Colours sentence example

colours
  • His character is drawn in most favourable colours as a good son, a loving husband and father, and a trusty friend.

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  • The colours are often very bright and varied.

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  • He also published (1767) a treatise on the History and Present State of Electricity, which embodies some original work, and (1772) a History of Discoveries relating to Vision, Light and Colours, which is a mere compilation.

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  • Its other manufactures include machinery, pianos and other musical instruments, cotton goods, cigars, furniture, leather, paper, colours and chemicals.

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  • The " tobes " are of all colours from brown to white.

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  • The principal manufactures are firearms, ironmongery, earthenware, woollen cloth, beer, stoneware, zinc goods, colours and salt; in the neighbourhood are iron and coal mines.

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  • But through the Priestly hands the Old Testament history passed, and their standpoint colours its records.

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  • Other colours known, as silver fawn and silver brown, are closely related.

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  • White, black, speckled grey and a peculiar russet brown, called moorat, are the prevailing colours.

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  • All able-bodied males are liable, on reaching their 21 st year, for 3 years' service with the colours, and 9 years in the reserve.

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  • In case of supreme necessity all males up to 70 years of age can be called upon to join the colours.

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  • This final moult is effected soon after the insect's appearance in the winged form; the creature seeks a temporary resting-place, the pellicle splits down the back, and the now perfect insect comes forth, often differing very greatly in colours and markings from the condition in which it was only a few moments before.

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  • Black, grey, yellow and brown are the prevalent colours of these rocks.

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  • For instance, the colour of a salt solution is the colour obtained by the superposition of the colours of the ions and the colour of any undissociated salt that may be present.

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  • In the East there is no sequence of liturgical colours, nor, indeed, any definite sense of liturgical colour at all; the vestments are usually white or red, and stiff with gold embroidery.

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  • Though, in the embroidery of vestments, many colours may be used, these five above named must severally give the dominant tone of colour on the occasions for which they are appointed.

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  • The Church of the Holy Sepulchre at Jerusalem seems already to have had its canon of liturgical colours.

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  • Some Churches, however, have adopted the colours of the use of Salisbury (Sarum).

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  • The red hangings of the Holy Table, usual where the liturgical colours are not used, are also - like the cushions to support the service books - supposed to be a survival of the Sarum use.

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  • By varying this process, designs in metals of different colours may readily be obtained.

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  • Bradford was at one time the centre of the clothing industry in the west of England, and was especially famous for its broadcloths and mixtures, the waters of the Avon being especially favourable to the production of good colours and superior dyes.

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  • Different substances were distinguished by the name of "alumen"; but they were all characterized by a certain degree of astringency, and were all employed in dyeing and medicine, the light-coloured alumen being useful in brilliant dyes, the dark-coloured only in dyeing black or very dark colours.

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  • Possibly in certain places the iron sulphate may have been nearly wanting, and then the salt would be white, and would answer, as Pliny says it did, for dyeing bright colours.

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  • Near it is the parliament .and banqueting hall, restored (1889-1892) by the generosity of William Nelson (1817-1887) the publisher, which contains a fine collection of Scottish armour, weapons and regimental colours, while, emblazoned on the windows, are the heraldic bearings of royal and other figures distinguished in national history.

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  • The Golden Chapel on the south side is rich late Perpendicular, with a roof of fan-tracery, showing signs of the original decoration in colours.

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  • As a rule flowers common to all zones are on the coast smaller and with paler colours than they are in the midlands.

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  • Of the seven lines he saw, he regarded the five most prominent as the natural boundaries or dividing lines of the pure simple colours of the prismatic spectrum, which he supposed to have four primary divisions.

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  • All hope of crushing revolutionary Vienna with Magyar aid was thus at an end, and Jellachich, who on the 10th issued a proclamation to the Croat regiments in Italy to remain with their colours and fight for the common fatherland, was free to carry out his policy of identifying the cause of the southern Sla y s with that of the imperial army.

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  • Its manufactures include cardboard, glue, oils, colours, fertilizers, chemical products, perfumery, &c. During the middle ages and till modern times Aubervilliers was the resort of numerous pilgrims, who came to pay honour to Notre Dame des Vertus.

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  • The astonishing colours and grotesque forms of some animals and plants which the museum zoologists gravely described without comment were shown by these observers of living nature to have their significance in the economy of the organism possessing them; and a general doctrine was recognized, to the effect that no part or structure of an organism is without definite use and adaptation, being designed by the Creator for the benefit of the creature to which it belongs, or else for the benefit, amusement or instruction of his highest creature - man.

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  • Later, in his article " Chromatics " in the supplement to the 5th edition of this encyclopaedia, he shows that the colours " lose the mixed character of periodical colours, and resemble much more the ordinary prismatic spectrum, with intervals completely dark interposed," and explains it by the consideration that any phasedifference which may arise at neighbouring striae is multiplied in proportion to the total number of striae.

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  • Generally only one bow is clearly seen; this is known as the primary rainbow; it has an angular radius of about 410, and exhibits a fine display of the colours of the spectrum, being red on the outside and violet on the inside.

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  • Sometimes an outer bow, the secondary rainbow, is observed; this is much fainter than the primary bow, and it exhibits the same play of colours, with the important distinction that the order is reversed, the red being inside and the violet outside.

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  • The most conspicuous colour band of the principal bows is the red; the other colours shading off into one another, generally with considerable blurring.

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  • The colours are much fainter, and according to Aristotle, who claims to be the first observer of this phenomenon, the lunar bows are only seen when the moon is full.

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  • Its hero is Jovian, one of the feeblest of Roman emperors, and Julian is everywhere exhibited in flaming colours as the villain of the story.

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  • The borders of the garment are painted with geometrical patterns in vivid colours; a broad stripe of ornament runs down the centre of the skirt.'

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  • Purple, pale green and white, richly embroidered, are favourite colours in the dresses represented on the painted tombs.

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  • In the case of Jason and the Argonauts, she plays the part of a kindly, good-natured fairy; Euripides, however, makes her a barbarous priestess of Hecate, while the Alexandrian writers depicted her in still darker colours.

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  • Other metals, such as manganese, copper, nickel, may show their presence by characteristic colours.

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  • The Burmese are fond of bright colours, and pink and yellow harmonize well with their dark olive complexion, but even here the influence of western civilization is being felt, and in the towns the tendency now is towards maroon, brown, olive and dark green for the women's skirts.

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  • The same oxide may produce different colours with different glass-mixtures, and different oxides of the same metal may produce different colours.

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  • The colours previously available for English table-glass were ruby, canary-yellow, emerald-green, dark peacock-green, light peacock-blue, dark purple-blue and a dark purple.

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  • The happiest specimens of this glass almost rival the wings of butterflies in the brilliancy of their iridescent colours.

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  • Except for making bottles of special colours, gas-heated tank furnaces are in general use.

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  • It must be remembered that the Romans possessed no fine procelain decorated with lively colours and a beautiful glaze; Samian ware was the most decorative kind of pottery which was then made.

