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commodities

commodities Sentence Examples

  • " Money and commodities are the real strength of any community."

  • Manufacturing industry is confined to a few articles and commodities, such as cement, tea, tin cans (for oil), cotton goods, oil refineries, tobacco factories, flour-mills, silk-winding mills (especially at Shusha and Jebrail in the south of Elisavetpol), distilleries and breweries.

  • Too many causes operated in favour of their depreciation: the enormous issue, the uncertainty as to their value if the Revolution should fail, the relation they bore to both specie and commodities, which retained their value and refused to be exchanged for a money of constantly diminishing purchasing power.

  • Since ale and beer have become excisable commodities the custom of appointing ale-tasters has in most places fallen into disuse.

  • The discovery and production of commodities require a knowledge of the distribution of geological formations for mineral products, of the natural distribution, life-conditions and cultivation or breeding of plants and animals and of the labour market.

  • The labour statistics published by the department are exhaustive, dealing with hours of labour, the state of the labour market, the condition of the working classes and the prices of commodities; annual reports are also ' Since 1882 there have been only two occasions on which the president of the board was not included in the cabinet.

  • The old Austria was very richly provided with raw materials; the coal and iron supply was especially rich; in the years immediately preceding the war the production of these two commodities followed in general a rising curve.

  • The average prices per kilogram of certain commodities in Lower Austria are shown in Table IX.: TABLE IX.-Average Food Prices (heller per kilogram).

  • This very cheapening of many commodities in 1913, side by side with which went also a cheapening of many manufactured articles, was indicated as the sign of a decline in the power of consumption of the population.

  • This factor was the rupture of communications with foreign countries, due in the earlier stages of the war to the limitation, and at one time the prohibition, of exports by neutral countries, the passing over of some of these countries to the enemy, and lastly the blockade by the enemy Powers, which increased in efficiency and made it more and more difficult to import the most essential commodities, until in the end it was almost impossible to obtain from abroad anything, needed either for the soldiers or the civilians.

  • The great mass of manufactured commodities were produced in the United Kingdom more cheaply than in foreign countries, and would not have been imported, with duty or without, except in sporadic amounts for some special qualities.

  • Machinery, coal, iron, woollens, ships, lead and copper are the commodities supplied by the United Kingdom.

  • The commodities otherwise mostly dealt in are opium, tea, rice, oil, raw cotton, fish and silk.

  • The weight of this ideal gold dollar would be adjusted at intervals in accordance with its power to purchase commodities as shown by the " index number " of prices.

  • The most important of the local dues is the gate tax, or dazio di consumo, which may be either a surtax upon commodities (such as alcoholic drinks or meat), having already paid customs duty at the frontier, in which case the local surtax may not exceed 50% of the frontier duty, or an exclusively communal duty limited to 10% on flour, bread and farinaceous products,2 and to 20% upon other commodities.

  • We will know it is coming when formerly scarce items, such as commodities, fall in price.

  • Other noteworthy sources of revenue are trade licences, direct taxes on lands and forests, stamp duties, posts and telegraphs, indirect taxes on tobacco, sugar and other commodities, the crown forests, and land redemption payable annually by the peasants since 1861.

  • His thoughts wandered to Billy Langstrom's love-widow Melissa, now absent even those precious two commodities with which to face the world.

  • It stands at the head of the effective navigation on the Rhine, and is not only the largest port on the upper course of that stream, but is the principal emporium for south Germany for such commodities as cereals, coal, petroleum, timber, sugar and tobacco, with a large trade in hops, wine and other south German produce.

  • On the 24th of July 1663 he alone signed a protest against the bill " for the encouragement of trade," on the plea that owing to the free export of coin and bullion allowed by the act, and to the importation of foreign commodities being greater than the export of home goods, " it must necessarily follow.

  • The commodities which the United Kingdom principally takes are wheat, wool, barley, eggs, oats and flax.

  • The industries of the town and its environs (Sandnaes, &c.) are prosperous, including factories for preserved foods, woollens and linens, lime, iodine from seaweed, and domestic commodities.

