Comes sentence example

comes
  • The truth comes out eventually.
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  • She doesn't know that giving it to any man she comes across basically makes her his wife.
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  • A single word comes to mind.
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  • "Jen's going to finish up this fall and graduate in December, before the baby comes," Cynthia said.
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  • I don't care if he comes to me.
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  • It costs more than it comes to.
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  • If he comes in here, there's no way out.
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  • She may live an eternity, even if her soul comes to you eventually, Darkyn explained.
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  • I have to do it before Gabriel comes for me.
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  • The election comes up in August.
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  • We keep a record of everyone who comes through.
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  • What are we supposed to say to some strange man when he comes down for his morning meal?
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  • The dust is chiefly of local origin, but partly comes from the Sahara.
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  • No less than 96% of the world's supply of platinum comes from the Urals; but the total output only ranges between 10,000 and 16,000 lb annually.
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  • In the form of an old woman named Deo (= the " seeker," or simply a diminutive form), she comes to the house of Celeus at Eleusis, where she is hospitably received.
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  • Above this comes a row of circular shields, adorned with intricate arabesques, while bands and wreaths of lilies are everywhere scupltured on the windows, balconies, tambours and cornices, adding lightness to the fabric. The whole is raised on a platform 7 ft.
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  • It is the general rule, with frequent exceptions, that the quotidian paroxysm comes on in the morning, the tertian about noon, and the quartan in the afternoon.
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  • The powerful fleet and maritime empire which Minos was said to have established will no doubt receive fuller illustration when the sea-town of Cnossus comes to be explored.
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  • Holmes (Caesar's Conquest of Gaul, 1899), who comes to the conclusion that "when the Reman delegates told Caesar that the Belgae were descended from the Germans, they probably only meant that the ancestors of the Belgic conquerors had formerly dwelt in Germany, and this is equally true of the ancestors of the Gauls who gave their name to the Celtae; but, on the other hand, it is quite possible that in the veins of some of the Belgae flowed the blood of genuine German forefathers."
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  • The union which sound religious teaching represents as realized in the submission of the will and the ethical harmony of the whole life is then reduced to a, passive experience, to something which comes and goes in time, and which may be of only momentary duration.
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  • When we have mentioned vanilla, which consists of the fleshy pods of an orchid, we have mentioned about the only economic product that now comes into market.
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  • Although the foregoing account of the temperatures of Asia supplies the main outline of the observed phenomena, a very important modifying cause, of which more will be said hereafter, comes into operation over the whole of the tropical region, namely, the periodical summer rains.
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  • The heated body of air carried from the Indian Ocean over southern Asia by the south-west monsoon comes up highly charged with watery vapour, and hence in a condition to release a large body of water as rain upon the land, whenever it is brought into circumstances which reduce its temperature in a notable degree.
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  • In the aquatic genera the epidermis comes to consist entirely of glandular cells, which are, however, arranged in a single layer.
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  • He comes to Attica and dies in the grove of the Eumenides at Colonus, in his death welcomed and pardoned by the fate which had pursued him throughout his life.
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  • The export that comes next in value is silk, and after it may be named wheat, barley, manganese ore, maize, wool, oilcake, carpets, rye, oats, liquorice and timber.
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  • - (Residence at the Court of London, p. 286.) Bentham's love of flowers and music, of green foliage and shaded walks, comes clearly out in this pleasant picture of his home life and social surroundings.
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  • Next comes a second ploughing of the fallow; and afterwards, in the latter end of June, the mowing of the meadows begins.
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  • "It is a wyues occupation," he says, " to wynowe all maner of comes, to make malte, to washe and wrynge, to make heye, shere come, and, in time of nede, to helpe her husbande to fyll the mucke wayne or dounge carte, dryue the ploughe, to loode heye, come and suche other; and to go or ride to the market to sel butter, chese, mylke, egges, chekyns, capons, hennes, pygges, gese, and all maner of comes."
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  • Most, if not all, of the important knowledge of remedies comes from America, where this subject reaches the highest perfection; even the life-histories of some of the British pests have been traced out in the United States and British colonies more completely than at home, from the creatures that have been introduced from Europe.
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  • " It comes into operation at a certain and not very advanced stage in the progress of agriculture."
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  • It is therefore extraordinarily difficult at present to know what happens, or rather what would happen if it were not prevented, when a country reaches " the stage of diminishing returns "; what precisely it is which comes into operation, for obviously the diminishing returns are the results, not the cause; or how commodities " obey " a law which is always " suspended."
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  • His camp-followers on the Gillies' Hill appeared over its crest at the critical moment which comes in all battles.
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  • Introduced into Britain at the beginning of the 17th century, the silver fir has become common there as a planted tree, though, like the Norway spruce, it rarely comes up from seed scattered naturally.
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  • From these three pairs of thoracic legs comes the name - Hexapoda - which distinguishes the class.
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  • Below this comes the front, and then the face or clypeus, to which a very distinct upper lip (labrum) is usually jointed.
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  • 3, Then comes the radial - usually 4 the most important nervure of the wing - typically with five branches, and the median with four.
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  • Our earliest information about the Ephthalites comes from the Chinese chronicles, in which it is stated that they were originally a tribe of the great Yue-Chi, living to the north of the Great Wall, and in subjection to the Jwen-Jwen, as were also the Turks at one time.
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  • Below the pediment comes an arcade with flat pilasters, which runs all round the exterior of the church.
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  • Above the shaft comes the arcaded bell-chamber, frequently built of Istrian stone; and above that again the attic, either round or square or octagonal, carrying either a cone or a pyramid or a cupola, sometimes surmounted by a cross or a gilded angel which serves as a weathercock.
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  • Nearly 60% of it comes in the spring and summer.
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  • A tenancy at will is determined by either party alienating his interest as soon as such alienation comes to the knowledge of the other.
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  • (vi.) Tenancy at Suferance.- A tenant who comes into possession by a lawful demise, but " holds over " or continues in possession after his estate is ended, is said to be a " tenant at sufferance."
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  • There remains one other important group, the so-called " kidney " cottons in which there are only long hairs, and the seed easily comes away clean as with " Sea Island," but, instead of each seed being separate, the whole group in each of the three compartments of the capsule is firmly united together in a more or less kidney-shaped mass.
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  • The rule is that on the first of the two months the seller of " futures " may, and before the last day of the second month must, deliver cotton against them, or, what comes to the same thing, buy back the " futures " on the basis of the price of " spot " cotton of middling grade.
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  • The miraculous germs always exist alongside other germs in a sort of sheath, like hidden springs in a machine, and emerge into the light when their time comes."
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  • But that view which admits a life of God that is not benumbed in an unchangeable sameness will be able to understand his eternal co-working as a variable quantity, the transforming influence of which comes forth at particular moments and attests that the course of nature is not shut up within itself.
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  • Large tanks of boiler-plate are used to receive the oil as it comes through the pipe-lines.
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  • Seven-eighths of the revenue comes from the hut tax and customs. The average annual revenue for the five years 1901-1905 was £96,880; the average annual expenditure £69,559.