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  • The Romans had at their command, of transparent colours, blue, green, purple or amethystine, amber, brown and rose; of opaque colours, white, black, red, blue, yellow, green and orange.

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  • Imitations of natural stones were made by stirring together in a crucible glasses of different colours, or by incorporating fragments of differently coloured glasses into a mass of molten glass by rolling.

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  • A very few specimens have been met with in which several colours are employed.

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  • The colours are vitrified and slightly in relief; green, blue and brown may be distinguished.

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  • He also made with great taste and skill large lustres and mirrors with frames of glass ornamented either in intaglio or with foliage of various colours.

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  • The coloured glass is usually not of one bright colour throughout, but semi-transparent and marbled; the colours in many instances are singularly fine and harmonious.

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  • They painted their bodies; the pintaderas, baked clay objects like seals in shape, have been explained by Dr Verneau as having been used solely for painting the body in various colours.

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  • Its chief industries are brewing, caskmaking and the manufacture of cement and colours.

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  • In the arts it is employed in the preparation of varnishes, and as a mordant for the production of colours on calico.

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  • His father, a drysalter and dealer in colours, used sometimes to make experiments in the hope of finding improved processes for the production of his wares, and thus his son early acquired familiarity with practical chemistry.

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  • After discussing the structure of the eye he gives an experiment in which the appearance of the reversed images of outside objects on a piece of paper held in front of a small hole in a darkened room, with their forms and colours, is quite clearly described and explained with a diagram, as an illustration of the phenomena of vision.

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  • He then notes the application to portraiture and to painting by laying colours on the projected images.

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  • The ruins consist of an amphitheatre (now almost entirely demolished, but better preserved in the 18th century), a theatre, and a very fine aqueduct in opus reticulatum, the quoins of which are of various colours arranged in patterns to produce a decorative effect.

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  • They exhibit a great dissimilarity in paths, motions and colours.

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  • In this situation it becomes much swollen and banded with colours, and produces a large number of ecaudate cercariae.

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  • It colours all his writings, and is intimately connected with some of the most characteristic attributes of his mind, a quick sympathetic imagination, a fine feeling for local differences, and a scientific instinct for seizing the sequences of cause and effect.

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  • The vaults are gracefully painted with floreated bands along the ribs and central patterns in each "cell," in rich soft colours on a white plastered ground.

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  • He was elected an associate of the Royal Society of Painters in Water Colours in 1876, and a full member in 1880; an associate of the Royal Academy in 1885, and an academician in 1893; and at Paris, in 1887, where he exhibited "The Newhaven Packet" and "The Clearness after Rain," he received a grand prix and was made a knight of the Legion of Honour.

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  • Its buff and blue cover was adopted from the colours of the Whig party whose political principles it advocated.

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  • The graceful form of their body, the elegance and rapidity of their movements, and the exquisite beauty of their colours have been the admiration of all who have had the good fortune to watch them in their native haunts.

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  • The majority are distinguished by the beautiful arrangement of their bright and highly ornamental colours; many species of Elaps have the pattern of the so-called coral-snakes, their body being encircled by black, red and yellow rings - a pattern FIG.

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  • While the colours on the metopes and triglyphs had faded somewhat, the border above them, topped with a cornice projecting 6 in., retained a most brilliant maeander pattern of red, blue and yellow, while below these were two bands of godroons of blue and red.

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  • Among the fish may be mentioned the tunny, dolphin, mackerel, sardine, sea-bream, dentice and pagnell; wrasse, of exquisite rainbow hue and good for food; members of the herring family, sardines, anchovies, flying-fish, sea-pike; a few representatives of the cod family, and some flat fish; soles (very rare); Cernus which grows to large size; several species of grey and red mullet; eleven species of Triglidae, including the beautiful flying gurnard whose colours rival the angel-fish of the West Indies; and eighteen species of mackerel, all migratory.

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  • On the 27th of April there was great excitement in Florence, Italian colours appeared everywhere, but order was maintained, and the grand-duke and his family departed for Bologna undisturbed.

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  • With drums beating and colours flying, every unit within call went forward for the final effort.

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  • It colours the faeces black owing to the formation of sulphide.

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  • The flowers, produced near the apex of the plant, are generally large and showy, yellow and rose being the prevailing colours.

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  • These insects are adorned with bands of black and yellow, or with bright metallic colours, and on account of their large size and formidable ovipositors they often cause needless alarm to persons unfamiliar with their habits.

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  • The vast majority of this group, including nearly 5000 known species, are usually reckoned as a single family, the Chalcididae, comprising small insects, often of bright metallic colours, whose larvae are parasitic in insects of various orders.

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  • If Machiavelli had any moral object when he composed the Mandragola, it was to paint in glaring colours the corruption of Italian society.

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  • He was disgusted with the brutality of English manners, which he paints in no flattering colours, and he found pedantry and superstition as rampant in Oxford as in Geneva.

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  • With the gas in excess a heavy lurid flame emitting dense volumes of smoke results, whilst if it be driven out in a sufficiently thin sheet, it burns with a flame of intense brilliancy and almost perfect whiteness, by the light of which colours can be judged as well as they can by daylight.

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  • The essence of this process is that the coke and lime are only heated to the point of combination, and are not 3 to 82 5 to 72 13 to 75 4 to 22 5 to 13 colours.

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  • Of the French and Bavarians 11,000 men, roo guns and 200 colours and standards were taken; besides the killed and wounded, the numbers of which were large but uncertain - many were drowned in the Danube.

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  • Nearly all the rivers in New Guinea yield " colours " of gold, but only in the Louisiade Archipelago has enough been discovered to constitute the district a goldfield.

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  • Considering the really few colours that the birds exhibit, the variation is something marvellous, so that fifty examples may be compared without finding a very close resemblance between any two of them, while the individual variation is increased by the "eartufts," which generally differ in colour from the frill.

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  • The colours range from deep black to pure white, passing through chestnut or bay, and many tints of brown or ashy-grey, while often the feathers are more or less closely barred with some darker shade, and the black is very frequently glossed with violet, blue or green - or, in addition, spangled with white grey or gold-colour.

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  • Though part of the plumage in many sun-birds gleams with metallic lustre, they owe much of their beauty to feathers which are not lustrous, though almost as vivid,' and the most wonderful combination of the brightest colours - scarlet, purple, blue, green and yellow - is often seen in one and the same bird.

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  • The colours are often brilliant; white spots and stripes being prevalent.

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  • The Stamp Act was repealed in March 1766, but the Townshend Acts, imposing duties on glass, paper, lead, painters' colours and tea, followed closely.

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  • He wrote several scientific works, that which attracted most attention at the time being his Optique des couleurs (1740), or treatise on the melody of colours.

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  • The sides of these ridges and pinnacles are bare of vegetation and display a variety of colours in buff, cream, pale green, grey and flesh.

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  • The middle series of the Lower Tertiaries, known as the Woolwich and Reading beds, rests either on the Thanet beds or on chalk, and consists chiefly of irregular alternations of clay and sand of very various colours, the former often containing estuarine and oyster shells and the latter flint pebbles.

