Come-from sentence example

come-from
  • So where did the money come from?

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  • They're all several hours after the fact and come from an unusual viewpoint; not where there would naturally be someone observing.

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  • Where did you come from?

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  • Where does she come from?

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  • I've just come from the park where I met Elisabeth Sidwell.

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  • He doesn't even know where they come from.

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  • Why would they admit the tips come from the nether world?

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  • No, he was quick to say, it didn't come from any "psychic foolishness" which he didn't believe existed.

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  • Pumpkin's vegetable nickname didn't come from his size.

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  • It seemed to come from behind them but it could have been anything—a dislodged rock, an echo of their own movements.

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  • The deal couldn't come from Zamon.

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  • He was dressed as if he'd just come from some club, all in leather with his blond hair in a braid.

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  • He saw the massive scarring that could come from no other than the Dark One, probably when he turned her.

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  • It hadn't come from the sky but from one of the buildings across the street, diagonal to her.

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  • He found some of his wired energy dissipating at the long walk and change of scenery despite knowing nothing good had ever come from a meeting with Sasha.

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  • Most…well, all but you come from the elitist circles of their times.

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  • Her attention turned to a different direction, the way they.d come from the beach.

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  • I come from the planet of Dolsom.

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  • Assistance might come from their direction, but any favor from the Council would cost him dearly in another way.

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  • All those colors didn't come from a bottle.

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  • Jackson fixed his eyes on the ceiling, bracing for the lecture about responsibility that was sure to come from Sarah.

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  • That's a strange thing to come from your lips.

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  • We come from two different worlds.

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  • Where did all that come from?

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  • Where did the blood come from?

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  • Where did all the anger and violence come from?

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  • Her father's wealth had come from his whore-daughter's ability to charm any man she chose.

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  • You come from Landis.

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  • I come from that direction!

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  • Too bad Denton didn't hear that - even if it did come from the lips of a child.

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  • Artillery and engineer officers come from the Ecole Polytechnique, infantry and cavalry from the Ecole spciale militaire de St-Cyr.

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  • The comparatively few indigenous placental mammals, besides the dingo or wild dog - which, however, may have come from the islands north of this continent - are of the bat tribe and of the rodent or rat tribe.

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  • The Anes are reported to have come from the Gold Coast by sea and to have been wrecked at this place.

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  • The balance of these tendencies has been against the attachment of great importance to sexual selection, and in favour of attaching a great importance to natural selection; but the dominant feature in the recent history of the theory has been its universal acceptance and the recognition that this general acceptance has come from the stimulus given by Darwin.

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  • The greater portion, however, of the numerous bands which visit the British Islands in autumn and winter doubtless come from the Continent - perhaps even from far to the eastward, since its range stretches across Asia to Japan, in which country it is as favourite a cage-bird as with us.

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  • These in turn come from the Chaldee or Aramaean form x7t?

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  • The revenues of the state come from two sources; about two-thirds from taxation and about one-third in all from the earnings of the penitentiary, from the fees collected by state officials, from the proceeds from the sale of state publications, and from the dividends from stock and bonds.

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  • After the withdrawal of the Romans in the 5th century the northern Britons seem to have shown greater determination in maintaining their independence than any of the southern kingdoms and, according to Welsh tradition, Cunedda, the ancestor of the kings of Gwynedd, had himself come from the north.

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  • Blue eyes in Eleanor's modern portrait come from a contemporary writer's description.

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  • The most important works dealing with fruit and other pests come from the pens of Saunders, Lintner, Riley, Slingerland and others in America and Canada, from Taschenberg, Lampa, Reuter and Kollar in Europe, and from French, Froggatt and Tryon in Australia.

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  • The Marico Valley was occupied early in the 19th century by Matabele, who had come from Zululand.

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  • Some change seems to have come from the north; and there are those who go so far as to say that the centre henceforward was the Argolid, and especially "golden" Mycenae, whose lords imposed a new type of palace and a modification of Aegean art on all other Aegean lands.

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  • Strabo himself talks of Armoric Heneti, and supposes them to have come from the neighbourhood of Brittany; another theory gives us Sarmatian Heneti, from the Baltic provinces; while the most widely accepted view was that they reached Italy from Paphlagonia.

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  • The interior, a basilica with nave and two aisles, contains columns said to come from a temple of Minerva and a fine mosaic pavement of 1166, with interesting representations of the months, Old Testament subjects, &c. It has a crypt supported by forty-two marble columns.

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  • Mr. Harding resigned from the U.S. Senate in Dec. 1920, and was inaugurated March 4 1921, the sixth President to come from Ohio.

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  • Early in 1145 news had come from Antioch to Eugenius III.

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  • The best cotton cloths are those manufactured by the Bugis people in Celebes, and the batek cloths which come from Java and are stamped with patterns.

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  • There can be no creation, for being cannot come from not-being; a thing cannot arise from that which is different from it.

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  • But the more serious difficulties which to many minds still stand in the way of the acceptance of the epistle have come from the developed phase of Pauline theology which it shows, and from the general background and atmosphere of the underlying system of thought, in which the absence of the well-known earlier controversies is remarkable, while some things suggest the thought of John and a later age.

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  • This Armenoid " stock must have come from Asia and, no doubt, reached Egypt by the Isthmus of Suez, but whence it came originally we do not know.