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  • This disagreement comes largely from the attempts made to find definitely expressed Greek philosophical dogmas in the book; such formulas it has not, but the general air of Greek reflection seems unmistakable.
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  • Transparent soaps are prepared by dissolving ordinary soap in strong alcohol and distilling off the greater portion of the alcohol till the residue comes to the condition of a thick transparent jelly.
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  • This, when cast into forms and allowed to harden and dry slowly, comes out as transparent soap. A class of transparent soap may also be made by the cold process, with the use of coco-nut oil, castor oil and sugar.
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  • But according to one, the second part of the word comes from the Greek Xv��ia, pouring, infusion, used in connexion with the study of the juices of plants, and thence extended to chemical manipulations in general; this derivation accounts for the old-fashioned spellings " chymist " and " chymistry."
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  • He comes from the east, that is, the land of the rising sun.
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  • In the next place comes the evidence derived from the whole range of ancient literature and specially from descriptions of the city or its different localities.
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  • Mount Morrison (14,270 ft.), which the Japanese re-named Niitaka-yama (New High Mountain), stands first, and Mount Sylvia (12,480 ft.), to which they give the name of Setzu-zan (Snowy Mountain), comes second.
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  • This method, as originally proposed, is not in common use, but has been superseded by Kjeldahl's method, since the nitrogen generally comes out too low.
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  • When he comes to the point where his memory has been clouded by Hagen's spells, Hagen restores his memory with another magic potion.
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  • The quiet expression of these startling ideas is more remarkable than their adoption; for smaller artists live on still more startling ideas; but most remarkable of all is the presentation of Parsifal, both in his foolishness and in the widsom which comes to him through pity.
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  • In his theories the element of mystical speculation for the first time comes to the front as all-important.
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  • Internal evidence again comes to our aid to lend its weight to the latter theory.
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  • The " Preparative Meeting " usually consists of a single congregation; next in order comes the " Monthly Meeting," the executive body, usually embracing several Preparative Meetings called together, as its name indicates, monthly (in some cases less often); then the " Quarterly Meeting," embracing several Monthly Meetings; and lastly the " Yearly Meeting," embracing the whole of Great Britain (but not Ireland).
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  • The headland is known to the Somali as Girdif or Yardaf - whence in all probability comes the European form Guardafui.
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  • The musk-ox comes in thousands every year to the great northern lakes, while the mink, marten, beaver, otter, ermine and musk-rat are sought by the fur-trader.
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  • Another branch from Calgary runs southward to Macleod, and to Lethbridge there comes from the south a branch of the Great Northern railway of the United States, connecting with the state of Montana.
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  • Not very long after the disappearance of serfdom in the most advanced communities comes into sight the new system of colonial slavery, which, instead of being the spontaneous outgrowth of social necessities and subserving a temporary need of human development, was politically as well as morally a monstrous aberration.
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  • There is also a thick woolly under-fur, shed in summer, when the whole coat comes off in blanket-like masses.
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  • The first sheet of a roll was named the last, Under the Romans, the former bore the name of the comes largitionum, who had control of the manufacture, with the date and name of place.
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  • Fravashi properly means "confession of faith," and when personified comes to be regarded as a protecting spirit.
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  • Now Ampliatus is a servile name: how comes it to be set up with such distinction in the sepulchre of the Flavii ?
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  • The left branch is appreciably noticed near Odessa and the north-west corner; the right branch sweeps past the Crimea, strikes the Caucasian shore (where it comes to the surface running across, but not into, the south-east corner of the Black Sea), and finally disperses flowing westwards along the northern coast of Asia Minor between Cape Jason and 1 The early Greek navigators gave it the epithet of axenus, i.e.
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  • The sulphur is dissolved by superheated water forced down pipes, and the water with sulphur in solution is forced upward by hot air pressure through other pipes; the sulphur comes, 99% pure, to the surface of the ground, where it is cooled in immense bins, and then broken up and loaded directly upon cars for shipment.
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  • Opposite to the promontory of Sabbioncello, and at the entrance to the Bocche di Cattaro, the frontier of Herzegovina comes down to the Adriatic; but these two strips of coast do not contain any good harbour, and extend only for a total distance of 141 m.
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  • Below the mountain crests, where only the hardiest lichens and mosses can survive, comes a belt of large timber, including many giant trees, 200 ft.
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  • The classical period comes to an end with Nedim; its brightest time is that which falls between the rise of Nef'i and the death of Nedim, or, more roughly, that extending from the accession of Ahmed I.
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  • The municipal water supply comes from a reservoir at Crystal Springs at the foot of Mill Mountain near the city limits.
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  • He sought the truth from whatever quarter he could get it, believing that all that is good comes from God, wherever it be found.
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  • The patient consulting the god sleeps in the Abaton, sees certain visions, and, as a result, comes forth cured the next morning.
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  • This final moult is effected soon after the insect's appearance in the winged form; the creature seeks a temporary resting-place, the pellicle splits down the back, and the now perfect insect comes forth, often differing very greatly in colours and markings from the condition in which it was only a few moments before.
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  • To the east of it comes the Museum for Art and Industry, founded in 1878, now one of the most important institutions of the kind in Germany, with which is connected a trades school.
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  • But if one ion, say the anion, travels faster through the liquid than the other, the end of the solution from which it comes will be more exhausted of salt than the end towards which it goes.
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  • Since zinc goes into solution and copper comes out, the electromotive force of the cell will be the difference between the two effects.
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  • Behind the citadel, and along its glacis on the southern side, are the gardens of Kalemegdan, commanding a famous view across the river; behind Kalemegdan comes Belgrade itself, a city of white houses, among which a few great public buildings, like the high school, national bank, national theatre and the so-called New Palace, stand forth prominently.
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  • The rubber comes into commerce in thick strips or sheets or as " scrap."
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  • Plantation rubber comes into commerce in the form of the crinkled ribbons known as crepe, in sheets or biscuits, and sometimes in large blocks made by compressing the crepe rubber.
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  • Only a small quantity of this rubber comes to England, and it is not much valued, being a " wet " rubber.
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  • Outside of these alpine regions comes a broad belt of elevated plains, ranging between 1200 and 1700 ft.
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  • Farther to the north-west, beyond these high plains, comes a broad belt of lowlands.
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  • After this short period of frost and snow summer comes in its full beauty; the days are very hot, and, although they are always followed by cold nights, vegetation advances at an astonishing rate.
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  • 5-11 is a genuine prophecy of the raising up of the Chaldaeans, whence comes that long experience of their rule required to explain the detailed denunciation of their tyranny?
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  • 5% lead if it comes from a Pattinson plant, from 5-to% if from a Parkes plant.
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  • In the meantime the lead in the moulds, which has solidified, is removed with the crane and stacked to one side, until its turn comes to be raised and charged into one of the pans.
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  • The oxychloride comes down as an amorphous white precipitate.
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  • Under various local names (the Garrigues, the mountains of Espinouse and Lacaune) and with numerous offshoots the range extends south-east and then east to the Montagne Noire, which runs parallel to the Canal du Midi and comes to an end some 25 m.
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  • So that a man may say his religion is now no more within himself, but is become a dividual moveable, which goes or comes near him, according as that good man frequents the house."