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  • The picturesque effect of this sculpturing by water, wind and fire is greatly enhanced by the brilliant colours along the faces of the hills and ravines - grey, yellow, black and every shade of red and brown.

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  • Notwithstanding its defects, Froude's History is a great achievement; it presents an important and powerful account of the Reformation period in England, and lays before us a picture of the past magnificently conceived, and painted in colours which will never lose their freshness and beauty.

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  • The city's foreign trade is light (the value of its imports was $859,442 in 1907; of its exports $664,525), but its river traffic is heavy, amounting to about 3,000,000 tons annually, and being chiefly in general merchandise (including food-stuffs, machinery and manufactured products), ores and metals, chemicals and colours, stone and sand and brick.

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  • For this work he was in 1889 awarded a Davy medal by the Royal Society, which ten years previously had bestowed upon him a Royal medal in recognition of his investigations in the coal-tar colours.

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  • He then read for the bar, but turned to astronomy and authorship instead, and in 1865 published an article on the "Colours of Double Stars" in the Cornhill Magazine.

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  • In other cases, especially near mineral veins, slates are filled with black needles of tourmaline or are bleached to pale grey and white colours, or are silicified and impregnated with mineral ores.

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  • White and yellow colours predominate and insects with a proboscis of medium length are the common pollinating agents, such as short-tongued bees.

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  • Geranium, Cardamine pratensis, mallows, Rubus, Oxalis, Epilobium, &c., but many species show more or less well-marked median symmetry (zygomorphism) as Euphrasia, Orchis, thyme, &c., and red, blue and violet are the usual colours.

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  • The shapes and colours are extremely varied; bilaterally symmetrical forms are most frequent with red, blue or violet colours.

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  • Cripple Creek's site was frequently prospected after 1860, and "colours" and gold "float" were always found, but not until February 1891 was the source discovered.

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  • They offer many points of analogy to the humming birds in their distribution, colours and even disposition.

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  • The animal, which reaches a length of more than 2 ft., is blackish-brown and yellow or orange, and on the thick tail these "warning colours" are arranged in alternate rings.

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  • This church, by Giuliano da Sangallo (1485-1491), is a Greek cross, with barrel vaults over the arms, and a dome; it is a fine work, and the decoration of the exterior in marble of different colours (unfinished) is of a noble simplicity.

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  • In pleasing contrast to such pests are the butterflies of all sizes and colours, beetles of an inconceivable variety of size, shape and colouration, and ants of widely dissimilar appearance and habits.

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  • None of them were written except through the use of ideographs, in the making of which the Aztecs used colours with much skill, while the Mayas used an abbreviated form, or symbols.

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  • These are painted on a fine stucco in beautiful colours (notably a kind of turquoise-green) and represent archaic forms of flowers and butterflies.

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  • The order of the successive colours in all colourless transparent media is red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.

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  • Dispersion is therefore due to the fact that rays of different colours possess different refrangibilities.

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  • In order to find the amount of dispersion caused by any given prism, the deviations produced by it on two rays of any definite pure colours may be measured.

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  • This quantity may readily be expressed in terms of the refractive indices for the three colours, for if A is the angle of the prism (supposed small) bc=(/1c - I)A, bD =(/ AD - OA, F - I)A, where µc, A n, µ F are the respective indices of refraction.

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  • By studying the dispersion of colours in water, turpentine and crown glass Newton was led to suppose that dispersion is proportional to refraction.

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  • If we compare the spectrum produced by refraction in a glass prism with that of a diffraction grating, we find not only that the order of colours is reversed, but also that the same colours do not occupy corresponding lengths on the two spectra, the blue and violet being much more extended in the refraction spectrum.

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  • If the refractive index is, for instance, the same for both in the case of green light, and a source of white light is viewed through the mixture, the green component will be completely transmitted, while the other colours are more or less scattered by multiple reflections and refractions at the surfaces of the powdered substance.

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  • Wood has studied the iridescent colours seen when a precipitate of potassium silicofluoride is produced by adding silicofluoric acid to a solution of potassium chloride, and found that they are due to the same cause, the refractive index of the minute crystals precipitated being about the same as that of the solution, which latter can be varied by dilution.

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  • In some media the usual order of the colours is changed.

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  • P. Leroux discovered that iodine vapour refracted the red rays more than the violet, the intermediate colours not being transmitted; and in 1870 Christiansen found that an alcoholic solution of fuchsine refracted the violet less than the red, the order of the successive colours being violet, red, orange, yellow; the green being absorbed and a dark interval occurring between the violet and red.

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  • Such bodies show strong absorption bands in those colours which they reflect, while of the transmitted light that which is of a slightly greater wave-length than the absorbed light has an abnormally great refrangibility, and that of a slightly shorter wave-length an abnormally small refrangibility.

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  • In the wild state its colours do not differ from those of a Crucian carp, and like that fish it is tenacious of life and easily domesticated.

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  • The hair varies in length, and is coarse and of different colours according to the individual.

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  • Coal is worked chiefly for lime-burning, and umber is prepared for the manufacture of colours.

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  • With the exception of a high dado, itself very beautiful, made of marble slabs with bands of mosaic between them, the whole interior surface of the walls, including soffits and jambs of all the arches, is covered with minute mosaic-pictures in brilliant colours on a gold ground.

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  • The outline of this description might be from Sharifu 'd-Din, while the colours are the poet's own.

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  • Coburg is a place of considerable industry, the chief branches of the latter being brewing, manufactures of machinery, colours and porcelain, iron-founding and saw-milling; and there is an important trade in the cattle reared in the neighbourhood.

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  • After ignition it becomes almost insoluble in acids, and on fusion with silicates it colours them green; consequently it is used as a pigment for colouring glass and china.

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  • The principal industries of Hull are iron-founding, shipbuilding and engineering, and the manufacture of chemicals, oil-cake, colours, cement, paper, starch, soap and cotton goods; and there are tanneries and breweries.

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  • At a later period the conquering Saracens obtained a mastery over the trade, and by them it was spread both east and west - the textures becoming meantime impressed with the patterns and colours peculiar to that people.

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  • For some purposes - making of gauzes, crapes, flour-bolting cloth and for what is termed " souples " - the silk is not scoured, and for silks to be dyed certain dark colours half-scouring is practised.

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  • The use of tin salts, especially stannic chloride, SnC1 4, enables dyers to weight all colours the same as black.

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  • A portion of the eria cocoons are white, while the others are of a lively brown colour, and for the dyeing of light colours the latter require to undergo a bleaching process.

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  • The dark colours are very difficult to bleach, but the silk itself takes dye-colours much more freely and evenly than either tussur or eria silk.

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  • They lost also 15 colours and 26 guns.

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  • Fish in an interesting variety of colours and shapes abound in the sea and in artificial ponds along the coasts.'

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  • The swarthy figure and brilliant costume of the "Moor" when reproduced in wood and picked out in colours produced a very striking effect, and when a small table was supported on the head by the upraised hands the idea of passive service was suggested with completeness.

