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columbia

columbia

columbia Sentence Examples

  • He was the author of Principles of Mining (1909), based on lectures given at Stanford and at Columbia universities.

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  • I reminded him that he said he went to Columbia because he needed the money.

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  • In the woods of Oregon, from the Columbia river southwards, an oak is found bearing some resemblance to the British oak in foliage and in its thick trunk and widely-spreading boughs, but the bark is white as in Q.

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  • Through the columns of the Independent Reflector, which he established in 1752, Livingston fought the attempt of the Anglican party to bring the projected King's College (now Columbia University) under the control of the Church of England.

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  • The city is the largest in British Columbia, and is the chief Canadian shipping port for Japan, China, Australia and the islands at which the C.P.R.

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  • The last time he made a business trip to Columbia, he had said they needed the money.

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  • VANCOUVER, a city and port in the province of British Columbia, Canada, on the southern side of Burrard Inlet.

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  • Gephart's Transportation and Industrial Development in the Middle West (New York, 1909), in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, is a commercial history of Ohio.

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  • P. Shepherd, Turgot and the Six Edicts (1903), in Columbia Univ.

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  • The Rocky Mountains, which give its charm to Alberta, are ascended by a gradual approach from the east, but are exceedingly abrupt on their transalpine slope in British Columbia.

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  • The post commands an excellent view of the Columbia, and of the mountain peaks, Mt Hood,.

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  • His excuse for going to Columbia had been that they needed money.

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  • When you went to Columbia, you said we needed the money.

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  • His father had connections... in Columbia?

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  • This wasn't about what he had hidden from her or the fact that he had left her alone for two weeks to go to Columbia.

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  • Uncle Fabrice lives in Columbia.

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  • The next weekend Carmen and Alex were having supper at Katie and Bill's house again and Alex was describing a place in Columbia.

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  • In 1811 he founded at the mouth of the Columbia river a settlement named after him Astoria, which was intended to serve as the central depot; but two years later the settlement was seized and occupied by the English.

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  • The "McGill University College of British Columbia" at Vancouver is one of the colleges of McGill University (Montreal).

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  • Vancouver is the centre of the important timber industry of British Columbia.

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  • The following statistics are interesting: - The enormous development of the wheat-growing industry is These figures do not include the wheat ground into flour and sent by way of British Columbia to Asia and Australia, nor the wheat retained by the farmers for seed.

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  • He graduated with high rank from Columbia College in 1842, having supported himself through his course.

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  • He taught mathematics at Columbia, and in 1845 was admitted to the bar, but, owing to defective eyesight, never practised.

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  • Murbach and C. Shearer, " On Medusae from the Coast of British Columbia and Alaska," Proc. Zool.

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  • Another son, Charles King (1789-1867), was also educated abroad, was captain of a volunteer regiment in the early part of the war of 1812, and served in 1814 in the New York Assembly, and after working for some years as a journalist was president of Columbia College in 1849-1864.

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  • of the Colorado river; the northern edge being formed by the divide of the drainage basin of the Columbia river, the eastern by that of the Colorado, the western by the central part of the Sierra Nevada crest, and by other high mountains.

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  • Of this total there were in the British Empire about 380,000 Jews (British Isles 240,000, London accounts for 150,000 of these; Canada and British Columbia 60,000; India 18,000; South Africa 40,000).

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  • In 1822 the capital was removed to Jackson from Columbia, Marion county.

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  • The seats of government have been Natchez (1798-1802), Washington (1802-1817), Natchez (1817-1821), Columbia (1821-1822), Jackson (1822 seq.).

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  • He was educated at Franklin College, Athens, Georgia, and at South Carolina College, Columbia, and was admitted to the bar in 1829.

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  • It forms extensive forests in Vancouver Island, British Columbia and Oregon, whence the timber is exported, being highly prized for its strength, durability and even grain, though very heavy; it is of a deep yellow colour, abounding in resin, which oozes from the thick bark.

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  • Every lineal descendant, over eighteen years of age, of any passenger of the "Mayflower" is eligible to membership. Branch societies have since been organized in several of the states and in the District of Columbia, and a triennial congress is held in Plymouth.

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  • Their chief settlements were Columbia (1788) and Cincinnati (1789).

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  • There are two excellent secondary accounts: Samuel P. Orth, The Centralization of Administration in Ohio, in the Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, xvi.

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  • A Boston vessel, the " Columbia " (Captain Robert Gray), opened trade with the north-west coast of America, and was the first American ship to circumnavigate the globe (1787-1790).

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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.

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  • California was admitted as a free state, and the slave trade was abolished in the District of Columbia; these were concessions to the North.

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  • by the line of peaks of the Rocky Mountains range, which runs northwesterly, and divides it from British Columbia.

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  • A branch line of the Canadian Pacific railway runs from Medicine Hat between 49° and 50° N., passing through the Crow's Nest Pass of the Rocky Mountains and carrying on trade with British Columbia.

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  • Dana of Columbia College the elementary facts of electromagnetism.

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  • Norway, Scotland, British Columbia 5 and Alaska, Patagonia and Chile, and even Spitsbergen and Novaya Zemlya, whose west coasts are far more indented than their east ones.

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  • Van Buren, who early allied himself with the Clintonians, was surrogate of Columbia county from 1808 until 1813, when he was removed.

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  • Rees and his assistants at the observatory of Columbia University, New York.

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  • A small island, Hog Island, is included in the township. The principal village, also known as Bristol, is a port of entry with a capacious and deep harbour, has manufactories of rubber and woollen goods, and is well known as a yacht-building centre, several defenders of the America Cup, including the "Columbia" and the "Reliance," having been built in the Herreshoff yards here.

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  • Recognizing that slavery was a state institution, with which the Federal government had no authority to interfere, he contended that slavery could only exist by a specific state enactment, that therefore slavery in the District of Columbia and in the Territories was unlawful and should be abolished, that the coastwise slave-trade in vessels flying the national flag, like the international slave-trade, should be rigidly suppressed, and that Congress had no power to pass any act which in any way could be construed as a recognition of slavery as a national institution.

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  • Leaving Hampton Roads on the 18th of August 1838, it Mopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Paumotu group of the Low Archipelago, the Samoan islands and New South Wales; from Sydney sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny islands; visited the Fiji and the Hawaiian islands in 1840, explored the west coast of the United States, including the Columbia river, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento river, in 1841, and returned by way of the Philippine islands, the Sulu archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope, reaching New York on the 10th of June 1842.

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  • He studied in the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and in Columbia University, where he graduated in 1870.

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  • He was president of Columbia University from 1890 to 1901, and did much for it by his business administration, his liberality (he gave $1,000,000 for the erection of a library) and his especial interest in the department of Political Science.

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  • In his term Columbia became a well-organized and closely-knit university.

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  • Its official name was changed from Columbia College to Columbia University.

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  • The New York College for the Training of Teachers became its Teachers' College of Columbia; a Faculty of Pure Science was added; the Medical School gave up its separate charter to become an integral part of the university; Barnard College became more closely allied with the university; relations were entered into between the university and the General, Union and Jewish theological seminaries of New York City and with Cooper Union, the Metropolitan Museum of Fine Arts and the American Museum of Natural History; and its faculty and student body became less local in character.

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  • VICTORIA, the capital of British Columbia and the principal city of Vancouver Island, in the S.E.

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  • The great increase during the few years preceding 1899 was due to the development of the goldfields of the North-Western Territory, especially British Columbia.

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  • VANCOUVER, a city and the county-seat of Clarke county, Washington, U.S.A., on the Columbia river about loo m.

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  • Vancouver Barracks, east of the city, is an important U.S. military post (established in 1849) and the headquarters of the Military Department of the Columbia (including Washington, Oregon, Idaho, except the part in Yellowstone Park, and Alaska); the military reservation includes some 640 acres.

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  • COLUMBIA, a city and the county-seat of Maury county, Tennessee, U.S.A., situated on the Duck river, in the central part of the state, 46 m.

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  • Columbia is served by the Louisville & Nashville, and the Nashville, Chattanooga & St Louis railways.

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  • It is the seat of the Columbia Institute for girls (under Protestant Episcopal control), founded in 1836, and of the Columbia Military Academy.

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  • Columbia is in a fine farming region; is engaged extensively in the mining and shipping of phosphates; has an important trade in live-stock, especially mules; manufactures cotton, lumber, flour, bricks, pumps and woollen goods; and has marble and stone works.

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  • Columbia was settled about 1807 and was incorporated in 1822.

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  • Columbia River >>

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  • From 1790 until 1846 Alexandria county was a part of the District of Columbia; at present the city, although within the limits of Alexandria county, is not administratively a part of it.

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  • De Witt Clinton graduated at Columbia College in 1786, and in 1790 was admitted to the bar.

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  • He graduated at Columbia College in 1795, and was admitted to the bar in 1797.

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  • From 1876 to 1909 he practised law in Columbia City, Ind., and from 1909 to 1913 was governor of Indiana.

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  • The female population is greater (and has been since 1765, at least) than the male, the percentage being in 1900 greater than in any other state of the Union (51.3%; District of Columbia, owing to clerks in government service 52.6%).

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  • to the American Revolution (in Columbia University Studies, vol i., 1892).

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  • Cushing, Transition from Provincial to Commonwealth Government in Massachusetts (Columbia University Studies in History, vol.

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  • Adams in maintaining the right of offering anti-slavery petitions, advocated the prohibition by Congress of the slave trade between the states, and favoured the exclusion of slavery from the District of Columbia.

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  • The Shoshoni, Shahaptin and Salish tribes are of middle stature; on the coast of British Columbia, Puget Sound, in Oregon, and northern California, are the shortest of all the North Americans save the Eskimo, while among them, on the Columbia, are taller tribes.

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  • Antioquia, Columbia.

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  • Along the archipelagoes of the North Pacific coast, from Mount St Elias to the Columbia river, the dugout attained its best.

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  • The Columbia river canoe resembled that of the Amur, the bow and stern being pointed at the water-line.

