public safety - can we?

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  • Nice Little Runner, Selling 4 My Mate Lastly, some common sense is always a good thing.

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  • That statement is a perfect example of hot-weather ' common sense ' which is actually quite senseless.

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  • smidgen of common sense along with a little intuition.

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  • Always use your common sense to determine the spacing of the components.

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  • She showed tact, determination and a refreshingly large amount of common sense.

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  • This is only common sense and most of us would agree that to overthrow tyranny, force must be sometimes be used.

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  • The anonymous objections are very much the statement of common-sense against philosophy; those of Caterus criticize the Cartesian argument from the traditional theology of the church; those of Arnauld are an appreciative inquiry into the bearings and consequences of the meditations for religion and morality; while those of Hobbes (q.v.) and Gassendi - both somewhat senior to Descartes and with a dogmatic system of their own already formed - are a keen assault upon the spiritualism of the Cartesian position from a generally " sensational " standpoint.

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  • The idea of Dr Saenz Pena was to conduct the government on common sense and non-partisan lines, in fact to translate into practical politics the principles which underlay the compromise of the Acuerdo.

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  • For the natural realist stands upon the common-sense position that minds and material objects have equally effective existence; while the idealist explains matter by mind and denies that mind can be explained by matter.

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  • Public opinion upheld the government in its attitude, for all persons of common sense realized that the suspension of the public services could not be permitted for a moment in a civilized country.

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  • of visionary experiences as well as of the principles of " common sense " (i.e.

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  • He is no intuitionalist; but he is a drily common-sense mind, piling up in heaps the ruinous fragments of an idealist system.

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  • It is discursive in its style and verbose; but, considering the period at which it appeared, it is remarkable for the strong common sense displayed by the author, his comparative freedom from prejudice, and his firm application of the methods of scientific reasoning to the interpretation of phenomena.

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  • Himself an ascetic and a mystic, to whom things spiritual were more real than the visible world, he had the strong common sense which 1 See R.

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  • Thus he was able often to recover the meaning of a passage which had long been buried under a heap of contradictory glosses, and he founded a school in which sobriety and common sense were added to the industry and ingenuity of former commentators.

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  • (1) In the first place, common sense suggests the avoidance, in malarious countries, of unhealthy situations, and particularly the neighbourhood of stagnant water.

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  • In this, indeed, as in other cases, it may be said that the emperor was guided less by any abstract principles than by a common-sense appreciation of the needs and possibilities of the moment.

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  • Amongst his publications may be mentioned The Church in Wales (1888); Common-Sense Patriotism (1894); and Landmarks Welsh Church History (1912).

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  • The results of these papers were embodied in the Enquiry into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense (1764).

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  • For the rest, as regards the question of nomenclature, Reid everywhere unites common sense and reason, making the former "only another name for one branch or degree of reason."

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  • Reason, as judging of things self-evident, is called common sense to distinguish it from ratiocination or reasoning.

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  • In his Common Sense About Women (1881) and his Women and Men (1888) he advocated equality of opportunity and equality of rights for the two sexes.

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  • They are, indeed, merely the application of a rigorous common sense to the facts of society.

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  • This he was able to do, as a moderate Lutheran, whose calmness and common sense contrasted advantageously with the unbridled violence of his contemporaries.

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  • True it is that there were not wanting other men in these islands whose common sense refused to accept the metaphorical doctrine and the mystical jargon of the Quinarians, but so strenuously and persistently had the Laster asserted their infallibility, and so vigorously had they assailed any who ventured to doubt it, that most peaceable ornithologists found it best to bend to the furious blast, and in some sort to acquiesce at least in the phraseology of the self-styled interpreters of Creative Will.

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  • In 1772 appeared anonymously his Doctrines of a Trinity and the Incarnation of God, examined upon the Principles of Reason and Common Sense.

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  • Elsewhere (ii.), it is true, it is said that there is no lasting satisfaction in pleasure; but the sage may mean to point out that, though there is no permanent outcome to life, it is the part of common-sense to enjoy what one has.

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  • As a ruler he displayed the same common sense.

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  • The brilliant success of Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel, in which Wagnerian technique is applied to the diatonic style of nursery songs with a humorous accuracy undreamed of by Wagner's imitators, points a moral which would have charmed Wagner himself; but until the revival of some rudiments of musical common sense becomes widespread, there is little prospect of the influence of Wagner's harmonic style being productive of anything better than nonsense.

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  • His strong common sense and sound practical judgment led him to adopt a policy of conciliation towards the native princes, and to promote measures tending to the betterment of the condition of the people.

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  • Clifford, The Common Sense of the exact Sciences (London, 1885); H.

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  • The whole question of this duel, however, requires consideration from the point of view of common sense.

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  • Believers in law have put their trust in authority or logic; while believers in disposition chiefly look to our instinctive faculties - conscience, common-sense or sentiment.