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  • And many must have come from far afield.

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  • The name' is not Babylonian, and what evidence as to his origin there is points to his having come from Elam, to the east of Babylonia.

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  • The finest work is said to come from Unst, though each parish has its own speciality.

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  • The, pasha and the higher officials in general come from Constantinople, but a very large portion of the other Turkish officials seem to come from the town of Kerkuk.

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  • In summer the warm winds come from the south and south-east, but having first to cross the Gobi,.

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  • This was the beginning of a pretended correspondence between Rohan and the queen, the adventuress duly returning replies to Rohan's notes, which she affirmed to come from the queen.

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  • Since the limitation of the width of the central band in the image of a luminous line depends upon discrepancies of phase among the secondary waves, and since the discrepancy is greatest for the waves which come from the edges of the aperture, the question arises how far the operation of the central parts of the aperture is advantageous.

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  • If the eye, provided if necessary with a perforated plate in order to reduce the aperture, be situated inside the shadow at a place where the illumination is still sensible, and be focused upon the diffracting edge, the light which it receives will appear to come from the neighbourhood of the edge, and will present the effect of a silver lining.

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  • The d may come from the French fleur d'ajodilee.

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  • There is, on the other hand, no conclusive evidence for the previous existence of a ' Strabo goes on to say that Archias fell in with certain men who had come from the Sicilian Megara, and took them with him to share in his enterprise.

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  • The earliest monuments that can be approximately dated come from Lagash (Tello).

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  • Many writers believe that the earliest references to gilds come from England.

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  • Rejecting the old notion that plants derive their nourishment from humus, he taught that they get carbon and nitrogen from the carbon dioxide and ammonia present in the atmosphere, these compounds being returned by them to the atmosphere by the processes of putrefaction and fermentation - which latter he regarded as essentially chemical in nature - while their potash, soda, lime, sulphur, phosphorus, &c., come from the soil.

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  • The theology of the Indian Syrian Christians is of a Nestorian type, and Cosmas Indicopleustes (6th century) puts us on the right track when he says that the Christians whom he found in Ceylon and Malabar had come from Persia (probably as refugees from persecution, like the Huguenots in England and the Pilgrim Fathers in America).

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  • At present the largest and most regular contributions to the population of Vienna come from the Czech provinces of Bohemia and Moravia, next in importance being those from Lower Austria and Styria.

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  • In 1880 the present writer saw lions killed in the north-west of Tunisia, but by 1902 the lion was regarded as practically extinct in the regency, though occasional rumours of his appearance come from the Khmir Mountains and near Feriana.

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  • Hence, if a prism is placed in front of the eye with its base towards the nose, a ray of light falling upon it will be bent inwards, and seem to come from a point farther out from the axis of vision.

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  • Conversely, if the base of the prism is turned towards the temple, the ray of light will seem to come from a point nearer the axis, and will induce the eye to turn inwards, to converge towards its fellow.

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  • As the district was full of traders, Subura may very well be an imported word, but the form with C must either go back to a period before the disappearance of g before v or must come from some other Italic dialect.

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  • The tile mosaics are believed to have come from Morocco.

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  • They come from tile adjacent continent of Asia, and they de- Wind velop considerable strength owing to the fact that there is an average difference of some 22 mm.

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  • The work upholds the doctrine of resistance, but affirms that resistance must come from properly constituted authorities and objects to anything which savours of anabaptism or other extreme views.

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  • Terah is said to have come from Ur of the Chaldees, usually identified with Mukayyar in south Babylonia.

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  • The growth and development of the shipbuilding industry has been immense, the firm of Harland & Wolff being amongst the first in the trade, and some of the largest vessels in the world come from their yards.

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  • The Gandhara school of sculpture, of which the best specimens come from the neighbourhood of Kanishka's capital, Purushpura (the modern Peshawar), is a branch of Graeco-Roman art adapted to Oriental religious subjects.

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  • Von Spee had come from Mas-a-Fuera, the last anchorage in his long Pacific trip. On Oct.

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  • This letter, professing to come from "Presbyter Joannes, by the power and virtue of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, Lord of Lords,"claimed that he was the greatest monarch under heaven, as well as a devout Christian.

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  • He and his adherents were outlawed; no one was to print, sell or read any of his writings, " since they are foul, harmful, suspected, and come from a notorious and stiff-necked heretic."

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  • A quarrel with the papacy turned, or helped to turn, his thoughts in the direction of Church reform, but he hoped this would come from within rather than from without, and with the aid of his friend John Gropper (1503-1559), began, about 1536, to institute certain reforms in his own diocese.

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  • This has taken mainly two opposite forms. On the one hand the attack has come from the old ground of the danger that is threatened to the reality of the external world and may be said to be in the interest of the object.

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  • The history of the sects of the middle ages is obscure, because the earliest accounts of them come from those who were concerned in their suppression, and were therefore eager to lay upon each of them the worst enormities which could be attributed to any.

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  • These soon ex tended over the whole of Cilicia and, before they had ceased, involved the death of some 20,000 Armenians and a lesser number of Moslems. Both the Government and the Sultan Abdul Hamid have been charged with responsibility for the outbreak; but instigation to the deed, though not perhaps directly from the Government, appears to have come from the Committee.

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  • The immediate proposal is said to have come from George Brown; the large political idea had long been advocated by Macdonald and Alexander Galt in Upper Canada - by Joseph Howe and others in the maritime provinces.