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  • The religious concep tions of the fishing tribes on the Pacific coast between Mount St Elias and the Columbia river are worked out by Boas; the transformation from the hunting to the agricultural mode of life was accompanied by changes in belief and worship quite as radical.

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  • Y.; Albert Buell Lewis, "Tribes of the Columbia Valley," Mem.

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  • He graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1768, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1771.

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  • Limestone 1 These include: the Adirondack Hatchery at Upper Saranac, Franklin county; the Caledonia Hatchery at Mumford, Monroe county; the Cold Spring Harbor Hatchery, at Cold Spring Harbor, Suffolk county; the Delaware Hatchery, at Margaretville, Delaware county; the Fulton Chain Hatcher y, at Old Forge, Herkimer county; the Linlithgo Hatchery, at Linlithgo, Columbia county; the Oneida Hatchery, at Constantia, Oswego county; and the Pleasant Valley Hatchery, at Taggart, Steuben county.

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  • In January 1784 Governor George Clinton recommended legislation for the " revival and encouragement of seminaries of learning," with the result that the legislature passed an act establishing a state university of which Columbia College, formerly King's, was the " mother " portion.

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  • In 1787 a second university act was passed which restored to Columbia College the substance of its original charter and made the University of the State of New York an exclusively executive body with authority to incorporate new colleges and academies and to exercise over them the right of visitation.

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  • Columbia University and Cornell University (q.v.), are: Union University (1795, non-sectarian), at Schenectady; Hamilton College (1812, non-sectarian), at Clinton; Colgate University (1819, non-sectarian), at Hamilton; Hobart College (1822, non-sectarian), at Geneva: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1824, non-sectarian), at Troy; New York University (1832, non-sectarian), in New York City; Alfred University (1836, non-sectarian), at Alfred; Fordham University (1841, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of St Francis Xavier (1847, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of the City of New York (1849, city); University of Rochester (1850, Baptist), at Rochester; Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1854, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; Niagara University (1856, Roman Catholic), at Niagara Falls; St Lawrence University (1858, non-sectarian), at Canton; St Bonaventure's College (1859, Roman Catholic), at St Bonaventure; St Stephen's College (1860, Protestant Episcopal), at Annandale; Manhattan College (1863, Roman Catholic), at New York City; St John's College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Brooklyn; Canisius College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Buffalo; Syracuse University (1871, Methodist Episcopal), at Syracuse; Adelphi College (1896, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; and Clarkson School of Technology (1896, non-sectarian), at Potsdam.

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  • In 1859 he was tried on a charge of murder, having shot Philip Barton Key, U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, whom Sickles had discovered to have a liaison with his wife; but was acquitted after a dramatic trial lasting twenty days.

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  • In this year British Columbia entered the confederation, one of the provisions of union being that a transcontinental railroad should be built within ten years.

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  • of Columbia.

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  • Kennedy, Historic Camden (Columbia, S.C., 1905).

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  • it is bounded by British Columbia, along the 49th parallel as far W.

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  • the Columbia river separates it from Oregon from the mouth of that river to the point of the upper intersection with the 46th parallel of N.

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  • The eastern half of the state is occupied in the north by a westward extension of the Rocky Mountains, and in the centre and south by the north-western portion of the Columbia Plateau province.

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  • East of the Cascade Mountains the Columbia and Spokane rivers mark the boundary between the Okanogan Highlands to the northward and the Columbia plateau to the southward; The Okanogan Highlands, an outlier of the Rocky Mountains extending westward from the Coeur d'Alene Mountains in Idaho, reach heights of 5000 to 6000 ft.

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  • The Columbia plateau consists of horizontal beds of lava having a total thickness of several thousand feet, and its surface has a general elevation of tow to 2000 ft.

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  • West of the Columbia river the plain is broken by several monoclinal ridges rising 2000 to 3000 ft.

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  • In some parts, especially (in Douglas and Grant counties) within the Big Bend of the Columbia, the plain is frequently cut by coulees, or abandoned river channels, some of them 500 to 600 ft.

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  • The Grand Coulee represents the course of the Columbia river during the glacial period, when its regular channel was blocked with ice.

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  • The Okanogan Highlands, the Columbia plain, the E.

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  • portion of the Puget Sound Basin are drained b y the Columbia and its tributaries.

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  • from the Columbia river it is about 400 ft.

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  • There are also several alkali lakes or chains of alkali lakes in the coulees on the Columbia plateau.

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  • Coyotes and jack-rabbits are the most numerous denizens of the Columbia plain.

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  • The sage-hen is common on the Columbia plain.

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  • There are large quantities of salmon in the lower Columbia river, in Gray's and Willapa harbours, and in Puget Sound; oyster fisheries in Gray's and Willapa harbours and in Puget Sound; cod, perch, flounders, smelt, herring and sardines in these and other salt waters.

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  • The Columbia plain is for the most part treeless and, except where irrigated, grows principally bunch-grass or, in its lower and more arid parts, sagebrush.

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  • On the Okanogan Highlands, on the eastern foothills of the Cascade Mountains, on the Blue Mountains and on the elevated portion of the Columbia Plain which comprises the E.

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  • border counties, the annual rainfall and melted snow amount to from 12 to 24 in., but in the southern half of eastern Washington the Columbia river flows through a wide district of low elevation, where the rainfall and melted snow amount to only 6 to 12 in.

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  • On the Columbia plateau the soil is principally volcanic ash and decomposed lava; it is almost wholly volcanic ash in the more arid sections, but elsewhere more decomposed lava or other igneous rocks, and some vegetable loam is mixed with the ash.

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  • The forest reserves are included in ten national parks, named the Chelan, Columbia, Colville, Kaniksu, Olympic, Ranier, Snoqualmie, Washington, Wanaha and Wenatchee, the Chelan being the largest, with an area of 2,492,500 acres.

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  • The Northern Pacific, the first of the transcontinental roads to touch the Pacific north of San Francisco, reaches Seattle with a wide sweep to the south, crossing the Columbia river about where it is entered by the Yakima and ascending the valley of the latter to the Cascade Mountains.

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  • The Northern Pacific sends a branch line south from Tacoma parallel with the coast to Portland on the Columbia river, where it meets the Southern Pacific and the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company's line (a subsidiary of the Union Pacific), thus affording communication southwards, and up the valley of the Columbia to the east.

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  • Entering the south-east corner of the state, the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company extends a line northwards to Spokane, and a branch of the Great Northern, leaving the main line at this city, runs north-westward into British Columbia.

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  • The Spokane, Portland & Seattle railway connects the three cities named by way of the Columbia Valley; and the Spokane & Inland Empire sends a line eastward into Idaho to the Coeur d'Alene country and another through the south-eastern part of the state into Nevada.

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  • In 1787 a company of Boston merchants sent two vessels, the " Columbia " and the " Washington " under John Kendrick and Robert Gray (1755-1806) to investigate the possibility of establishing trading posts.

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  • They reached Nootka Sound in September 1788, and in July 1789 Captain Gray in the " Columbia " began the homeward voyage by way of China.

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  • Captain George Vancouver (1758-1798), in charge of a British exploring expedition then engaged in mapping the coast (1792-1794), was sceptical of the existence of the river, but Captain Gray, undiscouraged, persisted in the search and on the 11th of May 1792 anchored in the river which he named Columbia in honour of his ship. The later claim of the United States to all the territory drained by the river was based chiefly upon this discovery by Captain Gray, who had succeeded where Spanish and British had failed.

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  • Just before the purchase of Louisiana, President Jefferson had recommended to Congress (18th January 1803) the sending of an expedition to explore the headwaters of the Missouri, cross the Rockies and follow the streams to the Pacific. In accordance with the recommendation Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, both officers of the United States Army, with a considerable party left St Louis on the 14th of May 1804, ascended the Missouri to the headwaters, crossed the Rockies and, following the Columbia river, reached the ocean in November 1805.

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  • American settlers in considerable numbers soon began to enter the region south of the Columbia river, and in 1841, and again in 1843, these settlers attempted to form a provisional government.

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  • Following the increase of population north of the Columbia, the territory was divided, and Washington Territory was established on the 2nd of March 1853, with the river as the southern boundary to the point where it is intersected by the forty-sixth parallel, and thence along that parallel to the summit of the Rocky Mountains, thereby including portions of the present states of Idaho and Montana.

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  • by the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta and Assiniboia; E.

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  • The principal rivers west of the Main Divide of the Rockies are the Clark Fork of the Columbia and its principal tributary, the Flathead, which rises in British Columbia.

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  • These are a state prison at Deer Lodge, managed by contract; a reform school at Miles City, an industrial school at Butte, an orphans' home at Twin Bridges, the soldiers' home at Columbia Falls, a school for deaf and blind at Boulder, and an insane asylum at Warm Springs, managed by contract.

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  • On leaving college he made a short visit to Europe, was elected to the London Alpine Club for climbing the Jungfrau and the Matterhorn, and returning to New York studied law for a brief period in the Law School of Columbia University and in the office of his uncle Robert B.

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  • The grizzly bear is now rare in the United States, save in the Yellowstone Park and the Clearwater Mountains of Idaho, though more common in British Columbia.

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  • In Maryland (and including the District of Columbia) there were 259 m.

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  • Columbia, his first objective, was reached on the 17th of February 1865.

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  • m., or little more than one-fourth of the area draining to the Atlantic. The American rivers draining to the Pacific, except the Yukon, Columbia and Colorado, are unimportant.

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  • Gerrhonotus, 8 species, in mountainous countries, from British Columbia to Costa Rica; like Diploglossus s.

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  • Grabau of Columbia University.

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  • A skirmish, fought the next day, opposite the west front of the present Columbia University, and known as the affair of Harlem Heights, cost the British a loss of seventy of their light infantry.

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  • In 1783 several Edgartown families joined the association made up of Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Providence and Newport whalers, who founded Hudson, on the Hudson river, in Columbia county, New York.

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  • He graduated at Columbia University in 1878, studied at Leipzig, where he received the degree of Ph.D.