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  • It has also been held that the word Africa comes from friqi, farikia (the country of fruit).
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  • The anthers are so situated that the pollen on escaping comes into contact with the stigma; in such flowers self-fertilization is compulsory and very effectual, as seeds in profusion are produced.
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  • From its use in the sense of regulated order comes the application of the term to a class in a school (" sixth form," " fifth form," &c.); this sense has been explained without sufficient ground as due to the idea of all children in the same class sitting on a single form (bench).
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  • A cosmopolitan on principle, and a convinced disbeliever in the ethics of his day, he comes very near to modern empiricism and especially to the modern Hedonist school.
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  • Scorpio certainly comes nearer to Limulus in the high development of its arterial system, and the intimate relation of the anterior aorta and its branches to the nerve centres and great nerves, than does any other Arthropod.
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  • The Latin comes meant literally a companion or follower.
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  • The designation comes thus developed into a formal official title of high officers of state, some qualification being added to indicate the special duties attached to the office in each case.
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  • Thus in the 5th century, among the comites attached to the emperor's establishment, we find, e.g., the comes sacrarum largitionum and the comes rei privatae; while others, forming the council, were styled comites consistorii.
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  • Others were sent into the provinces as governors, comites per provincias constituti; thus in the Notitia dignitatum we find a comes Aegypti, a conies Africae, a comes Belgicae, a comes Lugdunensis and others.
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  • Two of the generals of the Roman province of Britain were styled the comes Britanniae and the comes littoris Saxonici (count of the Saxon shore).
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  • In the 5th century the "sacred bounties" corresponded to the aerarium of the early Empire, while the res privatae represented the fisc. The officers connected with the palace and the emperor's person included the count of the wardrobe (comes sacrae vestis), the count of the residence (comes domorum), and, most important of all, the comes domesticorum et sacri stabuli (graecized as Kowis Tou o-Ta,3Xov).
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  • Another important officer of the later Roman court was the comes sacri patrimonii, who was instituted by the emperor Anastasius.
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  • The Frankish kings of the Merovingian dynasty retained the Roman system of administration, and under them the word comes preserved its original meaning; the comes was a companion of the king, a royal servant of high rank.
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  • The comes was appointed by the king and removable at his pleasure, and was chosen originally from all classes, sometimes from enfranchised slaves.
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  • A comes was generally raised from childhood in the king's palace, and rose to be a count through successive stages.
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  • A relic of the old official meaning of "count" still survives in Transylvania, where the head of the political administration of the Saxon districts is styled count (comes, Graf) of the Saxon Nation.
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  • From the 16th '"Count of the Lateran Palace" (Comes Sacri Lateranensis Palatii) was later the title usually bestowed by the popes in creating counts palatine.
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  • Another exception is that of the Pernambuco coast, where the rainy season comes between March and August, with the heaviest rainfall from May to July, which is the time of the southern winter.
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  • The harvest comes in January and February, in the rainy season, and the nut-gatherers often come one or two hundred miles in their boats to the best forests.
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  • The largest and best equipped of them are located in the federal states of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, though the greater part of the raw cotton used comes from the northern states and pays high freight rates.
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  • First comes the order of presbyters or elders.
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  • Here the Scholastic philosophy comes into conflict with Aristotle's doctrine of the eternity of the world.
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  • The most famous of the temples of Paestum, the so-called temple of Neptune, comes next in point of date (about 420 B.C.).
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  • This book, which comes down to the year 1526 and the extinction of Czech independence,'was founded on laborious research in the local archives of Bohemia and in the libraries of the chief cities of Europe, and remains the standard authority.
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  • Then comes a feeling of discomfort which can be often localized, the individual pointing with his finger to a spot somewhere behind the end of the breastbone.
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  • Difficulty and pain in swallowing may be complained of when the cancer is beginning to block the inlet, but if it is situated at the pylorus the discomfort comes on an hour or two after a meal - at the time that the partially digested food is trying to make its way into the small intestine.
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  • The following table gives the foreign trade of Hungary only for a period of years in millions sterling: - Of the merchandise' entering the country, 75-80% comes from Austria, and exports go to the same country to the extent of 75%.
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  • Next comes Germany with about 10% of the value of the total exports and 5% of that of imports.
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  • The English title of lord-lieutenant is generally used as the best translation of Faispdn or comes (in this connexion).
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  • (v.) The theory ofprobability also comes under this head.
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  • If r+s>n, a product such as E r E 3, worked out by the previous rules, comes out to be zero.
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  • The phase of the resultant effect is by symmetry that of the component which comes from the middle of a.
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  • We have hitherto supposed that the shadow of a diffracting obstacle is received upon a diffusing screen, or, which comes to nearly the same thing, is observed with an eye-piece.
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  • Now it is evident that the force in question, supposed to act upon the positive half only of the medium, produces just double of the effect that would be caused by the same force if the medium were undivided, and on the latter supposition (being also localized at a point) it comes under the head already considered.
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  • This comes to much the same thing, as the Massagetae seem to have contained an element which had come in from the land of the Issedones.
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  • After losing many men the Great King comes back to the place where he crossed the Danube, finds the Ionians still guarding the bridge in spite of the attempts of the Scyths to make them desert, and safely re-enters his own dominions.
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  • Of the imports about 50% comes from Great Britain and about 20% from British colonies (including other South African states).
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  • Next comes English grain tin.
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  • The Key of Truth regards the water as a washing of the body, and sees in the rite no opus operatum, but an essentially spiritual rite in which "the king releases certain rulers a from the prison of sin, the Son calls them to himself and comforts them with great words, and the Holy Spirit of the king forthwith comes and crowns them, and dwells in them for ever."
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  • The best cacau comes from the vicinity of Caracas and is marketed under that name.
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  • A little above Brandeis it picks up the Iser, which, like itself, comes down from the Riesengebirge, and at Melnik it has its stream more than doubled in volume by the Moldau, a river which winds northwards through the heart of Bohemia in a sinuous, trough-like channel carved through the plateaux.
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  • In a given case of anasarca due to a cause acting generally, it will be found that the liquid of the pleural cavity always contains the highest percentage of proteid, that of the peritoneal cavity comes next, that of the cerebral ventricles follows this, and the liquid of the subcutaneous areolar tissue contains the lowest.
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  • A remarkable man now comes to the front - Dion, the friend and disciple of Plato - and for a time the trusted political adviser of his nephew Dionysius.
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  • After his death in 289 comes another miserable and obscure period of revolution and despotism, in which Greek life was dying out; and but for the brief intervention of Pyrrhus in 278 Syracuse, and indeed all Sicily, would have fallen a prey to the Carthaginians.
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  • In the transitional period, when the Arabian school began to influence European medicine, but before the Salernitans were superseded, comes Nicolaus Praepositus, who wrote the Antidotarium, a collection of formulae for compound medicines, which became the standard work on the subject, and the foundation of many later compilations.
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  • The first recognition of a disease may be at a necropsy, but then usually by irresponsible pathologists; it is another matter when the physician himself comes under rebuke for failing to seize a way to cure, while the chance remained to him, by section of the abdomen during life.
