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common

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common

common Sentence Examples

  • She will only utilize it for common good.

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  • We have a lot in common, you know?

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  • The only thing they had in common was looks!

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  • I mean, we grew up together, so we have a lot in common, but...

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  • Carmen took her to the doctor, but he said there was no cure for the common cold and not to worry about it.

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  • Twice, though the first time is not common knowledge.

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  • Not an ounce of common sense in any of you.

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  • You and your mules have a lot in common, you know that?

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  • "You have a common goal," Lana said thoughtfully.

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  • In any event, it presents a beautiful view of the town common, our destination.

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  • At least they had one common interest.

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  • In his day, Shakespeare was low-brow entertainment for the common class.

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  • A girl that young didn't usually have much common sense.

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  • "Nonsense. Summer storms are as common as a fat man at a pie fair," he said as the ancient truck lurched forward.

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  • Brady strode from the private room into a common area, where two of his four remaining men waited.

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  • All very well perhaps from his point of view, but only a little better than the common dilettantism.

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  • The main floor consisted of common areas and wide halls lined with massive windows.

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  • She and Josh had everything in common, yet there were no sparks.

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  • It's not common knowledge yet, Wynn whispered.

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  • Claire gave a hint of a nod, remaining under the archway to the parlor, as if entering might subject her to some vile disease from these common folk.

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  • Common sense slumped back in as I could see his point.

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  • This kind of hunger is common and generally is what has triggered food riots, now and in the past.

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  • If he begins as a common sailor, he will never be anything else.

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  • If people with those conditions get better, information about their treatment can be widely shared with those who have the common genetic factors.

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  • Ozma has it; for its powers won't work in a common, ordinary country like the United States.

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  • This has been a common situation throughout areas with high degrees of poverty and is certainly the case in Ethiopia.

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  • The virtues of a superior man are like the wind; the virtues of a common man are like the grass--the grass, when the wind passes over it, bends.

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  • You gather knowledge from the little things which common men pass by unnoticed.

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  • Long before English became the lingua franca of the Internet age, the world has wanted a common language.

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  • He Traveled to the common area of the newbie barracks, where Bianca lay on her stomach across the couch in front of the TV.

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  • It is true that I was familiar with all literary braille in common use in this country--English, American, and New York Point; but the various signs and symbols in geometry and algebra in the three systems are very different, and I had used only the English braille in my algebra.

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  • When few people own land and most people live in cities, it is quite common to have high degrees of hunger in a nation that is exporting food.

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  • I considered telling her the tipster was ill and out of service for a few days but common sense dictated that doing so might encourage someone to commit a crime in the tipster's absence.

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  • We are not one another's enemies, and we'll never defeat our common enemy so long as we're squabbling.

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  • We're following a hunger and when it's ripe, all common sense and caution fly out the window.

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  • Mildred O'Malley, his wife was not listed as living in Massachusetts and the name was too common for Betsy to look in all the states.

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  • I should have demanded the freedom of all navigable rivers for everybody, that the seas should be common to all, and that the great standing armies should be reduced henceforth to mere guards for the sovereigns.

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  • "We ourselves eat only common food," answered the shah.

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  • Somehow, considering Gladys, Effie or Claire seemed to stretch common sense more than an overweight bungee jumper.

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  • "Common knowledge the war spilled over," the Watcher snapped.

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  • To us, their descendants, who are not historians and are not carried away by the process of research and can therefore regard the event with unclouded common sense, an incalculable number of causes present themselves.

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  • Only when we have admitted the conception of the infinitely small, and the resulting geometrical progression with a common ratio of one tenth, and have found the sum of this progression to infinity, do we reach a solution of the problem.

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  • They crossed through a common area with a kitchenette and large, flat-screen TV, past a gym, a library, and a few other common rooms, and into the barracks area, which bustled with activity.

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  • In addition to its small size, it shared a common wall to the Dean's quarters, infringing on their privacy.

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  • Let them all be pissed off at me; perhaps that would bring them closer together against a common enemy.

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  • This might be a common situation for him, but it was horrifying for her.

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  • The only thing she had in common with that girl was the fact that they were both poor.

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  • Fred, age seventy-six, was quick to embrace any hint of mystery and attach it to the most common everyday happening.

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  • Donnie won the first game with "cant" which Dean questioned, unsuccessfully, assuming the boy meant the more common version, "can't," which was unacceptable.

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  • Yes. I can even remember most of the common letter substitutions.

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  • They have no cause of their own to plead, but while they enlighten and sustain the reader his common sense will not refuse them.

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  • Every face, from Denisov's to that of the bugler, showed one common expression of conflict, irritation, and excitement, around chin and mouth.

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  • When the common sense fairy smacks you upside the head, you know where to find me.

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  • "Like some common whore," she muttered.

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  • We had a common goal for once in history... do you know who that bitch with him is?

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  • Before leaving, Jennifer Radisson explained that Josh had learned of Edith's new address in California—perhaps through some common friend—and had written his teenage sweetheart.

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  • "We have a common enemy," Andre reminded them.

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  • She made her way through the common areas to the dorms and cautiously opened the door to the room that had been hers.

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  • Irish and French share common ancestors.

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  • Even if he wasn't directly involved, it's a small high school and booze parties are probably common knowledge.

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  • Ours is a common misfortune and we will share it together.

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  • Many of the dreams that had delighted my young inexperience became beautifully less and "faded into the light of common day."

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  • On one occasion, while walking on the Common with her, I saw a police officer taking a man to the station-house.

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  • We have a comparatively decent system of common schools, schools for infants only; but excepting the half-starved Lyceum in the winter, and latterly the puny beginning of a library suggested by the State, no school for ourselves.

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  • Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.

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  • She seemed to have dropped any form of common sense somewhere between Hell and her world.

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  • It's a common threat to all of us.

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  • She's not heavily endowed with common sense or ambition, but she does have attributes.

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  • Common folk never ate there.

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  • Not only was Pierre's attempt to speak unsuccessful, but he was rudely interrupted, pushed aside, and people turned away from him as from a common enemy.

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  • Just exercise a little caution, have patience, good equipment and lots of common sense.

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  • Byrne's description was far too common to stand out but no one recalled a man hurriedly leaving the city in the middle of the night, Tuesday-Wednesday.

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  • Metal roofs, designed to slip the snow, were a common sight in Ouray.

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  • So the way in which these people killed one another was not decided by Napoleon's will but occurred independently of him, in accord with the will of hundreds of thousands of people who took part in the common action.

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  • Wynn's alliances and motivations were mysterious, but there was one thing they had in common: Deidre.

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  • But Edith's Annie was a minister's wife, not a common prostitute.

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  • "I needed a woman," he said dismissively, as if she was a common prostitute.

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  • For once, someone in the chain of command had some common sense.

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  • Although his father was a king, Cyrus was brought up like the son of a common man.

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  • Give me a few common tools and some food, and I will do well enough, said the sailor.

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  • They used that money to buy part of Coca Cola in the form of common stock.

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  • They give me a new sense of the variety and capacity of that nature which is our common dwelling.

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  • "That in which men differ from brute beasts," says Mencius, "is a thing very inconsiderable; the common herd lose it very soon; superior men preserve it carefully."