  • Commercial geography may be defined as the description of the earth's surface with special reference to the discovery, production, transport and exchange of commodities.

  • It aimed at the prohibition of discrimination between persons, places and commodities.

  • of wood and tiles, and well stored with commodities.

  • The native chiefs engaged in forays, sometimes even on their own subjects,for the purpose of procuring slaves to be exchanged for Western commodities.

  • On either side of the canal are the warehouses of wholesale dealers in cotton, wool, sugar, grain and other commodities.

  • It was thereafter frequented by traders for ivory, slaves and other commodities.

  • The cost of living increased on the whole; it was only in 1913 that there was a fall in the price of certain important commodities.

  • When the war came to an end Austria was almost completely stripped of many important commodities.

  • The chief commodities of trade arc coal, grain, lumber, flour and various products of the city's own manufactories.

  • HOGSHEAD, a cask for holding liquor or other commodities, such as tobacco, sugar, molasses, &c.; also a liquid measure of capacity, varying with the contents.

  • In 1803 a commission met to consider the state of the Dutch colonies, and advocated drastic administrative and commercial reforms, notably freedom' of trade in all commodities except firearms, opium, rice and wood - with coffee, pepper and spices, which were state monopolies.

  • In the treaty as finally framed duties on most manufactured commodities were reduced to a range of 1 0 or 15 per cent., some iron manufactures, however, being left at slightly higher rates.

  • The trend of the tariff policy of the Zollverein for some time after 1834 was towards protection; partly because the specific duties of 1818 became proportionately heavier as manufactured commodities fell in price, partly because some actual changes in rates were made in response to the demands of the Protectionist states.

  • In 1857 duties were still further reduced, the rate on most protected commodities going down to 24 per cent., and remaining at this comparatively low level until the outbreak of the Civil War.

  • The internal taxes of the war were applied not only in the form of income taxes, stamp taxes, licence and gross receipts taxes, but also as direct excise taxes on many commodities.

  • Thus the ten years immediately following the close of the war brought about the gradual transformation of the high duties levied on all commodities for revenue purposes into a system of high duties almost wholly on protective commodities.

  • vanced duties materially on a considerable number of commodities, both raw materials and manufactured articles.

  • This standard is the basis of the bushel used in the United States and Canada; but other "bushels" for use in connexion with certain commodities have been legalized in different states.

  • Over £1,250,000 worth of the exports consisted of coffee and bananas, and these commodities were of almost equal value.

  • "Labour," Smith answers, "is the real measure of the exchangeable value of all commodities."

  • In every improved society, then, these three elements enter more or less into the price of the far greater part of commodities.

  • A broad line of demarcation is thus drawn between the labour which results in commodities or increased value of commodities, and that which does no more than render services: the former is productive, the latter unproductive.

  • The prodigal, encroaching on his capital, diminishes, as far as in him lies, the amount of productive labour, and so the wealth of the country; nor is this result affected by his expenditure being on home-made, as distinct from foreign commodities.

  • Commercially, Cologne is one of the chief centres on the Rhine, and has a very important trade in corn, wine, mineral ores, coals, drugs, dyes, manufactured wares, groceries, leather and hides, timber, porcelain and many other commodities.

  • A unique scene in a tomb of the IVth Dynasty, however, shows men and women exchanging commodities against each otherfish, fish-hooks, fans, necklaces, &c. Probably this was a market in the open air such as is held weekly at the present time in every considerable village.

  • Every sentimental consideration was against a Union with a prelatic kingdom, " an auld enemy," which drove a hard bargain by threats of excluding Scottish commodities.

  • Herbert was that " ships, be sides the transporting of richer varieties from place to place, consociate the most remote regions of the earth by participation of commodities and other excellencies to each other."