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  • in 1881, was an instructor at Columbia in 188'- 1885, and professor at Bryn Mawr in 1885-1895, and became professor of Sanskrit and comparative philology in Yale University in 1895.

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  • Biggs, History of Miranda's Attempt in South America (London, 1809); and Veggasi, Revolution de la Columbia.

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  • ASTORIA, a city, port of entry, and the county-seat of Clatsop county, Oregon, U.S.A., on the Columbia river, 8 m.

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  • It is served by the Astoria & Columbia River railroad (Northern Pacific System), and by several coastwise and foreign.

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  • Astoria is the oldest American settlement in the Columbia Valley.

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  • The~ rivers that drain the Atlantic slope of the Appalachians are comparatively short; those that drain the Pacific slope include only two, the Columbia and the Colorado, which rise far inland, near the easternmost members of the Cordilleran system, and flow through plateaus and intermont basins to the ocean.

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  • It is in association with this field of extinct volcanic activity that a remarkable group of geysers and hot springs has been developed, from which the Yellowstone river, a branch of the Missouri, flows northeastward, and the Snake river, a branch of the Columbia, flows south-westward.

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  • The lava plains of the Columbia basin are among the most extensive volcanic outpourings in the world.

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  • The Columbia river has entrenched itself in a canyon-like valley around the northern and Western side of the lava plains; Snake river has cut a deeper canyon farther south-east where the plains are higher and has disclosed the many lava sheets which build up the plains, occasionally revealing a buried mountain in which the superposed river has cut an even narrower canyon.

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  • One of the most remarkable features of this province is seen in the temporary course taken by the Columbia river across the plains, while its canyon was obstructed by Pleistocene glaciers that came from the Cascade Mountains on the north-west.

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  • The range is squarely transected by the Columbia river, which bears every appearance of antecedent origin:

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  • The second important embayment is the estuary of the Columbia river; but theoccurrence of shoals at the mouth decreases the use that might otherwise be made of the river by ocean-going vessels.

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  • On the coastal plain there is the Columbia series of gravels, sands and barns, made up of several members.

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  • Its distribution is similar to that of the Lafayette, though the Columbia series is, for the most part, confined to lower levels.

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  • The Canadian zone crosses from Canada into northern and northwestern Maine, northern and central New Hampshire, northern Michigan, and north-eastern Minnesota and North Dakota, covers the Green Mountains, most of the Adirondacks and Catskills, the higher slopes of the mountains in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, the lower slopes of the northern Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the upper slopes of the southern Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a strip along the Pacific coast as far south as Cape Mendocino, interrupted, however, by the Columbia Valley.

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  • It is the home of the Columbia black-tail deer, western raccoon, Oregon spotted skunk, Douglas red squirrel, Townsends chipmunk, tailless sewellel (Haplodcn rufus), peculiar species of pocket gophers and voles, Pacific coast forms of the great-horned, spotted, screech and pigmy owls, sooty grouse, Oregon ruffed grouse, Stellers jay, chestnutbacked chickadee and Pacific winter wren.

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  • The Upper Sonoran life-zone comprises south-eastern Montana, central, eastern and north-eastern Wyoming, a portion of south-western South Dakota, western Nebraska and Kansas, the western extremity of Oklahoma, north-western Texas, eastern Colorado, south-eastern New Mexico, the Snake plains in Idaho, the Columbia plains in Washington, the Malheur and Harney plains in Oregon, the Great Salt Lake and Sevier deserts in Utah, and narrow belts in California, Nevada and Arizona.

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  • Since the Spanish War of 1898 there have been added to the United States various transmarine dominions, r~one of which has been formed into a state, or is likely to be so formed for a good while to come; and there is also one small piece of original area of the United States, viz, the District of Columbia, which is outside any state, because it contains the national capital.

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  • The Gulf of St Lawrence with its much indented shores and the coast of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick supply endless harbours, the northern ones closed by ice in the winter, but the southern ones open all the year round; and on the Pacific British Columbia is deeply fringed with islands and fjords with well-sheltered harbours everywhere, in strong contrast with the unbroken shore of the United States to the south.

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  • The northern part of Alberta and Saskatchewan and much of northern British Columbia are drained through the Athabasca and Peace rivers, first north-eastwards towards Athabasca Lake, then north through Slave river to Great Slave Lake, and finally north-west through Mackenzie river to the Arctic Ocean.

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  • The rest of the rivers flowing into the Pacific pass through British Columbia and are much shorter, though the two southern ones carry a great volume of water owing to the heavy precipitation of snow and rain in the Cordilleran region.

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  • The Columbia is the largest, but after flowing north-west and then south for about 400 m., it passes into the United States.

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  • The Fraser, next in size but farther north, follows a similar course, entering the sea at Vancouver; while the Skeena and Stikine in northern British Columbia are much shorter and smaller, owing to the encroachments of Peace and Liard rivers, tributaries of the Nelson, on the Cordilleran territory.

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  • In most cases they reach the coast through deep valleys or profound canyons, and the transcontinental railways find their way beside them, the Canadian Pacific following at first tributaries of the Columbia near its great bend, and afterwards Thompson river and the Fraser; while the Grand Trunk Pacific makes use of the valley of the Skeena and its tributaries.

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  • The divide between the rivers flowing west and those flowing east and north is very sharp in the southern Rocky Mountains, but there are two lakes, the Committee's Punch Bowl and Fortress Lake, right astride of it, sending their waters both east and west; and there is a mountain somewhat south of Fortress Lake whose melting snows drain in three directions into tributaries of the Columbia, the Saskatchewan and the Athabasca, so that they are distributed between the Pacific, the Atlantic (Hudson Bay) and the Arctic Oceans.

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  • wide covers towards the south almost all of British Columbia and a strip of Alberta east of the watershed, and towards the north forms the whole of the Yukon Territory.

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  • and affords the largest areas of arable and pasture land in British Columbia.

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  • Similar wide tracts of less broken country occur, after a mountainous interruption, in northern British Columbia and to some extent in the Yukon Territory, where wide valleys and rolling hills alternate with short mountain ranges of no great altitude.

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  • The Pacific border of the coast range of British Columbia is ragged with fjords and channels, where large steamers may go 50 or Too m.

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  • Near the height of land between British Columbia and Alberta there are many peaks which rise from 10,000 to 12,000 ft.

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  • in southern British Columbia and 4000 ft.

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  • Coal of a bituminous and also semi-anthracite kind is produced, the best mined on the Pacific slope of the continent, the coking coals of the Fernie region supplying the fuel of the great metal mining districts of the Kootenays in British Columbia, and of Montana and other states to the south.

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  • The Selkirks and Gold Ranges west of the Rockies, with their great areas of eruptive rocks, both ancient and modern, include most of the important mines of gold, silver, copper and lead which give British Columbia its leadership among the Canadian provinces as a producer of metals.

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  • In early days the placer gold mines of the Columbia, Fraser and Caribou attracted miners from everywhere, but these have declined, and lode mines supply most of the gold as well as the other metals.

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  • Most of the mining development is in southern British Columbia, where a network of railways and waterways gives easy access; but as means of communication improve to the north a similar development may be looked for there.

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  • The Atlin and White Horse regions in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon have attracted much attention, and the Klondike placers still farther north have furnished many millions of dollars' worth of gold.

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  • One cannot even describe the climate of a single province, like Ontario or British Columbia, as a unit, as it varies so greatly in different parts.

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  • So in various parts of the mountainous country of British Columbia, the flora varies according to climatic conditions.

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  • The larger animals of Canada are the musk ox and the caribou of the barren lands, both having their habitat in the far north; the caribou of the woods, found in all the provinces except in Price Edward Island; the moose, with an equally wide range in the wooded country; the Virginia deer, in one or other of its varietal forms, common to all the southern parts; the black-tailed deer or mule deer and allied forms, on the western edge of the plains and in British Columbia; the pronghorn antelope on the plains, and a small remnant of the once plentiful bison found in northern Alberta and Mackenzie, now called " wood buffalo."

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  • In British Columbia the puma or cougar, sometimes called the panther and the American lion, still frequently occurs; and in all parts the common fox and the silver fox, the lynx, beaver, otter, marten, fisher, wolverene, mink, skunk and other fur-bearing animals.

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  • In the mountains of British Columbia are the bighorn or Rocky Mountain sheep and the Rocky Mountain goat, while the saddleback and white mountain sheep have recently been discovered in the northern Cordillera.

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  • There are several varieties of grouse, the largest of which is the grouse of British Columbia and the pennated grouse and the prairie chicken of Manitoba and the plains, besides the so-called partridge and willow partridge, both of which are grouse.

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  • In certain parts of Ontario the wild turkey is occasionally found and the ordinary quail, but in British Columbia is found the California quail, and a larger bird much resembling it called the mountain partridge.

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  • 2 The areas assigned to Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and British Columbia are exclusive of the territorial seas, that to Quebec' is exclusive of the Gulf of St Lawrence (though including the islands lying within it), and that to Ontario is exclusive of the Canadian portion of the Great Lakes.

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  • In 1871 British Columbia and in 1873 Prince Edward Island joined the Dominion.

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  • West of the province of Ontario, then inaccurately defined, the provinces of Manitoba and British Columbia were the only organized divisions of the western territory, but in 1882 the provisional districts of Assiniboia, Athabasca, Alberta and Saskatchewan were formed, leaving the remainder of the north-west as unorganized territories, a certain portion of the north-east, called Keewatin, having previously been placed under the lieutenant-governor of Manitoba.

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  • m.; in Nova Scotia it is 22.3; New Brunswick, 11.8; Ontario, 9.9; Manitoba, 4.9; Quebec, 4.8; Saskatchewan, 1 oi; Alberta, o 72; British Columbia, o 4; the Dominion, 1 8.

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  • British Columbia contains a mixed population, of which in the mining districts a large proportion is American.

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  • Beyond Manitoba buffalo were still running on the plains, and British Columbia having lost its mining population of 1859 and 1860 was largely inhabited by Indians, its white population which centred in the city of Victoria being principally English.

