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colchester

colchester

colchester Sentence Examples

  • On the 13th of April 1396 he obtained ratification of the parsonage of St Stephen's, Walbrook, presented on the 30th of March by the abbot of Colchester, no doubt through his brother Robert, who restored the church and increased its endowment.

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  • George Airy was educated first at elementary schools in Hereford, and afterwards at Colchester Grammar School.

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  • He was one of the chief leaders in the second Civil War, but met with no success, and on the 27th of August, together with Lord Norwich, he surrendered to Fairfax at Colchester on promise of quarter for life.'

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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.

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  • Robert Key at Saham Tony in 1832 won over a young woman who converted her brother, Robert Eaglen, who, eighteen years later at Colchester, proved so decisive a factor in the life of Charles Haddon Spurgeon.

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  • The fact that Romford (Rumford, Rompford) lies on the high road between Colchester and London has determined its history.

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  • In the tribal division of Roman Britain given by Ptolemy their land included Camulodunum (Colchester), but nothing more is known of them.

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  • He went to school at Colchester and Maidstone, and in 1849 he became usher at a school in Newmarket.

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  • COLCHESTER, a township of Chittenden county, Vermont, U.S.A., on Lake Champlain, immediately N.E.

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  • The township has two villages: Colchester Centre, a small, quiet settlement, and Winooski (pop. in 1900, 3783) on the Winooski river.

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  • Charles Abbot Colchester >>

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  • Vessels entered and cleared (foreign and colonial trade): - In the coastwise trade, in 1881, 38,953 vessels of 4,545,904 tons entered; in 18 95, 43,7 0 4 vessels of 6,555,618 tons; but these figures include vessels trading within the Thames estuary (ports of London, Rochester, Colchester and Faversham), which later returns do not.

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  • But in some prominent towns, notably London, Colchester, Norwich and the Cinque Ports, it seems never to have been adopted.

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  • From the negotiations for the marriage of his daughter Sophia it appears that he had landed property in more than one place, and he had obtained on lease in 1722 a considerable estate from the corporation of Colchester, which was settled on his unmarried daughter at his death.

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  • He contested Colchester in 1788, when both candidates received the same number of votes, but Tierney was declared elected.

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  • An "anti-suicide bureau" was opened in 1907, and at Boxted, near Colchester, a scheme for Small Holdings has been initiated.

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  • The Romans at first imported their coins, and no Roman mints were established until about the end of the 3rd century, when coins were being struck at London and Colchester.

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  • Colchester, q.v.), a British and Roman town.

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  • SAMUEL HARSNETT (1561-1631), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Colchester in June 1561, and was educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where he was successively scholar, fellow and master (1605-1616).

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  • 1648), English soldier, was the son of Sir Thomas Lucas of Colchester, Essex.

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  • This parole he must be held to have broken when he took a prominent part in the seizure of Colchester in 1648.

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  • The two Royalists were shot the same evening in the Castle of Colchester.

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  • His father, Andrew Spottiswoode, who was descended from an ancient Scottish family, represented Colchester in parliament for some years, and in 1831 became junior partner in the firm of Eyre & Spottiswoode, printers.

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  • This order had its first seat in England at Colchester, where a house for Austin canons was founded about A.D.

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  • Here Claudius himself appeared - the one reigning emperor of the 1st century who crossed the waves of ocean, - and the army, crossing the Thames, moved forward through Essex and captured the native capital, Camulodunum, now Colchester.

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  • From the base of London and Colchester three corps continued the conquest.

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  • Within a few years of the Claudian invasion a colonia, or municipality of time-expired soldiers, had been planted in the old native capital of Colchester (Camulodunum), and though it served at first mainly as a fortress and thus provoked British hatred, it came soon to exercise a civilizing influence.

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  • Five modern cities, Colchester, Lincoln, York, Gloucester and St Albans, stand on the sites, and in some fragmentary fashion bear the names of five Roman municipalities, founded by the Roman government with special charters and constitutions.

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  • A fourth served Colchester, the eastern counties, Lincoln and York.

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  • COLCHESTER, a market town, river port and municipal and parliamentary borough of Essex, England; 52 m.

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  • As in other ancient buildings in Colchester there are evidences of the use of material from the Roman town which occupied the site, but it is clearly of Norman construction.

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  • Colchester is the centre of an agricultural district, and has extensive corn and cattle markets.

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  • Colchester returned two members to parliament from 1295 until 1885.

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  • In the 13th century Colchester was sufficiently important as a port to pay a fee-farm of X46, its ships plying to Winchelsea and France.