  • The islands retain the exemption from direct taxation which they enjoyed under the British protectorate; in lieu of this there is an ad valorem tax of 202% on exported oil and a tax of 6% on wine exported to Greek ports; these commodities are further liable to an export duty of 12%, which is levied on all agricultural produce and articles of local manufacture for the maintenance and construction of roads.

  • It imports commodities to the value of nearly 2,000,000 yearly, half of which is coal, with petroleum, iron, cereals, &c. In 1906, 777,000 tons of shipping, of which about half was British, and most of the rest Italian, entered.

  • In those districts where the staples of export are largely grown, the cultivators commonly sell their crops to travelling brokers, who re-sell to larger dealers, and so on until the commodities reach the hands of the agents of the great shipping houses.

  • The most important feature was the market-square, often surrounded by arcades with stalls for the sale of the principal commodities, and with a number of straight streets leading thence to the city gates.

  • On the other hand, the most important commodities offered for sale in the market had been subject to official examination already in Carolingian times.

  • Calhoun, believing that there was a natural tendency in the United States towards the development of manufactures, supported the Tariff Bill of 1816, which laid on certain foreign commodities duties higher than were necessary for the purposes of revenue.

  • Land, cattle and slaves are the principal kinds of wealth, and they are all constituents of the king's revenue; enforced work contributed by members of the community, and the furnishing commodities on requisition, further aid in the maintenance of the primitive state.

  • The public land yielded receipts which may indifferently be regarded as rents or taxes; the citizens contributed their services or commodities, and dues were raised on certain articles coming to market.

  • The barbarian invaders, though they were accustomed to contributions to their chiefs and to the payment of commodities as tributes or as penalties, had no acquaintance with the working of a regular system of taxation.

  • As tax contributions have taken the places of the revenue from land and fees, so, it would seem, are the taxes on commodities likely to be replaced or at least exceeded by the imposts levied on income as such, in the shape either of income taxes proper or of charges on accumulated wealth.

  • Hence the very general limitation of local revenues to certain typical forms. Though in some cases municipal taxation is imposed on commodities in the form of octrois or entry duties - as is notably the case in France yet the prevailing tendency is towards the levy of direct charges on immovable property, which cannot escape by removal outside the tax jurisdiction.

  • Shall he not be able thereby to produce worthy effects, and to endow the life of man with infinite commodities ?

  • The imports include manufactured goods, coal and other commodities.

  • Trade in other commodities, however, is on the increase, exports now amounting to nearly half a million sterling and imports to half that figure.

  • Seeking for commercial profit, not in the exchange of commodities, but solely in the acquisition of actual gold and silver, and realizing that the home market could not absorb a tithe of the merchandise imported, the Lisbon capitalists sent their ships to discharge in Antwerp (where a Portuguese staple was established in 1503), or in some other port near the central markets of Europe.

  • The imposition of the import duty on tea and other commodities was the project of Charles Townshend, and was carried into effect in 1767 without consultation with Lord Chatham, if not in opposition to his wishes.

  • AVOIRDUPOIS, or Averdupois (from the French avoir de pois, goods of weight), the name of a system of weights used in Great Britain and America for all commodities except the precious metals, gems and medicines.

  • The Latin word itself has various meanings: (1) the produce of the year's harvest; (2) all means of subsistence, especially grain stored in the public granaries for provisioning the city; (3) the market-price of commodities, especially corn; (4) a direct tax in kind, levied in republican times in several provinces, chiefly employed in imperial times for distribution amongst officials and the support of the soldiery.

  • Podgoritsa receives from the eastern plains and the north-eastern highlands a great quantity of tobacco, fruit, cereals, honey, silk, livestock and other commodities, which it distributes through Plavnitsa, its port on Lake Scutari, and through Riyeka to Cettigne and Cattaro.

  • These wars tended to paralyse industries in the countries affected, which were thus forced to English markets to buy manufactured commodities.

  • Marsivan is an unusually European place both in its aspect and the commodities procurable in the bazaar.

  • The next great group of taxes is that of the excise (q.v.) and customs duties upon commodities.