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  • But common-sense and conscience are quite as definite guides as logic or authority; and there seems no good reason for refusing to give the name of casuistry to their operations.

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  • But, then, Cicero and Seneca took common-sense as their guide.

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  • Very soon, however, these relics of casuistry were swept away by the rising tide of common-sense.

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  • The great object of 17th-century moralists had been to find some general principle from which the whole of ethics could be deduced; common-sense, by turning its back on abstract principles of every kind, forced the philosophers to come down to the solid earth, and start by inquiring how the world does make up its mind in fact.

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  • It was his mission to introduce a rational, common-sense point of view, and to bring the high matters of divine and human sciences into close and living contact with the everyday world.

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  • he had none of the common sense which had led her Joseph to realize the limits of her power.

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  • The theory of probabilities, which Laplace described as common sense expressed in mathematical language, engaged his attention from its importance in physics and astronomy; and he applied his theory, not only to the ordinary problems of chances, but also to the inquiry into the causes of phenomena, vital statistics and future events.

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  • Clifford, The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences (1885), chapters i.

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  • Mead was the pupil of the equally popular and successful John Radcliffe (1650-1714), who had acquired from Sydenham a contempt for book-learning, and belonged to no school in medicine but the school of common sense.

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  • The third and fourth books give evidence of acuteness in psychological analysis; the fourth and sixth of the most active and varied observation of natural phenomena; the fifth of original insight and strong common sense in conceiving the origin of society and the progressive advance of man to civilization.

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  • The various title-words of the several articles are often the merest stalkinghorses, under cover of which to shoot at the Bible or the church, the target being now and then shifted to the political institutions of the writer's country, his personal foes, &c., and the whole being largely seasoned with that acute, rather superficial, common-sense, but also commonplace, ethical and social criticism which the 18th century called philosophy.

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  • His common sense appears in his rejection of Hutchinson's attempt to prove that the Bible supplies a complete system of physical science, and his shrewdness in his Notes on Scripture Texts (1747).

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  • while Sayce has said roundly that common sense demands the acceptance of all as the work of the Hittites, who were the dominant caste throughout a loosely-knit empire extending at one time from the Orontes to the Aegean, Messerschmidt has stated with equal dogmatism that the Hittites proper were only one people out of many 1 in N.

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  • As soon as we recognize the part of sensation, we have no reason to deny the common-sense position that each piece of experience has its own quality, which is modified indefinitely by the relations in which it stands.

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  • In the Satires we find realistic pictures of social life, and the conduct and opinions of the world submitted to the standard of good feeling and common sense.

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  • We have the testimony of two men of shrewd common sense and masculine understanding - Martial and Juvenal - to the stale and lifeless character of the art of the Silver Age, which sought to reproduce in the form of epics, tragedies and elegies the bright fancies of the Greek mythology.

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  • Every belief of mankind is in the last analysis amenable to reason, and finds its origin in evidence that can appeal to the arbitrament of common sense.

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  • His views are grounded on two presuppositions: - first, the utter aversion of common sense to any theory of representative perception; second, the opinion which Collier held in common with Berkeley, and Hume afterwards, that the difference between imagination and sense perception is only one of degree.

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  • Both have the feeling that it is inconsistent with the common sense of mankind, which will insist that the very object perceived is the sole reality.

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  • Matthew Arnold, for example, declared this an instance in which Franklin was lacking in his " imperturbable common sense "; and J.

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  • Thus defined, idealism is opposed to ordinary common-sense dualism, which regards knowledge or experience as the result of the more or less accidental relation between two separate and independent entities - the mind and its ideas on one side, the thing with its attributes on the other - that serve to limit and condition each other from without.

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  • On one side of his thought Aristotle represents a reaction against idealism and a return to the position of common-sense.

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  • But with these advances came the danger of falling into error from which common-sense dualism and naturalistic monism were free.

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  • But that space and time, matter and cause should owe their origin to the action of the mind has always seemed paradoxical to common sense.

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  • The diplomatic situation became for the moment very acute, but after a short period of bellicose talk the common-sense of both countries prevailed.

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  • So far too as the Romans were capable of taking interest in speculative questions, the tragic poets contributed to stimulate curiosity on such subjects, and they anticipated Lucretius in using the conclusions of speculative philosophy as well as of common sense to assail some of the prevailing forms of superstition.

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  • Towards the end of September he fell a victim to the plague which was ravaging the land, and his illness sobered his spirit and brought into his message a deeper note than that merely moral and common-sense one with which, as a polite humanist, he had hitherto been content.

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  • His uncompromising antagonism to political blackmail and bribery, and his determination to pursue the right, as he saw the right, only in a common-sense fashion; made bitter enemies on the one hand among the corrupt politicians, and, on the other hand, among theoretical reformers) and discussions raged in the newspapers about his executive acts, his speeches, and his official messages much as they raged during his seven years in the White House.