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  • Nor have there been many great finds of coins; indeed most of the pieces in European collections probably come from the same hoard.

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  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.

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  • More probably, however, this is but an accidental coincidence; both adam and adamu may come from the same Semitic root meaning "to make."

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  • The like is true also of the fragments of the Elders preserved in Irenaeus (so far as these do not really come from Papias).

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  • I, hy) which come from the wall either by immigration (fig.

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  • One party taught that while the first impulse must come from the Holy Spirit the work might be compared to reviving a man apparently dead.

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  • The site was purchased by the United States government, and all the expenses come from national funds, the management being vested in the Smithsonian Institution.

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  • This is a lectionary which was once thought to have come from the neighbourhood of Jerusalem, but has been shown by Burkitt to come from.

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  • If, however, the weight in a degraded form, and the foot in an undegraded form, come from the East, it is needless to look for an exact relation between them, but rather for a mere working equivalent, like the 1000 ounces to the cubit foot in England.

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  • After the Toltecs came the Chichimecs, whose name, derived from chici, dog, is applied to many rude tribes; they are said to have come from Amaquemecan under a king named Xolotl, names which being Aztec imply that the nation was Nahua; at any rate they appear afterwards as fusing with more cultured.

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  • The h L lower Mississippi receives no large tributary from the T e ower east, but two important ones come from the west; the Mississippi Arkansas drainage area being a little less than that River.

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  • The Hamilton fauna which followed represents the admixture of the resident Onondaga fauna with new types which are thought to have come from South America, showing that faunal connections for marine life had been made between the interior of the United States and the lands south of the Caribbean Sea, a connection of which, before this time, there was no evidence.

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  • While the pennated grouse (called the prairie chicken in Canada) has always been plentiful, the prairie hen (or chicken) proper is a more recent arrival from Minnesota and Dakota, to which states it had come from Illinois and the south as settlement and accompanying wheatfields extended north.

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  • In central Euboea were the Curetes and Abantes, who seem to have come from the neighbouring continent by way of the Euripus; of these the Abantes, after being reinforced by Ionians from Attica, rose to great power, and exercised a sort of supremacy over the whole island, so that in Homer the inhabitants generally are called by that name.

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  • In his translations of Euripides' Cyclops, 381, "a bowl I Three cubits wide and four in depth, as much i As would contain four amphorae" the Greek original clearly points to "ten amphorae" and four may have come from the previous line.

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  • Other kinds of repetition are Shelley's Witch of Atlas, 6 i i seq., "Like one asleep in a green hermitage, I With gentle sleep about its eyelids playing" (sleep for smiles has come from the previous line); Revolt of Islam, 4749, "Where" for "When" appears to have come from "Where" in 4750 or 4751.

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  • This is where two alternative readings, neither of which, can have come from the other, have equal external support and equal intrinsic merit.

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  • As all earthly fire was thought to have come from heaven, Hephaestus has been identified with the lightning.

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  • It was a favourite residence of the emperor Frederick II., whose second and third wives, lolanthe and Isabella of England,'`were buried in the cathedral dedicated to St Richard, who is believed to have come from England in 492; their tombs, however, no longer exist.

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  • Thus the party of the scribes, when they came into conflict with an active political power, which at the same time claimed to represent the theocratic interests of Israel, were compelled to lay fresh stress on the doctrine that the true deliverance of Israel must come from God.

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  • If he bore in silence the odium that fell upon him owing to the break-up of the collection of the Louvre, it was because he knew that it would be fatal to allow it to be known that the first initiative in the matter had come from the king.

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  • It is allowable to deceive an enemy by fabricated despatches purporting to come from his own side; by tampering with telegraph 1112Ssages; by spreading false intelligence in newspapers; by sending pretended spies and deserters to give him untrue reports of the numbers or movements of the troops; by employing false signals to lure him into an ambuscade.

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  • It is a complicated task to determine the true character and the tenets of any ancient sect, considering that almost all the information that has reached us has come from the opponents.

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  • It is said to have been first applied to certain Belgic tribes in the basin of the Meuse, who may formerly have come from beyond the Rhine.

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  • By far the majority of Lancashire manufacturers sell their goods as they come from the loom, or, as it is called, in the "grey state," but an increasing number now cultivate the trade in finished goods.

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  • Said to have come from the church of St.

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  • A later Jewish oracle (46-62) refers to the wars of the second Triumvirate of Rome, and the whole compilation seems to come from a Christian redactor.

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  • While it is true that very diverse opinions are held concerning missions, it is indisputable that the most favourable testimonies come from those who have really taken the most pains to examine and understand their work.

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  • Tangier is almost destitute of manufactures, and while the trade, about £750,000 a year, is considerable for Morocco, it is confined chiefly to imports, about two-fifths of which come from Great Britain and Gibraltar, and one quarter from France.

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  • Opossums and wallabies, good useful furs, come from Australia and New Zealand.

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  • Widely distributed in North America, the best come from Canada, are costly and are used for military caps, boas, muffs, trimmings, carriage rugs and coachmen's capes, and the fur wears exceedingly well.

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  • The best come from Hudson Bay territory and are valuable.

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  • A few come from China, but the fur is yellowish-grey, slightly spotted and worth little.

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  • Largest skins come from Denmark, Holland and Germany.