  • Excise duties are charges upon commodities produced at home on their way to the consumer, and customs duties in the United Kingdom are charges upon commodities brought into the country from abroad; and they are of essentially the same nature.

  • The list of commodities selected for taxation in the English fiscal system, under Free Trade, is very small.

  • Among these tolls may perhaps be included some charges in the nature of octroi dues, imposed on commodities entering a town, but not to a great extent.

  • [Adam Smith specially praises indirect taxes on commodities under this head, because the consumer "pays them by little and little as he buys the goods," and "it must be his own fault if he ever suffers any considerable inconveniency from such taxes."] 4.

  • The colony has not only a large trade in its own commodities, but owes much of its commerce to the transit of goods to and from the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Rhodesia.

  • That Baltimore has grown rapidly as a manufacturing city since 1880 is seen from the fact that in that year there were but 3683 manufacturing establishments, with a total annual product valued at $78,417,304, as compared with 6359 establishments (of which 2274 were under the factory system) in 1900 producing commodities valued at $161,249,240 ($135,107,626 under the factory system); in 1905 there were 2163 establishments under the factory system with a total annual product valued at $151,546,580, an increase of 12.2% in the five years.

  • Baltimore is also a well-known centre for the manufacture of clothing, in which in 1905 ($22,684,656) it ranked fourth among the cities of the United States; for cigar and cigarette-making (1905, $4,360,366); for the manufacture of foundry and machine shop products (1905, $6,572,925), of tinware (1905, $5,705,980), of„shirts (1905, $5,710,783), of cotton-duck (the output of sailduck being about three-fourths of the total for the United States), bricks (about 150,000,000 annually), and fertilizers; it also manufactures furniture,malt liquors,and confectionery, and many other commodities in smaller amounts.

  • The daily activities of the great mass of the adult population, in countries where commodities are sold at definite prices for definite quantities, include calculations which have often to be performed rapidly, on data orally given, and leading in general to results which can only be approximate; and almost every branch of manufacture or commerce has its own range of applications of arithmetic. Arithmetic as a school subject has been largely regarded from this point of view.

  • In the town and district are numerous saw-mills, planing, cotton-spinning and flour-mills, factories for wood-pulp and domestic commodities, also a copper mine (at Omdal).

  • As some compensation for the low pay of the workmen, parliament tried to bring down the price of commodities to their former level, for (like labor) all manufactured articles had gone up immensely in value.

  • The latter, hard hit by the manorial difficulties that followed the plague o~f 1348-1349, found their rents stationary or even diminishing, while the price of the commodities from which the former made their wealth had permanently risen.

  • Edward did mercial much in his later years to develop interchange of develop- commodities with the Baltic, making treaties with ment.

  • The rivers furnish good water power, which is used in the manufacture of a variety of commodities, including foundry products, paper and pulp, woollen goods, hosiery, saws, needles and knitting machines.

  • The first English expedition to Benin was in 1553; after that time a considerable trade grew up between England and that country, ivory, palm-oil and pepper being the chief commodities exported from Benin.

  • In the first half of the 17th century the site of the garden was laid out as a square by Inigo Jones, with a piazza on two sides; and as early as 1656 it was becoming a market place for the same commodities as are now sold in it.

  • iv., it was held that a state licence tax discriminating against commodities the production of other states was void as abridging the privileges and immunities of the citizens of such other states (Ward v.

  • The system is rounded off by a number of trade federations for the sale and purchase of various commodities.

  • In 1637 duties were imposed on the chief commodities to foreign nations not in league with England.

  • No tax, either on commodities or property, was higher in Ireland than in England.

  • This it did at one time hold, when the treasure acquired by the discovery of America and the conquest of Mexico and Peru was squandered in the purchase of various commodities from England, the Netherlands and other countries.

  • In 1602, in command of the "Concord," chartered by Sir Walter Raleigh and others, he crossed the Atlantic; coasted from what is now Maine to Martha's Vineyard, landing at and naming Cape Cod and Elizabeth Island (now Cuttyhunk) and giving the name Martha's Vineyard to the island now called No Man's Land; and returned to England with a cargo of furs, sassafras and other commodities obtained in trade with the Indians about Buzzard's Bay.