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  • When moving to another country, it is important to have expertise in the most common language.

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  • Strange though, when I asked if gunshots were common, they answered yes, but it was a quiet weekend; none had been reported for several days.

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  • In contrast with the dread felt by the infantrymen placed in support, here in the battery where a small number of men busy at their work were separated from the rest by a trench, everyone experienced a common and as it were family feeling of animation.

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  • For common action people always unite in certain combinations, in which regardless of the difference of the aims set for the common action, the relation between those taking part in it is always the same.

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  • Abandoning the conception of cause, mathematics seeks law, that is, the property common to all unknown, infinitely small, elements.

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  • Each of them desired nothing more than to give himself up as a prisoner to escape from all this horror and misery; but on the one hand the force of this common attraction to Smolensk, their goal, drew each of them in the same direction; on the other hand an army corps could not surrender to a company, and though the French availed themselves of every convenient opportunity to detach themselves and to surrender on the slightest decent pretext, such pretexts did not always occur.

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  • He had that common sense of a matter-of- fact man which showed him what he ought to do.

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  • Sackler and DeLeo, partners for nearly 12 years, had more in common than their constant arguing would suggest.

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  • Nation-states allow groups of people to create governments that reflect their common values.

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  • They went out and walked about till dinnertime, talking of the political news and common acquaintances like people who do not know each other intimately.

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  • On the faces of all was one common expression of joy at the commencement of the long-expected campaign and of rapture and devotion to the man in the gray coat who was standing on the hill.

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  • Common sense tells us the obvious is usually where the truth rests and the obvious is either Fitzgerald or someone in the Dawkins family.

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  • The Lucky Strike tin is a common one, but some containers sell for a whole lot more than that.

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  • They said that a bright boy like George would not long be a common sailor.

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  • To study the laws of history we must completely change the subject of our observation, must leave aside kings, ministers, and generals, and study the common, infinitesimally small elements by which the masses are moved.

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  • It is darker in the woods, even in common nights, than most suppose.

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  • This is the result of my experience in raising beans: Plant the common small white bush bean about the first of June, in rows three feet by eighteen inches apart, being careful to select fresh round and unmixed seed.

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  • I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.

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  • Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.

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  • Rostov, in common with the whole army from which he came, was far from having experienced the change of feeling toward Napoleon and the French- -who from being foes had suddenly become friends--that had taken place at headquarters and in Boris.

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  • Another who wished to gain some advantage would attract the Emperor's attention by loudly advocating the very thing the Emperor had hinted at the day before, and would dispute and shout at the council, beating his breast and challenging those who did not agree with him to duels, thereby proving that he was prepared to sacrifice himself for the common good.

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  • They left the common area for the bedchambers wing.

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  • History shows us that these justifications of the events have no common sense and are all contradictory, as in the case of killing a man as the result of recognizing his rights, and the killing of millions in Russia for the humiliation of England.

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  • Religion, the common sense of mankind, the science of jurisprudence, and history itself understand alike this relation between necessity and freedom.

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  • That is our common misfortune, and I shall grudge nothing to help you.

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  • His fate is not that of a common man.

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  • You two have a lot in common.

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  • Fresh or dried spices like oregano, basil, dill or thyme are common.

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  • A lot in common?

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  • Why level downward to our dullest perception always, and praise that as common sense?

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  • Don't you understand that either we are officers serving our Tsar and our country, rejoicing in the successes and grieving at the misfortunes of our common cause, or we are merely lackeys who care nothing for their master's business.

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  • For a reply to these questions the common sense of mankind turns to the science of history, whose aim is to enable nations and humanity to know themselves.

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  • Those who tried to understand the general course of events and to take part in it by self-sacrifice and heroism were the most useless members of society, they saw everything upside down, and all they did for the common good turned out to be useless and foolish--like Pierre's and Mamonov's regiments which looted Russian villages, and the lint the young ladies prepared and that never reached the wounded, and so on.

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  • It's just sounds so common.

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  • Kris slid two rare green life crystals across the table, the common form of payment for an assassination not ordered by Death herself.

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  • What did she and Alex have in common?

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  • And to think she once thought she and Alex had nothing in common.

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  • Both recognized from the very start that aside from sex, they had absolutely nothing in common.

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  • After chatting about common friends she asked, "What can I do for you?"

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  • It wasn't a common name and there was little chance it was a coincidence.

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  • You and Damian have a common enemy, one that threatens both of you.

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  • It was times like this that she realized how much they had in common.

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  • Between veterinary school and the animal safari that had been Alex's dream, it should have been no surprise that they had common interest.

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  • I suppose Snowball would be a common name, and she's certainly an uncommon cat.

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  • Dad, the only thing Denton and I have in common is that we're both Homo Sapiens.

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  • He accepted the story about the woman as if it were common place - or maybe it was no surprise.

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  • We enjoy each other's company and we have a lot in common.

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  • It too, held the welcoming atmosphere of a hospital waiting room, with a living room, expansive kitchen, informal dining area and hallways leading off each side of the common areas.

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  • In consequence the special sciences and the wisdom of common life entangle themselves easily and frequently in contradictions.

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  • Why not interpret at once and render intelligible the common conception originating in natural science, viz.

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  • The cock, in his plumage of yellowish-green and yellow is one of the most finely coloured of common English birds, but he is rather heavily built, and his song is hardly commended.

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  • In common with the okapi, giraffes have skin-covered horns on the head, but in these animals, which form the genus Giraffa, these appendages are present in both sexes; and there is often an unpaired one in advance of the pair on the forehead.

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  • Let us consider some common phenomena in the light of these rival theories as to the nature of matter.

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  • Nevertheless, on careful examination of these three successive stages, it will easily be seen that, in spite of the apparent difference between them, all have a common foundation, source and purpose.

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  • It appears to be common in the neighbourhood of Cape Town, while the recent Antarctic expeditions have shown that it occurs in various localities from the Falkland Islands to the Antarctic circle.

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  • The most common of these sulphides is cobaltous sulphide, CoS, which occurs naturally as syepoorite, and can be artificially prepared by heating cobaltous oxide with sulphur, or by fusing anhydrous cobalt sulphate with barium sulphide and common salt.

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  • The serfs, whose wrongs seldom attracted notice in an age indifferent to the claims of common humanity, found a friend in this severe monarch, and he protected even the despised and persecuted Jews.

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  • Quarrels of a kind only too common among exiles followed; the Hungarians were especially offended by his claim still to be called governor.

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  • Unfortunately Poland profited little or nothing by this great triumph, and now that she had broken the back of the enemy she was left to fight the common enemy in the Ukraine with whatever assistance she could obtain from the unwilling and unready Muscovites.

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  • the common mushroom.

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  • The most common.

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  • liquids is a well-known phenomenon and common to all micro-organisms. A free still surface with a direct access of air are the necessary conditions.

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  • Certain acid fermentations are of common occurrence.

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  • GALVANIZED IRON, sheet iron having its surface covered with a thin coating of zinc. In spite of the name, galvanic action has often no part in the production of galvanized iron, which is prepared by dipping the iron, properly cleaned and pickled in acid, in a bath of molten zinc. The hotter the zinc the thinner the coating, but as a high temperature of the bath is attended with certain objections, it is a common practice to use a moderate temperature and clear off the excess of zinc by passing the plates between rollers.