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  • The male sex is slightly the more numerous in all the provinces except Quebec, the greatest discrepancy existing in British Columbia.

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  • Except in British Columbia and the unorganized territories, nearly all of these are on reservations, where they are under government supervision, receiving an annuity in money and a certain amount of provisions; and where, by means of industrial schools and other methods, civilized habits are slowly superseding their former mode of life.

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  • British Columbia has about 25,000, most of whom are along the coast, though one of the important tribes, the Shuswaps, is in the interior.

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  • The Chinese and Japanese numbered in 1906 about 20,000, of whom, three-quarters were in British Columbia, though they were spreading through the other provinces, chiefly as laundrymen.

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  • British Columbia endeavoured in 1905 to lay a similar restriction on the Japanese, but the act was disallowed by the federal legislature.

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  • A strong prejudice against direct taxation exists, and none is imposed by the federal government, though it has been tentatively introduced in the provinces, especially in Quebec, in the form of liquor licences, succession duties, corporation taxes, &c. British Columbia has a direct tax on property and on income.

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  • To that country fresh fish is sent in large quantities, and there is an important trade in canned salmon between British Columbia and Great Britain.

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  • Nova Scotia, British Columbia and the Yukon are still the most productive, but the northern parts of Ontario are proving rich in the precious metals.

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  • Coal, chiefly bituminous, occurs in large quantities in Nova Scotia, British Columbia and in various parts of the north-west (lignite), though most of the anthracite is imported from the United States, as is the greater part of the bituminous coal used in Ontario.

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  • The lumber trade of British Columbia has suffered from lack of an adequate market, but is increasing with the greater demand from the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

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  • In Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, the so-called railway belt of British Columbia and the territories, these crown lands are chiefly owned by the federal parliament; in the other provinces, by the local legislatures.

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  • About 80,000 persons find more or less permanent employment in the fishing industry, including the majority of the Indians of British Columbia.

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  • Since the opening of the 10th century, great progress has been made in the settlement and agricultural development of the western territories between the provinces of Manitoba and British Columbia.

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  • The chief fruit-growing districts have long been in southern and western Ontario and in Nova Scotia; but recently much attention has been devoted to fruit-growing in British Columbia, where large areas of suitable land are available for the cultivation of apples, pears and other fruits.

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  • Collections of fruit grown in British Columbia have received premier honours at the competitive exhibitions of the Royal Horticultural Society in London, where their high quality and fine colour have been greatly appreciated.

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  • Its cultivation promises to be successful in parts of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia.

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  • A second branch experimental farm is at Brandon in Manitoba, a third is at Indian Head in Saskatchewan and the fourth is at Agassiz in the coast climate of British Columbia.

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  • Popular feeling in British Columbia itself was not strongly in favour of union, and the terms under which the new province was to be received were the subject of much negotiation with the provincial authorities, and were keenly debated in parliament before the bill in which they were embodied was finally carried.

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  • In addition to these causes of difference there was an unsettled boundary dispute in British Columbia, and questions about the navigation of rivers common to the United States and Canada.

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  • Under this arrangement British Columbia became exceedingly restive, holding the Dominion to the engagement by which it had been induced to enter the union.

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  • The discovery of large deposits of nickel at Sudbury; of extremely rich gold mines on the head-waters of the Yukon, in a region previously considered well-nigh worthless for human habitation; of extensive areas of gold, copper and silver ores in the mountain regions of British Columbia; of immense coal deposits in the Crow's Nest Pass of the same province and on the prairies; of veins of silver and cobalt of extraordinary richness in northern Ontario - all deeply affected the industrial condition of the country and illustrated the vastness of its undeveloped resources.

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  • In that year several schooners, fitted out in British Columbia for the capture of seals in the North Pacific, were seized by a United States cutter at a distance of 60 m.

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  • In Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Manitoba and British Columbia the public schools are strictly undenominational.

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  • 190 4), and the Columbia Law School (LL.B.

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  • All western trade in Canada of the vast provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, must pass through the narrow belt of loo m., lying between the international boundary line and Lake Winnipeg.

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  • No Chinese labourer is allowed to enter any other Territory of the Union from Hawaii; and the act of Congress of the 26th of February 1885, " to prohibit the importation and migration of foreigners and aliens under contract or agreement to perform labour in the United States, its Territories and the District of Columbia," and the amending and supplementary acts, are extended to it.

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  • Work was begun on the system in 1826 and was continued without interruption until 1840, when the completed or nearly completed portions embraced a railway from Philadelphia to Columbia on the Susquehanna, a canal up the Susquehanna and the Juniata from Columbia to Hollidaysburg, a portage railway from Hollidaysburg through Blair's Gap in the Alleghany Front to Johnstown on the Conemaugh river, a canal down the Conemaugh, Kiskiminetas, and Allegheny rivers to Pittsburg, a canal up the Susquehanna and its west branch from the mouth of the Juniata to Farrandsville, in Clinton county, a canal up the Susquehanna and its north branch from Northumberland nearly to the New York border, and a canal up the Delaware river from Bristol to the mouth of the Lehigh; considerable work had also been done on two canals to connect the Ohio river with Lake Erie.

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  • In 1823 a company was incorporated to build a railway from Philadelphia to Columbia, but nothing further was done until 1828, when the state canal commissioners were directed to build this road and the Allegheny Portage railway from Hollidaysburg to Johnstown.

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  • Both the Philadelphia & Columbia and the Allegheny Portage railways were completed in 1834.

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  • He sought to incorporate in a new code for the District of Columbia, in 1832, a prohibition of the slave trade in the district, at the same time opposing the abolition of slavery there without the consent of Maryland and Virginia, which had originally ceded the district to the United States.

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  • had been conferred upon him by the universities of Harvard (1877), and of Columbia (1887),(1887), and the degree of D.D.

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  • This action was opposed by the church of New York City, and partly through this difference and partly because of quarrels over the denominational control of King's College (now Columbia), five members of the Coetus seceded, and as the president of the Coetus was one of them they took the records with them; they were called the Conferentie; they organized independently in 1764 and carried on a bitter warfare with the Coetus (now more properly called the American Classis), which in 1766 (and again in 1770) obtained a charter for Queen's (now Rutgers) College at New Brunswick.

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  • The Nootkas of British Columbia regard it as a tiny man, living in the crown of the head.

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  • of the Divide is drained by the Snake river into the Columbia river and the Pacific Ocean; the large section N.

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  • Owing to periodical inundations, the surrounding country is but little cultivated, and the greater part of the population, which is of the mixed type common to the lowlands of Columbia, is engaged in no settled productive occupation.

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  • GEORGETOWN, formerly a city of the District of Columbia, U.S.A., and now part (sometimes called West Washington) of the city of Washington, U.S.A., at the confluence of the Potomac river and Rock Creek, and on the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, about 22 m.

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  • merged in the District of Columbia in 1871, and annexed to the city of Washington in 1878.

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  • His son Charles (1770-1844)1844) was rector in various Long Island churches; and Charles's son Samuel (1801-1872), who graduated at Columbia in 1823, was rector of the Church of the Annunciation in New York in 1838-1868, and from 1862 professor of Biblical learning and the Interpretation of Scriptures in the General Theological Seminary.

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  • In North America, the principal region of volcanic activity lay in the west; great thicknesses of igneous rocks occur in the Lower Carboniferous rocks of British Columbia, and from the middle of the period until near its close volcanoes were active from Alaska to California.

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  • Dakota, Minnesota, District of Columbia, Oregon, Massachusetts, Tennessee, California, Colorado, Arkansas and Oklahoma.

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  • At the large and important Premier mine in the Transvaal the Elmore process, used in British Columbia and in Wales for the separation of metallic ores, has been also introduced.

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  • He later introduced a bill regarding slavery in the District of Columbia, which (in accordance with his statement of 1837) was to be submitted to the vote of the District for approval, and which provided for compensated emancipation, forbade the bringing of slaves into the District of Columbia, except by government officials from slave states, and the selling of slaves away from the District, and arranged for the emancipation after a period of apprenticeship of all slave children born after the 1st of January 1850.

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  • In April Congress passed and the president approved (6th April) an act emancipating the slaves in the District of Columbia, with compensation to owners - a measure which Lincoln had proposed when in Congress.

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  • It was common to those tribes east of the Rocky Mountains, in the south-west and upper Columbia; but unknown apparently among the Eskimo, along the northwest coast, and on the Pacific coast west of the Cascade range and the Sierras, except among some few Californian tribes, or here and there in Mexico and southward.

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  • It forms part of British Columbia.

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  • A partially submerged range of mountains, which has been termed the Vancouver Range, runs parallel to the coast of British Columbia; a portion of this range forms Vancouver Island, and it again rises above the level of the sea farther north, forming the Queen Charlotte Islands.

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  • In 1904 it was stated that the system was gaining favour in the east,' and that it had been adopted more or less by all the eastern colleges and universities with the exception of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia.

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  • QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS, a compact group lying off the northern part of the coast of British Columbia, and forming part of that province of Canada.

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  • began in earnest with the establishment of the Liberator by William Lloyd Garrison in 1831, soon led to the sending of innumerable petitions to congress for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, over which the Federal government had jurisdiction, and for other action by congress with respect to that institution.

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  • He graduated at Columbia College in 1882, was a graduate fellow in philosophy there from 1882 to 1884, when he took the degree of Ph.

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  • He was an assistant in philosophy at Columbia in 1885-1886, tutor in 1886-1889, adjunct professor of philosophy, ethics and psychology in 1889-1890, becoming full professor in 1890, and dean of the faculty of philosophy in 1890-1902.

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  • From 1887 until 1891 he was the first president of the New York college for the training of teachers (later the Teachers' College of Columbia University), which he had personally planned and organized.

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  • In 1901 he succeeded Seth Low as president of Columbia University.

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  • NANAIMO, a city of British Columbia, on the east coast of Vancouver Island.