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  • Lord John Russell and Lord Palmerston were naturally jealous of the prince's interference - and of King Leopold's and Baron Stockmar's - in state affairs; but Lord Melbourne took the common-sense view that a husband will control his wife whether people wish it or not.

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  • In the words of Drummond: "Erasmus was in his own age the apostle of common sense and of rational religion.

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  • From the beginning to the end of his career he remained true to the purpose of his life, which was to fight the battle of sound learning and plain common sense against the powers of ignorance and superstition, and amid all the convulsions of that period he never once lost his mental balance."

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  • Yet all these obstacles to a good understanding might, perhaps, have been surmounted if only the Polish diet had treated the Cossacks with common fairness and common sense.

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  • The peculiar situation of Sweden, and the circumstances of his time, made his policy necessarily opportunist, but it was an opportunism based on excellent common sense.

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  • In the solution of this problem the common sense of Wellington and of Castlereagh, with whom the duke worked throughout in complete harmony, played a determining part; it was mainly owing to their influence that France escaped the dismemberment for which the German powers clamoured, and which was advocated for a while by Lord Liverpool and the majority of the British cabinet.

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  • Here Wellington supported the proposal for the immediate evacuation of France, and it was owing to his common-sense criticism that the proposal of Prussia, supported by the emperor Alexander and Metternich, to establish an "army of observation" at Brussels, was nipped in the bud.

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  • Fortunately for Russia the autocratic power was now in the hands of a man who was impressionable enough to be deeply influenced by the spirit of the time, and who had sufficient prudence and practical common-sense to prevent his being carried away by the prevailing excitement into the dangerous region of Utopian dreaming.

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  • For some years the emperor, with his sound common-sense and dislike of exaggeration, held the balance fairly between the two extremes; but long years of uninterrupted labour, anxiety and disappointment weakened his zeal for reform, and when radicalism assumed more and more the form of secret societies and revolutionary agitation, he felt constrained to adopt severe repressive measures.

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  • His views imply a cultivated intelligence well versed in practical affairs, opposing to the extremes of both nominalism and realism a practical common sense.

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  • It seems contrary to common sense that neutral ships should be exposed to being detained, taken out of their course, and overhauled on mere suspicion of carrying contraband, when they are so far from the seat of war that there can be no presumption as to their destination.

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  • He had much practical common-sense, and keen sympathy for all who were in distress and for animals.

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  • Common-sense must have shown the leaders of the revolt that they would never be safe while Peter lived, and they had insults to avenge.

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  • 8); and, though common sense and natural good feeling set bounds in most cases to the tyranny of the nobles, yet there was scarcely any injustice too gross to be possible.

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  • Efficient ventilating can only be effected by the exercise of common sense and vigilance, and care must be taken to avoid cold draughts through the houses.

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  • As Archbishop of the Northern Province he took a conspicuous part in the social and economic, as well as the religious, questions agitating an industrial community, while in the House of Lords his eloquence and clear common-sense gave him an influence not confined to ecclesiastical matters.

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  • But, after making all allowances, it remains true that he had a pefect sense of proportion, sound maxims and thorough common-sense.

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  • But in what that vividness (ivap-yaaa) consists is a question which Epicurus does not raise, and which he would no doubt have deemed superfluous quibbling over a matter sufficiently settled by common sense.

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  • A strong sense of duty, genuine piety, and a cautious but by no means pusillanimous common-sense coloured every action of his patient, laborious and eventful life.

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  • In his instructions to Novosiltsov, his special envoy in London, the tsar elaborated the motives of his policy in language which appealed as little to the common sense of Pitt as did later the treaty of the Holy Alliance to that of Castlereagh.

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  • And his unbending common-sense, and sobriety of criticism in matters which deeply interested the less academic Radicals who were enthusiasts for extreme courses, would have made the parliamentary situation difficult but for the exceptional popularity of the prime minister.

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  • His counsels were marred by his reluctance to appeal to arms at the critical moments of action, and by the slenderness of his own resources, but they deserve attention for their broad common sense and spirit of tolerance.

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  • Yet the shrewd common-sense, the biting humour, the power of graphic description and the imaginative " mysticism " give them a unique attraction for many even who do not fully sympathize with the implied philosophy or with the Puritanical code of ethics.

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  • The religious objection was insuperable; opportunities of commercial development were indispensable; war with England was not to be contemplated by the common sense of the country; and thus, as de Foe wrote, " The Union was merely formed by the nature of things."

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  • 3 They are shrewd, intelligent and possess much common sense.

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  • tongue, or in a foreign language, and may be used (as in the examination for entrance to the Osborne Naval College) to test the important qualities (hardly tested in any other examinations at present), readiness of wit, common-sense and nerve.