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  • Colchester was made the see of a suffragan bishop by King Henry VIII., and two bishops were in succession appointed by him; no further appointments, however, were made until the see was re-established under Queen Victoria.

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  • See Victoria County History, Essex; Charters and Letters Patent granted to the Borough of Colchester (Colchester, 1903); Morant, History of Colchester (1748); Harrod's Report on the Records of Colchester (1865); Cutts, Colchester (Historic Towns) 1888; J.

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  • Round, "Colchester and the Commonwealth" in Eng.

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  • xv.; Benham, Red Paper Book of Colchester (1902), and Oath Book of Colchester (1907).

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  • Colchester, Vermont >>

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  • From the above it will have been evident that, as Barlowe remarks concerning the compass, "the lame tale of one Flavius at Amelphus, in the kingdome of Naples, for to have devised it, is of very slender probabilitie"; and as regards the assertion of Dr Gilbert, of Colchester (De magnete, p. 4, 1600), that Marco Polo introduced the compass into Italy from the East in 1260, 1 we need only quote the words of Sir H.

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  • The Winooski river, which forms the boundary between Burlington and the townshi p of Colchester and which enters Lake Champlain N.W.

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  • He was educated for the law, entered the Middle Temple (becoming autumn reader in 1526), was town clerk of Colchester, and was on the commission of the peace for Essex in 1521.

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  • HENRI LE CARON (whose real name was Thomas Miller Beach) (1841-1894), British secret service agent, was born at Colchester, on the 26th of September 1841.

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  • 220, found at Colchester, dedicated to an unknown equivalent of Mars, Medocius, by one "Lossio Veda, nepos [=kin of] Vepogeni, Caledo."

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  • The alliance was of value to Claudius, for the territory of the Iceni (Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire) lay immediately north of the new province and its capital town Colchester, and Prasutagus had loyally kept faith with Rome.

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  • Colchester, since A.D.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Colchester discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • After Cary's election he left the university and would have accepted the great church of Colchester, but the bishop of London refused to grant institution and induction.

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  • GILBERT (or [[Gylberde), William]] (1544-1603), the most distinguished man of science in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and the father of electric and magnetic science, was a member of an ancient Suffolk family, long resident in Clare, and was born on the 24th of May 1544 at Colchester, where his father, Hierome Gilbert, became recorder.

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  • Educated at Colchester school, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, in 1558, and after taking the degrees of B.A.

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  • On the death of the queen in 1603 he was reappointed by her successor; but he did not long enjoy the honour, for he died, probably of the plague, on the 30th of November (loth of December, N.S.) 1603, either in London or in Colchester.

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  • LYMAN TRUMBULL (1813-1896), American jurist and political leader, was born at Colchester, Connecticut, on the 12th of October 1813, and was a grandson of Benjamin Trumbull (1735-1820), a Congregational preacher and the author of a useful Complete History of Connecticut (2 vols., 1818).

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  • Norwich and Ipswich, Yarmouth, Lowestoft, Harwich and Colchester may be mentioned in the north-eastern part, all depending for their prosperity on agriculture or on the sea; and a fringe of summer resorts on the low coast has arisen on account of the bracing climate.

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  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

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  • Of these, excluding Welsh ones, we may with some certainty identify Canterbury (Caint), Caerleonon-Usk, Leicester (Lerion), Penzelwood, Carlisle, Colchester, Grantchester (Granth), London, Worcester (Guveirangon), Doncaster (Daun), Wroxeter (Guoricon), Chester (Legion - this is Roman), Lichfield (Licitcsith) and Gloucester (Gloui).

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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.

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  • Among shell-fish, crabs and oysters are taken principally off the east coast; the oyster beds in the shallow water off the north Kent and Essex coasts, as at Whitstable and Colchester, being famous.

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  • The Britons burnt the Roman municipalities of Verulam and Colchester, the mart of London, and several military posts, massacred "over 70,000" Romans and Britons friendly to Rome, and almost annihilated the Ninth Legion marching from Lincoln to the rescue.

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  • G.) 11VERS, [[Richard Savage, 4th Earl]] (c. 1660-1712), was the second son of Thomas, 3rd earl; and after the death about 1680 of his elder brother Thomas, styled Viscount Colchester, he was designated by that title until he succeeded to the peerage.

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  • After becoming Lord Colchester on his brother's death he entered parliament as member for Wigan in 1681 and procured a commission in the Horseguards under Sarsfield in 1686.

