How to use Columba in a sentence

columba
  • The existing genera include Anas, Aquila, Bubo, Columba, Cypselus, Lanius, Picus, Phalacrocorax, Sula, &c. Very interesting is the fact that Serpentarius, Psittacus and Trogon are amongst this list of birds, which are now restricted to the tropics.

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  • Madeira has also its peculiar golden-crested wren (Regulus maderensis), and its peculiar pigeon (Columba trocaz), while two allied forms of the latter (C. laurivora and C. bollii) are found only in the Canaries.

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  • They are represented as endeavouring to prevent the progress of St Patrick and St Columba by raising clouds and mist.

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  • The word drill is always used to render the Latin magus, and in one passage St Columba speaks of Christ as his Druid.

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  • So it was with Celtic saints, and Adamnan, in his life of St Columba, i.

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  • These palimpsests had originally belonged to the famous convent of St Columba at Bobbio, and had been written over by the monks with the acts of the first council of Chalcedon.

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  • They are named after Columba and Oran, who are said to have stopped here after they left Ireland.

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  • He was afterwards known as Columkille, or Columba of the Church, to distinguish him from others of the same name.

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  • Columba himself studied under two of the most distinguished Irishmen of his day, Finian of Moville (at the head of Strangford Lough) and Finian of Clonard.

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  • Columba established himself on the island of Hy or Iona, where he erected a church and a monastery.

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  • The precise details, except in a few cases, are unknown, or obscured by exaggeration and fiction; but it is certain that the whole of northern Scotland was converted by the labours of Columba, and his disciples and the religious instruction of the people provided for by the erection of numerous monasteries.

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  • Columba was honoured by his countrymen, the Scots of Britain and Ireland, as much as by his Pictish converts, and in his character of chief ecclesiastical ruler he gave formal benediction and inauguration to Aidan, the successor of Conall, as king of the Scots.

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  • The last years of Columba's life appear to have been mainly spent at Iona.

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  • Several Irish poems are ascribed to Columba, but they are manifestly compositions of a later age.

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  • The original materials for a life of St Columba are unusually full.

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  • The island of Columba was occasionally plundered by English and other rovers, but in the 16th century it became the property of Sir James Stuart, whose grandson became 2nd earl of Murray by virtue of his marriage to the elder daughter of the 1st earl.

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  • Towards the end of his sojourn in Rome he fell violently in love with a Roman lady called Faustine, who appears in his poetry as Columba and Columbelle.

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  • They were companions of St Columba and their efforts to convert the folk to Christianity seem to have impressed the popular imagination, for several islands bear the epithet "Papa" in commemoration of the preachers.

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  • The original edifice is believed to have been erected in the time of Columba, but the transept and nave of the existing structure date from the early part of the 13th century, the choir from the 15th.

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  • Although Columba is said to have planted a church here, the authoritative history of the town does not begin for several centuries after the era of the saint.

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  • The cathedral is said to contain the remains of its founder, together with those of St Columba and St Bridget.

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  • The abbey was founded in 1163 as a Cluniac monastery by Walter Fitzalan, first High Steward of Scotland, the ancestor of the Scottish royal family of Stuart, and dedicated to the Virgin, St James, St Milburga of Much Wenlock in Shropshire (whence came the first monks) and St Mirinus (St Mirren), the patron-saint of Paisley, who is supposed to have been a contemporary of St Columba.

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  • We find the same custom in the Celtic church of St Columba.

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  • Their defeat by the Picts, in 560, induced the Irish St Columba to endeavour to convert the conquering Picts.

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  • The antiquarian remains include a weather-worn sculptured stone cross and the ruins of a chapel of St Columba.

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  • The island takes its name from the fact that St Molios, a disciple of St Columba, founded a church near the north-western point.

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  • The Carey brook, by the side of which the abbey stands, was formerly called the Margy, and on its waters according to tradition dwelt the four children of Lir, changed to swans by their step-mother until St Columba released them from enchantment.

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  • The meeting of Kentigern and Columba probably took place soon after 584, when the latter began to preach in the neighbourhood of the Tay.

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  • In 846 or 848 he transported the relics of St Columba to a church which he had constructed at Scone.

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  • In 679 he was elected abbot of Hy or Iona, being ninth in succession from the founder, St Columba.