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  • Thus the court of king's bench (curia regis de banco) was founded, and the foundation of the court of common pleas was provided for in one of the articles of Magna Carta.

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  • Articles written in common soon led to a complete literary partnership, and 1831 there appeared in the Revue de Paris a joint novel entitled Prima Donna and signed Jules Sand.

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  • The one wished to throw Indiana into the common stock, the other refused to lend his name, or even part of his name, to a work in which he had had no share.

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  • She was then living in Paris, a few doors from her friend Mme d'Agoult, and the two set up a common salon in the Hotel de France.

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  • As a painter of nature she has much in common with Wordsworth.

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  • It is a matter of common observation that the blue of the sky is highly variable.

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  • MAIMONIDES, the common name of RABBI MOSES BEN

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  • The phenomenon was quite common between 9.30 A.M.

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  • A small variety of the common mushroom found in pastures has been named A.

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  • velutinus, a slender, ringless, hollow-stemmed, blackgilled fungus, common in gardens and about dung and stumps; it is about the size of a mushroom, but thinner in all its parts and far more brittle; it has a black hairy fringe hanging round the edge of the cap when fresh.

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  • The common mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is propagated by spores, the fine black dust seen to be thrown off when a mature specimen is laid on white paper or a white dish; these give rise to what is known as the "spawn" or mycelium, which consists of whitish threads permeating dried dung or similar substances, and which, when planted in a proper medium, runs through the mass, and eventually develops the fructification known as the mushroom.

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  • Another small and common species, M.

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  • It is a small bitter species common in upland pastures and fir plantations early in the season.

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  • A few species, however, like the common British forms Chelifer cancroides and Chiridium museorum, frequent human dwellings and are found in books, old chests, furniture, &c.; others like Ganypus littoralis and allied species may be found under stones or pieces of coral between tide-marks; while others, which are for the most part blind, live permanently in dark caves.

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  • Anyway, he expired two days later in the guardhouse of the citadel of St Petersburg, two days after the senate had condemned him to death for imagining rebellion against his father, and for hoping for the co-operation of the common people and the armed intervention of his brother-in-law, the emperor.

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  • Other trees common in the state are the persimmon, sassafras, and, in the Ohio Valley region, the sycamore.

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  • Wild ginger, elder and sumach are common, and in the mountain areas, rhododendrons, mountain laurel and azaleas.

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  • Yet it was common; Verres was worshipped before he was impeached !

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  • When the law speaks universally, and something happens which is not according to the common course of events, it is right that the law should be modified in its application to that particular case, as the lawgiver himself would have done, if the case had been present to his mind.

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  • The source of Roman equity was the fertile theory of natural law, or the law common to all nations.

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  • The connexion in Roman law between the ideas of equity, nature, natural law and the law common to all nations, and the influence of the Stoical philosophy on their development, are fully discussed in the third chapter of the work we have referred to.

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  • The real beginning of English equity is to be found in the custom of handing over to that officer, for adjudication, the complaints which were addressed to the king, praying for remedies beyond the reach of the common law.

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  • One cause of this separation was the rigid adherence to precedent on the part of the common law courts.

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  • For a long time it was thought that precedents could have no place in equity, inasmuch as it professed in each case to do that which was just; and we find this view maintained by common lawyers after it had been abandoned by the professors of equity themselves.

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  • From that time certainly equity, like common law, has professed to take its principles wholly from recorded decisions and statute law.

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  • Albs were originally quite plain, but about the 10th century the custom arose of ornamenting the borders and the cuffs of the sleeves with strips of embroidery, and this became common in the 12th century.

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  • In England rood lofts do not appear to have been introduced before the 14th century, and were not common till the 15th.

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  • Their common gravestone is in existence at the present day, bearing date July 11, 1759.

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  • The English common law, with all the absurdities and rigours of that day, was arbitrarily extended to an alien system of society.

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  • As a title, however, it was much less common and also less dignified than that of avoue.

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  • The scales of the images formed in the focus of the eyepiece common to both microscopes shall be identical.

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  • The story of Lohengrin as we know it is based on two principal motives common enough in folklore: the metamorphosis of human beings into swans, and the curious wife whose question brings disaster.

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  • in 1314, ruled their lands in common, but after some trouble between them Rudolph abdicated in 1317.

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  • This belief in the infallibility of revelation is involved in the very beliefs in revelation itself, and is common to all sections of Christians, who differ mainly as to the kind and measure of infallibility residing in the human instruments by which this revelation is interpreted to the world.

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  • Collier preferred the version of the Book of Common Prayer issued in 1549, and regretted that certain practices and petitions there enjoined were omitted in later editions.

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  • In 1718 was published a new Communion Office taken partly from Primitive Liturgies and partly from the first English Reformed Common Prayer Book,..

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  • On several occasions concordats have established a new division of dioceses, and provided that future erections or divisions should be made by a common accord.

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  • For Belgium and Holland; abandoned by a common accord.

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  • He showed indeed none of the avaricious temper so common among the politicians of the time.

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  • Such a view of existence has been common throughout the history of thought, and especially among physical scientists.

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  • South of the park lies the open common of Blackheath, mainly within the borough of Lewisham, and in the east the borough includes the greater part of Woolwich Common.

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  • Each problem was something unique; the elements of transition from one to another were wanting; and the next step which mathematics had to make was to find some method of reducing, for instance, all curves to a common notation.

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  • It also encouraged vivisection - a practice common with Descartes himself.

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  • The common people, whom he had always favoured at the expense of the boyars, thereupon implored him to come back on his own terms. He consented to do so, but entrenched himself within a peculiar institution, the oprichina or "separate estate."

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  • The term is used in this general sense in certain rubrics of the English Book of Common Prayer, in which it is applied equally to rectors and vicars as to perpetual curates.

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  • The gas also occurs in minute quantities in the common minerals of the earth's crust.

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  • Strutt has suggested that helium in hot springs may be derived from the disintegration of common rocks at great depths.

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  • At atmospheric pressure the discharge is able to pass through a far greater distance in helium than in the common gases.

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  • This was the name in common use when the Jesuits entered China towards the end of the 16th century, and began to send home accurate information about China.

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  • It was a cavalry melee, in which the common code of honour caused Macedonian and Persian chieftains to engage hand to hand, and at the end of the day the relics of the Persian army were in flight, leaving the high-roads of Asia Minor clear for the invader.

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  • There seems nothing to fix the exact spot of this town; the common identification with Multan is, according to Raverty and V.

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  • He is described as of an athletic frame, though not taller than the common, and a white and ruddy complexion.

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  • vir.) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales prefaces his account of Alexander with the statement that his story is so common That every wight that hath discrecioun Hath herd somewhat or all of his fortune.

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  • The name Larissa was common to many "Pelasgian" towns, and apparently signified a fortified city or burg, such as the citadel of Argos.

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  • flOd, a word common to Teutonic languages, cf.

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  • But he was a profoundly interested observer of affairs at home and among 1 The Assyrian term abubu is used of the great primeval deluge (in the Gilgamesh epic), and also of the local floods common in the country.