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  • the border of modern Northamptonshire), submitted to Edward and at the same time Colchester was fortified; a large portion of Essex submitted and the whole of the East Anglian Danes came in.

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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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  • But Alfred was not to see the happy day when York and Lincoln, Colchester and Leicester, were to become mere shire-capitals in the realm of United England.

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  • In 1155 the manor was granted to the abbey of St John of Colchester, later to Cardinal Wolsey, and on his disgrace, to Thomas Howard, duke of Norfolk, to whom Elizabeth in 1567 granted a market on Saturday.

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  • billeted in the town of Colchester.

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  • brigade of infantry 50 miles from London in 48 hours to join Fairfax at the siege of Colchester.

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  • echoing footsteps tho, why not go and find out what life was like in Victorian Colchester?

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  • Soccer: Agent sparks fears Soccer: Daddy Danns's double Soccer: Attitude is praised by Williams Soccer: Colchester United.. .

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  • leadey led two educational workshop at the Colchester Institute on the 22nd October for the A-Level Students.

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  • We have had a lot of success in breeding other lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemurs will also breed well at Colchester.

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  • We have had a lot of success in breeding other lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemur species and hope that the Red-fronted lemurs will also breed well at Colchester.

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  • mews development accessed from the Colchester Road.

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  • Maybe Colchester police demanding costly security measures is proving off-putting.

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  • Protestors against the widening of the A12 near Colchester occupied several pillboxes, even digging tunnels through the concrete floors.

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  • Similarly, a slight shortening of the route past Colchester meant moving markers toward the west from Manningtree to Harwich.

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  • Soccer: Agent sparks fears soccer: Agent sparks fears Soccer: Daddy Danns's double Soccer: Attitude is praised by Williams Soccer: Colchester United.. .

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  • On the 13th of April 1396 he obtained ratification of the parsonage of St Stephen's, Walbrook, presented on the 30th of March by the abbot of Colchester, no doubt through his brother Robert, who restored the church and increased its endowment.

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  • George Airy was educated first at elementary schools in Hereford, and afterwards at Colchester Grammar School.

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  • He was one of the chief leaders in the second Civil War, but met with no success, and on the 27th of August, together with Lord Norwich, he surrendered to Fairfax at Colchester on promise of quarter for life.'

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  • Its immediate occasion was the disputation at Heidelberg (1568) for the doctorate of theology by George Wither or Withers, an English Puritan (subsequently archdeacon of Colchester), silenced (1565) at Bury St Edmunds by Archbishop Parker.

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  • Robert Key at Saham Tony in 1832 won over a young woman who converted her brother, Robert Eaglen, who, eighteen years later at Colchester, proved so decisive a factor in the life of Charles Haddon Spurgeon.

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  • The fact that Romford (Rumford, Rompford) lies on the high road between Colchester and London has determined its history.

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  • In the tribal division of Roman Britain given by Ptolemy their land included Camulodunum (Colchester), but nothing more is known of them.

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  • He went to school at Colchester and Maidstone, and in 1849 he became usher at a school in Newmarket.

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  • COLCHESTER, a township of Chittenden county, Vermont, U.S.A., on Lake Champlain, immediately N.E.

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  • The township has two villages: Colchester Centre, a small, quiet settlement, and Winooski (pop. in 1900, 3783) on the Winooski river.

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  • Charles Abbot Colchester >>

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  • Vessels entered and cleared (foreign and colonial trade): - In the coastwise trade, in 1881, 38,953 vessels of 4,545,904 tons entered; in 18 95, 43,7 0 4 vessels of 6,555,618 tons; but these figures include vessels trading within the Thames estuary (ports of London, Rochester, Colchester and Faversham), which later returns do not.

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  • But in some prominent towns, notably London, Colchester, Norwich and the Cinque Ports, it seems never to have been adopted.

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  • From the negotiations for the marriage of his daughter Sophia it appears that he had landed property in more than one place, and he had obtained on lease in 1722 a considerable estate from the corporation of Colchester, which was settled on his unmarried daughter at his death.

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  • He contested Colchester in 1788, when both candidates received the same number of votes, but Tierney was declared elected.

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  • An "anti-suicide bureau" was opened in 1907, and at Boxted, near Colchester, a scheme for Small Holdings has been initiated.

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    0
  • The Romans at first imported their coins, and no Roman mints were established until about the end of the 3rd century, when coins were being struck at London and Colchester.

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  • Colchester, q.v.), a British and Roman town.

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  • SAMUEL HARSNETT (1561-1631), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Colchester in June 1561, and was educated at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, where he was successively scholar, fellow and master (1605-1616).