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  • This defence of the poetic point of view against brute force and common sense was admirably constructed and it proved one of the most popular of his plays.

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  • Among Mr Shaw's later writings on economics are: Socialism for Millionaires (1901), The Common Sense of Municipal Trading (1904), and Fabianism and the Fiscal Question (1904).

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  • - xxxi.) " wisdom " is sometimes common sense or sagacity, sometimes the reflective habit of mind and largeness of outlook, sometimes the recognition of the ideal standard of living.

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  • Merck (1741-1791), an army official in the neighbouring town of Darmstadt, he found a friend and mentor, whose irony and common-sense served as a corrective to his own exuberance of spirits.

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  • A visit to Switzerland in the summer of 1775 may not have weakened his interest in her, but it at least allowed him to regard her objectively; and, without tragic consequences on either side, the passion was ultimately allowed to yield to the dictates of common-sense.

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  • They were addressed to the "common" man and appealed to his common sense of spiritual things.

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  • Nor was he less successful in the larger matters of administration and organization, which brought into play his sound practical judgment and strong common-sense.

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  • He upheld Reid's psychological method and expounded the "common-sense" doctrine, which was attacked by the two Mills.

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  • As a speaker, he was clear, logical and impressive, and on select committees his common sense was most valuable.

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  • God must perforce be satisfied with whatever common sense thinks it fair and reasonable that He should expect.

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  • That being so, the Jansenist obeyed his Inner Light, and paid little heed to the earth-bound standards of unregenerate common sense.

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  • Theologians might draw their fine-spun distinctions between realms where the pope was actually infallible' and realms where he was not; but Pius knew well that loyal Catholic common sense would brush their technicalities aside and hold that on any conceivable question the pope was fifty times more likely to be right than any one else (see Vatican Council and Infallibility) .

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  • He must have been a fine specimen of the more cultured Puritans - possessed of a robust common-sense in admirable contrast with some of his contemporaries.

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  • 30), when it constitutes an appeal to common sense.

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  • In the Catholic church, however, common sense prevailed, and those who desired to follow the Encratite ideal repaired to the monasteries.

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  • Paley, though an excellent expositor and full of common sense, had the usual defect of common-sense people in philosophy - that of tame acquiescence in the prejudices of his age.

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  • This change in the attitude of common-sense morality in respect to "anything that is lent upon usury" is one of the most peculiar and instructive features in the economic progress of society.

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  • xxiii.) he answers the question with much common sense.

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  • Fenion assailed him on the religious side, and managed to transform him into a devotee, exceedingly affectionate, earnest and religious, but woefully lacking in tact and common sense.

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  • Bossuet can only be thought of as the high-priest of authority and common-sense; but Fenelon has been made by turns into a sentimentalist, a mystical saint, an 18th-century philosophe, an ultramontane churchman and a hysterical hypocrite.

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  • Rabelais is the incarnation of the "esprit Gaulois," a jovial, careless soul, not destitute of common sense or even acute intellectual power, but first of all a good fellow, rather preferring a broad jest to a'fine-pointed one, and rollicking through life like a good-natured undergraduate.

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  • Smith (1882); and The Common Sense of the Exact Sciences, completed by Professor Karl Pearson (1885).

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  • He was without doubt one of the greatest statesmen of his age, concealing beneath a simple exterior and homely habits a profound political sagacity and an unerring common-sense, and possessing in a high degree those useful qualities of patience, moderation, and tenacity, which characterized nearly all the princes of the house of Jagiello.

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  • His practical common sense recoiled from the amazing conclusions which were drawn from it by many of its more eccentric advocates.

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  • [This last passage is specially directed against taxes which are expensive to collect, or discourage trade, or offer temptation to smuggling, or subject people to frequent visits of the tax-gatherer.] These maxims have commanded universal assent, as they are obviously the common sense of the subject.

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  • What Cousin finds psychologically in the individual consciousness, he finds also spontaneously expressed in the common sense or universal experience of humanity.

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  • In fact, it is with him the function of philosophy to classify and explain universal convictions and beliefs; but common-sense is not with him philosophy, nor is it the instrument of philosophy; it is simply the material on which the philosophical method works, and in harmony with which its results must ultimately be found.

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  • The common sense of a British jury had preserved, in spite of parliament and ministry, that free right of meeting which was to be one of the strongest instruments of future reform.

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  • It was the triumph of common sense over official arguments.

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  • He was also - like Calvin, if on more narrowly common-sense lines - an admirable exegete.

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  • In the 18th century " Illumination " - an age which piqued itself upon its " enlightenment, " and " Ilium!- which did a good deal to drive away obscurity, though at the cost of losing depth - Deism outside the churches is matched by a spirit of cool common-sense within them, a spirit which is not confined to professed Rationalists.