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  • His high conception of God's transcendence, it may be supposed, led him to ignore intermediary agencies, which are common in the popular literature, and later, under the influence of this same conception of transcendence, are freely employed.

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    0
  • They have so much in common that they must have drawn from the same current bodies of thought, or there must have been borrowing in one direction or the other.

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  • It is common to all Germanic languages; cf.

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  • At least four species of fleas (including Pulex irritans) which infest the common rat are known to bite man, and are believed to be the active agents in the transmission of plague from rats to human beings.

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  • is the ancient and common view; but even in the 15th century B.C. Jerusalem was known as Uru-salim.

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  • With respect to the calculating rods, he mentions in the dedication that they had already found so much favour as to be almost in common use, and even to have been carried to foreign countries; and that he has been advised to publish his little work relating to their mechanism and use, lest they should be put forth in some one else's name.

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  • It was a long time before decimal arithmetic came into general use, and all through the 17th century exponential marks were in common use.

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  • There are two sorts - the common, and the Jersey or Russian, the latter being much larger and less pungent.

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    0
  • The Presbyterianism now visible in England is of Scottish origin and Scottish type, and beyond the fact of embracing a few congregations which date from, or before, the Act of Uniformity and the Five Mile Act, has little in common with the Presbyterianism which was for a brief period by law established.

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  • In common with the general Presbyterianism of the British Isles, the Presbyterian Church of England has in recent years been readjusting its relation to the Westminster Confession of Faith.

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  • But these two sections of Protestantism, in their common exile and in presence of the preponderating Roman Catholicism of the country, seemed at first inclined to draw closer together than had been thought possible in Great Britain.

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  • Shields (1825-1904), who afterwards entered the Protestant Episcopal Church, republished and urged the adoption of the Book of Common Prayer as amended by the Westminster Divines in the royal commission of 1661; and Henry Van Dyke was prominent in the latter stage of the movement for a liturgy.

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  • In 1869 the Old and New Schools in the North combined on the basis of the common standards; to commemorate the union a memorial fund was raised which amounted in 1871 to $7,607,492.

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  • The principal rocks are andesites, but trachytes and basalts are also common.

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  • Three species of deer are common.

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  • Flares, rabbits and squirrels are common.

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  • The common law as it existed before his time was wholly inadequate to cope with the new cases and customs which arose with the increasing development of commerce.

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  • A similar influence was exerted by him in other branches of the common law; and although, after his retirement, a reaction took place, and he was regarded for a while as one who had corrupted the ancient principles of English law, these prejudices passed rapidly away, and the value of his work in bringing the older law into harmony with the needs of modern society has long been fully recognized.

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  • In common with the state of Michoacan, Morelia is a stronghold of clericalism and conservatism.

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    0
  • The conquest of Cyprus by the Turks, and their aggressions on the Christian powers, frightened the states of the Mediterranean into forming a holy league for their common defence.

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  • Existing marsupials may be divided into three main divisions or sub-orders, of which the first, or Polyprotodontia, is common to America and Australasia; the second, or Paucituberculata, is exclusively South American; while the third, or Diprotodonts, is as solely Australasian inclusive of a few in the eastern Austro-Malayan islands.

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  • C. Stirling indicate that in the enclosed as far as the nails in structure of the feet this creature a common integument.

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  • Hind-feet short and broad, with five welldeveloped toes; the first large, nailless and opposable; the second and third slender and united by a common integument as far as.

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  • It may be obtained as a dark brown amorphous powder by placing a mixture of io parts of the roughly powdered oxide with 6 parts of metallic sodium in a red-hot crucible, and covering the mixture with a layer of well-dried common salt.

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  • The older records utilized by the Deuteronomic and later compilers indicate some common tradition which has found expression in these varying forms. Different religious standpoints are represented in the biblical writings, and it is now important to observe that the prophecies of Hosea unmistakably show another attitude to the Israelite priesthood.

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  • The comparative richness of proteaceous plants in Western Australia and South Africa first suggested a common source for these primitive types.

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  • Several smaller forms of the same general appearance are known as wallabies, and are common everywhere.

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  • Five rather common species are certainly deadly - the death adder, the brown, the black, the superb and the tiger snakes.

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  • The range in species is very limited, no one being common to eastern and western Australia.

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    0
  • As a step towards such hypothesis it has been noted that the Antarctic, the South African, and the Australian floras have many types in common.

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  • Kaolin, fire-clays and brick-clays are common to all the states.

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  • The Common wealth is empowered to retain one-fourth of the net revenue from customs and excise, the balance must be handed back to the states.

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    0
  • Pottery, common to Malays and Papuans, the bows and arrows of the latter, and the elaborate canoes of all three races, are unknown to the Australians.

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  • Again, while they differ physically from neighbouring races, while there is practically nothing in common between them and the Malays, the Polynesians, or the Papuan Melanesians, they agree in type so closely among themselves that they must be regarded as forming one race.

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  • He urges that the similarities of some of the primitive races of India and Africa to the aborigines of Australia are indications that they were peopled from one common stock.

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  • Each tribe occupied a recognized territory, averaging perhaps a dozen square miles, and used a common dialect.

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  • Howitt and Dr Roth appear to have satisfied themselves of a belief, common to most tribes, in a mythic being (he has different names in different tribes) having some of the attributes of a Supreme Deity.

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  • Giles's journeys added greatly to our knowledge of the characteristics of Western and South Australia, and he was able to bear out the common opinion that the interior of Australia west of 132° E.

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    0
  • The former Royal Dockyard was made over to the War Office in 1872 and converted into stores, wharves for the loading of troopships, &c. The Royal Artillery Barracks, facing Woolwich Common, originally erected in 1775, has been greatly extended at different times, and consists of six ranges of Brick building, including a church in the Italian Gothic style erected in 1863, a theatre, and a library in connexion with the officers' mess-room.

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  • On the Common is the Royal Military Academy, a castellated building erected from the design of Sir J.

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  • Woolwich Common (142 acres) is partly within this borough, but mainly in Greenwich.

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  • South of it is Eltham Common (37 acres), and in the E.

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  • of the borough are Plumstead Common (103 acres) and Bostall Heath (134 acres).

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  • Near Woolwich Common there are brick and tile kilns and sand and chalk pits, and there are extensive marketgardens in the locality.

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    0
  • The peoples within the frontier had been transformed into Romanized provincials; outside, the various tribes had become merged in the common appellation of Frisians.

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  • Saxon was at this period the common title of all the north German tribes; there was but little difference between Frisians and Saxons either in race or language, and they were closely united for some four centuries in common resistance to the encroachments of the Frankish power.

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  • It constituted the most common form of divination in ancient Babylonia, where it can be traced back to the 3rd millennium B.C. Among the Etruscans the prominence of the rite led to the liver being looked upon as the trade-mark of the priest.

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  • On the other hand, serious difficulties arise if we assume that every animal sacrificed represents a deity; and even assuming that such a belief underlies the rite of animal sacrifice, a modification of the belief must have been introduced when such sacrifices became a common rite resorted to on every occasion when a deity was to be approached.

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    0
  • The number of rainy days throughout the peninsula varies from 160 to over 200 in each year, but violent gusts of wind, called " Sumatras," accompanied by a heavy downpour of short duration, are more common than persistent rain.