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  • 1648), English soldier, was the son of Sir Thomas Lucas of Colchester, Essex.

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  • This parole he must be held to have broken when he took a prominent part in the seizure of Colchester in 1648.

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    0
  • The two Royalists were shot the same evening in the Castle of Colchester.

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  • His father, Andrew Spottiswoode, who was descended from an ancient Scottish family, represented Colchester in parliament for some years, and in 1831 became junior partner in the firm of Eyre & Spottiswoode, printers.

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  • This order had its first seat in England at Colchester, where a house for Austin canons was founded about A.D.

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  • His chief apostle in England was Christopher Vitel, a native of Delft, an "illuminate elder," living at Colchester and Southwark, who ultimately recanted.

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  • Here Claudius himself appeared - the one reigning emperor of the 1st century who crossed the waves of ocean, - and the army, crossing the Thames, moved forward through Essex and captured the native capital, Camulodunum, now Colchester.

    0
    0
  • From the base of London and Colchester three corps continued the conquest.

    0
    0
  • Within a few years of the Claudian invasion a colonia, or municipality of time-expired soldiers, had been planted in the old native capital of Colchester (Camulodunum), and though it served at first mainly as a fortress and thus provoked British hatred, it came soon to exercise a civilizing influence.

    0
    0
  • Five modern cities, Colchester, Lincoln, York, Gloucester and St Albans, stand on the sites, and in some fragmentary fashion bear the names of five Roman municipalities, founded by the Roman government with special charters and constitutions.

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  • A fourth served Colchester, the eastern counties, Lincoln and York.

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  • COLCHESTER, a market town, river port and municipal and parliamentary borough of Essex, England; 52 m.

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  • As in other ancient buildings in Colchester there are evidences of the use of material from the Roman town which occupied the site, but it is clearly of Norman construction.

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  • Colchester is the centre of an agricultural district, and has extensive corn and cattle markets.

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  • Colchester returned two members to parliament from 1295 until 1885.

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  • In the 13th century Colchester was sufficiently important as a port to pay a fee-farm of X46, its ships plying to Winchelsea and France.

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  • Colchester was made the see of a suffragan bishop by King Henry VIII., and two bishops were in succession appointed by him; no further appointments, however, were made until the see was re-established under Queen Victoria.

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  • See Victoria County History, Essex; Charters and Letters Patent granted to the Borough of Colchester (Colchester, 1903); Morant, History of Colchester (1748); Harrod's Report on the Records of Colchester (1865); Cutts, Colchester (Historic Towns) 1888; J.

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  • Round, "Colchester and the Commonwealth" in Eng.

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  • xv.; Benham, Red Paper Book of Colchester (1902), and Oath Book of Colchester (1907).

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  • Colchester, Vermont >>

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  • From the above it will have been evident that, as Barlowe remarks concerning the compass, "the lame tale of one Flavius at Amelphus, in the kingdome of Naples, for to have devised it, is of very slender probabilitie"; and as regards the assertion of Dr Gilbert, of Colchester (De magnete, p. 4, 1600), that Marco Polo introduced the compass into Italy from the East in 1260, 1 we need only quote the words of Sir H.

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  • The Winooski river, which forms the boundary between Burlington and the townshi p of Colchester and which enters Lake Champlain N.W.

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  • He was educated for the law, entered the Middle Temple (becoming autumn reader in 1526), was town clerk of Colchester, and was on the commission of the peace for Essex in 1521.

    0
    0
  • HENRI LE CARON (whose real name was Thomas Miller Beach) (1841-1894), British secret service agent, was born at Colchester, on the 26th of September 1841.

    0
    0
  • 220, found at Colchester, dedicated to an unknown equivalent of Mars, Medocius, by one "Lossio Veda, nepos [=kin of] Vepogeni, Caledo."

    0
    0
  • The alliance was of value to Claudius, for the territory of the Iceni (Norfolk, Suffolk, and Cambridgeshire) lay immediately north of the new province and its capital town Colchester, and Prasutagus had loyally kept faith with Rome.

    0
    0
  • Colchester, since A.D.

    0
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of Colchester discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

    0
    0
  • After Cary's election he left the university and would have accepted the great church of Colchester, but the bishop of London refused to grant institution and induction.

    0
    0
  • GILBERT (or [[Gylberde), William]] (1544-1603), the most distinguished man of science in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and the father of electric and magnetic science, was a member of an ancient Suffolk family, long resident in Clare, and was born on the 24th of May 1544 at Colchester, where his father, Hierome Gilbert, became recorder.