  • to secure freedom from the Moors, it was an ad valorem tax of 10, increased afterwards to 14%, on the selling price of all commodities, whether raw or manufactured, chargeable as often as they were sold or exchanged.

  • gabulum, gablum, a tax, for the origin of which see Gavelkind), a term which, in France, was originally applied to taxes on all commodities, but was gradually limited to the tax on salt.

  • This rather antiquated system is, however, a crucial part of the setting of prices for metal commodities throughout the world.

  • bearish on commodities (and house prices) recently and has 70 billion " ready " to invest.

  • The same situation has taken place in economics, industry, etc. The list of commodities (goods and services) has become boundless.

  • carbamate levels in fruit and vegetables has revealed that levels can vary in some commodities.

  • An ingrossed Bill for repealing certain clauses in an Act for prohibiting French Commodities, was read a Third time.

  • commodity favorite ploy is to call for investment in infrastructure to enable native people to produce commodities for sale to the west.

  • commodityse commodities traders seeking an inside tip on short-term squash futures?

  • commoditylass="ex">Bulk commodities are piled above, inspected by Mahu.

  • commodityall citizens of the world and should conduct ourselves as human beings, not trading commodities.

  • congealed in certain commodities, and consequently changes the value of those commodities.

  • It would seem that many of us would spend the entirety of our Sunday in hot pursuit of these rare commodities.

  • exports of all commodities.

  • fetishism of commodities.

  • Therefore a Standing Committee will be formed for rationalizing the existing rates of value addition for all commodities including readymade garments.

  • Much of this transport is needless: every day, identical commodities pass in opposite directions, criss-crossing the globe.

  • interchange of commodities.

  • prized commodities, as recorded in the tribute pages of the Codex Mendoza.

  • Are these commodities traders seeking an inside tip on short-term squash futures?

  • The export of raw hides and wool is considerable; in 1898 these commodities were valued respectively at £90,400 and f 24,000.

  • In the same way certain governments become famous for certain commodities, as Moscow for osier baskets, flower baskets, wicker furniture and lace; Kostroma for lace, wooden utensils, toys, wooden spoons, cups and bowls, bast sacks and mats, bast boots and garden products; Yaroslavl for furniture, brass samovars, saucepans, spurs, rings, &c.; Vladimir for furniture, osier baskets and flower-stands and sickles; NizhniyNovgorod for bast mats and sacks, knives, forks and scissors; Tver for lace, nails, sieves, anchors, fish-hooks, locks, coarse clay pottery, saddlery and harness, boots and shoes, and so on.

  • The 18th century has a goodly tale of Jewish artists in metal-work, makers of pottery, and (wherever the gilds permitted it) artisans and wholesale manufacturers of many important commodities.

  • (This is the interpretation adopted by Dubois, pp. 86, 92, following Dittenberger.) We find other Eastern merchants resident here - merchants from Heliopolis, Berytus (Beirut), Nabataea, Palestine, and from Asia Minor, Greece, &c. We find far less trace of commercial relations with the West, though there was considerable importation of commodities from southern Spain - wine, oil, metals, salt fish, &c., while a good ` deal of pottery was exported to Spain and southern Gaul.

  • The essentially dishonest practice of deluging yarn with water, which has sometimes even degenerated into the use of weighting materials deleterious to weaving, has been recognized as a great nuisance, but while various attempts have been made to protect the buyer the question seems to have pretty well settled itself on the principles which commonly rule the sales of commodities between those who intend to do business continuously.

  • In the same year he secured the negotiation of the Gadsden Treaty (see Gadsden, James), by which the boundary dispute between Mexico and the United States was adjusted and a large area was added to the Federal domain; and in June 1854 he concluded with Lord Elgin, governor-general of Canada, acting for the British Government, a treaty designed to settle the fisheries question and providing for tariff reciprocity (as regards certain enumerated commodities) between Canada and the United States.