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  • These numbers have been very generally accepted as fairly correct, and Dr Creighton 1 comes to the conclusion after careful consideration that the population of London from the reign of Richard I.
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  • Between the typical West African chimpanzee and the gorilla there is no difficulty in drawing a distinction; the difficulty comes in when we have to deal with the aberrant races, or species, of chimpanzee, some of which are so gorilla-like that it is by no means easy to determine to which group they really pertain.
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  • At the end of the stroke, when his platform comes opposite to a corresponding platform on the other rod, he steps over on to the latter during the instant of rest prior to the reversal of the stroke, descends with the second rod on this down stroke, steps again at the proper time to a platform of the first rod and so on to the bottom.
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  • As the larger part of the water in a mine comes from the surface, the cost of drainage may be reduced by intercepting this surface water, and collecting it at convenient points in the pump shaft from which it may be raised at less cost than if permitted to go to the bottom.
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  • If the vertical tube, measuring from the point where the branch comes in, is a few inches greater than the height of the barometer, and the glass and mercury are perfectly clean, the apparatus slowly but surely produces an almost absolute vacuum.
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  • This tradition is important in spite of the fact that it first comes clearly before us in a writer belonging to the latter part of the 2nd century, because the prominence and fame of Luke were not such as would of themselves have led to his being singled out to have a Gospel attributed to him.
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  • But in regard to their power of retaining their magnetism none of them comes at all up to the compound metal steel.
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  • The light oil fraction of the coal-tar distillate, which comes over below 140° and consists principally of benzene, toluene and the xylenes, yields on fractionation (i) various volatile impurities such as carbon disulphide, (2) the benzene fraction boiling at about 80° C., (3) the toluene fraction boiling at too°, (4) the xylene fraction boiling at 140°.
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  • Several copies of these lists from the library of Nineveh are in existence, the earliest of which goes back to 911 B.C., while the latest comes down to the middle of the reign of Assur-bani-pal.
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  • Then comes the story of the struggle between the gods of light and the powers of darkness, and the final victory of Merodach, who clove Tiamat asunder, forming the heaven out of one half of her body and the earth out of the other.
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  • And as the personal element disappears in the conception of the prophetic calling, so it tends to disappear in the prophetic view of history, and the future comes to be conceived not as the organic result of the present under the divine guidance, but as mechanically determined from the beginning in the counsels of God, and arranged under artificial categories of time.
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  • As in the case of similar formations generally, they are endowed with a sensitiveness to touch which enables them to grasp and coil themselves round any suitable object which comes in their way, and thus to support the plant.
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  • That which comes into the European market as jaggery or khaur is obtained from the sap of several palms, the wild date (Phoenix sylvestris), the palmyra (Borassus flabellifer), the coco-nut (Cocos nucifera), the gomuti (Arenga saccharifera) and others.
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  • The sorghum is hardier than the sugar-cane; it comes to maturity in a season; and it retains its maximum sugar content a considerable time, giving opportunity for leisurely harvesting.
    0
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  • These results are brought about by adding to the cold juice as it comes from the mill the proper proportion of milk of lime set up at 8° B., and then delivering the limed juice in a constant steady stream as near the bottom of the defecator as possible; it is thus brought into immediate contact with the heating surface and heated once for all before it ascends, with the result of avoiding the disturbance caused in the ordinary defecator by pouring cold juice from above on to the surface of the heated juice, and so establishing down-currents of cold juice and up-currents of hot juice.
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  • The value of fresh bagasse, or as it is often called " green " bagasse, as fuel varies with the kind of canes from which it comes, with their treatment in the mill, and with the skill used in firing; but it may be stated broadly that I lb of fresh bagasse will produce from I a lb to 24 lb of steam, according to the conditions.
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  • When the new cell comes into operation and becomes the head of the battery, the first or tail cell is thrown out, and number two becomes the tail cell, and so the rounds are repeated; one cell is always being emptied and one filled or charged with slices and heated up, the latter becoming the head of the battery as soon as it is ready.
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  • The juice, which has now become comparatively clear, is again treated with lime, and again passed through a saturator and filter presses, and comes out still clearer than before.
    0
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  • The word itself comes from the Lat.
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  • Then at last comes the real subject of the poem, usually the panegyric of some man of influence or wealth to whom the poet has come in hope of reward and before whom he recites the poem.
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  • Ordinarily carbon is used as the electrode material, but when carbon comes in contact at high temperatures with any metal that is capable of forming a carbide a certain amount of combination between them is inevitable, and the carbon thus introduced impairs the mechanical properties of the ultimate metallic product.
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  • From Nuba, the Arabic form of the name of this people, comes the modern Nubia, a term about the precise meaning of which no two writers are in accord.
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  • Then comes the collection of weapons and armour, including the famous Ambras collection, so called after the castle of Ambras near Innsbruck, where it was for a long time stored.
    0
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  • Our knowledge of Arnold's life comes from the Chronica and his own biographical notes.
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  • The qualification " almost " is necessary because so complex a system of actions comes into play, and accurate observations have extended through so short a period, that the proof cannot be regarded as absolute.
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  • The best bark comes from the Carabaya district in southeastern Peru, but it is found in many localities on the eastern slopes of the Andes.
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  • Here comes in Hermas's doctrine of works of supererogation, in fulfilment of counsels of perfection, on lines already seen in Did.
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  • Instances of its application are found in the separation of orthoand para-nitrophenol, the o-compound distilling and the p- remaining behind; in the separation of aniline from the mixture obtained by reducing nitrobenzene; of the naphthols from the melts produced by fusing the naphthalene monosulphonic acids with potash; and of quinoline from the reaction between aniline, nitrobenzene, glycerin, and sulphuric acid (the product being first steam distilled to remove any aniline, nitrobenzene, or glycerin, then treated with alkali, and again steam distilled when quinoline comes over).
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  • - The general observation that under a constant pressure a pure substance boils at a constant temperature leads to the conclusion that the distillate which comes over while the thermometer records only a small variation is of practically constant composition.
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  • (30Xis, a missile) comes next in order from its size and conspicuous effects.
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  • If, however, it encounters the host the larva bores its way in, and attacks the liver, mouth or gonad in which it comes to rest.
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  • (X about 50; after La.caze-Duthiers.) and then, surrounding itself with the secretion of its cystogenous cells, comes to rest.
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  • " Arthur, the leader (comes Britanniae, dux bellorum) of the Siluri or Dumnonii against the Saxons, flourished at the beginning of the 6th century.
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  • " I hardly know if even to you," he writes to his wife, " I dare disclose the sweet and softened feeling that comes over me when I find a young man whose examination is thoroughly satisfactory.
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  • It is worth noting, however, that Herder in his provokingly tentative way of thinking comes now and again very near ideas made familiar to us by Spencer and Darwin.
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  • Fermo Maggiore comes next in interest.
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  • Dressed as a peasant (or a fool), he departs (his mother, in some versions, dying of grief), and comes to the king's court.
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  • Scarcely has the cherry season passed when that of the wistaria (fuji) comes, followed by the azalea(tsutsuji) and the iris (shibu), the last being almost contemporaneous with the peony (botan), which is regarded by many Japan se as the king of flowers and is cultivated assiduously.