    0
    0
  • Educated at Colchester school, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, in 1558, and after taking the degrees of B.A.

    0
    0
  • On the death of the queen in 1603 he was reappointed by her successor; but he did not long enjoy the honour, for he died, probably of the plague, on the 30th of November (loth of December, N.S.) 1603, either in London or in Colchester.

    0
    0
  • LYMAN TRUMBULL (1813-1896), American jurist and political leader, was born at Colchester, Connecticut, on the 12th of October 1813, and was a grandson of Benjamin Trumbull (1735-1820), a Congregational preacher and the author of a useful Complete History of Connecticut (2 vols., 1818).

    0
    0
  • Norwich and Ipswich, Yarmouth, Lowestoft, Harwich and Colchester may be mentioned in the north-eastern part, all depending for their prosperity on agriculture or on the sea; and a fringe of summer resorts on the low coast has arisen on account of the bracing climate.

    0
    0
  • We there learn that the following place-names are ultimately of Celtic origin: - Brougham, Catterick, York, Lincoln (Lindum), Manchester (Mancunium), Doncaster (Danum), Wroxeter (Viroconium), Lichfield (Letocetum), Gloucester (Glevum), Cirencester (Corinium), Colchester (Camulodunum), London, Reculver, Richborough (Rutupiae), Dover, Lymne, Isle of Wight, Dorchester (Durnovaria), Sarum, Exeter (Isca), Brancaster (Branodunum), Thanet.

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    0
  • Of these, excluding Welsh ones, we may with some certainty identify Canterbury (Caint), Caerleonon-Usk, Leicester (Lerion), Penzelwood, Carlisle, Colchester, Grantchester (Granth), London, Worcester (Guveirangon), Doncaster (Daun), Wroxeter (Guoricon), Chester (Legion - this is Roman), Lichfield (Licitcsith) and Gloucester (Gloui).

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  • The following are suffragan or assistant bishoprics (the names of the dioceses to which each belongs being given in brackets): Dover, Croydon (Canterbury), Beverley, Hull, Sheffield (York), Stepney, Islington, Kensington (London), Jarrow (Durham), Guildford, Southampton, Dorking (Winchester), Barrow-inFurness (Carlisle), Crediton (Exeter), Grantham (Lincoln), Burnley (Manchester), Thetford, Ipswich (Norwich), Reading (Oxford), Leicester (Peterborough), Richmond, Knaresborough (Ripon), Colchester, Barking (St Albans), Swansea (St.

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    0
  • Among shell-fish, crabs and oysters are taken principally off the east coast; the oyster beds in the shallow water off the north Kent and Essex coasts, as at Whitstable and Colchester, being famous.

    0
    0
  • The Britons burnt the Roman municipalities of Verulam and Colchester, the mart of London, and several military posts, massacred "over 70,000" Romans and Britons friendly to Rome, and almost annihilated the Ninth Legion marching from Lincoln to the rescue.

    0
    0
  • G.) 11VERS, [[Richard Savage, 4th Earl]] (c. 1660-1712), was the second son of Thomas, 3rd earl; and after the death about 1680 of his elder brother Thomas, styled Viscount Colchester, he was designated by that title until he succeeded to the peerage.

    0
    0
  • After becoming Lord Colchester on his brother's death he entered parliament as member for Wigan in 1681 and procured a commission in the Horseguards under Sarsfield in 1686.

    0
    0
  • the border of modern Northamptonshire), submitted to Edward and at the same time Colchester was fortified; a large portion of Essex submitted and the whole of the East Anglian Danes came in.

    0
    0
  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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    0
  • But Alfred was not to see the happy day when York and Lincoln, Colchester and Leicester, were to become mere shire-capitals in the realm of United England.

    0
    0
  • In 1155 the manor was granted to the abbey of St John of Colchester, later to Cardinal Wolsey, and on his disgrace, to Thomas Howard, duke of Norfolk, to whom Elizabeth in 1567 granted a market on Saturday.

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  • Colchester still uses the symbol of the Sea Holly to celebrate a quondam source of its wealth.

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  • Port Vale, MK Dons, Colchester and Blackpool are unfancied 40-1 shots, with Chesterfield rank outsiders at 66-1.

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  • Similarly, a slight shortening of the route past Colchester meant moving markers toward the west from Manningtree to Harwich.

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  • Against a hot wall, where nothing else would grow, Dr Acland, of the Grammar School, Colchester, planted some, and they gave a beautiful bloom.

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  • Originally called Seymour, the band were formed in Colchester, Essex in 1989.

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