  • Only two things indicated the social condition of Moscow--the rabble, that is the poor people, and the price of commodities.

  • Regional buying power will be used to purchase commodities such as Wheeled bins, recycling containers and composting units.

  • These opportunities include, but are not limited to, shares, debt, and commodities.

  • LTD Commodities, a popular catalog company, offers a "pay later" option for those who sign up for business accounts.

  • LTD Commodities sells housewares, gifts, clothing and home décor items in low price ranges.

  • This company sells the same types of items as LTD Commodities.

  • Watson also stated that veganism applies "to the exclusion of flesh, fish, fowl, eggs, honey, animal milk and its derivatives, and encourages the use of alternatives for all commodities derived wholly or in part from animals."

  • She's since kept busy, starring in Broadway's Festen (The Celebration) in 2006 and although she's past the age where Hollywood actresses are considered sexy commodities, she's won acclaim from men's magazine GQ.

  • Research is important when looking for a new puppy or adult dog to bring into your home, especially in the case of Cavachons since they are also highly prized commodities on the puppy mill market.

  • Diagnosed narcoleptics are valuable commodities to these research centers.

  • Today, many park enthusiasts have preserved older maps as valuable collectibles that showcase the changes the park has undergone over the years, and they are often hot commodities to other park fans.

  • All land is originally "created" by Linden Lab, but after it is purchased or given to a user, the land (and other commodities) can be bought and sold much like a real world market.

  • There are a number of commodities for sale at each of the ports, and just like in real life, the prices for these items fluctuate quite a bit and vary significantly from area to area.

  • Quite the contrary, in fact, as it provides quite a bit of variety -- trading commodities, performing tasks for the governor, and battling it out with other pirates -- but I can't imagine playing this game through to its conclusion.

  • One of the hottest commodities on the Internet today are High School Musical 2 MP3 files.

  • Many of the questions of the greatest practical importance at the present time, such as the competition between old and new methods of manufacturing commodities substantially the same in kind, and equally useful to the great body of consumers, arise largely from the immobility of capital or labour, or both of them.

  • In the East End and other poor quarters a large trade in second-hand clothing, flowers and vegetables, and many other commodities is carried on in the streets on movable stalls by costermongers and hawkers.

  • His "theorie des debouches" amounts to this, that, products being, in last analysis, purchased only with products, the extent of the markets (or outlets) for home products is proportional to the quantity of foreign productions; when the sale of any commodity is dull, it is because there is not a sufficient number, or rather value, of other commodities produced with which it could be purchased.

  • "Rent, therefore, enters into the price of commodities in a different way from wages and profits.

  • The price of a pig was twice, and that of an ox six times as great as that of a sheep. Regarding the prices of commodities other than live-stock we have little definite information, though an approximate estimate may be made of the value of arms. It is worth noticing that we often hear of payments in gold and silver vessels in place of money.

  • He goes on to show that the variations of prices are due solely to money and commodities in circulation.

  • to Melos in the earlier Second City Period of Phylakope) and to Cyprus, receiving in return such commodities as Melian obsidian knives.

  • Syria, and manufactures textiles in silk, cotton and wool, carpets and leather commodities, besides being the centre of a large district growing cereals, pistachios and fruit.

  • Throughout most of the villages in the rural tracts men, women and children all take part in the agricultural operations, although in riverine villages whole families often support themselves from the sale of petty commodities and eatables.

  • The Germans recognized the staple rights of Bruges for a number of commodities, such as wool, wax, furs, copper and grain, and in return for this material contribution to the growing commercial importance of the town, they received in 1309 freedom from the compulsory brokerage which Bruges imposed on foreign merchants.

  • Cacao, tobacco, cotton, rice and indigo are grown in the neighbouring country, and the town has a considerable trade in these and other commodities; it also manufactures sugar, fans and woven fabrics.