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  • Cotton linings include silesia, originally a linen cloth made in Silesia and now usually a twilled cotton cloth which is dyed various colours; Italian cloth, a kind of jean or sateen produced originally in Italy.

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  • The king is a hero of the chivalric type common in contemporary romance; freedom is a "noble thing" to be sought and won at all costs; the opponents of such freedom are shown in the dark colours which history and poetic propriety require; but there is none of the complacency of the merely provincial habit of mind.

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  • Some valuable plants are obtained in the mountains of south and southwestern Tibet, yielding the excellent yellow and red colours used to dye the native cloths."

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  • The Tibetan regent, with his enlightened and kindly spirit, is painted by Huc in most attractive colours, and Markham expressed the opinion that the native authorities were then willing to receive strangers, while the jealousy that excluded them was Chinese only.

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  • The oldest example of native sarcophagi are copied from Egyptian mummy-cases, painted with colours and ornamented with carvings in low relief; towards and during the Greek period the contours of the body begin to be marked more clearly on the cover.

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  • The sight of these flowers in spring, with mile after mile of brilliant and varied colours, attracts visitors even from foreign countries.

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  • Not only do albinoes thus carry the determinants for pattern, but it has been known for some time that they also carry gametically, but never visible somatically, the determinants for either the ferment or the chromogen for one or more colours.

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  • Some of the individuals will be one or other of the two colours, the determinants of which were borne by the albino, and others the colour of the pigmented parent.

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  • The impurity of the colours (due partly to the sun's diameter, but still more to oblique refraction) is more marked in halos than in rainbows; in fact, only the red is at all pure, and as a rule, only a mere trace of green or blue is seen, the external portion of each halo being nearly white.

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  • Poulton as the unification of warning colours.

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  • With two exceptions, these chickens that had learnt to associate black and yellow banding with a bitter taste also refused to touch the caterpillar of the cinnabar moth (Euchelia jacobaeae), which is banded with these colours.

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  • They appear, however, to have no appreciation of mimetic and warning colours, and have therefore not influenced in any way the evolution of mimetic resemblances dependent upon hues and patterns.

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  • While the moral issues are finally determined by this day, yet the world of the Messianic age is painted with the colours of the prophet's own surroundings.

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  • The water which trickles over the rims of the pools and basins on the upper terraces is a transparent blue, while the formation itself contains a network of fibrous algae which gives it a wonderful variety of colours.

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  • In the lower Geyser basin are the Mammoth Paint Pots, a group of mud springs with colours varying according to the mineral ingredients in the steam, which not only colours the mud but also forms it into imitative figures.

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  • Alternations of the brighter colours are also displayed in the feathers of the throat, breast and tail-coverts, so as to be in like manner characteristic of the species, and in several the bare space round the eye is yellow, green, blue or lilac. The sexes are alike in coloration, the males being largest.

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  • Before beginning to plant, it would be well to construct tables or lists of the plants, specifying their respective times of flowering, colours and heights.

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  • The colours include golden-yellow, red, orange-yellow, crimson, maroon and intermediate shades.

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  • The prices quoted are subject to constant fluctuation and represent purely trade prices for bulk, and it should be explained that the very great variations are due to different sizes, qualities and colours, and moreover are only first cost, before skins are dressed and prepared.

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  • Similar in quality to the black, but far more limited in number; the colours range from light yellow to a rich dark brown.

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  • Coarse hair, heavy pelt, mostly dark yellowish and brown colours, only found in western parts of United States, Russia and Siberia.

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  • The colours vary from pale yellowish to a dark red,.

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  • Generally the colours are yellowish or brown.

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  • The colours are pale orange and white with very dark markings, a strong contrast making a fine effect.

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  • The colours of the under wools of river otters vary, some being very dark, others almost yellow.

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  • The colours vary from pale grey brown to a rich black, and many have even or uneven sprinkling of white or silvery-white hairs.

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  • Many of the domestic kind in central and northern Europe and Canada are used for drivers' and peasants' coat linings, &c. In Great Britain many coats of the home-reared sheep, having wools two and a half to five inches long, are dyed various colours and used as floor rugs.

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  • In Paris, too, they obtain beautiful results in the "topping" or colouring Russian sables and the Germans are particularly successful in dyeing Persian lambs black and foxes in all blue, grey, black and smoke colours and in the insertion of white hairs in imitation of the real silver fox.

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  • As illustrative of this, it may be explained that any brown tone of fur such as sable, marten, mink, black marten, beaver, nutria, &c., will go well upon black or very dark-brown furs, while those of a white or grey nature, such as ermine, white lamb, chinchilla, blue fox, silver fox, opossum, grey squirrel, grey lamb, will set well upon seal or black furs, as Persian lamb, broadtail, astrachan, caracul lamb, &c. White is also permissible upon some light browns and greys, but brown motley colours and greys should never be in contrast.

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  • The introduction of a third fur in the same garment or indiscriminate selection of colours of silk linings, braids, buttons, &c., often spoils an otherwise good article.

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  • With regard to the natural colours of furs, the browns that command the highest prices are those that are of a bluish rather than a reddish tendency.

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  • Although the sewing, which is necessarily done by hand, the sections being of so unequal and tortuous a character, is rather roughly executed, the matching of colours and qualities is excellent.

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  • The enormous quantities of pieces admit of good selection and where odd colours prevail in a lining it is dyed.

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  • The front hall, corridors and apartments are painted in the Pompeian style, with brilliant colours and with great artistic skill.

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  • The modelling is of a very high order, and the one eye which remains perfect is cut out of rock crystal, with the pupil and iris marked by colours applied to the lower face of the crystal.

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  • The effective strength of the army in 1904 with the colours was 3406 officers and 40,382 men.

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  • The Catholic party also strove to mitigate the principle of obligatory military service by encouraging the system of volunteering and by a reduction of the time of active service and of the number with the colours.

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  • The very high dispersion (index for red light = 2.402, for blue light = 2.460) gives it the wonderful " fire " or display of spectral colours.

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  • They had lost some 2 500 killed, amongst them Gournay and Berbier du Metz, the chief of artillery, the Allies twice as many, as well as 48 guns, and Luxemburg was able to send 150 colours and standards to decorate NotreDame.

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  • Bordas, C. Doelter and others, that the rays induce important changes in the colours of many minerals.

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  • Japp, in the Kekule memorial lecture he delivered before the London Chemical Society on the 15th of December 1897, declared that three-fourths of modern organic chemistry is directly or indirectly the product of Kekule's benzene theory, and that without its guidance and inspiration the industries of the coal-tar colours and artificial therapeutic agents in their present form and extension would have been inconceivable.

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  • The eggs are very remarkable objects, curiously unlike those of other birds; and their shell looks as if it were of highly-burnished metal or glazed porcelain, presenting also various colours, which seem to be constant in the particular species, from pale primrose to sage-green or light indigo, or from chocolate brown to pinkish orange.