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  • His own Christian belief, sincere and earnest, was more the outcome of the common sense which, largely through him, moulded the prudential theology of England in the 18th century, than of the nobler elements present in More, Cudworth and other religious thinkers of the preceding age, or afterwards in Law and Berkeley, Coleridge and Schleiermacher.

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  • " He would be thought void of common sense who asked, on the one side, or, on the other, went to give a reason, why ` it is impossible for the same thing to be and not to be.'

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  • For (r), as concrete and transient, it is obviously not the real essential good that the philosopher seeks; (2) the feelings most prominently recognized as pleasures are bound up with pain, as good can never be with evil; in so far, then, as common sense rightly recognizes some pleasures as good, it can only be from their tendency to produce some further good.

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  • p p p Although the Socratic induction forms a striking feature of Plato's dialogues, his ideal method of ethics is purely deductive; he admits common sense only as supplying provisional steps and starting-points from which the mind is to ascend to knowledge of absolute good, through which knowledge alone, as he conceives, the lower notions of particular goods are to be truly conceived.

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  • Aristotle no doubt faithfully represents the common sense of Greece in considering that, in so far as virtue is in itself good to the virtuous agent, it belongs to that species of good which we distinguish as beautiful.

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  • Though common sense will admit that virtues are the best of goods, it still undoubtedly conceives practical wisdom as chiefly exercised in providing those inferior goods which Aristotle, after recognizing the need or use of them for the realization of human well-being, has dropped out of sight; and the result is that, in trying to make clear his conception of practical wisdom, we find ourselves fluctuating continually between the common notion, which he does not distinctly reject, and the notion required as the keystone of his ethical system.

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  • The conflict between these two elements of Common Sense was too profound to be compromised; and the moral consciousness of mankind demanded a more trenchant partisanship than Aristotle's.

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  • The common sense of Christendom gradually shook off these extravagances; but the reluctance to shed blood lingered long, and was hardly extinguished even by the growing horror of heresy.

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  • Wollaston's theory of moral evil as consisting in the practical contradiction of a true proposition, closely resembles the most paradoxical part of Clarke's doctrine, and was not likely to approve itself to the strong common sense of Butler; but his statement of happiness or pleasure as a " justly desirable " end at which every rational being " ought " to aim corresponds exactly to Butler's conception of self-love as a naturally governing impulse; while' the " moral arithmetic " with which he compares pleasures and pains, and endeavours to make the notion of happiness quantitatively precise, is an anticipation of Benthamism.

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  • When, however, we look closer, we find that the principle of order, or obedience to government, is not seriously intended to imply the political absolutism which it seems to express, and which English common sense emphatically repudiates; while the formula of justice is given in the tautological or perfectly indefinite proposition " that every man ought to have his own."

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  • There is, however, in Tucker's theological link between private and general happiness a peculiar ingenuity which Paley's common sense has avoided.

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  • Thus, in his view, not merely natural inclinations towards pleasures, or the desires for selfish happiness, require to be morally resisted; but even the prompting of the individual's conscience, the impulse to do what seems to him right, if it comes into conflict with the common sense of his community.

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  • On the whole, then (though degeneracy, as well as progress, is a force in human evolution), we are not tempted to believe in so strange a combination of forgetfulness with long memory, nor so excessive a degeneration from common sense into a belief in the personality of phenomena, as are required no less by Spencer's system than by that of Max Muller.

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  • The dream of Cardinal Alberoni, Philip V.s minister, was to set fire to all this inflammable material in order to snatch therefrom a crown of som~ sort to satisfy the maternal greed of Elizabeth Farnese; and this he might have attained by the occupation of Sardinia and the expedition to Sicily (1717-1718), if Dubois, a priest without a religion, a greedy parvenu and a diplomatist of second rank, though tenacious and full of resources as a minister, had not placed his common sense at the disposal of the regents interests and those of European peace.

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  • Of talent there was enough and to spare in the Assembly; what was conspicuously lacking was common sense and a practical knowledge of affairs.

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  • The contradictions he finds in the common-sense conception of inherence, or of "a thing with several attributes," will now become obvious.

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  • But in conceiving A we make, not n positions, still less n+t positions, but one position simply; for common sense removes the absolute position from its original source, sensation.

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  • The common-sense conception of change involves at bottom the same contradiction of opposing qualities in one real.

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  • he was emphatically a modern gentleman, of scrupulous courtesy, sportive gaiety, acquainted with what was going on in the world, taking a real interest in it, giving and getting information, very neatly dressed, with a shrewd common sense always alive about him, in a modern room with modern furniture, plain, it is true, but with no marks of poverty about it - in a word, with all the ease, the gracefulness, the polish of a modern gentleman of good birth, considerable accomplishments, and a very various information."

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  • Between these extreme parties the Roman Church took the middle way of common sense.