  • Some commodities, however, are subject to a monopoly of production, whether from the peculiarities of a locality or from legal privilege: their price is always the highest that can be got; the natural price of other commodities is the lowest which can be taken for any length of time together.

  • The imports consist of the usual commodities required by a population where little of the land is actually cultivated.

  • From the internal, as distinct from the international, aspect, the absolute quantity of money, supposed as of fixed amount, in a country, is of no consequence, while a quantity larger than is required for the interchange of commodities is injurious, as tending to raise prices and to drive foreigners from the home markets.

  • Properly a "duty" differs from a "tax" in being levied on specific commodities, transactions, estates, &c., and not on individuals; thus it is right to talk of import-duties, excise-duties, deathor succession-duties, &c., but of income-tax as being levied on a person in proportion to his income.

  • On the other hand, the commodities which poured into Venice and Genoa from the East had to find a route for their diffusion through Europe.

  • "Labour alone, therefore, never varying in its own value, is alone the ultimate and real standard by which the value of all commodities can at all times and places be estimated and compared.

  • As regards their geographical distribution, fungi, like flowering plants, have no doubt their centres of origin and of dispersal; but we must not forget that every exchange of wood, wheat, fruits, plants, animals, or other commodities involves transmission of fungi from one country to another; while the migrations of birds and other animals, currents of air and water, and so forth, are particularly efficacious in transmitting these minute organisms. Against this, of course, it may be argued that parasitic forms can only go where their hosts grow, as is proved to be the case by records concerning the introduction of Puccinia malvacearum, Peronospora viticola, Hemileia vastatrix, &c. Some fungi - e.g.

  • All these commodities are exported in considerable quantities, besides bitumen, which is obtained from a mine worked by a French III.

  • A large part of the foreign trade is in their hands, and at the season of the sheep-shearing their agents and representatives are found everywhere among the Bedouins and Madan Arabs of the interior, purchasing the wool and selling various commodities in return.

  • After the division of the Roman empire, Constantinople became the last refuge of learning, arts and taste; while Alexandria continued to be the emporium whence were imported the commodities of the East.

  • It is therefore extraordinarily difficult at present to know what happens, or rather what would happen if it were not prevented, when a country reaches " the stage of diminishing returns "; what precisely it is which comes into operation, for obviously the diminishing returns are the results, not the cause; or how commodities " obey " a law which is always " suspended."

  • The extension of the "maximum" to all commodities onry increased the confusion.

  • The most important manufactures are iron and steel, carriage hardware, electrical supplies, bridges, boilers, engines, car wheels, sewing machines, printing presses, agricultural implements, and various other commodities made wholly or chiefly from iron and steel.

  • Through it passed the silks of Bambyce, called bombazines, the light textiles of Mosul (mosulines - muslins) and many other commodities for the wealthy and luxurious.

  • The first step was to decree the penalty of six years' imprisonment against any person who should sell specie for a more considerable quantity of assignats, or who should stipulate a different price for commodities according as the payment was to be made in specie or in assignats.

  • Tea makes up nearly one-half of the imports, the other commodities being silks, cottons, hides and wool; while cottons and other manufactured wares constitute considerably over 50% of the exports.

  • A Japanese does not say the poison killed him but he died on account of the poison; nor does he say the war has caused commodities to appreciate, but commodities have appreciated in consequence of the war.

  • The possibility that it had been brought to England by Cabot or some of his successors earlier in the century is not to be overlooked, and reasons will presently be assigned for supposing that one of the breeds of English turkeys may have had a northern origin;' but the of tenquoted distich first given in Baker's Chronicle (p. 298), asserting that turkeys came into England in the same year - and that year by reputation 2524 - as carps, pickerels and other commodities, is wholly untrustworthy, for we know that both these fishes lived in the country long before, if indeed they were not indigenous to it.

  • It has a large trade in wool, flax and grain, its markets for these commodities being very numerously attended.

  • The fact that during the period under review Egypt suffered very severely from the general fall in the price of commodities makes the prosperity of the country the more remarkable.

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