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  • Next to these comes the monkey (saru), which dwells equally among the snows of the north and in the mountainous regions of the south.
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  • These two newspapers now stand alone as purveyors of copious telegraphic news, and in the next rank, not greatly lower, comes the fiji Shimpo.
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  • When the velvet comes to him, it already carries a colored picture permanently fixed by the yzen process, but the wires have not been withdrawn.
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  • Gregory of Nyssa's untrustworthy panegyric represents him as having wrought miracles of a very startling description; but nothing related by him comes near the astounding narratives given in the Martyrologies, or even in the Breviarium Romanum, in connexion with his name.
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  • By a love of each degree man comes into conjunction with them and the worlds of nature, spirit and God.
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  • Then comes the Buchstein group with the Grosser Buchstein (7 2 94 ft.).
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  • Next in importance comes the mining of brown coal, which has also been carried on for a long time.
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  • A good deal of bloodstone comes from India, where it occurs in the Deccan traps, and is cut and polished at Cambay.
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  • Foremost among the weeklies comes the New York Nation (1865).
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  • His father held the offices of comes privatarum and sacrarum largitionum (controller of the emperor's private revenue and the public exchequer) under Odoacer, and subsequently attached himself to Theodoric, by whom he was appointed corrector (governor) of Bruttii and Lucania, and praefectus praetorio.
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  • Between the two comes the animal - man, i.e.
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  • It is the first part which is cast off when the snake sheds its skin; this is done several times in the year, and the epidermis comes off in a single piece, being, from the mouth towards the tail, turned inside out during the process.
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  • The life of pleasure which he had lived in his youth comes back to him, not as it was in its actual distractions and disappointments, but in the idealizing light of meditative retrospect.
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  • The great mass of the vegetation, however, is of the low-growing type (maquis or garrigue of the western Mediterranean), with small and stiff leaves, and frequently thorny and aromatic, as for example the ilex (Quercus coccifera), Smilax, Cistus, Lentiscus, Calycotome, &c. (2) Next comes, from 1600 to 6500 ft., the mountain region, which may also be called the forest region, still exhibiting sparse woods and isolated trees wherever shelter, moisture and the inhabitants have permitted their growth.
    0
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  • From one of the mineral springs comes a heavily charged water known in commerce as "Eau de Vals," and in great request in Smyrna.
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  • Janus, the god of the door, comes undoubtedly first, though unfortunately we know but little of his worship in the household, except that it was the concern of the men.
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  • Thus, the simple reflection that the door is used for the double purpose of entrance and exit leads to the notion of the Janus of the state as bifrons (" two-faced"): the thought of the door as the first part of the house to which one comes, produces the more abstract idea of Janus as the "god of beginning," in which character he has special charge of the first beginnings of human life (Consevius), the first hour of the day, the Calends of the month and the first month of the year in the later calendar: for the same reason his name takes the first place in the indigitamenta.
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  • Not merely his literary and historical importance, but almost all that is known about him, comes from his chronicle of the fourth crusade, or Conquete de Constantinople.
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  • Towards the close of the century comes John Wycliffe and his English travelling preachers, who passed the torch to Hus and the Bohemians, and in the next age Savonarola, who was to Florence what Jeremiah had been to Jerusalem.
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  • Kattenbusch, with whom Harnack is in general agreement, regards the Old Roman Creed, which comes to light in the 4th century, as the parent of all developed forms, whether Eastern or Western.
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  • They tend in any case to prove that the Quicumque comes to us from the school of Lerins, of which Honoratus was the first abbot, and to which Caesarius also belonged.
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  • "The Decrees of God are His eternal Purpose according to the Counsel of His Will, whereby for His Own Glory He hath foreordained whatsoever comes to pass."
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  • In negotiations between Anglican and Russian churchmen the confession of Dositheus l usually comes to the front.
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  • More than two-thirds of the wheat comes from abroad; fish, vegetables and fruit are also imported from Sicily in considerable quantities.
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  • Next in importance comes the spinning and weaving of wool, cotton, linen and carpet manufactures, and dyeing.
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  • The native country of the insect is Mexico, and it is there more or less cultivated; but the greater part of our supply comes from New Granada and the Canary Islands.
    0
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  • We have seen that written documents have been preserved in Mesopotamia to which such a date as 4500 B.C. may be ascribed with a good deal of confidence; and that from the third millennium B.C. a flood of contemporary literary records comes to us both from Egypt and Mesopotamia.
    0
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  • At this point comes in the evidence - unknown to Froude, Skelton, Hosack, and Henderson in his book The Casket Letters - of a number of documents, notes of information, and indictments of Mary, written for or by the earl of Lennox.
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  • Two typical forms are in use; in one a liquid is prepared in which the crystal freely swims, the density of the liquid being ascertained by the pycnometer or other methods; in the other a liquid of variable density, the so-called "diffusion column," is prepared, and observation is made of the level at which the particle comes to rest.
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  • Our best authority is the 68th book of Dio Cassius; then comes the "Panegyric" of Pliny, with his correspondence.
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  • Then comes an account of the casting down of Satan from heaven.
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  • The water-supply comes from the Niagara river.
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  • Amongst these are the dome, an isolated elevation rising steeply but not coming within too fathoms of the surface; the bank, an elevation coming nearer the surface than too fathoms, but not so near as 6 fathoms; and finally the shoal or reef, which comes within 6 fathoms of the surface, and so may constitute a danger to shipping.
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  • The greatest of the intercontinental seas, the Arctic, comes nearest to oceanic conditions in the extent and depth of its depressions.
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  • The reddish colour comes from the presence of oxides of iron, and particles of manganese also occur in it, especially in the Pacific region, where the colour is more that of chocolate; but when it is mixed with globigerina ooze it is grey.
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  • This deflecting force is directly proportional to the velocity and the mass of the particle and also to the sine of the latitude; hence it is zero at the equator and comes to a maximum at the poles.
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  • While Gelocus exhibits a marked approximation to the Tragulidae, Prodremotherium comes nearer to the FIG 2.
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  • It traces the necessary acts by which the cognitive consciousness comes to be what it is, both in form and in content.
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  • All that has been expounded follows if the ego comes to consciousness.
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  • " In the same way, a theory that some particular substance, say water, is homogeneous and continuous may be a good working theory up to a certain point, but may fail when we come to deal with quantities so minute or so attenuated that their heterogeneity of structure comes into prominence.
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  • Rain comes with the south-east monsoon, and on the northern part of the coast the rainy season is divided into two parts, the great and the little Masika: the former falls in the months of September, October, November; the latter in February and March.
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  • But when spring comes all is changed.
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  • He never comes to see after an enemy.
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  • It is in seeking to realize its own ideas in the world of knowledge, feeling and action that the mind comes into possession of itself; it is in becoming permeated and transformed by the mind's ideas that the world develops the fullness of its reality as object.
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  • Deliverance from the pantheistic conception of the universe comes through the recognition of the central place occupied by thought and purpose in the actual world, and, as a consequence of this, of the illegitimacy of the abstraction whereby material energy is taken for the ultimate reality.