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  • The events and ministerial changes of Louis XVIII.'s reign are described under the article France: History, but it may be said here that the king's policy throughout was one of prudence and common sense.

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  • Merivale as a historian cannot be compared with Gibbon for virility, but he takes an eminently common-sense and appreciative view.

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  • Common-sense intuitionalism would deny that man does this, attributing to him immediate knowledge of reality.

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  • They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them.

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  • Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense?

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  • He had that common sense of a matter-of- fact man which showed him what he ought to do.

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  • For a reply to these questions the common sense of mankind turns to the science of history, whose aim is to enable nations and humanity to know themselves.

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  • History shows us that these justifications of the events have no common sense and are all contradictory, as in the case of killing a man as the result of recognizing his rights, and the killing of millions in Russia for the humiliation of England.

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  • Religion, the common sense of mankind, the science of jurisprudence, and history itself understand alike this relation between necessity and freedom.

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  • How refreshing to hear a politician put common sense ahead of dogma.

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  • I believe these principles resonate with the common sense of the British people.

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  • Ever since Harrow and Oxford days I have wondered why there is not more sanctified common sense among Christians.

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  • It is requested that all helmsmen act with common sense and display good seamanship, thus enabling everyone to enjoy their sailing.

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  • Ca n't have political correctness and political self-preservation compromised by common sense in the pursuit of public safety - can we?

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  • That statement is a perfect example of hot-weather ' common sense ' which is actually quite senseless.

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  • Personally I would suggest you use a smidgen of common sense along with a little intuition.

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  • Always use your common sense to determine the spacing of the components.

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  • She showed tact, determination and a refreshingly large amount of common sense.

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  • This is only common sense and most of us would agree that to overthrow tyranny, force must be sometimes be used.

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  • Finally, use common sense when purchasing baby care products to use on your baby.

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  • While it is great to make new friends and meet new people, searching the Web or meeting others face-to-face requires common sense and caution.

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  • First, as with anything else you do with your baby, it pays to use common sense.

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  • However, if you show a little restraint and add a little common sense into the equation, you and baby will surely find a compromise on a stunning little outfit just in time for the Christmas festivities.

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  • There are those who weigh emphatically on both sides of the issue, so it may be best to address the topic with basic common sense.

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  • Having some common sense and good buying techniques will help you stay clear from sheisty used car salesmen.

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  • If you are interested in starting a hobby as a fish keeper, you will need to arm yourself with knowledge and use some good old-fashioned common sense.

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  • Some are legitimate and others are scams, but you can avoid the pitfalls with a little preparation and common sense.

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  • Make sure that the sites you are browsing are secure for making purchases and that you use common sense for all online purchases.

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  • These three rules, along with a healthy dose of common sense will get you a long way.

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  • Whatever the approach, you can thwart most of these threats with a reliable anti-virus/firewall combination, like those offered by McAfee, Symantec, F-Secure and others, coupled with a healthy serving of common sense.

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  • Even though you have common sense and probably ended up with problems due to unforeseen circumstances, but there's always something new to be learned.

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  • Observe all of the safety notations on your bunk bed building plans, and always use good judgment and common sense when constructing furniture or toys for your children.

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  • By following some common sense rules of the road, anyone can increase their driving efficiency.

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  • As with people, use common sense and consult a veterinarian before using this or any other herbal treatment on your beloved pet.Many pet owners try flower remedies to soothe anxieties in their pets.

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  • Use your common sense when choosing herbal remedies.

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  • If you're considering taking black cohosh, use common sense and caution.

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  • For the best possible experience, you just have to use common sense to protect yourself.

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  • Many online banking safety precautions are just common sense.

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  • A little common sense goes a long way - a course on writing historical fiction taught by a technical writer may not be the best way to spend your hard-earned cash.

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  • Remember to use good common sense when searching for an online date, the same as you would in any other dating situation.

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  • Remember to always practice common sense safety when chatting with or meeting people off of the Internet.

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  • Frostbite - If there's snow on the ground, common sense tells you that it's probably very cold out.

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  • Just be careful, and don't leave your common sense back at the lodge with your snowsuit.

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  • Tween boys especially get a kick out of this show, and it was rated one of the top trendy shows for tweens by Common Sense Media.

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  • They get killed in traffic accidents: The number one causes of deaths in teenagers is motor vehicle accidents, which means teenage girls and guys should never accept a ride with someone who has been drinking and use common sense.

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  • They will regularly ignore the advice of others and seem to lack common sense.

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  • If you have some kitchen common sense and a few tasty staple ingredients, it's always possible to throw together a decent meal.

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  • If special instructions as to the type of dress are not listed than you are free to choose your apparel using common sense.

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  • Use common sense to determine what not to wear to a wedding.

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  • Most of the advice could be called common sense.