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  • Adamnan wrote a Life of St Columba, which, though abounding in fabulous matter, is of great interest and value.

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  • Columba and his nephew Drostan founded a monastery here in the 6th century, of which no trace remains.

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  • The only historical Regulus (Riagail or Rule, whose name is preserved by the tower of St Rule) was an Irish monk expelled from Ireland with St Columba; his date, however, is c. 573-600.

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  • Even Columba himself, in his Latin hymn Altus prosator, was suspected by Gregory the Great of favouring Arian doctrines.

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  • Thus there were coarbs of Columba at Iona, Kells, Derry, burrow and other places.

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  • The coarb might be a bishop or only an abbot, but in either case all the ecclesiastics in the family were subject to him; in this way it frequently happened that bishops, though their superior functions were recognized, were in subjection to abbots who were only priests, as in the case of St Columba, or even to a woman, as in the case of St Brigit.

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  • In 563 Columba founded the monastery of Hi (Iona), which spread the knowledge of the Gospel among the Picts of the Scottish mainland.

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  • Cormac ua Liathain, a disciple of St Columba, visited the Orkneys, and when the Northmen first discovered Iceland they found there books and other traces of the early Irish church.

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  • The author of the deed fled for sanctuary to St Columba.

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  • St Columba's kinsmen, the northern Hy Neill, took up the quarrel, and attacked and defeated the king at Culdreimne in 561.

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  • Aed, son of Ainmire (572-598) of the northern Hy Neill, figures prominently in the story of St Columba.

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  • Columba and his successors at Iona brought the faith to the Picts and Scots; Aidan established the Northumbrian bishopric at Lindisfarne.

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  • Columba livia, so called because it lives in caves and cliff sites.

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  • Foirtgirn The (probable) same person turns up again in the Life of St Columba as an Irish ecclesiastic.

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  • The Abbey was to become the Mausoleum of the early Celtic Kings of Scotland who wished to be buried near to St. Columba.

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  • Oran Creative Crafts occupy the former pigsty at the Columba Steadings on the beautiful island of Iona.

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  • In spite of attempts to chase him away, Columba spoke to him and prophesied that he would be an eloquent preacher.

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  • Of royal blood, Columba was ordained a presbyter in his native Ireland.

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  • It also seems reflected in the dispute involving Foirtgirn, involving a sorcerer and St Columba.

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  • Yet the night was not without its stars; at Rome Leo the Great and Gregory the Great could preach, and the missionaries Patrick, Columba, Columbanus, Augustine, Wilfrid, Willibrord, Gall and Boniface are known by their fruits.

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  • Irish accounts represent Columba as undertaking this mission in consequence of the censure expressed against him by the clergy after the battle of Cooldrevny; but this is probably a fabrication.

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  • What Ulfilas was to the Gothic tribes, what Columba and his disciples were to the early Celtic missions, what Augustine or Aidan was to the British Isles, what Boniface was to the churches of Germany and Anskar to those of Denmark and Sweden, that, on the discovery of a new world of missionary enterprise, was Xavier to India, Hans Egede to Greenland, Eliot to the Red Indians, Martyn to the church of Cawnpore, Marsden to the Maoris, Carey, Heber, Wilson, Duff and Edwin Lewis to India, Morrison, Gilmour, Legge, Hill, Griffith John to China, Gray, Livingstone, Mackenzie, Moffat, Hannington, Mackay to Africa, Broughton to Australia, Patteson to Melanesia, Crowther to the Niger Territory, Chalmers to New Guinea, Brown to Fiji.

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  • Skelmorlie Aisle, the sole relic of the old parish church of St Columba, was converted into a mausoleum in 1636.

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  • The ardri desired to make the colony an Irish state tributary to the high-king; but on the special pleading of St Columba it was allowed to remain independent.

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  • In French Teacher is reading "Columba" to me.

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  • I let the Montrose go (she is heading across toward Wemyss Bay) and await the tardy arrival of Saint Columba.

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  • It's said that St. Columba banished it back into the water with the sign of the cross and a stern warning.

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  • Waterleaf Spa at Sakmania Lodge - This Columba River Gorge spa caters to day customers as well as those staying at the lodge.

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