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    0
  • The scorpion and the centipede are both common.

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    0
  • He supported the claims of Bohemia to a full autonomy; he strongly attacked both the February constitution and the Ausgleich with Hungary; what he desired was a common parliament for the whole empire based on a settlement with each one of the territories.

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    0
  • The most common wild animals are deer, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, skunks, woodchucks and muskrats.

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    0
  • The ruffed grouse (or "partridge") is the most common of game birds, but woodcock, ducks and geese are quite common.

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  • Among deciduous trees the state is noted for its sugar maples; birch and beech are common on the hills, and oaks, elm, hickory, ash, poplar, basswood, willow, chestnut and butternut on the less elevated areas.

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  • The state usually has long and severe winters and cool summers, but sudden changes of temperature are common at all seasons.

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    0
  • The best soils are in the west section, where limestone clays or shell marls are common.

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    0
  • In the next session, November 1548-March 1549, he was a leading opponent of the first Act of Uniformity and Book of Common Prayer.

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    0
  • The enforcement of the first Book of Common Prayer had also been part of his official duties; and the fact that Bonner made no such protest against the burning of heretics as he had done in the former case shows that he found it the more congenial duty.

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    0
  • C. Eyton to have some very exceptional osteological features, and these were found to be also common to Pteroptochus and Scytalopus.

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  • A large portion was occupied by the Guarii, the ancestors of the MacGuires or Maguires, a name still common in the district.

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  • A bitter principle to which the name of quercin has been applied by Gerber, its discoverer, has also been detected in the acorn of the common oak; the nutritive portion seems chiefly a form of starch.

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  • It was introduced into England by Philip Miller about 1 735, and is now common in parks and plantations, where it seems to flourish in nearly all soils.

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  • Common throughout the northern and middle states and Canada, the red oak attains a large size only on good soils; the wood is of little value, being coarse and porous, but it is largely used for cask-staves; the bark is a valuable tanning material.

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  • Bishop Williams, a kinsman of Cromwell's, relates at this time that he was "a common spokesman for sectaries, and maintained their part with great stubbornness"; and his earliest extant letter (in 1635) is an appeal for subscriptions for a puritan lecturer.

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  • He declared, when answering a complaint that a certain captain in his regiment was a better preacher than fighter, that he who prayed best would fight best, and that he knew nothing could" give the like courage and confidence as the knowledge of God in Christ will."The superiority of these men - more intelligent than the common soldiers, better disciplined, better trained, better armed, excellent horsemen and fighting for a great cause - not only over the other parliamentary troops but over the royalists, was soon observed in battle.

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  • Any comparison between the generalship of these two great commanders would therefore be misleading, for want of a common basis.

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    0
  • While therefore Cromwell's administration became in practice little different from that of Strafford, the aims and ideals of the two statesmen had nothing in common.

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  • Oracular possession of the kind above described is also common among savages and people of lower culture; and Dr Tylor, in his Primitive Culture, ii.

    0
    0
  • The common or true duiker (C. grimmi) is found in bush-country from the Cape to the Zambezi and Nyasaland, and ranges northward on the west coast to Angola.

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    0
  • The public buildings are mostly constructed of broken stone and mortar, plastered outside and covered with red tiles, but the common dwellings are generally constructed of tapiarough trellis-work walls filled in with mud.

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    0
  • By the common law of England a corpse is not the subject of property nor capable of holding property.

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    0
  • The application of "common sense" to the problem of substance supplied a more satisfactory analytic for him than the scepticism of Hume which reached him through a study of Kant.

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    0
  • In the United States imprisonment for debt was universal under the common law, but it has been abolished in every state, except in certain cases, as where there is any suspicion of fraud or where the debtor has an intention of removing out of the state to avoid his debts.

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  • Pidgin English is the common language along the coast.

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  • It is very common on the coasts of Europe and eastern North America, but its flesh is much less esteemed than that of the true Gadi.

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    0
  • The motor in most common use for electric cranes is the series wound, continuous current motor, which has many advantages.

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    0
  • In commercial matters, payment in kind was still common, though the contracts usually stipulate for cash, naming the standard expected, that of Babylon, Larsa, Assyria, Carchemish, &c. The Code enacted, however, that a debtor must be allowed to pay in produce according to statutory scale.

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  • Pledges were often made where the intrinsic value of the article was equivalent to the amount of the debt; but antichretic pledge was more common, where the profit of the pledge was a set-off against the interest of the debt.

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    0
  • A common way of doing business was for a merchant to entrust goods or money to a travelling agent, who sought a market for his goods.

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  • Adoption was very common, especially where the father (or mother) was childless or had seen all his children grow up and marry away.

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    0
  • The death penalty was freely awarded for theft and other crimes regarded as coming under that head; for theft involving entrance of palace or temple treasury, for illegal purchase from minor or slave, for selling stolen goods or receiving the same, for common theft in the open (in default of multiple restoration) or receiving the same, for false claim to goods, for kidnapping, for assisting or harbouring fugitive slaves, for detaining or appropriating same, for brigandage, for fraudulent sale of drink, for disorderly conduct of tavern, for delegation of personal service, for misappropriating the levy, for oppression of feudal holders, for causing death of a householder by bad building.

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  • Imprisonment was common, but is not recognized by the Code.

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    0
  • Though many types of manually operated switchboards have been brought into use, differing from each other in respect of circuit and working arrangements, yet each of them may be placed in one or other of three main classes according as the system of working is magneto, call-wire, or common battery.

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  • There are still many magneto exchanges in existence, but when new exchanges are erected only the very smallest are equipped for magneto working, that system having succumbed to the common battery one in the case of all equipments of moderate and large dimensions.

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  • One of the greatest advances made in the development of the art of telephony was the introduction of the " common battery relay system."

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  • - Hayes Common Battery System.

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  • - Stone Common Battery System.

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  • variation in resistance of the transmitter spoken into causes a variation of the pressure at the line terminals of the impedance coils, and since those terminals are common to the two circuits the variable E.M.F.

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  • - Dean Common Battery System.

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  • - Subscriber's Circuit, Common Battery System.

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  • The position meter just mentioned is common to all the cords on one position and records all completed calls handled at the position.

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    0
  • These animals also occur in the desert district south of the Tarim; but are most abundant in the deserts and mountains to the southward of Kuruktagh, where there are a few brackish-water pools, and are also common in the barren mountains between Kuruktagh and Choetagh.

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    0
  • Foxes are common in the neighborhood of Rome.

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    0
  • The sea mammals include the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis).

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    0
  • Small cuttlefish are in common use as an article of diet.

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    0
  • In Lombardy a six-year shift is common: either wheat, clover, maize, rice, rice, rice (the last year manured with lupines) or maize, wheat followed by clover, clover, clover ploughed in, and rice, rice and rice manured with lupines.

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  • The Emilian region is one where regular rotations are best observeda common shift being grain, maize, clover, beans and vetches, &c., grain, which has the disadvantage of the grain crops succeeding, each other.

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  • The following scheme indicates a common Sicilian method of a type which has many varieties: fallow, grain, grain, pasture, pastureother two divisions of the area following the same order, but beginning respectively with the two years of grain and the two of pasture.