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  • The real issue comes into view in the attempt, undertaken in the interest of freedom, to substitute for the notion of the world as a cosmos pervaded by no discernible principle and in its essence indifferent to the form impressed upon it by its active parts.
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  • More than half the prune crop of California comes from Santa Clara county.
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  • Among the Cordilleras in their western and interior drainages, over a space covering more than twenty degrees of latitude, the student comes again upon massive ruins.
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  • Next comes a section (xiv., xv.) reflecting a somewhat later development concerning fixed services and ministry; the desire for a stated service, and the need of regular provision for it, is leading to a new order of things.
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  • Whether the second part was known to the writer of the Apostolic Church Order is not clear, as his only quotation of it comes from one of the eucharistic prayers.
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  • A new shade of condemnation for dogmas as things merely assumed comes to be noticeable here, especially in Kant.
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  • He did a lot of research so he is not confused by the enigma of the pain that comes with the disease.
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  • Though thus attributed here to Alcuin, who is known to have revised the Lectionary or Comes Hieronymi, the compilation 176 homilies arranged in order for all the Sundays and festivals of the ecclesiastical year; and probably was completed before the year 780.
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  • It is from demesne as used in sense (a) that the modern restricted use of the word comes, i.e.
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  • This comes out in the writings both of Robinson and of Henry Jacob, both of whom passed gradually from Puritanism to Separatism at a time when the silencing of some 300 Puritan clergy by the Canons of 1604, and the exercise of the royal supremacy under Archbishop Bancroft, brought these " brethren of the Second Separation " into closer relations with the earlier Separatists.
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  • This does not quite defray the interest on the cost of their construction and equipment, inasmuch as it barely comes to 31% thereon, but rates and fares are deliberately kept low to encourage settlement and communication.
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  • The identification of the " hosts " with the stars comes to the same thing; the stars were thought of as closely connected with angels.
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  • Though it has resisted all attempts to reduce it to an ordered scheme, and probably was not written on any set plan, still it is possible roughly to indicate its contents: after the prologue and introductory chapter setting forth St Benedict's intention, follow instructions to the abbot on the manner in which he should govern his monastery (2, 3); next comes the ascetical portion of the Rule, on the chief monastic virtues (4-7); then the regulations for the celebration of the canonical office, which St Benedict calls "the Work of God" or "the divine work," his monks' first duty, "of which nothing is to take precedence" (8-20); faults and punishments (23-30); the cellarer and property of the monastery (31,32); community of goods (33, 34); various officials and daily life (21, 22, 35-57); reception of monks (58-61); miscellaneous (62-73).
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  • The author's intelligence and acuteness are more completely hampered by doctrinal presuppositions when he comes to treat questions relating to the history of the individual books of the New Testament canon.
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  • In his antipathy to Christianity, which appears to him barbaric and superstitious, he gives himself up to the scepticism and satire of a man of the world through which he comes in contact with Epicurean tendencies."
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  • And yet, there is all through an undercurrent which runs hard against his surface verdicts, and here and there comes to expression.
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  • Jesus withdraws to the Judaean desert, but soon returns, six days before Passover, to Bethany; Mary anoints Him, a crowd comes to see Him and Lazarus, and the hierarchs then plan the killing of Lazarus also.
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  • Thomas, who had been absent, doubts the resurrection; Jesus comes and submits to the doubter's tests.
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  • In the sense in which it is treated in this article it appears in 'Middle English as soun, and comes through Fr.
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  • But if the fork has, say, rather greater frequency, the hole in the wheel comes round at the end of the two seconds before the bead has quite come into position, and the two flashes appear gradually to move back in the opposite way to the pendulum.
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  • But the reflection is not complete, for some of the energy comes out as waves; hence the direct and reflected trains are quite equal, and cannot neutralize each other at the loop.
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  • If it is touched in the middle with a feather, the edge of a card, or the finger nail, and bowed a quarter of the way along the octave, the first overtone comes out.
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  • Basutoland comes fourth.
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  • There is a point, of course, where a man must take the isolated peak and break with all his associates for clear principle: but until that time comes he must work, if he would be of use, with men as they are.
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  • The Vogtland is the most densely wooded portion of the kingdom, and next comes the Erzgebirge.
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  • It is now the busiest port on the south coast, being the terminus of the railway from Tarsus and Adana, by which (but still more by road) the produce of the rich "Aleian" plain comes down.
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  • Now the state or government comes at a certain stage of organization: small groups are drawn together; powerful corporations fall into line; a national feeling develops; eventually the state as we know it is formed.
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  • Next let the loads advance a distance a so that W2 comes to C. Then the shear at C is R(n+a)/l - WI, plus any reaction d at B, due to any additional load which has come on the girder during the movement.
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  • There is something chameleon-like in its appearances; its genuine views are kept in the background from tactical considerations, and first one aspect, then another, comes into prominence.
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  • He could not, like Marlowe's Mephistophilis or Milton's Satan, regretfully paint the glories of the height from which he has been hurled; for he denies the distinction between high and low, since "everything that comes into being deserves to be destroyed."
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  • Immediately south of the Kalta-alaghan comes a relatively deep depression, the Kum-kol valley, forming a very well-marked feature in the physical conformation of this region.
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  • The fundamental character of energy in material systems here comes into view; if there were any other independent scalar entity, besides mass and energy, that pervaded them with relations of equivalence, we should expect the existence of yet another set of qualities analogous to those connected with temperature.
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  • Now, as the conjurations were addressed to the deity, asipu, according to the definition given above, comes more reasonably under the category of priest.
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  • Lichtenstein has established the fact that from the egg of the Aphis of Pistachio galls, Anopleura lentisci, is hatched an apterous insect (the gall-founder), which gives birth to young Aphides (emigrants), and that these, having acquired wings, fly to the roots of certain grasses (Bromus sterilis and Hordeum vulgare), and by budding underground give rise to several generations of apterous insects, whence finally comes a winged brood (the pupifera).
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  • He comes before us as a belated epicurean, whose airy trifles cannot be warbled in an atmosphere surcharged with tempests and gunpowder.
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  • Thus, in the end, Aristippus, the founder of ' the purest hedonism in the history of thought, comes very near not only to the Cynics, but to the more cultured hedonism of Epicurus and modern thinkers.
    0
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  • After Ctesias comes Aristotle's /iLTT LKl (Psittace), which Sundevall supposes him to have described only from hearsay.
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  • Mark, hunting in the forest, comes upon them sleeping in a cave, and as Tristan, who knows that the king is in the neighbourhood, has placed his sword between them, is convinced of their innocence.
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  • From it comes the earl's title of Lord St Colme (1611).
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  • Muller also suggested a modification of the Knight-Darwin law, which had left unexplained the numerous instances of continued successful self-pollination, and restated it on these terms: "Whenever offspring resulting from crossing comes into serious conflict with offspring resulting from selffertilization, the former is victorious.
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  • There is a perfect cleavage parallel to the surface of the scales, and the cleavage flakes are flexible but not elastic. The material is greasy to the touch, and soils everything with which it comes into contact.
    0
    0
  • Nearly all the high grade blacksmithing coal mined in the United States comes from Maryland.