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  • Relations between Spain and the United States became strained, and war seemed imminent; but on the 8th of December the Spanish government agreed to surrender the "Virginius" on the 16th, to deliver the survivors of the crew and passengers to an American war-ship at Santiago, and to salute the American flag at Santiago on the 25th if it should not be proved before that date that the "Virginius" was not entitled to sail under American colours.

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  • The term of service is 2 years (3 years in the cavalry) with the colours, 7 or 8 in the reserve and 2 in the Landwehr; in the case of men not drafted to the active army the same total period of service is spent in various special reserves.

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  • The object of this apparently high-handed step was to avoid the expense and delay of summoning the supernumeraries again to the colours when the bills should have received parliamentary sanction; but it was not unnaturally resented by the Hungarian Chamber, which has ever possessed a lively sense of its prerogatives.

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  • C. t has for its subject pavements and roads, their construction, mosaic floors; c. 2 is on white stucco for walls (opus albarium); c. 3 on concrete vaults, gypsum mouldings, stucco prepared for painting; c. 4 on building of hollow walls to keep out the damp, wall decoration by various processes; c. 5 on methods and styles of wall painting, the debased taste of his time; c. 6 on fine stucco made of pounded marble - three coats to receive wall paintings; c. 7 on colours used for mural decoration; c. 8 on red lead (minium) and mercury, and how to use the latter to extract the gold from wornout pieces of stuff or embroidery; c. 9 on the preparation of red lead and the method of encaustic painting with hot wax, finished by friction; cc. to-14 on artificial colours - black, blue, purple;, c. to white lead and ostrum, i.e.

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  • Other pieces paint in glowing colours the joys of heaven and the pains of hell.

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  • The peace strength of permanent troops, without the annual contingent of recruits, is about 13,500 officers and men, the annual contingent of men trained two or three years with the colours about 22,500, and the annual contingent of special reservists (men trained for brief periods) about 17,000.

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  • Reservists who have definitively left the colours are recalled for short refresher trainings, the number of men so trained in 1907 being about 80,000.

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  • The field army on a war footing, without depot troops, garrison troops and reservists, would be about 50,000 strong, but by constituting new cadres at the outbreak of war and calling up the reserves it could be more than doubled, and as a matter of fact nearly 120,000 men were with the colours in the manoeuvre season in 1907.

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  • The steep, ragged walls of the crater show a great variety of colours, intensified by the light from the deep blue sky above.

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  • His career as a preacher began in 1544, and the story has been told in glowing colours by his disciple John Knox.

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  • In this document James was painted in the blackest colours.

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  • In outward appearance the motmots have an undoubted resemblance to bee-eaters, but, though beautiful birds, various shades of blue and green predominating in their plumage, they do not exhibit such decided and brilliant colours; and, while the beeeaters are only found in the Old World, the motmots are a purely Neotropical form, extending from southern Mexico to Paraguay, and the majority of species inhabit Central America.

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  • In this connexion Pfeffer points out that the penetrating power .of light into a clear sea varies for light of different colours.

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  • The Venetian painters assured him, he says, that they had never seen finer colours.

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  • Blue, red, and a golden yellow, all somewhat faded through lapse of time and exposure, are the colours chiefly employed.

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  • The simplest is for the impression made by an observed object on the retina, the eye; in this connexion the term "after-image" (better "after-sensation") is used for an image which remains when the eye is withdrawn from a brilliantly lighted object; it is called positive when the colour remains the same, negative when the complementary colours are seen.

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  • They usually have the frizzly hair of the Melanesians, and paint their bodies in brilliant colours, especially yellow.

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  • Faust is a patchwork of many colours.

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  • Wampum was of two colours, dark purple and white, of cylindrical form, averaging a quarter of an inch in length, and about half that in diameter.

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  • A strand of wampum, consisting of purple and white shell-beads or a belt woven with figures formed by beads of different colours, operated on the principle of associating a particular fact with a particular string or figure, thus giving a serial arrangement to the facts as well as fidelity to the memory.

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  • The female figure is largely made use of, and rich and harmonious colours are sought, the glitter of metal being invariably subdued by deadening its lustre, or by patinas and oxides.

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  • In both cases the colours are the same, - turquoise blue, copper green, dark purple or golden brown, under an exquisitely transparent glaze.

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  • On the fatal field of Chillianwalla, which patriotism prefers to call a drawn battle, the British lost 2400 officers and men, besides four guns and the colours of three regiments.

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  • As a rule married women wear brighter colours than unmarried ones.

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  • Until Newton's discovery of the different refrangibility of light of different colours, it was generally supposed that object-glasses of telescopes were subject to no other errors than those which arose from the spherical figure of their surfaces, and the efforts of opticians were chiefly directed to the construction of lenses of other forms of curvature.

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  • When in 1666 he made his discovery of the different refrangibility of light of different colours, he soon perceived that the faults of the refracting telescope were due much more to this cause than to the spherical figure of the lenses.

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  • But, having ascertained by experiment that for all colours of light the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflexion, he turned his attention to the construction of reflecting telescopes.

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  • The two components of double stars often exhibit complementary colours.

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  • As a rule contrasted colours are shown by pairs having a bright and a faint component which are relatively wide apart; brilliant white stars frequently have a blue attendant - this is instanced in the case of Regulus and Rigel.

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  • We have now reached the most celebrated name among the Arabian caliphs, celebrated not only in the East, but in the West as well, where the stories of the Thousand and One Nights have made us familiar with that world which the narrators represent in such brilliant colours.

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  • Having taken all precautions, Mamun now made his solemn entry into Bagdad, but, to show that he came as a master, he still displayed for several days the green colours, though at last, at the request of Tahir, he consented to resume the black.

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  • As they bore red colours, they were also called Mohammira, or Redmakers.

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  • Sandstone of various colours was the chief material employed by the Khmers; limonite was also used.

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  • The mats may be of one colour only, or they may be made of different colours and in different designs.

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  • Many of these Indian grass-mats are admirable examples of elegant design, and the colours in which they are woven are rich, harmonious and effective in the highest degree.

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  • The mountains about it are high and bare and brilliant with varied colours.

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  • The mineral is especially liable to surface alteration, tarnishing with beautiful iridescent colours; a blue colour usually predominates, owing probably to the alteration of the chalcopyrite to covellite (CuS).

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  • All able-bodied citizens between the ages of seventeen and fiftyfive are compelled to serve one year with the colours and are then enrolled in the reserve.

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  • Indeed, even prior to the definite establishment of the caste-system, the mingling of the lower race with the upper classes, especially with the aristocratic landowners and still more so with the yeomanry, had probably been going on to such an extent as to have resulted in two fairly well-defined intermediate types of colour between the priestly order and the servile race and to have facilitated the ultimate division into four" colours "(varna).

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  • In course of time the process of intermingling, as we have seen, assumed such proportions that the priestly class, in their pride of blood, felt naturally tempted to recognize, as of old, only two" colours,"the Aryan Brahman and the non-Aryan Sudra.

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  • In these tribes the bold and active habits, the striking colours, or the fantastic diversities of structure,have so long attracted remark that recent investigations, while adding a multitude of new species and supplying the specialist with an infinity of new details, have not materially altered the scientific standpoint.