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  • The darkest and best come from Labrador and Hudson Bay, and the ordinary sorts from the northwest of the United States and, as with silver and other kinds, the quality is inferior when taken from warmer latitudes.

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  • The majority used for the trade come from Virginia and the southern and western parts of the United States.

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  • Slink lambs come from South America and China.

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  • A few come from Canada and are of better quality.

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  • Marmots are also found in North America, Canada and China; the best, however, come from Russia.

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  • The most pleasing natural grey come from Adelaide.

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  • The best skins come from the northern parts of the United States.

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  • The best skins come from Ohio and New York.

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  • The principal Baggara tribes are the Hawazma, Meseria, Kenana, Habbania, and Homr. The Homr are said to have entered Kordofan from Wadai about the end of the 18th century and to have come from North Africa.

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  • Violent wind storms generally come from the south.

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  • Further, the ilmenite, which is the most characteristic associate of the diamond in blue ground, and other of the accompanying minerals, may have come from basic rocks of a different nature.

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  • Some of the finest and largest stones have come from the Jagersfontein mine; one, the Jubilee, found in 1895, weighed 640 carats in the rough and 239 carats when cut.

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  • The heavy old-fashioned country-made packages are rapidly being replaced by light-tared Boxes made from several thicknesses of veneer pressed closely together, most of which come from Russia.

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  • Most of the cavalry and artillery riding horses come from Prussia proper.

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  • Salem was settled in 1626 by Roger Conant (1593-1679) and a company of "planters," who in 1624 (under the Sheffield patent of 1623 for a settlement on the north shore of Massachusetts Bay) had attempted a plantation at Cape Ann, whither John Lyford and others had previously come from Plymouth through "dissatisfaction with the extreme separation from the English church."

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  • The smallest detachment of our troops cannot pass through that district without meeting everywhere eager and exulting gratulations, the tone of which proves them to come from glowing hearts.

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  • Multitudes of people have, even in this short interval, come from the hills and fastnesses in which they had sought refuge for years, and have reoccupied their ancient deserted villages.

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  • The students come from all parts of the Mahommedan world.

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  • The third governor, Abmad Pasha, hearing that orders for this execution had come from Constantinople, endeavoured to make himself an independent ruler and had coins struck in his own name.

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  • About one-third (in quantity) come from Ulpian, a very copious writer; Paulus stands next.

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  • Almost all come from the Theological lowest orders, a few from the middle classes, and none.

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  • Two lives edited by Thomas Hearne under the names of Elmham and Titus Livius Forojuliensis come from a common source; the longer, which Hearne ascribed incorrectly to Elmham, is perhaps the original work of Livius, who was an Italian in the service of Humphrey of Gloucester, and wrote about 1440.

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  • A glass cup with reliefs carved in the blue and white technique of the Portland Vase, representing a pastoral sacrifice, which was sold by auction in Paris in 1912 for 64,000 francs, was said to have come from Heraclea Pontica.

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  • The only contributions which redeem these hundred years and more from the charge of disrespect to the native muse come from the pen of the Sempills (q.v.).

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  • Considerations of weight had long prevented Lavoisier from accepting this doctrine, but he was now able to explain the process fully, showing that the hydrogen evolved did not come from the metal itself, but was one product of the decomposition of the water of the dilute acid, the other product, oxygen, combining with the metal to form an oxide which in turn united with the acid.

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  • Rawlinson also suggests that the Phoenicians may have originally come from the Bahrein Is.

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  • In crowds they besieged the palace, and had already begun to take vengeance on the foreign monks and sailors who had come from Chalcedon to the metropolis, when, at the entreaty of Eudoxia, the emperor consented to his recall.

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  • Much of this material is demonstrably derived from the second document; and it is qu i te possible that the whole of it may come from that source.

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  • This teaching leads to a conflict with certain Judaeans who seem to have come from Jerusalem, and it proves a severe test even to the faith of disciples.

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  • Where opposition manifests itself, it is not native opposition, but comes from religious teachers who are parts of a system which centres in Jerusalem, and who are sometimes expressly noted as having come from Jerusalem.

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  • These words come from lectures on the history of philosophy, which laid the foundation for his Plaanomenologie des Geistes (Bamberg, 1807).

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  • The European, especially if he come from India, is charmed by their apparently frank, openhearted, hospitable and manly manners; but the charm is not of long duration, and he finds that the Afghan is as cruel and crafty as he is independent.

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  • The finest specimens come from Assam and Burma.

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  • He describes himself as a worshipper of Bhagavata (= Vishnu), and states that he had come from Taxila in the name of the great king Antialcidas, who is known from his coins to have lived c. 170 B.C.

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  • Considerable quantities of coal come from South Wales.

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  • Owing to the destruction of the primeval forests for the formation of sugar plantations, the indigenous flora is only seen in parts of the interior plains, in the river valleys and on the hills; and it is not now easy to distinguish between what is native and what has come from abroad.

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  • Nasr warned the Arabs against their common enemy, "who preaches a religion that does not come from the Envoy of God, and whose chief aim is the extirpation of the Arabs."

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  • Lequio, who had come from Carnia.

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  • On his way at Puteoli, the passengers and crew of a ship just come from Alexandria cheered the old man by their spontaneous homage, declaring, as they poured libations, that to him they owed life, safe passage on the seas, freedom and fortune.