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  • On graduating at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1764, Jay entered the office of Benjamin Kissam, an eminent New York lawyer.

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  • In 1840, however, when it began to advocate measures which he deemed too radical, he withdrew his membership, but with his pen he continued his labours on behalf of the slave, urging emancipation in the district of Columbia and the exclusion of slavery from the Territories, though deprecating any attempt to interfere with slavery in the states.

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  • Within four months (1842) he surveyed the Pass and ascended to the summit of the highest of the Wind River Mountains, since known as Fremont's Peak, and the interest aroused by his descriptions was such that in the next year he was sent on a second expedition to complete the survey across the continent along the line of travel from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia river.

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  • The rivers that drain the Atlantic slope of the Appalachians are comparatively short; those that drain the Pacific slope include only two, the Columbia and the Colorado, which rise far inland, near the easternmost members of the Cordilleran system, and flow through plateaus and intermont basins to the ocean.

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  • The oldest is that on Brooklyn (or Columbia) Heights, west of City Hall Park, rising abruptly from the river to a height of from 70 to ioo ft., and commanding a delightful view of the harbour.

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  • 2 (New York, 1904) of Columbia University Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law; C. H.

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  • The lower division appears on the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts, and is traceable thence, in a great belt southwest of those points, through Maine and the Hudson-Champlain valley into Alabama, a distance of some 2000 m.; and the rocks are brought up again on the western uplift, in Nevada, Idaho, Utah, western Montana and British Columbia.

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  • in the former (in British Columbia) - while over the interior of the continent it is seldom more than 1000 ft.

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  • WASHINGTON, a city and the capital of the United States of America, coterminous with the District of Columbia, on the north-east bank of the Potomac river at the head of tide and navigation, 40 m.

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  • The charitab'e and correctional institutions of the District of Columbia are the following government institutions, under the control of the United States or of the District of Columbia: Freedmen's Hospital (1862), United States Naval Hospital (1866), an Insane Asylum on the S.

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  • side of the Anacostia river, the District of Columbia Industrial Home School (1872), a Municipal Lodging House (1892), a Soldiers' and Sailors' Temporary Home (1888), Workhouse, Reform School for Boys, Reform School for Girls and Industrial Home School (1872).

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  • The public school system, under the control of a Board of Education of six men and three women appointed by the supreme court judges of the District of Columbia, embraces kindergartens, primary schools, grammar schools, high schools, a business high school, manual training schools, normal schools and night schools.

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  • George Washington University, in the vicinity of the White House, is a nonsectarian institution (opened in 1821 under the auspices of the Baptist General Convention as "The Columbian College in the District of Columbia"; endowed by W.

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  • One-half the expenses of the government of Washington is paid by the District of Columbia and one-half by the United States.

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  • Cox, 1800-1900, Celebration of the _Tooth Anniversary of the Establishment of the Seat of Government in the District of Columbia (Washington, 1901); J.

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  • (Baltimore, 1885); C. Howard, Washington as a Center of Learning (Washington, 1904); Tindall, Origin and Government of the District of Columbia (ibid., 1903); A.

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  • His son, Morgan Dix (1827-1908), graduated at Columbia in 1848 and at the General Theological Seminary in 1852, and was ordained deacon (1852) and priest (1853) in the Protestant Episcopalian church.

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  • He graduated from the university of North Carolina in 1818, studied law in the office of Felix Grundy (1777-1840) at Nashville in 1819-1820, was admitted to the bar in 1820, and began to practise in Columbia, the county-seat of Maury county.

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  • When the slave power became more aggressive, in and after the year 1831, Clay defended the right of petition for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, and opposed Calhoun's bill forbidding the use of the mails to "abolition" newspapers and documents.

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  • They are divided into four sections: - those of the Maritime Provinces, with their Convention, their Home and Foreign Mission Boards, an Education Board and a Publication Board, and with M `Master University (Arts, Theological and Academic departments) as its educational institution; those of Manitoba and the North-west, with Brandon College as its educational institution; and those of British Columbia, Caiiadian Baptists numbered 120,000 in 1909, and are considered in the above general estimates.

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  • NEW WESTMINSTER, a city on the north bank of the Fraser river, British Columbia, 15 m.

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  • Founded in 185 9 it was the capital of British Columbia when the British possessions on the Pacific coast formed two colonies - i.e.

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  • British Columbia (the mainland portion) and Vancouver Island.

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  • Oyster banks of some importance exist in the Gulf of St Lawrence and on the coast of British Columbia.

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  • The foreign trade is chiefly with British Columbia, South America, China and Japan, and there is a considerable trade with Europe, Australia and Mexico.

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  • COLUMBIA, the capital city of South Carolina, U.S.A., and the county-seat of Richland county, on the E.

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  • It is served by the Atlantic Coast Line, the Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, and the Columbia, Newberry & Laurens railways.

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  • Columbia is picturesquely situated on the level top of a bluff overlooking the Congaree, which falls about 36 ft.

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  • Until 1805, when it was incorporated as a village, Columbia was under the direct government of the legislature; in 1854 it was chartered as a city.

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  • Sherman, on his march through the Carolinas, entered Columbia, and on the ensuing night a fire broke out which was not extinguished until most of the city was destroyed.

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  • Columbia, Tennessee >>

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  • In the borough are a Home for Aged Protestants (1882), the United Presbyterian Home for the Aged (1879), and Columbia hospital (1908).

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  • by British Columbia and Montana, E.

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  • of this imaginary line, being a part of the Columbia Plateau region.

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  • In the third physiographic region, the Columbia plateau, are the Saw Tooth, Boise, Owyhee and other rugged ranges, especially on the S.

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  • Instead of being one plain formed by erosion, this region is rather a series of plains built up with sheets of lava, several thousand feet deep, varying considerably in elevation and in smoothness of surface according to the nature of the lava, and being greater in area than any other lava beds in North America except those of the Columbia river, which are of similar formation and, with the Snake river plains, form the Columbia plateau.

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  • The Snake river (which receives all the drainage of Idaho except small amounts taken by the Spokane, the Pend Oreille and the Kootenai in the N., all emptying directly into the Columbia, and by some minor streams of the S.E.

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  • into a deep narrow valley, and joins the Columbia in S.E.

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  • The first recorded exploration of Idaho by white men was made by Lewis and Clark, who passed along the Snake river to its junction with the Columbia; in 1805 the site of Fort Lemhi in Lemhi county was a rendezvous for two divisions of the Lewis and Clark expedition; later, the united divisions reached a village of the Nez Perce Indians near the south fork of the Clearwater river, where they found traces of visits by other white men.

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  • In 1810 Fort Henry, on the Snake river, was established by the Missouri Fur Company, and in the following year a party under the auspices of the Pacific Fur Company descended the Snake river to the Columbia.

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  • COLUMBIA, a borough of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on the W.

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  • The Pennsylvania railway has repair shops here, and among Columbia's manufactures are silk goods, embroidery and laces, iron and steel pipe, engines, laundry machinery, brushes, stoves, iron toys, umbrellas, flour, lumber and wagons; the city is also a busy shipping and trading centre.

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  • Columbia was first settled, by Quakers, in 1726; it was laid out as a town in 1787; and in 1814 it was incorporated.

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  • Columbia, South Carolina >>

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  • He travelled in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Mexico, British Columbia and other countries; but in 1858 came the opportunity which brought him fame.

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  • A peculiar feature of the canal was a system of inclined planes or railways on which there were cradles, carrying the canal boat up (or down) the incline; these were devised by Professor James Renwick (1818-1895) of Columbia College; 12 of them in the eastern division raised boats altogether about 720 ft., and II of them in the western division lowered the boats about 690 ft.

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  • end of the Cache valley poured its waters into the Columbia river system.

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  • Spartanburg was founded in 1787, and, although railway communication with Columbia and Charleston was opened in 1859, there was little growth until the establishment of the first cotton mill in the vicinity in 1880; it was chartered as a city in this year.

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  • by Yukon Territory and British Columbia.

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  • As early as 1861 gold discoveries were made on the Stikine river; repeated discoveries, culminating in the Cassiar district "boom," were made in British Columbia from 1857 to 1874; colourings along the Yukon were reported in 1866-1867 and systematic prospecting of the upper river began about 1873.

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  • in British Columbia.

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  • In 1864 authority was granted to an American company to make explorations for a proposed Russo-American company's telegraph line overland from the Amur river in Siberia to Bering Strait, and through Alaska to British Columbia.

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  • (D.) columbiana, ranging from British Columbia to California, is a smaller animal, recognizable by the larger and longer tail, which is black above and white below.

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  • Cinchona Calisaya has also been cultivated extensively in Bolivia and in Tolima, United States of Columbia.

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  • It is served by the Great Northern, the Northern Pacific, the Canadian Pacific, and the Bellingham Bay & British Columbia railways - being a terminus of the last named, which operates only 62 m.

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  • He wrote: The State: Elements of Historical and Practical Politics, Sketch of Institutional History and Administration (1889); The State and Federal Government of the United States (1891); Division and Reunion, 1829-1889 (1893) in the "Epochs of American History" series; An Old Master and Other Political Essays (1893); Mere Literature and Other Essays (1893); George Washington (1896), an excellent biography; the popular History of the American People (1902); Constitutional Government in the United States (1908), being Columbia University Lectures; and in the seventh volume of the Cambridge Modern History the chapter on "State Rights, 1850-1860."

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  • Among institutions of higher learning the university of Missouri at Columbia is the chief one maintained by the state.

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  • Judson, Law and Practice of Taxation in Missouri (Columbia, 1900); M.

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  • The city is served by the Port Townsend Southern railway (controlled by the Northern Pacific, but operated independently) and by steamship lines to Victoria (British Columbia), San Francisco, Alaska and Oriental ports.

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  • With three exceptions, all the genera of this extensive family belong to the New World, being specially characteristic of the Neotropical region, where they occur as far south as Patagonia, while extending northward into the warmer parts of the Nearctic regions as far as California and British Columbia.