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  • For the naturalist they have the recommendation that many are easy to obtain, that most, apart from the very minute, are easy to handle, and that all, except as to the fleeting colours, are easy to preserve.

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  • Depicting feudalism in the vivid colours of an age at war with feudal institutions, breathing into antique histories the breath of actual life, embracing the romance of Italy and Spain, the mysteries of German legend, the fictions of poetic fancy and the facts of daily life, humours of the moment and abstractions of philosophical speculation, in one homogeneous amalgam instinct with intense vitality, this extraordinary birth of time, with Shakespeare for the master of all ages, left a monument of the Re- naissance unrivalled for pure creative power by any other product of that epoch.

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  • The Chalcedony Cascade displays a variety of colours.

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  • Among the most remarkable of its separate summits, which rise superbly in a crescent about Aspen, are North Italian Peak (13,225), displaying the red, white and green of Italy's national colours, White Rock Mountain (13,532), Mt.

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  • He had increased his reputation by the publication in 1597 of his Essays, along with which were the Colours of Good and Evil and the Meditationes Sacrae; but his private fortunes were in a bad condition.

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  • The short tract, Colours of Good and Evil, which with the Meditationes Sacrae originally accompanied the Essays, was afterwards incorporated with the De Augmentis.

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  • The two colours are printed each at one revolution from the two Two-Colour type-formesas they pass under the cylinder, which rotates twice in its travel.

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  • It fuses at red heat, and colours glass a ruby-red.

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  • Yet people of all colours find it very healthy, and the whites are very prolific. I resided in the town itself nine months, and in the neighbourhood seven months more.

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  • It is customary to mix these colours together, thus producing a curious ginger-coloured yarn, which upon being dyed black in the piece takes a fuller and deeper shade than can be obtained by piecedyeing a solid-coloured wool.

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  • The species and the numerous hybrids which have been obtained artificially, show a great variety in size and colour of the flower, including the richest deep crimson and blood-red, white, or with striped, mottled or blended colours.

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  • The yarns are capable of being dyed brilliant colours, but, unfortunately, the colours are not very fast to light.

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  • In particular he revived and gave new force to the theory of colour-vision associated with the name of Thomas Young, showing the three primary colours to be red, green and violet, and he applied the theory to the explanation of colour-blindness.

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  • This was with Goethe, who succeeded in securing his interest for those investigations on colours on which he was himself engaged.

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  • All colours are complementary, or go in pairs; each pair makes up the whole activity of the retina, and so is equivalent to white; and the two partial activities are so connected that when the first is exhausted the other spontaneously succeeds.

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  • This theory of complementary colours as due to the polarity in the qualitative action of the retina is followed by some criticism of Newton and the seven colours, by an attempt to explain some facts noted by Goethe, and by some reference to the external stimuli which cause colour.

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  • In 1828 he made inquiries about a chair at Heidelberg; and in 1830 he got a shortened Latin version of his physiological theory of colours inserted in the third volume of the Scriptores ophthalmologici minores (edited by Radius).

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  • Engineers and other specialists are recruited on various terms. A certain number, again varying from year to year, almost from month to month, are allowed to engage for the full 12 years with the colours (long service).

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  • Thus in 1907-1908, 1551 men were serving on a 12-year colour engagement, 24,856 on a term of 7 years colours and 5 reserve, 3589 on a 6 and 6 term, 3449 on 3 and 9 engagement, 45 2 9 for other terms, out of a total of 37,974 recruits or soldiers signing fresh engagements.

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  • The army reserve, formed of men who have served wit h the colours, consists of four classes.

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  • The new premier succeeded in persuading the Riksdag to pass a bill increasing the period of service with the colours in the army to six years and that in the militia to forty-two days, and as a set-off a remission of 3 o% on the land taxes.

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  • To this nucleus were added 6160 recruits, the contingent for that year of young men twenty-one years of age compelled to serve with the colours.

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  • The government also gives primary instruction to recruits when serving with the colours, which, with the increasing employment of the people in the towns, helps to stimulate a desire for education among the lower classes.

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  • In this manner the conditions are maintained that any one constant of reproduction is equal for two different colours, i.e.

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  • If all three constants of reproduction be achromatized, then the Gaussian image for all distances of objects is the same for the two colours, and the system is said to be in " stable achromatism."

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  • If a constant of reproduction, for instance the focal length, be made equal for two colours, then it is not the same for other colours, if two different glasses are employed.

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  • Fraunhofer, who defined the colours by means of the dark lines in the solar spectrum; and showed that the ratio of the dispersion of two glasses varied about 20% from the red to the violet (the variation for glass and water is about 50%).

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  • Should there be in two lenses in contact the same focal lengths for three colours a, b, and c, i.e.

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  • In uniting three colours an " achromatism of a higher order " is derived; there is yet a residual " tertiary spectrum," but it can always be neglected.

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  • The Gaussian theory is only an approximation; monochromatic or spherical aberrations still occur, which will be different for different colours; and should they be compensated for one colour, the image of another colour would prove disturbing.

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  • The most important is the chromatic difference of aberration of the axis point, which is still present to disturb the image, after par-axial rays of different colours are united by an appropriate combination of glasses.

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  • The condition for the reproduction of a surface element in the place of a sharply reproduced point - the constant of the sine relation - must also be fulfilled with large apertures for several colours.

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  • Abbe succeeded in computing microscope objectives free from error of the axis point and satisfying the sine condition for several colours, which therefore, according to his definition, were " aplanatic for several colours "; such systems he termed " apochromatic."

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  • Fused borax dissolves many metallic oxides, forming complex borates which in many cases show characteristic colours.

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  • To supply the deficiencies Castelar called out more than roo,000 conscripts, who joined the colours in less than six weeks.

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  • Inchbold (London, 1908), describe the towns, &c., most frequently visited by tourists, and are illustrated in colours.

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  • Chinatown, at the foot of Nob Hill, covers some twelve city blocks, and with its temples, rich bazaars, strange life and show of picturesque colours and customs, it is to strangers one of the most interesting portions of the city.

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  • Thus a drop of train oil will spread itself over the surface of the sea till it shows the colours of thin plates.

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  • In the earlier stages of approximation the obstacle thus arising may not be important; but when the thickness of the layer of air is reduced to the point at which the colours of thin plates are visible, the approximation must be sensibly resisted by the viscosity of the air which still remains to be got rid of.

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  • Along the Colorado is the Painted Desert, remarkable for the bright colours - red, brown, blue, purple, yellow and white - of its sandstones, shales and clays.

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  • In the Lower Sonoran belt, soapweed, acacias (Palo Verde or Parkinsonia torreyana), agaves, yuccas and dasylirions, the creosote bush and mesquite tree, candle wood, and about seventy-five species of cactuses - among them omnipresent opuntiae and great columnar " Chayas " - make up a striking vegetation, which in its colours of dull grey and olive harmonizes well with the rigidity and forbidding barrenness of the plains.