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  • Peasant proprietorship is most common in Lombardy and Piedmont, but it is also found elsewhere.

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    0
  • In Lombardy, besides the mezzadria, the lease is common, but the ierzieria is rare.

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    0
  • In Venetia it is more common than elsewhere in Italy for owners to till their own soil.

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  • The ruder branches of the artthe making of tiles and common waresare pretty generally diffused.

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    0
  • Split up into numerous and mutually hostile communities, they never, through the fourteen centuries which have elapsed since the end of the old Western empire, shook off the yoke of foreigners completely; they never until lately learned to merge their local and conflicting interests in the common good of undivided Italy.

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  • It is one of the strongest instances furnished by history of the fascination exercised by an idea that the Italians themselves should have grown to glory in this dependence of their nation upon Caesars who had nothing but a name in common with the Roman Imperator of the past.

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    0
  • The conception of a permanent confederation, bound together in offensive and defensive alliance for common objects, has not occurred to these hard fighters and stubborn asserters of their civic privileges.

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    0
  • It was led by the Medici, who sided with the common people, and increased their political importance by the accumulation and wise employment of vast commercial wealth.

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  • The humanistic movement had created a common culture, a common language and sense of common nationality.

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  • As regards their common opposition to the Turk, this appeal led to nothing; but it marked the growth of a new Italian consciousness.

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  • Apprehending the importance of Italian federation, Lorenzo, by his personal tact and prudent leadership of the republic, secured peace and a common intelligence between the five powers.

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  • Meanwhile, no scheme for combination against common foes arose in the peninsula.

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    0
  • The upper classes were still to a large extent inoculated with French ideas, but the common people were either devoted to the dynasty or indifferent.

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  • Unfortunately, on this, as on other critical occasions, deputies proved themselves incapable of common effort to promote general welfare.

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  • This something more consisted, at least in part, of the arrangement, with the help of Austria and Germany, of an Anglo-Italian naval understanding having special reference to the Eastern question, but providing for common action by the British and Italian fleets in the Mediterranean in case of war.

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  • In some cases there was foundation for the laborers claims, but unfortunately the movement got into the hands of professional agitators and common swindlers, and the leader, a certain Giampetruzzi, who at one time seemed to be a worthy colleague of Marcelin Albert, was afterwards tried and condemned for having cheated his own followers.

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  • Public opinion upheld the government in its attitude, for all persons of common sense realized that the suspension of the public services could not be permitted for a moment in a civilized country.

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  • LEECH, the common name of members of the Hirudinea, a division of Chaetopod worms. It is doubtful whether the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, which is rarer in England than on the continent of Europe, or the horse leech, Aulastoma gulo, often confused with it, has the best right to the original possession of this name.

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  • In 1538 an embassy of German divines visited England with the design, among other things, of forming a common confession for the two countries.

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    0
  • As regards the Brahmanas of the Rigveda, two of such works have been handed down, the Aitareya and the Kaushitaki (or Sankhayana)-Brahmanas, which have a large amount of their material in common.

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    0
  • From Socrates, in Xenophon's Memorabilia, downwards, the argument is tolerably common; it is notable in Cicero; in the modern discussion it dominates the 18th-century mode of thought, is confidently appealed to though not worked out by Butler, and is fully stated by Paley.

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  • If it is ultimate truth in its own region, that region cannot be accepted as more than half the entire universe of reality (common sense intuitionalism; dualism).

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  • declares that common pleas must henceforward be heard in a fixed place.

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    0
  • The newer rocks, common also to the Nicobars and Sumatra, are in Ritchie's Archipelago chiefly and contain radiolarians and foraminifera.

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    0
  • Divorce is rare, unfaithfulness after marriage not common and incest unknown.

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    0
  • The species of Hydra, however, are extremely common and familiar inhabitants of ponds and ditches.

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  • The buds may all become detached after a time and give rise to separate and independent individuals, as in the common Hydra, in which only polyp-individuals are produced and sexual elements From Allman's Gymnoblastic Hydroids, by permission of are developed the Council of the Ray Society.

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  • common flesh, which cannot be assigned more to one individual than another, but consists of a more or less complicated network of tubes, corresponding to the hydrocaulus and hydrorhiza of the primitive independent polypindividual.

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  • A fur- ‘ - ther peculiarity of this type of colony is that theentire coenosarcal complex is covered externally by a common layer of ectoderm; it is not clear how this covering layer is developed.

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  • Budding from the hydrocaulus may be combined with budding from the hydrorhiza, so that numer ous branching colonies arise from a common basal stolon.

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  • (I) True fission or longitudinal division of an individual into two equal and similar daughter-individuals is not common but occurs in Gastroblasta, where it has been described in detail by Arnold Lang [30].

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  • If the three principal organ-systems of the medusa, namely mouth, tentacles and umbrella, be considered in the light of phylogeny, it is evident that the manubrium bearing the mouth must be the oldest, as representing a common property of all the Coelentera, even of the gastrula embryo of all Enterozoa.

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  • Next in order come the tentacles, common to all Cnidaria.

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  • Hence the budding of medusae exemplifies very clearly a common phenomenon in development, a phylogenetic series of events completely dislocated in the ontogenetic time-sequence.

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  • The spermatogenesis and maturation and fertilization of the germ-cells present nothing out of the common and need not be C.

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  • For the most part, polyp and medusa have been regarded as modifications of a common type, a view supported by the existence, among Scyphomedusae (q.v.), of sessile polyp-like medusae (Lucernaria, &c.).

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  • The sub-order includes the family Hydridae, containing the common fresh-water polyps of the genus Hydra.

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  • Many species are known, of which three are common in European waters.

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  • 20) is a common British form.

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  • Pennaria, with a free medusa known as Globiceps, is a common Mediterranean form.

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  • 5), a common British hydroid, produces gonophores; so also does Cordylophora, a form inhabiting fresh or brackish water.

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  • Coryne, a common British longed into a brood pouch conhydroid, produces gonophores; taining embryos.

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  • Trophosome polyps forming branching colonies of which the stem and main branches are thick and composed of a network of anastomosing coenosarcal tubes covered by a common ectoderm and supported by a thick chitinous perisarc; hydranths similar to those of Coryne; gonosome, sessile gonophores.

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  • The stem may contain a single coenosarcal tube (" monosiphonic ") or several united in a common perisarc (" polysiphonic ").

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  • An apparent, but not real, exception is Halecium halecinum, in which the blastostyle is produced from the side of a nutritive polyp, and both are enclosed in a common theca without a partition between them (Allman [1] p. 50, fig.

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  • A-D are stages common to both; from D arises the hydrotheca (E) or the gonotheca (F); th, theca; st, stomach; 1, tentacles; m, mouth; mb, medusa-buds.

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  • Aequorea is a common medusa.

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  • The nearest approach to the Stylasteridae is perhaps to be found in Ceratella, with its arborescent trophosome formed of .anastomosing coenosarcal tubes supported by a thick perisarc and covered by a common ectoderm.

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  • 64) is a common Mediterranean species.

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  • 70, 71), common in the Mediterranean and other seas.