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  • Many people perceive cruise travel as exotic and unfamiliar, but with a few common sense cruise ship tips its easy to make the most of your vacation, from beginning to end.

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  • In fact, the upscale cruise line requests that shorts not be worn in public areas after 6 p.m.; however, common sense rules.

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  • You can generally rely on the adult Welsh to exercise some common sense and calmer manners.

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  • Now, there needs to be some common sense going on when it comes to hosting an open house.

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  • The best way is to use a water hose, but if that is not available to you, the next best thing to do is try to use common sense.

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  • Certain Terriers like Norfolks and Border Terriers also have enough energy and common sense to get along well with kids.

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  • Here's where a little common sense combined with an understanding of how your fingers work is important.

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  • If you prefer shirts with an edge, that's great, but remember to use some common sense.

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  • Health maintenance is accomplished through common sense methods such as cleaning house and healthy feed.

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  • A lot of food safety information can be chalked up to common sense that anyone can follow.

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  • "Why is internet safety important?" is one of those common sense questions.

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  • Using good common sense is the best way to keep your home and family safe when the whether turns cold.

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  • While there is the potential to meet the person of your dreams through a website, always proceed with common sense and caution when meeting potential partners for a first date.

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  • There are no dating rules that you need to follow except common sense and putting other people's interests on a level even with your own.

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  • Good Sleep Habits: Common sense habits, such as going to bed at the same time every night, getting enough sleep, and avoiding alcohol and caffeine can help.

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  • Instead, use common sense if you suspect your child is sleepwalking and you're concerned.

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  • If sleepwalking continues, use some common sense precautions.

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  • Some of these steps have to do with the actual type of sunglasses you purchase, while others, like wearing a hat, are just common sense and relatively inexpensive and easy to do.

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  • This is common sense body physics and if you've played any sports that keep you mobile (basketball, volleyball) you tend to move your hips, torso, and pivot on your feet.

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  • Many times, common sense will help you decide which Elemental to use through the different challenges.

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  • Logically, this would be common sense as the game largely depends on your skill, but I can't help but feel something's not right when I try to plant a bomb and find myself stabbed in the back while my teammates stand by and calmy observe.

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  • A few rules that would seem to be common sense are also commonly ignored.

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  • By using common sense when selecting your destination, packing the proper equipment, and seeking professional assistance in getting prepared to leave for your trip, you'll be well prepared for a fun and safe cold weather camping experience.

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  • If you use a little common sense and keep a few simple things in mind, you can end up finding a great deal on exactly the mobile phone you're looking for.

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  • Most smartphones are capable of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connections so extra common sense in important.

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  • Cell phones can be attacked with viruses and other, more subtle ways, but by just exercising a little common sense about what you download or who you let use your phone, then it's less likely you will become a victim.

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  • It's common sense to keep your phone away from moisture or liquid so you don't get a wet cell phone problem.

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  • Certain common-sense precautions can be taken to guard against the disease.

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  • The idea that "everyone is doing it" may influence some kids to ignore their better judgment or their common sense.

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  • Using common sense and following safety precautions are the best ways to prevent foreign objects from entering the body.

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  • On the other hand, taking these simple and common sense precautions can help prevent many potential accidents.

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  • What are your personal successes with following the common sense of feng shui?

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  • If the APR is considerably higher than the initial rate, there's a good chance that your rate and payments will be a lot higher when the loan adjusts.Sometimes the desire to own a home can overcome common sense.

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  • If the APR is considerably higher than the initial rate, there's a good chance that your rate and payments will be a lot higher when the loan adjusts.Sometimes the desire to own a home can overcome common sense.

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  • Use common sense when it comes to anything that has to do with your home and walk away or be prepared to say no to people you don't trust.

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  • While it cannot be fully determined if utilizing a laptop computer on one's knees and lap decreases sperm quality, count, or production, common sense says there may be some link between male fertility and laptops.

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  • In fact, most of them are just good common sense.

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  • Although guidelines may vary a bit, depending on whether you're swimming at the pool or in an open body of water, these common sense tips will help keep you in a "safety" frame of mind.

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  • A combination of UV swimsuits and clothing, SPF 50 sun block lotion and some common sense will go a long way towards having a safe and enjoyable time in the sun.

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  • Use caution and common sense when brewing your own batch of kombucha tea, and always consult a physician if you become ill, tired, or experience any adverse symptoms after drinking kombucha.

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  • Use common sense and choose supplements that have been reviewed by neutral, independent labs if you can for best results.

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  • This is about the time when Scentsy combining scents and recipes will rely less on your cooking prowess and more on your common sense.

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  • You'll need one if you want to qualify for a tax deduction in the future, and it can help you reverse a charge if necessary.Use common sense.

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  • Take time to make sure you know what you're getting into with any dating website you consider joining, and use common sense and caution if you decide to become better acquainted with people you meet on the web.