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  • BLOOMSBURG, a town and the county-seat of Columbia county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., on Fishing Creek, 2 m.

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  • by the state of Washington, from which it is separated in part by the Columbia river, the 46th parallel forming the rest of the boundary; E., by Idaho, from which it is separated in part by the Snake river; S., by Nevada and California, and W., by the Pacific Ocean.

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  • With the exception of the mouth of the Columbia river, the bays and inlets by which the shore is indented are small and of very little importance.

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  • the Great Basin is bounded by the drainage systems of the tributaries of the Columbia river, and on the S.W.

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  • The most important stream is the Columbia river, which forms the northern boundary for 300 m.

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  • The largest tributary of the Columbia is the Snake river, which for nearly 200 m.

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  • The principal tributaries of the Columbia E.

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  • of the Cascade Mountains and lying wholly within the state are the John Day river, which rises in the Blue Mountains and enters the Columbia 29 m.

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  • enters the Columbia 12 m.

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  • It rises on the western slope of the Cascades and enters the Columbia river about 100 m.

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  • The river fauna of the coast is of two distinct types: the type of the Columbia fauna in rivers north of the Rogue; and another type in the Klamath and its tributaries.

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  • Typical of the Columbia river is Catastomus macrocheilus and of the Klamath, C. rimiculus.

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  • In the most heavily wooded region along the Pacific coast and the lower course of the Columbia river are forests of the Douglas fir with stands of 100,000 ft.

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  • At Astoria, near the mouth of the Columbia river, the mean annual temperature is 52° F., with extremes recorded of 97° and 10°; but at Silver Lake, in the Great Basin region, while the mean annual temperature is 44°, the highest and lowest ever recorded are respectively 104° and - 32°.

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  • in the N.; in the Columbia Valley the amount is from 10 to 15 in.; in the valleys and foothills of the Blue Mountains, 12 to 25 in.; and in the plateau region of central and south-eastern Oregon, 8 to 22 in.

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  • Agriculture and Stock-Raising.--Oregon has some of the most productive agricultural lands in the United States, but they are rather limited in extent, being confined for the most part to the valleys west of the Cascade Mountains and the counties bordering .on the Columbia river east of those mountains.

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  • The Columbia river has long been famous for its salmon, and as the supply seemed threatened with exhaustion for several years following the maximum catch in 1883, the state legislature in 1901 passed an act establishing a close season both early in the spring and late in the summer and prohibiting any fishing, except with hook and line, at any time, without a licence.

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  • In 1908 two laws proposed by initiative petition were passed, stopping all fishing by night and fishing in the navigable channels of the lower river, limiting the length of seines to be used in the lower river and abolishing the use of gear by fishermen of the upper river - the mouth of the Sandy river, in Multnomah county, being the dividing line between the upper and lower Columbia.

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  • The total catch of salmon on the Oregon side of the Columbia river in 1901 was 16,725,435 lb from this it rose to 24,575,228 lb in 1903, but fell to 18,151,743 lb in 1907 and 18,463,546 in 1908.

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  • There is some roofing slate along the Rogue river, natural cement, nickel ore, bismuth and wolframite in Douglas county, gypsum in Baker county, fire-clay in Clatsop county, borate of soda on the marsh lands of Harney county, infusorial earth and tripoli in the valley of the Deschutes river, chromate of iron in Curry and Douglas counties, molybdenite in Union county, bauxite in Clackamas county, borate of lime in Curry county, manganese ore in Columbia county, and asbestos in several of the southern and eastern counties.

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  • from the mouth of the Columbia river to Portland, 12 m.

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  • From the mouth of the Willamette river vessels of light draft ascend the Columbia (passing the Cascade Falls through a lock canal, which was opened in 1896 and has a depth of 8 ft., a width of 92 ft.

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  • On the coast, Coos Bay, a tidal estuary, is the principal harbour between the mouth of the Columbia and San Francisco; it admits vessels drawing 14 to 16 ft.

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  • The principal railways are: that of the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company (controlled by the Union Pacific), which crosses the north-eastern corner of the state and then runs along the bank of the Columbia river to Portland; three lines of the Southern Pacific in the Willamette Valley, the main line connecting Portland with San Francisco; the Astoria & Columbia River, connecting Portland and Astoria; the Coos Bay, Roseburg & Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company (owned by the Southern Pacific), connecting Coos Bay with one of the Southern Pacific lines; and the Corvallis & Eastern (owned by the Southern Pacific), connecting Yaquina Bay with all three lines of the Southern Pacific. Throughout the Cascade Mountain Region and the great semi-arid region east of those mountains, which together embrace more than two-thirds of the state's area, there is not a railway.

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  • Among the institutions not receiving state aid are Albany College (Presbyterian, 1867), at Albany; Columbia University (Roman Catholic, 1901), at Portland; Dallas College (United Evangelical, 1900), at Dallas; Pacific University (Congregational, 1853), at Forest Grove; McMinnville College (Baptist, 1858), at McMinnville; Pacific College (Friends, founded in 1885 as an academy, college opened in 1891), at Newberg;.

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  • It was in the prosecution of this trade that Captain Robert Gray (1755-1806), an American in the service of Boston merchants, discovered in 1792 the long-sought river of the West, which he named the Columbia, after his ship. By the discovery of this stream Gray gave to the United States a claim to the whole territory drained by its waters.

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  • about 52° 20' N., and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, American explorers acting under the orders of President Jefferson, in1805-1806had passed west of the Rocky Mountains and down the Columbia river to the Pacific Ocean.

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  • In 1811 the Pacific Fur Company, a kind of western division of the American Fur Company, founded a trading post at the mouth of the Columbia which they called Astoria, and set up a number of minor posts on the Willamette, Spokane and Okanogan rivers.

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  • It was applied to the territory drained by the Columbia river for the first time, perhaps, by Hall J.

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  • steps to reoccupy the Columbia Valley.

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  • Fortunately for the Americans, however, the company in 1824 sent to the Columbia river as its chief factor and governor west of the Rocky Mountains Dr John McLoughlin (1784-1857), who ruled the region with an iron hand, but with a benevolent purpose, for twenty-two years.

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  • On the northern bank of the Columbia in1824-1825he built Fort Vancouver, which became a port for ocean vessels and a great entrepot for the western fur trade; in 1829 he began the settlement of Oregon City; and, most important of all, he extended a hearty welcome to all settlers and aided them in many ways, though this was against the company's interests.

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  • The new government encountered the opposition of the missionaries and of the non-American population, but it was soon strengthened by the "Great Immigration" in 1843, when nearly nine hundred men, women and children, after assembling at Independence, Missouri, crossed the plains in a body and settled in the Columbia Valley.

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  • After this year the flow of immigrants steadily increased, about 1400 arriving in 1844, and 3000 in 1845.1 Signs of hostility to the Hudson's Bay Company now began to appear among the American population, and in 1845 the provisional government sought to extend its jurisdiction north of the Columbia river, where the Americans had hitherto refrained from settling.

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  • Gilbert's Trade and Currency in Early Oregon, in the Columbia University Studies in Economics, vol.

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  • EDWARD LIVINGSTON (1764-1836), American jurist and statesman, was born in Clermont, Columbia county, New York, on the 26th of May 1764.

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  • He then studied law at Columbia (LL.B.

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  • Rawles, Centralizing Tendencies in the Administration of Indiana (New York and London,1903),Columbia Univ.

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  • There is a large city and county building (1894), built of rough grey sandstone from Utah county; it has a dome on the top of which is a statue of Columbia; over its entrances are statues of Commerce, Liberty and Justice; its balconies command views of the neighbouring country and of the Great Salt Lake; the interior is decorated with Utah onyx.

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  • COLUMBIA, a city and the county-seat of Boone county, Missouri, U.S.A., situated in the central part of the state, about 145 m.

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  • Columbia is served by the Wabash and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railways.

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  • Columbia is the seat of the University of Missouri, a coeducational state institution, established in 1839 and opened in 1841; it received no direct financial support from the state until 1867, and its founding was due to the selfsacrifice of the people of the county.

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  • In 1908 the university had (at Columbia) 200 instructors and 2419 students, including 680 women; included in its library is the collection of the State Historical Society.

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  • The School of Mines of the university is at Rolla, Mo.; all other departments are at Columbia.

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  • At Columbia, also, are the Parker Memorial hospital, the Teachers College high school, the University Military Academy, the Columbia Business College, Christian College (Disciples) for women, established in 1851, its charter being the first granted by Missouri for the collegiate education of Protestant women; the Bible College of the Disciples of Christ in Missouri; and Stephens College (under Baptist control) for women, established in 1856.

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  • Columbia was first settled about 1821.

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  • Columbia, Pennsylvania >>

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  • Miller, The Peopling of Kansas (Columbus, 0., 1906), a doctoral dissertation of Columbia University; and for the controversy touching John Brown, G.

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  • After the peace he served as commissioner of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands from 1865 until 1874; in 1872 he was special commissioner to the hostile Apaches of New Mexico and Arizona; in1874-1881was in command of the Department of the Columbia and conducted the campaign against Chief Joseph in 1877 and that against the Bannocks and Piutes in 1878.

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  • He is better known, however, as the author of the patriotic anthem "Hail Columbia" (1798).

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  • The son graduated at Columbia College in 1827, and in 1830 was admitted to the bar, but practised only a short time.

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  • of Columbia, in the N.W.

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  • After graduating from Williams College in 1890, he studied at the Columbia Law School and the New York Law School.

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  • This line, at which the south-east flowing rivers fall from higher levels in the crystalline rocks of the Piedmont Plateau down to somewhat lower levels in the softer rocks of the Coastal Plain, passes in a general south-west direction from the North Carolina border north-east of Cheraw through Camden and Columbia to the Savannah river opposite Augusta, Georgia.

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  • at Columbia and to 40° F.

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  • as far as Columbia, but from there to Greenville decreases to 75° F.; and the mean annual temperature decreases to 62° F., at Columbia and to 58° F.

