How to use Comely in a sentence

comely
  • She is very comely, with the beauty indigenous to this country.

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  • I could not bear to arrest so lively, so comely a process.

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  • In person she is comely, dressed in a slovenly picturesque way with curly hair flying about in all directions.

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  • In particular, when faced with a large group of comely wenches, the surprise and joy on his face was a picture.

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  • About the time of setting out on his Indian expedition he was described as a most comely man, upwards of 6 ft., tall, well-proportioned, of robust make and constitution; inclined to be fat, but prevented by the fatigue he underwent; with fine, large black eyes and eyebrows; of sanguine complexion, made more manly by the influence of sun and weather; a loud, strong voice; a moderate wine-drinker; fond of simple diet, such as pilaos and plain dishes, but often neglectful of meals altogether, and satisfied, if occasion required, with parched peas and water, always to be procured.i During the reign of Nadir an attempt was made to establish a British Caspian trade with Persia.

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  • Upon this Gilpin prepared for martyrdom; and, having ordered his house-steward to provide him with a long garment, that he might "goe the more comely to the stake," he set out for London.

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  • A comely, fresh-looking old man was conducting the service with that mild solemnity which has so elevating and soothing an effect on the souls of the worshipers.

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  • After setting forth that " building with brick was not only more comely and durable, but also more safe against future perils of fire," it was enacted " that all the outsides of all buildings in and about the city should be made of brick or stone, except doorcases and windowframes, and other parts.

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  • Comely (1892, also in Cursus scripturae sacrae, 1907) are the most satisfactory modern editors, from the Roman Catholic church, but it should not be forgotten that the 16th century produced the Literalis expositio of Cajetan (Rome, 1529) and the similar work of Pierre Barahona (Salamanca, 1590), no less than the epoch-making edition of Luther (Latin, 1519, &c.; German, 1525 f.; English, 1575 f.).

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  • His wife objected his utter incapacity as a farmer; and they finally took a small house at Comely Bank, Edinburgh, where they could live on a humble scale.

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