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  • This writer stated that he had found the germ of his remarks among the papers of his deceased brother, and that they had come from Legendre, who had himself received them from some one unnamed.

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  • The principal imports are cotton goods, of which 80% come from Great Britain, rice, kola nuts, chiefly from Liberia, spirits, tobacco, building material, and arms and ammunition, chiefly "trade guns."

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  • The most numerous inscriptions come from the excavations in Carthage, the ancient colony of Sidon.

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  • Corps a few weeks before; he had come from the Asiago uplands and knew little or nothing of the II.

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  • According to Morewood it is more likely to have come from the Japanese Sake or Sacki (see SAK), derived in its turn from the name of the city of Osaka.

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  • This can only have come from a Sabellian.

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  • The "streaks" 1 or "heads" of jute as they come from the bale are in a hard condition in consequence of having been subjected to a high hydraulic pressure during baling; it is therefore necessary to soften them before any further process is entered.

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  • The prefatory note there may come from a Hebrew MS., but perhaps refers to chapter i.

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  • That the Iranians must have come from the East to their later home, is sufficiently proved by their close relationship to the Indians, in conjunction with whom they pre- frani8fls viously formed a single people, bearing the name and Aryan Arya.

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  • Nearly three-fourths of the imports come from Great Britian, which, however, takes no more than some 35% of the exports.

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  • Yet such considerations do not operate against the literary judgment that the pastorals did not come from Paul's pen.

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  • The " Alpine race " is commonly supposed to be Mongoloid in origin and to have come from Asia, the home of round-skulled races.

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  • Not only are relics of La Tene culture found in Ireland, but the oldest Irish epics celebrate tall, fair-haired, grey-eyed heroes, armed and clad in Gallic fashion, who had come from the continent.

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  • But the altered name of Lombard also denoted henceforth some of the proudest of Italians; and, though the Lombard speech had utterly perished their most common names still kept up the remembrance that their fathers had come from beyond the Alps.

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  • In England, at least, the enterprising traders and bankers who found their way to the West, from the 13th to the 16th centuries, though they certainly did not all come from Lombardy, bore the name of Lombards.

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  • Some modern writers have included in the same class the Burgundians, a nation which had apparently come from the basin of the Oder, but the evidence at our disposal on the whole hardly justifies the supposition that their language retained a close affinity with Gothic.

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  • Those on the right bank all come from Queensland and bring down enormous volumes of water in flood time; on the left bank the most important tributaries are the Gwydir, Namoi, Castlereagh, Bogan and Macquarie.

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  • On the lower Congo the prevailing winds are from the west and the southwest, but this prevalence becomes less and less marked towards the interior, until on the upper river they come from the south-east.

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  • The rest of the Avesta, in spite of the opposite opinion of orthodox Parsees, does not even claim to come from Zoroaster.

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  • These three poems are remarkable for the corrupt state of their text, which makes it likely that they have come from the same source and possibly are by the same author.

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  • The other poems come from two sources.

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  • Sokota, one of the great central markets, and capital of the province of Waag in Amhara, at the converging point of several main trade routes; the market is numerously attended, especially by dealers in the salt blocks which come from Lake Alalbed.

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  • The best breeds come from the Shoa uplands.

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  • The important van der Hoop collection arose out of bequests by Adrian van der Hoop and his widow in 1854 and 1880; but the most famous pictures in the Ryks Museum are perhaps the three which come from the Trippenhuis, namely, the so-called "Nightwatch" and the "Syndics of the Cloth Hall" by Rembrandt, and the "Banquet of the Civic Guard," by van der Helst.

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  • It could certainly not have come from the Babylonians, however, whose system of attendant spirits was far from being so complete as that which is set forth in the Book of Daniel, but rather from Persian sources where a more complicated angelology had been developed.

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  • This prince did not even come from the family of Nebuchadrezzar.

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  • Most of the pyrites consumed in the United Kingdom come from Spain; this Spanish pyrites generally (not always) contains enough copper (say 3 or 4%) to make its extraction from the residues ("cinders) a paying process, and this of course cheapens the price of the sulphur to the acid manufacturer.

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  • Evidently the impulse towards unity had to come from without; it began with the alliance between the Carolingians and the Papacy, and was accentuated by the recognition of the liber canonum.

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  • It is nowadays admitted by all that these three collections come from the same source.

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  • The traditions about Cambyses, preserved by the Greek authors, come from two different sources.

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  • In Elizabeths time the danger, if not entirely external, did not come from the government itself.

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  • In all these cases the virus seems to have come from Holland; the last two executions followed the rash dedication to James I.

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  • They are supposed to be recent immigrants to Syr-darya, having come from the former Bulgarian Empire on the middle Volga.

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  • The columns of verde antique on either side of the nave are commonly said to have come from the temple of Diana at Ephesus, but recent authorities regard them as specially cut for use in the church.

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  • In this work he endeavoured to show, by an examination of geographical names, that a race or races speaking dialects allied to modern Basque once extended through the whole of Spain, the southern coast of France and the Balearic Islands, and suggested that these people, whom he identified with the Iberians of classical writers, had come from northern Africa, where the name of Berber still perhaps perpetuates their old designation.

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  • The last two come from the Shan States, and are navigable for between 20 and 30 m.

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  • They come from the cities of the east or the farms of the south.