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  • (106° to -2°) at Columbia, and then decreases to 102°F.

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  • at Columbia in August 1900.

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  • Between 1816 and 1826 the state expended upon internal improvements $1,712,626, a large part of which was appropriated for building canals round the rapids of five rivers; 1 In this class are included the manufactures of only four cities, Charleston, Columbia, Greenville and Spartanburg, which in 1900 had populations of 8000 or more.

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  • The' principal cities are Charleston, Columbia (the capital), Spartanburg, Greenville, Sumter, Anderson and Rock Hill.

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  • The state supports wholly or in part, the university of South Carolina (before 1906 South Carolina College), established at Columbia in 1801; the South Carolina Military Academy (locally called " The Citadel ") established at Charleston in 1845, Clemson Agricultural College (1889), at Clemson, Oconee county, with departments of agriculture, chemistry, mechanics and electricity, textiles and military, and academic and preparatory courses; Winthrop Normal and Industrial College for Girls (1895) at Rock Hill, and the Coloured Normal, Industrial, Agricultural and Mechanical College (1896) at Orangeburg.

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  • There are theological seminaries at Columbia (1828, Presbyterian), at Due West (1837, Associate Reformed Presbyterian), and at Mount Pleasant (1898, Lutheran).

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  • Charities, eec. - The state has no board of public charities, and under the present constitution the county commissioners are overseers of the poor, except in Charleston and Columbia whose poor are provided for by the municipal authorities.

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  • There is an institution for the deaf, dumb and blind (1849, since 1857 a state institution) at Cedar Springs, and a state hospital for the insane, founded in 1821 at Columbia by Samuel Farrow (1760-1824) and opened in 1828.

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  • The state penitentiary is also at Columbia.

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  • In 1786 they were forced to consent to the removal of the seat of government to Columbia (final removal, 1790) and in 1808 to a reapportionment of the representation, based partly on wealth and partly on numbers.

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  • 1911 Bibliography - For general description see Michael Tuomey, Report on the Geology of South Carolina (Columbia, 1848); the Handbook of South Carolina; Resources, Institutions, and Industries of the State, published by the State Department of Agriculture, Commerce and Immigration (Columbia, 1907; 2nd ed., 1908); the Annual Reports (1904 seq.) of the same department and its other publications; and W.

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  • 1899), which are accurate and interesting, but neglect the manuscript sources at Columbia.

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  • Roy Smith, South Carolina as a Royal Province, 1719-1776 (New York, 1903), based on the manuscript sources at Columbia.

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  • Gibbes, Documentary History of the American Revolution (3 vols., Columbia, 1853; New York, 1857).

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  • Moving up the Pacific coast to British Columbia, we find the musk-rat taking the part played by Vishnu, when in his avatar as a boar he fished up the earth from the waters.

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  • The more metaphysical Tacullies of British Columbia say that in the beginning nought existed but water and a musk-rat.

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  • Among the parks are Loring, near the centre of the city, in which is a statue of Ole Bull; Lyndale, in the south-west part of the city; Interlachen, just north-west of Lyndale; Glenwood, in the west of the city; Van Cleve, Logan, Windom and Columbia in the part of the city east of the Mississippi river; Riverside, on the south-west bank of the Mississippi; and Minnehaha Park, in which are the Minnehaha Falls, a beautiful cascade of the Minnehaha Creek (the outlet of Lake Minnetonka), near the Mississippi, with a fall of 50 ft., well known from Longfellow's poem " Hiawatha."

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  • The numerous small lakes in the city (there are about 200 lakes in Hennepin county) have been incorporated in the park system; among them are Lake Harriet (353 acres; in Lake Harriet Park), Lake Calhoun (on which are extensive public baths), Lake Amelia (295 acres), Lake of the Isles (loo acres), Cedar Lake, Powder Horn Lake (in the park of that name) and Sandy Lake (in Columbia Park).

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  • The pursuit was vigorous, and only a remnant of the Confederate forces reassembled at Columbia, 40 m.

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  • Though she made no special distinction of creed in her charities, she was a notable benefactor of the Church of England, building and endowing churches and church schools, endowing the bishoprics of Cape Town and of Adelaide (1847), and founding the bishopric of British Columbia (1857).

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  • She established Columbia fish market (1869) in Bethnal Green, and presented it to the city, but owing to commercial difficulties this effort, which cost her over X200,000, proved abortive.

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  • She was devoted to the protection of animals and prevention of cruelty, and took up with characteristic zeal the cause of the costermongers' donkeys, building stables for them on her Columbia market estate, and giving prizes for the best-kept animals.

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  • Wilcox, "Municipal Government in Michigan and Ohio," in Columbia University Studies (New York, 1896); C. M.

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  • FERNIE, an important city in the east Kootenay district of British Columbia.

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  • There are about 50o coke ovens in operation at Fernie, which supply most of the smelting plants in southern British Columbia with fuel.

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  • REVELSTOKE, an incorporated town of British Columbia, on the Columbia river and the Canadian Pacific railway, 381 m.

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  • N.J., and in 1774 entered King's College (now Columbia University) in New York City.

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  • In summer, with the snow and skiers gone, British Columbia attracts mountain bikers and hikers to the slopes.

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  • Us who elected at sea so cruising the Columbia.

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  • Columbia Md introduction written by by the ideas explanation seems to.

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  • Columbia cruise dinner river the river.

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  • Columbia river cruises pass holders can across a reader's.

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  • Columbia district health in insurance some of the these states can.

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  • child Columbia district health in insurance some of the these states can.

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  • day dive package Columbia visited the openings in the.

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  • And regular slots district of columbia querying recovering compulsive because they are.

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  • defye Columbia defies most of the rules of modern hotel management.

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  • Throughout most of at oahu's turtle the columbia river factor says Donna.

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  • economist magazine 's resources on Columbia - recent articles and a survey of the country.

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  • British Columbia is located in the western extremity of Canada bordered by the Pacific Ocean.

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  • The area in the vast flatland of the Gusev Crater where Spirit landed this weekend will be called the Columbia Memorial Station.

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  • glacier fluctuations in British Columbia and western Alberta.

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  • The action ranges from rural Essex to London's prisons and convict hulks; from the wilds of British Columbia to the Australian goldfields.

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  • It was founded in 1999 by Bob Goodman, a general internist at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

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  • In 2004 Meldrum won the Kurt Schork award for international freelance journalism from Columbia University in New York.

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  • It was Labor hopeful Nathan Oley who was thoroughly lacerated at the Columbia Road Tenants & Residents Association's hustings last night.

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  • The issue seems a no-brainer, yet somehow Columbia Records in America never picked up on the album.

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  • Petrology Introduction to petrology Introduction to Petrology is an online petrology course at the University of British Columbia.

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  • pleads on behalf of the dead crew of space shuttle Columbia.

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  • policyitional transport policies do not work for the poor - whether in Columbia or Britain.

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  • resort located in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • rumor spread that Columbia had now offered around a million dollars.

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  • A couple who own a shipyard on the Columbia bought Hero and she will be rebuilt as a yacht.

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  • soapstone quarry in the District of Columbia.

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  • In the ensuing folk rock stampede, Vanguard never did reap the huge folk rock sales of Columbia or even its indie rival Elektra.

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  • timber frames are clad with Western Red Cedar sourced directly from the forests of British Columbia.

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  • He was the son of Philip Livingston (1686-1749), and grandson of Robert Livingston (1654-1725), who was born at Ancrum, Scotland, emigrated to America about 1673, and received grants (beginning in 1686) to "Livingston Manor" (a tract of land on the Hudson, comprising the greater part of what are now Dutchess and Columbia counties).

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  • This periodical, first a monthly and later a weekly, was published successively in Ohio, Tennessee, Maryland, the District of Columbia and Pennsylvania, though it appeared irregularly, and at times, when Lundy was away on lecturing tours, was issued from any office that was accessible to him.

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  • The grand Trunk Pacific railway, the great transcontinental line promoted by the Laurier government, passes through Manitoba north of the Canadian Pacific, coming from the east deflects southward to pass through Winnipeg, and then strikes northward in a direct line of easy gradients to find its way through the Rocky Mountains to its terminus of Prince Rupert on the north coast of British Columbia.

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  • J., founded in 1812 by the General Assembly; the Auburn Theological Seminary at Auburn, N.Y., founded in 1819 by the synod of Geneva, and afterwards associated with the New School; a school at Hampden Sidney, Virginia, founded by the synod of Virginia in 1824, named Union Theological Seminary in Virginia after 1826, supported after 1828 by the synods of Virginia and North Carolina, and in 1898 removed to Richmond, Va.; the Western Theological Seminary, founded at Allegheny (Pittsburg), Pa., in 1827 by the General Assembly; the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina, founded in 1828 by the synod of South Carolina; Lane Theological Seminary, founded independently in 1829 by the New School at Cincinnati, Ohio; and Union Theological Seminary, founded in 1836 by independent action of New School men, in New York City.

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  • Hunt, in Fifth Avenue, opposite the Lenox library, New York, and a large "Alma Mater," near the approach to Columbia University, New York.

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  • He was a terse, able and lucid speaker, master of wit and sarcasm, and a fearless critic. He gave liberally to Cooper Union, of which he was trustee and secretary, and which owes much of its success to him; was a trustee of Columbia University from 1901 until his death, chairman of the board of trustees of Barnard College, and was one of the original trustees, first chairman of the board of trustees, and a member of the executive committee of the Carnegie Institution.

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  • In1850-1851he filled the unexpired term of Thomas Corwin in the U.S. Senate, strenuously opposing Clay's compromise measures and advocating the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia.

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  • - Webber records the case of Stamm Egyptian cotton imported into Columbia, in which by simple selection, as outlined above, during two years plants were obtained uniformly earlier, more productive, and yielding longer and better lint.

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  • A branch line of the Canadian Pacific railway runs from Medicine Hat between 49° and 50° N., passing through the Crow's Nest Pass of the Rocky Mountains and carrying on trade with British Columbia.