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  • Filey is in favour with visitors who desire a quiet resort without the accompaniment of entertainment common to the larger watering-places.

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  • The common idea of the origin of things is that of an absolute creation of matter and mind alike.

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  • It is also described as a bifurcation of two twigs, mental and bodily creation out of a common root.

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  • The process is conceived as an infinite series of variations or specifications of one primitive and common type.

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    0
  • The process is essentially a polar linear action, or differentiation from a common centre.

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  • The observation that large groups of species of widely different habits present the same fundamental plan of structure; and that parts of the same animal or plant, the functions of which are very different, likewise exhibit modifications of a common plan.

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    0
  • Their natural resemblances and differences are only to be expressed by disposing them as if they were branches springing from a common hypothetical centre.

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  • Such a comparison is necessarily illogical, as the existing apes are separated from the common ancestor by at least as large a number of generations as separate it from any of the forms of existing man.

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  • Such a condition has been termed, with regard to the group of animals or plants the organs of which are being studied, archecentric. The possession of the character in the archecentric condition in (say) two of the members of the group does not indicate that these two members are more nearly related to one another than they are to other members of the group; the archecentric condition is part of the common heritage of all the members of the group, and may be retained by any.

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  • A form of apocentricity extremely common and often perplexing may be termed pseudocentric; in such a condition there is an apparent simplicity that tive anatomy.

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    0
  • The acts of councils of this age are full of the trials of bishops not only for heresy but for immorality and common law crimes.

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  • This writer traces their origin to the 14th century; but the procedure does not seem to have become regularized or common till the reigns of Louis XII.

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  • 439) Other traces occur in the Acts of Uniformity, which make offences of depraving the Book of Common Prayer triable at Assizes (between 23 Eliz.

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  • All the Malagasy lemurs, which agree in the structure of the internal ear, are now included in the family Lemuridae, confined to Madagascar and the Comoro Islands, which comprises the great majority of the group. The other families are the Nycticebidae, common to tropical Asia and Africa, and the Tarsiidae, restricted to the Malay countries.

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  • when he took over the city from Mathilda, an important new provision being that general rules for the government of the city were only to be made by arrangement between the count or his officials and the common council of the citizens.

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  • By common consent he was deified and all those who could afford the cost obtained his statue or bust; for a long time his statues held a place among the penates of the Romans.

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  • It is no "fugitive and cloistered virtue" that Aurelius seeks to encourage; on the contrary, man must lead the "life of the social animal," must "live as on a mountain"; and "he is an abscess on the universe who withdraws and separates himself from the reason of our common nature through being displeased with the things which happen."

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  • In Gloucestershire simnel cakes are still common; and at Usk, Monmouth, the custom of mothering is still scrupulously observed.

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  • Whilst succinite is the common variety of European amber, the following varieties also occur: Gedanite, or "brittle amber," closely resembling succinite, but much more brittle, not quite so hard, with a lower meltingpoint and containing no succinic acid.

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  • This beautiful material presents a great diversity of tints, but a rich hyacinth red is common.

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  • in diameter, and with the shoots or young branches more or less angular; the glossy deltoid leaves are sharply pointed, somewhat cordate at the base, and with flattened petioles; the fertile catkins ripen about the middle of June, when their opening capsules discharge the cottony seeds which have given the tree its common western name; in New England it is sometimes called the "river poplar."

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  • In these northern habitats it attains a large size; the wood is very soft; the buds yield a gum-like balsam, from which the common name is derived; considered valuable as an.

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  • There was little of originality in Luria's doctrines; the theory of emanations, the double belief in the process of the Divine Essence as it were self-concentrating (Zimzum) and on the other hand as expanding throughout creation; the philosophical " sceptism '° which regards God as unknowable but capable of direct intuition by feeling - these were all common elements of mystical thought.

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  • indultusn, from indulgere, grant, concede, allow), a, papal licence which authorizes the doing of something not sanctioned by the common law of the church; thus by an indult the pope authorizes a bishop to grant certain relaxations during the Lenten fast according to the necessities of the situation, climate, &c., of his diocese.

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  • Cuvier's term in its wide extension, however, passed into general use; but, as the anatomy of the different forms became more fully known, the difficulty of including them under the common designation made itself increasingly obvious.

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  • The term Anatomy, originally employed in biological science to denote a description of the facts of structure revealed on cutting up an organism, whether with or without the aid of lenses for the purposes of magnification, is restricted in the present article, in accordance with a common modern use, to those facts of internal structure not concerned with the constitution of the individual cell, the structural unit of which the plant is composed.

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  • Such a system is called a tissuesystem, the word tissue being employed for any collection of cells with common structural, developmental, or functional characters to which it may be conveniently applied.

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  • The common wall separating the pits of the two adjoining cells is pierced by strands of protoplasm.

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  • Many of the lower forms of Brown Seaweeds (Phoeophyceae) have a thallus consisting of simple or branched cell threads, as in the green and red forms. The lateral union of the branches to form a solid thallus is not, however, so common, nor is it carried to so high a pitch of elaboration as in the Rhodophyceae.

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  • In addition to the cell types described, it is a very common occurrence in these bulky forms for rhizoid-like branches of the cells to grow out, mostly from the cells at the periphery of the medulla, and grow down between the cells, strengthening the whole tissue, as in the Rhodophyceae.

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  • A very common function of hairs is to diminish transpiration, by creating a still atmosphere between them, as in the case of the sunk stomata already mentioned.

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  • They may, for instance, be glandular or stinging, as in the common stinging nettle, where the top of the hair is very brittle, easily breaking off when touched.

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  • One of the most striking characters common to the two highest groups of plants, the Pteridophytes and Phanerogams, is the Vascular possession of a double (hydrom-leptom) conducting .s system, such as we saw among the highest mosses, YS em.

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  • but with sharply characterized and peculiar features, probably indicating common descent throughout both these groups.

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  • Vessels are common in the Angiospermous group of Flowering Plants.

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  • The whole stele may be surrounded by a common external endodermis; sometimes there is an internal endodermis in addition, separating the bundles from the pith; while in other cases each bundle possesses a separate endodermis surrounding it.

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  • A polystelic con g dition arises in some members of this order by the association of collateral 8 bundles round common centres.

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  • In the very frequent cases where the bundles have considerable individuality, the fibrous pericyclic cap very clearly has a common origin from the same strand of tissue as the vascular elements themselves.

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  • Certain plants possess another source of energy which is common to them and the animal world.

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  • If we consider a leaf of the common fern we find that in its young condition it is closely rolled up, the upper or ventral surface being quite concealed.

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  • Irritation and hypertrophy of cells are common signs of the presence of parasites, as ovinced by the numerous malformations, galls, witches-brooms, &c., on diseased plants.

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  • Still further insight is afforded by our increasing knowledge of the enzymes, and it is to be remarked that both poisons and enzymes are very common in just such parasitic Fungi as induce discolorations, hypertrophies and the death of cellse.g.

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  • Yellowing is a common sign of water-logged roots, and if accompanied by wilting may be due to drought.

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  • Spotted Leaves, &c.Discoloured spots or patches on leaves and other herbaceous parts are common symptoms of disease, and often furnish clues to identification of causes, though it must be remembered that no sharp line divides this class of symptoms from the preceding.