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  • Some potatoes, turnips and beans are grown upon the farms; but the corned beef, bacon and groceries come from the cities.

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  • Sometimes there is another church and small settlement in the upper valley, to which, once or twice in a summer, the Lapps come from great distances to attend service.

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  • Moreover, if the white light come from a source at a higher temperature than theirs, the sections, or lines, absorbed by them show dark against a continuous background.

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  • The presidency of Munster, an office the creation of which had long been contemplated, was then conferred on Sir John Perrot, who drove James "Fitzmaurice" Fitzgerald into the mountains, reduced castles everywhere, and destroyed a Scottish contingent which had come from Ulster to help the rebels.

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  • The principal imports, of which over s come from Great Britain or British colonies, are cotton goods, kola-nuts (from Sierra Leone), tobacco, rice, sugar and spirits.

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  • Before the French occupation the dominant people were the Hova, a Malayo-Indonesian people who must have come from the Malay Peninsula or the adjacent islands.

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  • On bank holidays and similar occasions thousands of excursionists come from the manufacturing towns within reach.

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  • The emoluments of this office, which involved no duties save that of continuing his scientific labours, were fixed at 1000 scudi; and it was the desire of increased leisure, rather than the promptings of local patriotism, which induced him to accept an offer the original suggestion of which had indeed come from himself.

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  • The name Dagon seems to come from ddg " fish," and that his idol was half-man half-fish is possible from the ichthyomorphic representations found upon coins of Ascalon and Arvad, and from the fact that Berossus speaks of an Assyrian merman-god.

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  • Quien, the interrogative pronoun which has taken the place of the old qul, seems to come from q u e rn.

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  • Starting with the indisputable fact that man's life and happiness are largely dependent upon phenomena in the heavens, that the fertility of the soil is de pendent upon the sun shining in the heavens as well as upon the rains that come from heaven, that on the other hand the mischief and damage done by storms and inundations, to both of which the Euphratean Valley was almost regularly subject, were to be traced likewise to the heavens, the conclusion was drawn that all the great gods had their seats in the heavens.

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  • Immigrant species have even come from Texas and New Mexico, from the Dakotas and the Rockies.

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  • When in a compound pistil the style of each carpel is thus displaced, it appears as if the ovary were depressed in the centre, and the style rising from the depression in the midst of the carpels seems to come from the torus.

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  • Further, all the fragments come from the provinces which were under the jurisdiction of Diocletian, from which it is argued that the edict was only published in the eastern portion of the empire; certainly the phrase universo orbi in the preamble is against this, but the words may merely be an exaggerated description of Diocletian's special provinces, and if it had been published in the western portion as well, it is curious that no traces have been found of it.

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  • But these people may themselves have come from Jutland.

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  • These tubes were formerly supposed to secrete the sweet substance known as "honey-dew" so much sought after by ants; but this is now known to come from the alimentary canal.

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  • Jule, the regional commander for the eastern hemisphere and the oldest of the three of them by far, had come from the same world as the Watchers but refused to talk about it.

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  • It seemed to come from behind them but it could have been anything—a dislodged rock, an echo of their own movements.

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  • Most…well, all but you come from the elitist circles of their times.

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  • She was dressed in clothing meant to facilitate her movement, but Xander wore heavy boots and clothing, as if he'd just come from outdoors.

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  • Thursday should not be an occasion for congratulating ourselves on how far we have come from the moral abyss of National Socialism.

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  • People would come from miles away, just to watch the beautiful lady with her sparkling facial adornments.

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  • Some of these selections come from Java and other parts of Indonesia via the fm airwaves of Sumatra's major cities.

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  • It may come from a sheep, goat, or Tibetan antelope.

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  • If we come from apes why are there still apes?

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  • I'm curious, where does the bamboo come from?

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  • Evaluation of the evidence base for magnetic bandages to heal wounds Where does the evidence come from?

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  • Power doesn't come from the end of a gun barrel; it comes from the look in a crowd's eye.

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  • Most honey bees in Britain come from domestic hive colonies.

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  • The only names which are considered for appointment to diocesan bishoprics come from the church.

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  • The rest will come from the issuing of domestic public debt in the form of treasury bonds.

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  • A commune wine will come from anywhere within the parish boundary.

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  • About 40% of kids come from single parent families, mostly the result of marriage breakups.

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  • I have just got bulldog broadband on adsl, and not used to this having come from ntl cable.

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  • In future, more of our wealth and jobs will come from small and growing businesses.

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  • Pillars inserted to avoid calamity are said to have come from the timbers of Spanish Galleons sunk in the Armada.

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  • We come from all walks of life and quickly build up a special camaraderie.

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  • The main medical properties of cayenne come from a chemical called capsaicin, which gives peppers their heat.

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  • My complex carbs come from oats or sweet potatoes.

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  • Both colors benefit from some time spent in wooden casks, not surprisingly these come from France.

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  • The Church of England demands to have its say; threats of mutiny come from the officer caste.

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  • Where do some of the fundamental concepts of Hinduism come from?

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  • Eventually she discovers that real Easter eggs come from broody hen, Mavis, rather than the local confectioner.

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  • Their costumes looked like they'd come from modern day department stores, rather than a theatrical costumiers.

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  • Secondly, with such a vast force, where would all the landing craft come from?