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  • Ferric chloride colours its aqueous solution a dark violet, and bromine water precipitates tribromresorcin.

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  • The other colours result from various mixtures of these four, and are infinite in number.

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  • It was in the recess in the back wall of this hall that the famous Peacock Throne used to stand, "so called from its having the figures of two peacocks standing behind it, their tails being expanded and the whole so inlaid with sapphires, rubies, emeralds, pearls and other precious stones of appropriate colours as to represent life."

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  • He is on the whole for the nobles and against the commons; and, though the unfavourable colours in which he paints the leaders of the latter are possibly reflected from the authorities he followed, it is evident that he despised and disliked the multitude.

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  • Annalists of the Gracchan age imported into the early struggles of patricians and plebeians the economic controversies of their own day, and painted the first tribunes in the colours of the two Gracchi or of Saturninus.

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  • The result is a curious mosaic, in which pieces of all colours and dates are found side by side, and in which even the great artistic skill displayed throughout fails to conceal the lack of internal unity.

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  • The general colour of the surface is black above and grey below, the colours gradually shading into each other.

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  • Early next year two papers from his pen were published in Beddoes' West Country Contributions - one " On Heat, Light and the Combinations of Light, with a new Theory of Respiration and Observations on the Chemistry of Life," and the other "On the Generation of Phosoxygen (Oxygen gas) and the Causes of the Colours of Organic Beings."

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  • Then he went to Rome and Naples and visited Vesuvius and Pompeii, called on Volta at Milan, spent the summer in Geneva, and returning to Rome occupied the winter with an inquiry into the composition of ancient colours.

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  • His father, after a vain search for him, consulted the oracle, and was referred to the person who should suggest the aptest comparison for one of the cows of Minos which had the power of assuming three different colours.

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  • Besides the transparent yellowishbrown of the wax when used in its natural state, as it very frequently was used in the earlier middle ages, many other colours, FIG.

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  • Any attempt to classify examples by their colours fails, for, while at some periods the particular tints employed in certain chanceries may have been selected with a view to marking the character of the documents so sealed, such practice was not consistently followed.

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  • Wallace also alluded to the resemblance of animals, and more especially of insects, to their surroundings, and points out that "those races having colours best adapted to concealment from their enemies would inevitably survive the longest."

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  • Most distinctive is the ubiquitous carpeting of mosses, varying in colours from the pure white and cream of the reindeer moss to the deep green and brown of the peat moss, all conspicuously spangled in the brief summer with bright flowers of the higher orders, heavy blossoms on stunted stalks.

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  • They employ four different colours, yellow, the natural colour, black, red and brown, which are obtained by dyeing, and these colours they combine into effective designs.

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  • None of the houses have chimneys, and smoke soon colours the interior a dark brown.

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  • The costumes of the children educated at the different orphanages are varied and picturesque, those of the municipal orphanage being dressed in the city colours of red and black.

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  • It seems certain that these conclusions were independent of Berkeley and Malebranche, and were not drawn from Arthur Collier's Clavis universalis (1713), with which they have much in common, but were suggested, in part at least, by Locke's doctrine of ideas, Newton's theory of colours, and Cudworth's Platonism, with all of which Edwards was early familiar.

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  • With oil it was accordingly at one time saturated in hopes of reviving the colours.

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  • He chose the moment of a terrific struggle for the colours between the opposing sides; hence the work became commonly known as the "Battle of the Standard."

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  • The master lost no time in proceeding to the execution of his design upon the mural surface; this time he had devised a technical method of which, after a preliminary trial in the Sala del Papa, he regarded the success as certain; the colours, whether tempera or other remains in doubt, were to be laid on a specially prepared ground, and then both colours and ground made secure upon the wall by the application of heat.

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  • When the central group was done the heat was applied, but it was found to take effect unequally; the colours in the upper part ran or scaled from the wall, and the result was a failure more or less complete.

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  • After erection the steelwork should receive one or two coats of paint; two coats are to be recommended, in which case they should be of different colours.

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  • There is nothing in the book inconsistent with Swift's professed and real character as a sturdy Church of England parson, who accepted the doctrines of his Church as an essential constituent of the social order around him, battled for them with the fidelity of a soldier defending his colours, and held it no part of his duty to understand, interpret, or assimilate them.

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  • Until 1896 building materials were chiefly imported; but, after that year, many quarries were opened to develop the native resources of limestone, sandstone, serpentine, red, yellow and green granite, and marbles of all colours, including the white marble from Dorna in Suceava, said by Rumans to rival that of Carrara in Italy.

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  • Two years later biographical studies of Theodore Beza and Peter Martyr Vermili (Leben des Theodor de Beza and des Peter Martyr Vermili, Heidelberg, 1809) revealed more genuine scholarship. In 1812 appeared his History of the Iconoclastic Emperors of the East (Geschichte der bilderstiirmenden Kaiser des ostromischen Reichs), in which he controverted some points in Gibbon and sought to avoid painting the past in present-day colours.

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  • For years he had looked at all earthly good through the medium of a philosophy which taught him that it,, without exception, contained within itself the seeds of bitterness, and was altogether worthless and impermanent; but now to his wavering faith the sweet delights of home and love, the charms of wealth and power, began to show themselves in a different light, and glow again with attractive colours.

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  • In 1872 he introduced in the Senate a resolution providing that the names of battles with fellow citizens should not be placed on the regimental colours of the United States.

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  • The first was hardly a sufficient bond of union, among men of different nationalities, when booty could be had nearly always by private venture under the colours of the separate European powers.

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  • It attains a length of 6 ft., weighing then perhaps 30 lb, and is of a greenish colour, occasionally mixed with brown, while the tail is surrounded with alternate rings of those colours.

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  • In the MS. of the chronicle of Diebold Schilling of Bern (c. 1480) there is in the picture of the battle of Sempach a warrior pierced with spears falling to the ground, which may possibly be meant for Winkelried; while in that of Diebold Schilling of Lucerne (1511), though in the text no allusion is made to any such incident, there is a similar picture of a man who has accomplished Winkelried's feat, but he is dressed in the colours of Lucerne.

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  • Since about 1800 this industry had been confined to the north-west of Bohemia, and it survived just till 1900, when it was entirely abandoned - not because its product had become any less necessary, but, quite on the contrary, because the enormously increasing demand for fuming sulphuric acid, arising through the discovery of artificial alizarine and other coal-tar colours, could not possibly be supplied by the clumsy Bohemian process.

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  • The principal materials of which they are built are limestone, granite, marble and bricks, and terra-cotta of various colours.

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  • To indicate the time or times of tupping three colours of paint are used.

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  • Next about the moon was a Circle of white, and next about that the inner Crown, which was of a bluish green within next the white, and of a yellow and red without, and next about these Colours were blue and green on the inside of the Outward Crown, and red on the outside of it.

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  • Colours are not Qualifications of Light, derived from Refractions, or Reflections of natural Bodies (as 'tis generally believed), but original and connate properties, which in divers Rays are divers.