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  • It is a very common event to find the early stages of injury indicated by pale yellow spots, which turn darker, brown, red, black, &c., later, e.g.

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  • Excrescences may be divided into those occurring on herbaceous tissues, of which Galls are well-known examples, and those found on the woody stem, branches, &c., and themselves eventually woody, of which Burrs of various kinds afford common illustrations.

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  • Turning now to outgrowths of a woody nature, the well-known burrs or knaurs, so common on elms and other trees are cases in point.

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  • Conditions of hyper-turgescence are common in herbaceous plants in wet seasons, or when overcrowded and in situations too moist for them.

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  • It is the common result of fires passing alongtoo rapidly to burn the trees; and thin-barked treeshornbeam, beech, firs, &c. may exhibit it as the results of sunburn, especially when exposed to the south-west after the removal of shelter.

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  • Obviously no more than this is possible until physiologists are able to state much more precisely than at present what is the influence of common salt on the plants of salt-marshes, of the action of calcium carbonate on plants of calcareous soils, and of the action of humous compounds on plants of fens and peat moors.

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  • ristic composition, especially by different dominant species, for d by minor differences of the common habitat.

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  • For vei Lmple, the sand dunes of North America and those of western am rope are widely separated in geographical position and there- ge~ e in floristic composition, yet they are related by common rai:

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  • The effect of common salt on the metabolism of plants is not understood.

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  • He showed further, that the increase of common salt in the soil is correlated with a reduction in the number and size of the chlo,-oplastids, and therefore in the amount of chlorophyll.

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  • On the other hand, some plants did not respond to the action of common salt, whilst others were killed.

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  • Schimper had previously maintained that the action of common salt in the cell-sap is detrimental as regards assimilation.

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  • The effect of lime on plants is less understood even than the effect of common salt.

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  • Direct division is a much less common phenomenon than was formerly supposed to be the case.

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  • The tisallus (thallome) is a plant-body which is not differentiated into the members root, stem and leaf; it is the morphologically simplest body, such as is of common occurrence in the lower plants (e~.

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  • A common conversion while cooking is deciding how many ounces are in a cup.

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  • A survey of the vegetable kingdom indicates that evolution has proceeded, on the whole, from the simple to the complex; at the same time, as has been already mentioned, evidence of reduction or degeneration in common.

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  • Common experience shows that temperature is the most important condition which controls the distribution of plants.

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  • Buffon remarked that the same temperature might have been expected, all other circumstances being equal, to produce the same beings in different parts of the globe, both in the animal and vegetable kingdoms. Yet lawns in the United States are destitute of the common English daisy, the wild hyacinth of the woods of the United Kingdom is absent from Germany, and the foxglove from Switzerland.

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  • The cause of such agreement is, according to Grisebach, shrouded in the deepest obscurity, but it finds its obvious and complete explanation in the descent from a common ancestor which he would unhesitatingly reject.

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  • The British Phanerogamic flora, it may be remarked, does not contain a single endemic species, and 38% of the total number are common to the three northern continents.

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  • Comparing the Alps with the Pyrenees, according to Ball, each has about half its flora common to the other:

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  • Of species common to the two, Maximowicz finds that Manchuria possesses 40% and scarcely 9% that are endemic. Of a collection of about 500 species made in that country by Sir Henry James nearly a third are British.

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  • Maximowiczfinds that 40% of the plants of Manchuria are common to Europe and Asia, but the proportion falls sharply to i6% in the case of Japan.

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  • It precludes the explanation of any common features in the dissevered porciuns of the tropical area of vegetation by lateral communirations, and throws back their origin to the remotest geological antiquity.

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  • No genus or species of palm, for example, is common to the Old and New Worlds.

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  • A peculiar feature in which tropical Africa stands alone is that at least one-fifth and probably more of the species are common to both sides of the continent and presumably stretch right across it.

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  • The singular shrubby Amaryllids, Vellozieae, are common to tropical and South Africa, Madagascar and Brazil.

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  • Conifers are scantily represented by Callitris and Podocarpus, which is common to all three sub-regions; and Cycads by the endemic Encephalartos and Stangeria.

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  • Amongst Conifers, Podocar pus is found throughout, Agathis is common to Australia, New Zealand and New Caledonia; Araucaria ~ ~he first and last.

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  • The absurd attempt was, and sometimes is still, made by geographers to include all natural science in geography; but it is more common for specialists in the various detailed sciences to think, and sometimes to assert, that the ground of physical geography is now fully occupied by these sciences.

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  • Existing classifications, however, do not take account of any difference in kind between mountain and hills, although it is common in the German language to speak of Hiigelland, Mittelgebirge and Hochgebirge with a definite significance.

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  • He took up his residence in Avila, where he had built a convent; and here he resumed the common life of a friar, leaving his cell in October 1497 to visit, at Salamanca, the dying infante, Don Juan, and to comfort the sovereigns in their parental distress.

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  • 156, 1866; " Skull of Common Fowl," ibid.

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  • The most primitive combination, ambiens and A B X Y, is the most common; next follows that of A X Y, meaning the reduction of B, i.e.

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  • the iliac portion of the caud-ilio-femoralis; A B X and B X Y are less common; A X and X Y are rare and occur only in smaller groups, as in subfamilies or genera; B X occurs only in Podiceps.

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  • The iris is in most young birds at first brown or dull-coloured, but with maturity attains often very bright tints which add considerably to the charm of the bird; sexual dimorphism is in this respect of common occurrence.

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  • Such A y es laevocarotidinae of Garrod are common, e.g.

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  • The great auk, once common on the British coasts, those of Denmark, the east coast of North America, then restricted to those of Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland, has been killed by man, and the same fate has overtaken the Labrador duck, the Phillip Island parrot, Nestor productus, and the large cormorant of FIG.

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  • the remark on p. 481 of his work that " the countries of the East Indian flora have no kinds of birds in common with America which are vegetable feeders."

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  • There is no family of birds common to the Nearctic area and the Antillean subregion without occurring also in other parts of the Neotropical region, a fact which proves its, affinity to the latter.

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  • " More than one-third of the genera of Nearctic birds are common also to the Palaearctic subregion.

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  • If we take the number of Nearctic species at 700, which is perhaps an exaggeration, and that of the Palaearctic at 850, we find that, exclusive of stragglers, there are about 120 common to the two areas.

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  • Of these 128 are common to the Nearctic subregion.

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  • Species of 51 more seem to occur as true natives within the Ethiopian and Indian regions, and besides these 18 appear to be common to the Ethiopian without being found in the Indian, and no fewer than 71 to the Indian without occurring in the Ethiopian.

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  • But there are also species, though not Passerine, which are absolutely identical with those of Britain, the barn owl, common quail, pigmy rail, and little grebe or dabchick, all of them common and apparently resident in the island.

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  • The resulting " classification is based on the examination, mostly autoptic, of a far greater number of characters than any that had preceded it; moreover, they were chosen in a different way, discernment being exercised in sifting and weighing them, so as to determine, so far as possible, the relative value of each, according as that value may vary in different groups, and not to produce a mere mechanical ` key ' after the fashion become of late years so common " (Newton's Dictionary of Birds, Introduction, p. 103).

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