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    0
  • Any constitution or constitutional amendment proposed by such constitutional convention comes into effect only if approved by a majority of the votes cast in a popular election.
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    0
  • Of these by far the greater part comes from France.
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    0
  • The German investigators seem to have a great preference for the H form of cell, but it is clear that a narrow tubular cell of the British board of trade form not only comes more quickly to the temperature of the water bath in which it is placed, but is more certain to be wholly at one temperature.
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  • St Paul himself knew when he was speaking by the Spirit, and when he was not; and we too can recognize to some extent when the afflatus comes upon him.
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  • The bulk of the imports comes from the United States (52% in 1904), Great Britain (19%) and Germany (13%).
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  • 5), though this comes out more clearly for the southern kingdom, where, down to the last days of Hebrew independence, the official prophets of Jerusalem were connected with the Temple and were under the authority of the chief priest (Jer.
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  • Next in importance comes the timber trade; game is also plentiful.
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  • (34), though in uneven numbers of kats, comes out in round thousands of units when reduced to this standard.
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  • When the division of labour has been established, each member of the society must have recourse to the others for the supply of most of his wants; a medium of exchange is thus found to be necessary, and money comes into use.
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  • The rent of land comes next to be considered, as the last of the three elements of price.
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  • Next comes the distinction of the gross national revenue from the net - the first being the whole produce of the land and labour of a country, the second what remains after deducting the expense of maintaining the fixed capital of the country and that part of its circulating capital which consists of money.
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  • 1 He is less absolute in his doctrine of governmental non-interference when he comes to consider in his fifth book the "expenses of the sovereign or the commonwealth."
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  • But when the study of its subject comes to be systematized on the basis of a general social philosophy more complete and durable than Smith's, no contributions to that final construction will be found so valuable as his.
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  • When the prey comes into contact with the tentacles it is paralysed, and at the same time held firmly, by the barbed threads shot out from the stinging organs or nematocysts.
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  • The crown of tentacles thus comes to form a fringe to the margin of the body, and the hypostome becomes the manubrium.
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  • These Seven, then, are in most systems half-evil, half-hostile powers; they are frequently characterized as " angels," and are reckoned as the last and lowest emanations of the Godhead; below them - and frequently considered as derived from them - comes the world of the actually devilish powers.
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  • After this comes the creation of the four men and their wives who are the ancestors of the Quiches, and the tradition records the migrations of the nation to Tulan, otherwise called the Seven Caves, and thence across the sea, whose waters were divided for their passage.
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  • The general business of the town, other than that which comes before the town meeting, is managed by the selectmen, and they are specially intrusted with the regulation of the highways, sidewalks and commons.
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  • With the rise of a belief in departmental gods comes the age of polytheism; the belief in elemental spirits may still persist, but they fall into the background and receive no cult.
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  • The best quality comes from castrated males, females producing the next best.
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  • The animal undergoes during that time a process of combing by which all the wool and a portion of the hair, which of necessity comes with it, is removed.
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  • The drawback for the dogmatist of such a view as Serapion broaches in his prayers was this, that although it explained how the Logos comes to be immanent in the elements, as a soul in its body, nevertheless it did not guarantee the presence in or rather substitution for the natural elements of Christ's real body and blood.
    0
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  • This species occurs in England the whole year round, and is presumed to have bred there, though the fact has never been satisfactorily proved, and knowledge of its erratic habits comes from naturalists in Pomerania and Sweden.
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    0
  • When the elements of light have at last been completely, or as far as possible, delivered from the world, the end of all things comes.
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  • The transition from the strongly folded structure of the Alleghany ridges and valleys to the nearly horizontal structure of the Appala; chian plateau is promptly made; and with the change of structure comes an appropriate change of form.
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  • Then comes the East Texas timber belt, broad in the north-east, narrowing to a point before reaching the Rio Grande, a low and thoroughly dissected cuesta of sandy Eocene strata; and this is followed by the Coast Prairie, a very young plain, with a seaward slope of less than 2 ft.
    0
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  • Wherever it comes to the surface it comes up from beneath younger rocks which are, as a rule, less metamorphic. By means of deep borings it is known at many points where it does not appear at the surface, antI is believed to be universal beneath younger systems.
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  • In Texas, whence the name Comanchean comes, and where different parts of the system are of diverse origins, there is some limestone.
    0
    0
  • Most of the quicksilver produced in the United States comes from California (86% of the total in 1908), but a considerable quantity M comes from Texas, and small amounts are produced CIWJV.
    0
    0
  • Every bill when introduced is referred to some committee, and each bill comes up for consideration by the whole house on the report of the committee which has dealt with it.
    0
    0
  • Thus it comes that comparatively slight use is made of the experience of the permanent financial officials in the framing of revenue-raising and appropriation bills.
    0
    0
  • Hence comes the modern use of the word for a low-born or vulgar person, particularly one with an unpleasant, surly or miserly character.
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  • At the end of the mass the cleric, clad in chasuble and stole and bearing a linen bag on one arm, comes before the pope or bishop and receives a blessing.
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  • The chronicle comes down to the death of James I.
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  • - Passing westward by rail from the forest-covered Archean with its rugged granite hills, the flat prairie of Manitoba with its rich grasses and multitude of flowers comes as a very striking contrast, introducing the Interior Continental plain in its most typical development.
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  • As the result of an exhaustive analysis of the text and of the political and religious events of the time, Mayer comes to the conclusion that the document was forged about 775, i.e.
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  • Next comes the gall bladder, a pear-shaped bag, the fundus of which is in front and below, the neck behind and above.
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  • The distress is due to spasmodic muscular contraction, and it comes on at intervals, each attack increasing the patient's misery.
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  • When death comes, the farce is over (la farce est jouee), therefore let us take our pleasure while we can.
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  • This is obvious enough in the Metaphysics: it has two openings (Books A and a); then comes a nearly consecutive theory of being (B, F, E, Z, H, 0), but interrupted by a philosophical lexicon A; afterwards follows a theory of unity (1); then a summary of previous books and of doctrines from the Physics (K); next a new beginning about being, and, what is wanted to complete the system, a theory of God in relation to the world (A); finally a criticism of mathematical metaphysics (M, N), in which the argument against Plato (A 9) is repeated almost word for word (M 4-5).
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  • History comes nearer to philosophy; and Aristotle's Constitutions were known to his enemy Timaeus, who attacked him for disparaging the descent of the Locrians of Italy, according to Polybius (xii.), who defended Aristotle.
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  • So far from coming first, Logic comes nowhere in his classification of science.
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  • The Latin commentators, the Arabians and the schoolmen show how Aristotle has been the chief author of modern culture; while the vindication of modern independence comes out in his critics, the greatest of whom were Roger and Francis Bacon.
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  • The Reason Of This Is, That The Intercalary Month, Inserted At The End Of The Cycle, Contains Only Twenty Nine Days Instead Of Thirty; Whence, After 11 Has Been Added To The Epact Of The Year Corresponding To The Golden Number 19, We Must Reject Twenty Nine Instead Of Thirty, In Order To Have The Epact Of The Succeeding Year; Or, Which Comes To The Same Thing, We Must Add Twelve To The Epact Of The Last Year Of The Cycle, And Then Reject Thirty As Before.