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  • Nor are there only Rays proper and particular to the more eminent colours, but even to all their intermediate gradations.

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  • And this Analogy 'twixt colours, and refrangibility is very precise and strict; the Rays always either exactly agreeing in both, or proportionally disagreeing in both.

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  • I have refracted it with Prismes, and reflected it with Bodies, which in Day-light were of other colours; I have intercepted it with the coloured film of Air interceding two compressed plates of glass, transmitted it through coloured Mediums, and through Mediums irradiated with other sorts of Rays, and diversly terminated it; and yet could never produce any new colour out of it.

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  • For in such mixtures, the component colours appear not, but, by their mutual allaying each other constitute a midling colour."

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  • And this I have experimented in a dark Room by illuminating those bodies with uncompounded light of divers colours.

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  • And that this is the intire and adequate cause of their colours, is manifest, because they have no power to change or alter the colours of any sort of Rays incident apart, but put on all colours indifferently, with which they are inlightened.

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  • Then place a Lens of about three foot radius (suppose a broad Object-glass of a three foot Telescope), at the distance of about four or five foot from thence, through which all those colours may at once be transmitted, and made by its Refraction to convene at a further distance of about ten or twelve feet.

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  • If at that distance you intercept this light with a sheet of white paper, you will see the colours converted into whiteness again by being mingled.

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  • You may also see, that, if any of the Colours at the Lens be intercepted, the Whiteness will be changed into the other colours.

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  • And therefore, that the composition of whiteness be perfect, care must be taken, that none of the colours fall besides the Lens."

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  • Thus the word used by the Abipones to denote 5 was the name of a certain hide of five colours.

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  • The most important industries of the town are worsted-spinning, carriage and wagon building, and the making of colours and pottery.

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  • It is worn over the rochet by the pope, cardinals, bishops and prelates, the colours varying as in the case of the cappa magna.

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  • Oil of turpentine is largely used in the preparation of varnishes and as a medium by painters in their "flat" colours.

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  • In its gorgeous colours the opah surpasses even the dolphins, all the fins being of a bright scarlet.

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  • The whole surface of the wicker-work was plastered on the outside and made brilliantly white with lime, or occasionally striped in various colours, leaving the white poles exposed to view.

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  • It would seem that the number of colours in the dress indicated the rank of the wearer.

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  • Even the costume of the Croatian peasantry, to whom brilliant colours and intricate embroideries are always dear, proclaims their racial identity with the Serbs; their songs, dances and musical instruments, the chief part of their customs and folk-lore, their whole manner of life, so little changed by its closer contact with Western civilization, may be studied in Servia (q.v.) itself.

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  • The river fishes belong chiefly to the family Chromididae; many of them are of brilliant and bizarre appearance, with strongly contrasted colours in bands and spots.

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  • The very various periods named make it probable that the periodical return of the phoenix belongs only to vulgar legend, materializing what the priests knew to be symbolic. Of the birds of the heron family the gorgeous colours and plumed head spoken of by Pliny and others would be least inappropriate to the purple heron (Ardea purpurea), with which, or with the allied Ardea cinerea, it has been identified by Lepsius and Peters (Alteste Texte des Todtenbuchs, 1867, p. 51).

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  • But the golden and purple hues described by Herodotus may be the colours of sunrise rather than the actual hues of the purple heron.

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  • In strictness the angle is dependent upon the frequency, but if the dispersion be weak relatively to the double refraction, the product sin 24 - a)sin 2Ni - (3) has sensibly the same value for all terms of the summation, and we may write I=cos 2 (1 3 - a)/a 2 - sin 2 (1 ' - a) sin 2 (t ' - a 2 sin 2 2 This formula contains the whole theory of the colours of crystalline plates in polarized light.

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  • In the former case the retardation of phase varies so little with the period that the intensity is nearly the same for all colours; in the latter case it alters so rapidly that for a small change in the period the intensity passes from a maximum or a minimum, and consequently so many constituents of the light are weakened and these are so close to one another in frequency, that the light presents to the eye the appearance of being white.

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  • This state of things may, however, be considerably departed from if the axes of optical symmetry of the crystal are different for the various colours.

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  • Colours, metals, stones, plants, drugs and animal life of all kinds were associated with the planets and placed under their tutelage.

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  • Iron ores (60 to 70% of iron), copper ores, colours, brown coal, graphite, slate, and lithographic stone are obtained - nearly 2,000,000 tons of iron ore annually.

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  • Its clays which are of all colours, are the most valuable of the state.

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  • In 1880 he became a member of the Society of American Artists, and in 1885 was elected to full membership in the National Academy of Design, New York, and was for one term its vice-president; he became a member also of the American Water Color Society and of the Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London.

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  • By using these glasses and employing minerals with special optical properties, it is possible to correct objectives so that three colours can be combined, leaving only a quite slight tertiary spectrum, and removing the spherical aberration for two colours.

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  • In the apochromats the chromatic difference of the spherical aberrations is eliminated, for the spherical aberration is completely avoided for three colours.

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  • Since in these systems the sine-condition can be fulfilled for several colours, the quality of the images of points beyond the axis is better.

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  • The Greeks supposed it to be the capital of Media, confusing the Manda, of whom Astyages was king, with the Mada or Medes of Media Atropatene, and ascribed its foundation to Deioces (the Daiukku of the cuneiform inscriptions), who is said to have surrounded his palace in it with seven concentric walls of different colours.

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  • Half the realm of creative art, that of statuary, was thus suppressed at a blow; and the other half, painting, forfeited all the grace and freedom, all the capacity of new themes, forms and colours, all the development which we see in the Latin Church.

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  • In the dahlia the florets are rendered quilled, and are made to assume many glowing colours.

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  • It is colourless, or of different colours.

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  • To allure and attract them to visit the flower the odoriferous secretions and gay colours are developed, and the position and complicated structure of the parts of the flower are adapted to the perfect performance of the process, It is comparatively rare in hermaphrodite flowers for self-fertilization to occur, and the various forms of dichogamy, dimorphism and trimorphism are fitted to prevent this.

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  • The play of brilliant colours and of ever-changing contrasts of light and shade on those rugged mountain-sides and on the surface of the sea itself might have been expected to appeal to the most prosaic. The surface of the sea is generally smooth (seldom, however, absolutely inert as the pilgrims represented it), but is frequently raised by the north winds into waves, which, owing to the weight and density of the water, are often of great force.

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  • This first step has led to the synthetical production of the most characteristic substances of essential oils in the laboratory, and the synthetical manufacture of essential oils bade fair to rival in importance the production of tar colours from the hydrocarbons obtained on distilling coal.

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  • The green and blue, so frequent in frogs and newts, are merely subjective colours, due to interference.

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  • In the typical newts (Molge) of Europe, the males are adorned during the breeding season with bright colours and crests or other ornamental dermal appendages, and, resorting to the water, they engage in a lengthy courtship accompanied by lively evolutions around the females, near which they deposit their spermatozoa in bundles on a gelatinous mass, the spermatophore, probably secreted by the cloacal gland.