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  • Thomas, History of Military Government in Newly Acquired Territory of the United States (Columbia University Studies in History, Economics and Public Law, vol.

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  • His declarations during the campaign were vague regarding the tariff and unfavourable to the United States Bank and to nullification, but he had already somewhat placated the South by denying the right of Congress to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia without the consent of the slave states.

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  • Whitten, Public Administration in Massachusetts, in Columbia University, Studies in History, vol.

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  • Though there were a few mission stations in the eastern part of the present state of Washington (see Whitman, Marcus), the first permanent American settlement north of the Columbia was made in 1845 on the Des Chutes river, at the head of Puget Sound at the present Tumwater.

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  • Its most characteristic animals and birds are the white-tailed jack-rabbit, pallid vole, sage hen, sharp-tailed grouse and greentailed towhee; the large Columbia ground-squirrel (Spermophflus columbianus) is common in that part of the zone which re west of the Rocky Mountains, but east of the Rockies it is replaced by another species (Cynomys) which closely resembles a small prairie dog.

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  • If placed upon Europe it would extend from Rome to the North Cape, but latitude is of course only one of the factors influencing climate, the arrangement of the ocean currents and of the areas of high and low pressure making a very wide difference between the climates of the two sides of the Atlantic. In reality the Pacific coast of Canada, rather than the Atlantic coast, should be compared with western Europe, the south-west corner of British Columbia, in lat.

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  • Manitoba was the first to be constituted; in 1871 British Columbia, New which had hitherto held aloof, determined, under the persuasion of a sympathetic governor, Mr (later Sir) Antony Musgrave, to throw in its lot with the Dominion.

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  • In 1837 with one other representative from°Sangamon county, named Dan Stone, he protested against a series of resolutions, adopted by the Illinois General Assembly, expressing disapproval of the formation of abolition societies and asserting, among other things, that "the right of property in slaves is sacred to the slave holding states under the Federal Constitution"; and Lincoln and Stone put out a paper in which they expressed their belief "that the institution of slavery is founded on both injustice and bad policy, but that the promulgation of abolition doctrines tends rather to increase than abate its evils," "that the Congress of the United States has no power under the Constitution to interfere with the institution of slavery in the different states," "that the Congress of the United States has the power, under the Constitution, to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, but that the power ought not to be exercised unless at the request of the people of the District."

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  • Lamon, The Life of Abraham Lincoln from his Birth to his Inauguration as President (Boston, 1872), supplemented by Recollections of Abraham Lincoln 1847-1865 (Chicago, 1895), compiled by Dorothy Lamon, valuable for some personal recollections, but tactless, uncritical, and marred by the effort of the writer, who as marshal of the District of Columbia, knew Lincoln intimately, to prove that Lincoln's melancholy was due to his lack of religious belief of the orthodox sort; William H.

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  • The Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb (see Deaf And Dumb), on Kendall Green, in the north-eastern part of the city, is composed of Kendall school (a secondary school) and of Gallaudet College (called in1864-1893the National Deaf Mute College; the present name is in honour of Dr T.

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  • 1848), the eminent metallurgist, and professor in Columbia University; Laura Elizabeth Richards (b.

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  • At Astoria, near the mouth of the Columbia river, the mean annual temperature is 52° F., with extremes recorded of 97° and 10°; but at Silver Lake, in the Great Basin region, while the mean annual temperature is 44°, the highest and lowest ever recorded are respectively 104° and - 32°.

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  • about 52° 20' N., and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, American explorers acting under the orders of President Jefferson, in1805-1806had passed west of the Rocky Mountains and down the Columbia river to the Pacific Ocean.

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  • at Columbia and to 40° F.

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  • as far as Columbia, but from there to Greenville decreases to 75° F.; and the mean annual temperature decreases to 62° F., at Columbia and to 58° F.

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  • (106° to -2°) at Columbia, and then decreases to 102°F.

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  • My teacher and other friends think I could ride a Columbia tandem in the country with perfect safety.

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  • The traveller on the prairie is naturally a hunter, on the head waters of the Missouri and Columbia a trapper, and at the Falls of St. Mary a fisherman.

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  • Whistler Blackcomb is a ski resort located in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • Rumor spread that Columbia had now offered around a million dollars.

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  • Excavations in an ancient soapstone quarry in the District of Columbia.

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  • Twenty years later Columbia took off on the first space shuttle flight.

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  • He writes about fishing all over the world â mostly in British Columbia, steelhead fishing.

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  • Walls ~ The timber frames are clad with Western Red Cedar sourced directly from the forests of British Columbia.

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  • Whilst on their wintering grounds in coastal British Columbia, the birds mainly eat roots and tubers of emergent plants on tidal flats.

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  • Varietals can also be labeled with the region where they came from, such as a Clare Valley, Australia, Riesling, a Columbia Valley Semillon, but that region label is not part of the name of the variety of wine.

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  • If you need to free up space but still have plenty of sleeping room, consider a Columbia Twin Full Bunk Bed.

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  • Anyone needing to free up space will love the Columbia Twin Full Bunk Bed made by Atlantic Furniture.

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  • Anyone looking for extra room and storage space will love the design and function of the Columbia Twin Full Bunk Bed.

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  • Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine: The Boucher Institute is located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • The University of British Columbia also has a great plant forum where people of all experience levels can ask questions.

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  • A variety of diverse and well-regarded institutions, including Purdue University, UCLA, Columbia University and Arizona State University, offer majors in interior design.

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  • Located on Columbia Square,the Kehoe House was built in 1892 in the Queen Anne style by William Kehoe, an owner of an ironworks foundry.

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  • Encyclopedia.com - The only resource free in this online encyclopedia is Columbia Encyclopedia, and it's somewhat dated.

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  • The University of Missouri Columbia's online offerings include a Master of Education degree with early childhood education, gifted education, literacy, and social studies concentrations.

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  • Most of the information, especially when pulling from other encyclopedias, comes from The Columbia Encyclopedia, Oxford's World Encyclopedia and the Encyclopedia of World Biography.

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  • Ontario ski areas are not as famous as those in other parts of Canada, such as Quebec, Banff and British Columbia.

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  • The Whistler ski resort located in Whistler, British Columbia was the official alpine skiing venue for the 2010 Winter Olympics.

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  • The story begins in the spring of 1994, when Daniel Spiegelman dismantles a wall in Columbia University's Butler Library, steals books and then escapes to Europe with roughly $1.8 million in rare books, letters and manuscripts.

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  • Raw BC - Based in British Columbia, Canada, this forum contains lots of local support, as well as forums for recipes and discussion for members worldwide.

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  • South America, particularly Columbia, is becoming a bigger transporter of the drug as well.

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  • The number of motorcycle operators who were charged with alcohol-related offenses increased in 25 states, as well as the District of Columbia.

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  • An online magazine, Join Together from Columbia University, recently published an article about one of their students, Donald Kurth.

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  • Once clean, Kurth applied to Columbia University where he was enrolled despite his average grades and history of arrest.

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  • His dedication to change his life became reality when he graduated with honors and enrolled in medical school at Columbia University.

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  • The majority of U.S. states, along with the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have passed laws declaring that workplaces, restaurants and bars must be 100 percent smoke-free environments.

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  • Born in 1967, in Ladysmith, British Columbia, Anderson is most famous for acting on the syndicated hit Baywatch and for her (former) marriage to rocker Tommy Lee.

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  • Born in Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada on July 1st, 1967, she was the first baby born on Canada Day during the nation's Centennial year.

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  • Her parents, Barry and Carol Anderson, moved to Comox, British Columbia, while Pamela was still a baby.

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  • Finally, Columbia Record's Tommy Mottola signed her up as a pop singer.

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  • At times it looked as though he would never rap again, and his record label, Columbia, dropped him.

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  • Obama studied at Columbia University and Harvard Law School, and served as a senator for the state of Illinois before being elected to the Presidency.

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  • Shakira was born February 2, 1977, in Columbia.

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  • This strategy paid off, and she signed a record deal with Sony Columbia while still in high school.

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  • Columbia Records picked up the group in 1996.

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  • When Born to Reign failed to go platinum, Smith's label, Columbia, dropped him.

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  • Born in British Columbia, Canada in 1976, Ryan Reynolds is an actor with a large and strong fan following.

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  • He finished high school on schedule and then went on to Columbia University.

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  • Seth Rogen was born April 15, 1982 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • She has completed some of her college education at Columbia University and continues to take courses when her acting schedule allows time for them.

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  • Ryan Rodney Reynolds was born on October 23, 1976, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • Marc Singer was born on January 29 1948, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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  • With brands like Columbia and Obermeyer, you can buy from this website with the complete assurance that one of these suits will protect your child from all of the winter elements.

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  • Columbia Sportswear company has a small selection of kids' fishing shirts, although these are designed exclusively for boys.

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  • Bonehead Short-Sleeve: Columbia's most popular fishing shirt for boys is made of a soft cotton poplin that allows for a full range of motion.

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  • Columbia University of New York enrolled 23, 813 in the 2005 school year.

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  • Columbia houses several well-regarded graduate schools, including the Graduate School of Journalism.

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  • Columbia and Dartmouth round out the top ten.

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  • The same U.S. News and World Report rankings list Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and Princeton as the schools with the lowest acceptance rates, ranging from 10 to 13 percent.

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  • Columbia University is located in New York, New York.

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  • Students can apply for admission to WSU in conjunction with admission to Clark College or Lower Columbia College.

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  • Private universities like New York University, Columbia University and Yale are included in this average.

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  • Some cruises last as long as 21 days, including those that leave from Vancouver, British Columbia.

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  • It leaves from Vancouver, British Columbia, and visits Hawaii, though other ports may also be available.

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  • Columbia River cruises take travelers along the scenic border between the states of Oregon and Washington.

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  • There's no way to fit an oceanliner on the Columbia River.

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  • Note that some cruises travel on both the Columbia River and the Snake River, which is a waterway that begins in Eastern Oregon and heads to Southern Idaho.

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