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  • More than 25 percent would come from extensively managed forestlands and about 75 percent from intensively managed croplands.

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  • Two stone crucifix in the walls of the present Abbey are believed to have come from this Saxon church.

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  • The plants are organically cultivated or come from wild, ecologically clean areas.

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  • Patients come from across the globe to have tumors treated by the UK ' s only medical cyclotron.

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  • Poopy, my lovely black darling; where have you come from?

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  • And Alice's public key will not decrypt documents originating from Eve, even if she claims they come from Alice.

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  • The stones come from Thailand and have been used for 100's of years in the Far and Middle East as a natural deodorant.

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  • Whilst the number of lower intelligence children invariably come from a socio-economically deprived background.

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  • This fluoride would come from food and drink or from fluoride dietary supplements.

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  • If the universe was formed from a giant dodo egg, where did the dodo egg, where did the dodo egg come from?

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  • Unlike the bearded dragons tested, chameleon skin gives more uniform results, regardless of where on the body the samples come from.

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  • The bacteria that cause TB are inhaled in the form of microscopic droplets that come from a person infected with TB.

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  • It can also come from natural sources, such as wind-blown dust, as well as construction, mining and quarrying activities.

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  • Many successful entrepreneurs come from tough, working class backgrounds.

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  • The main sources of sugar required to produce ethanol come from fuel or energy crops.

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  • Her slow exhalations seemed to come from somewhere outside herself; she didn't think, couldn't think, only felt.

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  • If you come from continental European fandom this must all seem truly exotic.

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  • He said his own forebears had come from central Europe in a previous wave of immigration, no doubt to escape persecution.

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  • Frequently Asked Questions about fuel cells Where did fuel cells come from?

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  • For words always come from the past, whether from the previous moment's thinking or the earliest genesis of the race.

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  • Haven't evolutionary geneticists been hinting at this all along by telling us that monkeys are where our genetic codes come from?

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  • Infection by a virus may come from the same virus that causes colds and from an Epstein-Barr virus - the latter causes glandular fever.

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  • Obviously I come from a gnome background so I say Gnome.

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  • Children sometimes have a tenuous grasp of where food comes from, for example the belief that ' chips come from London ' .

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  • Where these stories come from is anyone's guess.

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  • I think the first shot did come from an Ira gunman.

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  • They are made from a naturally occurring metal called hematite, although they look like they should have come from outer-space.

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  • Clues to the normal function of MLL in mammalian haematopoiesis have come from the identification of domains that share homology with other known proteins.

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  • Staff should not indoctrinate or confuse children, who will come from a range of faith backgrounds, including families with no religious faith.

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  • At the time, British officials suggested the steroid may have come from a nasal inhaler or cold remedy widely available in the US.

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  • The London Book Fair Sir, The London Book Fair reflects the benign internationalism that can come from the business of writing.

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  • The enzymes come from the pancreas and from cells lining the intestine.

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  • Invariant Theory of Finite Groups This introductory lecture will be concerned with polynomial invariant Theory of Finite Groups This introductory lecture will be concerned with polynomial invariants of finite groups which come from a linear group action.

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  • The lowest order contributions to the partition function will come from metrics with a U1 isometry, and given behavior at infinity.

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  • Goals tend to come from unsightly goalmouth scrambles or weak headers under onrushing keepers.

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  • The impetus for these targets has mainly come from European legislation on waste, which is slowing impacting on the UK.

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  • English operates as an international lingua franca and the great majority of communication in English is between people who come from non-Anglo backgrounds.

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  • The blue shield, gold cross and four rampant lions come from the Arms of the Bishopric.

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  • These come from overheating, broken covers and exposed live wires.

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  • The re-used masonry may have come from a 12 th century chapel, perhaps situated within the castle.

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  • Care Co-ordinators can come from a variety of professions including medical, nursing, social work, occupational therapy and psychology.

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  • Occasional splashes of color come from tormentil, heath milkwort, devil's matchsticks or silver-studded blue butterfly.

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  • The traffic tends to come from seedy places like domain names that have lapsed in payment or commonly misspelled domain entries.

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  • They come from 20 different countries and have taken lifelong monastic vows, while at the same time retaining their own denominations.

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  • Hand for three or for a. Come from problem proved morris was.

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  • Both ideas may come from the 16th century mystic Jacob Boehme, who was an influence on many philosophers in London in the 1740s.

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  • This exhalation should come from the diaphragm and not be excessively noisy as in a grunt or a snort.

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  • Their function and meaning remain obscure, tho many have come from graves or shrines and so could either be deities or memorial images.

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  • The threat could come from terrorists, rivals or even obsessive fans.

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  • Some of the best and funniest one-liners come from ordinary people who don't realize they have been funny.

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  • It is also argued that such paragons are hard to find, and indeed would probably only come from competitors.

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  • By lunchtime you should be clear of these hills and into the rolling pastureland of the Charolais - where the famous cattle come from.

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  • I had come from a city where a few unnamed trees grew out of asphalt pavements, ignored, unseen.

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  • The majority of her portrait commissions come from America and she specializes in the mediums graphite pencil, colored pencil and oils.

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  • Peta said, " Eighty-five percent of the fur industry's skins come from animals living captive on fur factory farms.

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  • Both examples come from Blue Bridge Lane which is known to occupy the periphery of the precinct of St Andrew's.