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  • In terms of choosing whom to meet and when to give out personal information, common sense should be your guide.

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  • Use common sense when engaging in adult online chat and don't give out personal information.

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  • In regards to self defense, the most important concept to remember is your common sense.

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  • Practical ideas require common sense and a commitment to respect the other person.

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  • Internet Dating: Tips, Tricks and Tactics - Internet Dating is a short book that is filled with many basic tips and common sense advice that is easy to read and locate.

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  • I Can't Believe I'm Buying This Book: A Commonsense Guide to Successful Internet Dating - This book purposely focuses on common sense with regard to online dating, since common sense is often forgotten when it comes to dating.

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  • The book contains a lot of common sense advice for those looking for long-term relationships instead of casual dating.

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  • Remember, anyone can see what you've posted, and if you want to make a good impression, then use some common sense!

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  • As with any online transaction or communication, common sense must be used at all times on MySpace.

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  • Remember, however, to always use common sense.

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  • No matter which dating sites appeal to you, remember to use common sense when sharing your personal information.

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  • As with any significant online jewelry purchase, it's a good idea to use common sense regarding your transaction.

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  • The same common sense rules apply whether you are eating out or dining in.

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  • Most of the common backpack problems can be solved or avoided with a bit of common sense and attention to the body.

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  • The cards can help you take stock of whatever is happening in your life, but it's up to you to use common sense and make the wisest choices you can.

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  • They both appreciate common sense as well as the benefits of a regular routine.

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  • Each of these signs has a pragmatism and healthy dose of common sense that Scorpio finds attractive and reassuring.

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  • While you can't prevent every illness, taking common sense precautions can go a long way in keeping your child away from sickness.

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  • Yet, even with all of the resources available, the simplest resources are often the best-a Bible and good common sense.

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  • However, there's nothing like using some good common sense when it comes to choosing gifts for your child.

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  • Most of these involve the use of common sense when operating a scooter as well.

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  • Use a little common sense when figuring out if this will work.

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  • If you're tempted by the promise of a free psychic reading, be sure to do your homework on the psychic and exercise common sense.

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  • The advice in the book is a mixture of common sense and creative thinking.

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  • A lot of what Suze Orman includes in her books is simple common sense.

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  • For people with more financial experience, some of these recommendations may seem like simple common sense.

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  • Just remember to exercise courtesy, common sense and respect when posting about your favorite Young and the Restless happenings.

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  • Of course, you should use your common sense when eating in Europe.

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  • When shopping online, use common sense when choosing a seller.

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  • But no matter the type of hotel you stay in, nothing beats common sense as your first line of defense.

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  • As with most security and safety issues, common sense prevails.

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  • It's not difficult to identify so-called "programs" and "systems" that will do nothing but rob you of your hard earned money if you simply use common sense.

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  • It's probably common sense to most people, but when learning to drive an automatic car, it's best to not pull out into rush hour downtown traffic before you know what you're doing.

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  • Remember to use common sense about what you need, what you can afford, how much you can put down, and to test-drive the vehicle.

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  • Keep in mind that if you're interested in buying dirt cheap cars, you will have to do some research, be prepared to shop around and look at many vehicles, and use common sense before you buy.

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  • Use your common sense and be courteous to other posters.

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  • Use common sense when starting a new diet to be sure that it is based on healthy, balanced eating instead of some fad diet and you will find success.

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  • But equal parts determination, discipline and common sense can get you perfectly good results in relatively short order too.

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  • Dieting success should include moderation and exercise, as well as healthy foods and common sense.

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  • But whether you have health risks or not--use common sense when shopping for diet supplements and disregard audacious claims.

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  • It's not about the latest diet, it's really a common sense approach.

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  • Before racing to download any of these language-learning programs, remember to exercise basic common sense.

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  • Use common sense and you should be fine.

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  • The site doesn't endorse the listings posted there, and any information gathered there needs to be filtered through some good old common sense.

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  • Use common sense when deciding what information to include in your birthday party invitations.

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  • Use some common sense tips before you book the room, don't forget the final details, and you'll be happy you rented the room.

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  • Sure, college students are considered adults, but for many, the freedom of college sends common sense right out the window.

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  • Brad believes in applying a scientific approach to the supernatural and focuses on disproving common sense explanations for supernatural events.

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  • The message from the writers was clear - robots will never have common sense.

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  • All you need is a bit of common sense and a basic understanding of skin care fundamentals.

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  • Although these services can be convenient, use common sense to avoid hacked accounts.

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  • Using chat rooms safely requires only a little extra knowledge and a lot of common sense!

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  • These "tips and hints" can seem like cheating to people who are on the losing side of this kind of strategy, but it's really more common sense than anything else.

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  • Part of choosing the right style is common sense.

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