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  • The traditional site of these battles covers a very wide area, and it is supposed that Arthur held a post analogous to that of the general who, under the Roman occupation, was known as Comes Britanniae, and held a roving commission to defend the island wherever attacked, in contradistinction to the Dux Britanniarum, who had charge of the forces in the north, and the Comes Littoris Saxonici, whose task it was to defend the south-east line.
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  • An amendment to the constitution may be proposed by a twothirds vote of the legislature, and comes into effect on receiving a majority of the popular vote.
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  • The relation between the divine mind and finite intelligence, at first thought as that of agent and recipient, is complicated and obscure when the necessity for explaining the permanence of real things comes forward.
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  • Jebel el-Akabah is much more barren than Jebel Akhdar, and the desert comes right down to the sea in Marmarica, whose few inhabitants are more concerned with salt-collecting and sponge fishing than with agriculture.
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  • Next comes the typical Sciurus, including the great bulk of the entire group, and ranging over Europe, Asia, North Africa and America.
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  • From two to three weeks after the completion of the cocoon the enclosed insect is ready to escape; it moistens one end of its self-made prison, thereby enabling itself to push aside the fibres and make an opening by which the perfect moth comes forth.
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  • If the attack comes on a short time before maturity, the worms are able to spin a cocoon of a feeble character, but worms with this disease never change into chrysalides, but always die in the cocoon before transformation can take place.
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  • France comes a good second in importance with a consumption of 9 to 10 million lb annually.
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  • The word " buffer " comes nearest to the object, but even this term implies more than is meant.
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  • In tropical countries drought is the commonest cause of a failure in the harvest, and where great droughts are not uncommon - as in parts of India and Australia - the hydraulic engineer comes to the rescue by devising systems of water-storage and irrigation.
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  • The first step is to open test works; and directly they show the necessity, regular relief works are established, in which the people may earn enough to keep them from starvation, until the time comes to sow the next crop.
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  • Clew Bay, with its islets capped by glacial drift, is a submerged part of a synclinal of Carboniferous strata, and Old Red Sandstone comes out on the north side of this, from near Achill to Lough Conn.
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  • Unfortunately the antagonism between physostigmine and atropine is not perfect, and Sir Thomas Fraser has shown that in such cases there comes a time when, if the action of the two drugs be summated, death results sooner than from either alone.
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  • Personal ornaments and decorations of dwellings, furniture, vehicles and pottery had once a consecrating, or - what often comes to the same thing - a prophylactic value and significance.
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  • " Here at least, for the first time in the Acts and Epistles, we have the ecclesia spoken of in the sense of the one universal ecclesia, and it comes more from the theological than from the historical side; i.e.
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  • Again the root difference between the Presbyterian and Episcopalian conceptions of the church comes to light.
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  • As has been well said, " the church is primarily a witness - the strength of its authority lies in the many sides from which the witness comes."
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  • The term was used not in the modern sense of above or transcending nature (a sense which µeTa cannot bear), but simply to convey the idea that the treatise so-called comes " after " the physical treatises.'
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  • On the strength of the consilience of arguments for evolution in the organic world, he carries back the process in the whole world, until he comes to a cosmology which recalls the rash hypotheses of the Presocratics.
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  • He supposes that all organisms have developed from the simple cell, and that this has its origin by spontaneous generation, to explain which he propounds the " carbon-theory," that protoplasm comes from inorganic carbonates.
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  • So Avenarius (q.v.) was no materialist, but only an empiricist anxious to reclaim man's natural view of the world from philosophic incrustations; yet when his Empiriokriticismus ends in nothing but environment, nervous system, and statements dependent on them, without soul, though within experience, he comes near to materialism, as Wundt has remarked.
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  • He comes near to Hume's substitution of succession of phenomena for real causality.
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  • Withdraw this foundation of bodies as inter-resisting forces causing one another in collision to form a joint mass with a common velocity but without penetration, and the evidence of the third law disappears; for in the case of attractive forces we know nothing of their modus operandi except by the analogy of the collision of inter-resisting bodies, which makes us believe that something similar, we know not what, takes place in gravity, magnetism, electricity, &c. Now, Mach, though he occasionally drops hints that the discovery of the law of collision comes first, yet never explains the process of development from it to the third law of motion.
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  • Secondly, when Wundt comes to the psychical, he naturally infers from his narrow Kantian definition of substance that there is no proof of a substrate over and above all mental operations, and falsely thinks that he has proved that there is no substance mentally operating in the Aristotelian sense.
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  • In the Septuagint and Vulgate it immediately precedes Esther, and along with Tobit comes after Nehemiah; in the English Apocrypha it is placed between Tobit and the apocryphal additions to Esther.
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  • According to Tacitus it was regarded as a disgrace for a comes to survive his lord, and we know that in later times they frequently shared his exile.
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  • (5) The Congregation on the discipline of the sacraments (Sacra Congregatio de Disciplina Sacramentorum), established by Pius X., thus comes to occupy the third rank.
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  • When several words are connected in a sentence they seldom require more than one case element, and that comes last.
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  • It is possible to state the conditions of solubility in terms of the theory of available energy, but the result comes to little more than a re-statement of the problem in other terms. Nevertheless, such a re-statement is in itself sometimes an advance in knowledge.
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  • Isaac. If the solution be confined in a sealed glass tube, the first thin shower is not formed, and the system remains liquid till the secondary dense shower comes down.
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  • But, if no solid be present initially, or if the cooling be rapid, the liquid of composition x becomes supersaturated and may cool till the supersaturation curve is reached at b, and a cloud of A crystals comes down.
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  • Then comes an outer vessel, in which a freezing mixture can be placed.
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  • This constant can be measured experimentally, and for such a substance as sugar or water comes out about 0.3 at 20° C., the unit of time being the day.
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  • 6 But the fullest information about the state of Phoenicia in the i 5th and 14th centuries B.C. comes from the Amarna tablets, among which are many letters from the subject princes and the Egyptian governors of Phoenicia to the Pharaoh.'
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  • Between the withdrawal of the Egyptian rule in Syria and the western advance of Assyria there comes an interval during which the city-states of Phoenicia owned no suzerain.
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  • It comes, however, within the great volcanic zone which stretches from the north of Sumatra, through Java and the other Sundanese islands, round to Amboyna, Tidore, Ternate, Halmahera and the Philippines.
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  • (Low power from 3 to 8; medium from 5 to 14; high from 7 to 21.) Each eyepiece is provided with a dummy eyepiece which comes opposite to the eye which is not observing and permits of it being kept open.
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  • A few seconds after each of these headlong descents a mysterious sound strikes his ear - compared by some to drumming, and by others to the bleating of a sheep or goat,' which sound evidently comes from the bird as it shoots downwards, and then only.
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  • Next comes a belt of fertile plateaus bounded on the east by the Little Khingan, or Dusse-alin, a picturesque well-wooded range, which stretches in a north-easterly direction from Kirin across Manchuria, is pierced by the Amur, and continues on its left bank, separating the Bureya from the Amgun.
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  • This insect comes from Central America.
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