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  • The inquiries tend to come from young enlisted personnel who joined the military within the last 10 years.

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  • According to the US EPA, 9% of the airborne pollutants creating ground level ozone come from the VOCs in paint.

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  • We are Bolton's youth environment posse and we come from all over Bolton.

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  • I was a very precocious child and started worrying about things like where all the water had come from for the Flood.

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  • Pit with him highest to lowest amp preventive medicine come from carts.

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  • Others come from families of dogs genetically prone to anxiety.

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  • So, where does the word quack come from?

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  • Rabbinic writings which come from the 1st century ce?

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  • The great and the good had come from all over the world and they sat in serried ranks to pay their last homage.

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  • These may come from new approaches such as the role of sigma, NMDA and acetylcholine receptors.

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  • The cooling is hastened by refrigerators in the room beneath, these refrigerators in the room beneath, these refrigerators being supplied with water which has come from two ice machines.

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  • By 1986 there were 26 tractors the capital having come from migrant worker remittances.

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  • The first two recipes come from The Cranks Recipe Book (Grafton ), produced by the now famous but once pioneering vegetarian restaurant.

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  • We need to see beyond the rather immature demand that we always get our own way to the rich rewards that come from collaboration.

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  • I come from a background of Iyengar and I like to feel the poses, even in a sun salutation.

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  • Alternatively, the darkness may have come from a severe sandstorm.

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  • A new life that is awash with the improved self-confidence that can come from having a bigger penis!

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  • Large spreads of burnt seaweed ash and crushed shell may have come from a white tanning agent used to make vellum.

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  • It might have come from the center of the world, this smoke, where the fires of the ages still smolder.

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  • Many had come from far and wide just to see the spitfire which appeared at 15.08.

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  • The call had come from her own creative subconscious.

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  • Yet another says the original tip-off did not come from an MI5 informer, but from someone who phoned the Met's antiterrorist hotline.

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  • Ninety per cent of all black truffles in Italy come from Umbria.

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  • Inspiration has come from the 1920s and my color palette works around black, brown, green, turquoise and pink.

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  • Note the bell, which may have come from the Sanctus bell turret visible in the adjacent photo.

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  • The desire for this can come from Mentor or Student, or may even arise unbidden from the sharing of intense magical experiences.

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  • All these evils come from inside and make a man unclean.

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  • The variation of water vapor density with altitude suggests the water vapor density with altitude suggests the water vapor may come from a localized source comparable to a geothermal hot spot.

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  • With malt whiskey the heating of the kiln will come from peat.

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  • Fraternal twins share the same womb, but come from different ovum.

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  • He must have come from Winchester College in one of the earliest batches of scholars from that college, the sole feeder of New College, not from St John Baptist College, Winchester, as guessed by Dr William Hunt in the Dict.

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  • But while reason and revelation are two distinct sources of truths, the truths are not contradictory; for in the last resort they rest on one absolute truth - they come from the one source of knowledge, God, the Absolute One.

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  • That is, it is possible to conceive of an ethical science which would extend considerably our knowledge of economic affairs, but no important new principle or original discovery, relevant to economic investigation, has come from that quarter in recent years, and at present ethics has more to learn from economics than the latter has from ethics.

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  • There were in 1789 a number of mulattoes in Paris, who had come from San Domingo to assert the rights of the people of colour in that colony before the national assembly.

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  • But in reading all the accounts of Mme de Stael's life which come from herself or her intimate friends, it must be carefully remembered that she was the most distinguished and characteristic product of the period of sensibilite - the singular fashion of ultra-sentiment which required that both men and women, but especially women, should be always palpitating with excitement, steeped in melancholy, or dissolved in tears.

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  • The land mammals of Greenland are decidedly more American than European; the musk-ox, the banded lemming (Cuniculus torquatus), the white polar wolf, of which there seems to have been a new invasion recently round the northern part of the country to the east coast, the Eskimo and the dog - probably also the reindeer - have all come from America, while the other land mammals, the polar bear, the polar fox, the Arctic hare, the stoat (Mustela erminea), are perfectly circumpolar forms. The species of seals and whales are, if anything, more American than European, and so to some extent are the fishes.

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  • If a retarding plate be now inserted so as to operate upon the pulses which come from one side of the grating, while leaving the remainder unaffected, we have to consider what happens at the focal point chosen.

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  • It was time for a new departure, but there seemed to be no sufficient strength left within the charmed circle of the orthodox schools, and the new movement was fated to come from the masses, whose voice had hitherto been silent in the art world.

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  • The population of Euboea at the present day is made up of elements not less various, for many of the Greek inhabitants seem to have immigrated, partly from the mainland, and partly from other islands; and besides these, the southern portion is occupied by Albanians, who probably have come from Andros; and in the mountain districts nomad Vlach shepherds are found.

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  • Orfraie "again is occasionally interchanged with Effraie (which, through such dialectical forms as Fresaie, Fressaia, is said to come from the Latin praesaga), the ordinary French name for the barn-owl, Aluco fiammeus (see OWL).

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  • Further, we apprehend by means of a light which does not come from ourselves.

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  • When the people saw me come from the sky they naturally thought me some superior creature, and bowed down before me.

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  • I was born in Kentucky, you know, where all the best and most aristocratic horses come from.

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  • He wondered where they had come from and where they were going.

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  • Men come from every country to see him and learn from him.

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