Coke sentence example

coke
  • He set a glass of Coke on the counter before her.
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  • "It's just a Coke," Fitzgerald lied, adding, "if it's any of your business."
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  • The bituminous coal of West Virginia is a particularly good coking coal, and in 1905, 1906, 1907 and 1908 West Virginia ranked second (to Pennsylvania) among the states of the Union in the amount of coke manufactured; the Flat Top district is the principal cokemaking region.
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  • In Jefferson county there were in 1900 more than 300 mining and manufacturing establishments, engaged, chiefly, in the production of iron, coal and coke, and a majority of these are in Birmingham and its suburban towns.
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  • It is cleaner than coke and is said to FIG.
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  • The demand for coke is due to the rapidly growing iron and steel industry.
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  • Sean brought her a bowl of thick beef stew, soda bread, and a Coke.
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  • The charge was distilled almost to dryness, though the operation was not carried far enough to cause the residue to " coke."
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  • We find the records of it in the second volume of Marsden's Select Pleas in the Court of Admiralty, and in Lord Coke's writings: Reports, part xiii.
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  • It is due to the memory of the judges of Lord Coke's time to say that, at any rate as regards contracts made in partibus transmarinis, the same rule appears to have been applied at least as early as 1544, the judges then holding that "for actions transitory abroad action may lie at common law."
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  • In 1668 was published his Aurum reginae or Records concerning Queen-gold, the Brief Animadversions on Coke's Institutes in 1669, and the History of King John, Henry III.
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  • The most common varieties met with are lampblack, gas carbon, wood charcoal, animal charcoal and coke.
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  • Trinidad is in a coal and coke and stock-raising region, and alfalfa, frijole and sugar beets are produced in large quantities in the surrounding region, much of which is irrigated.
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  • The manufacture of steel, though in its infancy, gave promise of equalling that of iron, and the coke industry is also of growing importance, the product of Alabama during the five years from 1896 to 1901 showing a greater increase, relatively, than that of the other states.
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  • The chief local industries are tanning and the manufacture of petroleum drums. The opening, in 1895, of the railway to Bucharest, which crosses the Danube by a bridge at Cerna Voda, brought Constantza a considerable transit trade in grain and petroleum, which are largely exported; coal and coke head the list of imports, followed by machinery, iron goods, and cotton and woollen fabrics.
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  • Coal and coke are largely exported, and corn, timber and esparto grass are imported.
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  • The burden of superintending these missions and providing funds for their support rested on Dr Coke, who took his place as the missionary bishop of Methodism.
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  • The Centenary of the Missionary Society falls in 1913, but Methodist Missions really date from 1786 when Dr Coke landed at Antigua.
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  • So long as charcoal only was used in the furnaces (until about 1840) and during the brief period in which this was replaced largely by anthracite, the industry was of chief importance in the eastern section, but with the gradual increase in the use of bituminous coal, or of coke made from it, the industry moved westward, where, especially in the Pittsburg district, it received a new impetus by The introduction of iron ore from the Lake Superior region.
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  • The manufacture of great quantities of coke has resulted from the demand for this product in the iron and steel industry and from the abundance of coking coal; the manufacture of glass has been promoted by the supply of glass sand and natural gas in the west of the state; the manufacture of leather by the abundance of hemlock bark; the manufacture of pottery, terra-cotta and fire-clay products by the abundance of raw material; the manufacture of silk and silk goods by the large number of women and girls who came into the state in families of which the men and boys were employed in mining and picking anthracite coal; and in each of these industries as well as in a few others the state has for many years produced a large portion of the country's product.
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  • The silk and cement industries are confined largely to the eastern cities and boroughs; the coke, tin and terne-plate, and pickling industries to the western; and the construction and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, Chambersburg, Butler and Philadelphia.
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  • 10 It is a maxim of the law indeed that, as Coke says, " the knight is by creation and not by descent," and, although we hear of such designations as the " knight of Kerry " or the " knight of Glin," they are no more than traditional nicknames, and do not by any means imply that the persons to whom they are applied are knights in a legitimate sense.
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  • In 1814 the Wesleyan Missionary Society was formed, Methodist effort of this kind having previously been left to the individual enterprise of Dr Thomas Coke.
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  • It is important that the ventilation should be as efficient as practicable, especially where coke fuel is to be used.
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  • Where coke or ordinary hard coal are used, the removal of clinkers should be done systematically, and the fires stirred.
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  • They require more draught than coke fires, but care must be taken not to give too much, as excessive heat is likely to melt or soften the fire-bars.
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  • Coal and coke are largely exported to London and Hull.
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  • It was then, in 1735, that Abraham Darby showed how to make cast iron with coke in the high furnace, which by this time had become a veritable blast furnace.
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  • Impurities.-The properties of iron and steel, like those of most of the metals, are profoundly influenced by the presence of small and sometimes extremely small quantities of certain impurities, of which the most important are phosphorus and sulphur, the former derived chiefly from apatite (phosphate of lime) and other minerals which accompany the iron ore itself, the latter from the pyrite found not only in most iron ores but in nearly all coal and coke.
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  • These two things are done simultaneously by heating and melting the ore in contact with coke, charcoal or anthracite, in the iron blast furnace, from which issue intermittently two molten streams, the iron now deoxidized and incidentally carburized by the fuel with which it has been in contact, and the mineral matter, now called " slag."
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  • 7 and 8, of a solid column of lumps of fuel, ore and limestone, which are charged through a hopper at the top, and descend slowly as the lower end of the column is eaten off through the burning away of its coke by means of very hot air or " blast " blown through '?
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  • Interpenetrating this descending column of solid ore, limestone and coke, there is an upward rushing column of hot gases, the atmospheric nitrogen of the blast from the tuyeres, and the FIG.
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  • Hence from this level down the only solid matter is the coke, in lumps which are burning rapidly and hence shrinking, while between them the molten iron and slag trickle, somewhat as sketched in fig.
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  • Below this level the solid charge descends easily, because it consists of coke alone or nearly alone, and this in turn because the temperature here is so high as to melt not only the iron now deoxidized and brought to the metallic state, but also the gangue of the ore and the limestone, which here unite to form the molten slag, and run freely down between the lumps of coke.
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  • This coke descends freely even through this fast-narrowing space, because it is perfectly solid and dry without a trace of pastiness.
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  • In limiting the diameter at the tuyeres to 122 ft., the height of the boshes to one which will keep their upper end below the region of pastiness, and their slope to one over which the burning coke will descend freely, we limit the width of the furnace at the top of the boshes and thus complete the outline of the lower part of the furnace.
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  • There are some very evident disadvantages of excessive height; for instance, that the weight of an excessively high column of solid coke, ore and limestone tends to crush the coke and jam the charge in the lower and narrowing part of the furnace, and that the frictional resistance of a long column calls for a greater consumption of power for driving the blast up through it.
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  • Conceive these gases passing at this great velocity through the narrow openings between the adjoining lumps of coke and ore.
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  • Now the heat developed by the combustion of coke to carbonic oxide with cold air containing the usual quantity of moisture, develops a temperature only slightly above this critical point; and it is only the heat represented by this narrow temperature-margin that is available for doing this critical work of fusion and deoxidation.
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  • If by pre-heating the blast we add to the sum of the heat available; or if by drying it we subtract from the work to be done by that heat the quantity needed for decomposing the atmospheric moisture; or if by removing part of its nitrogen we lessen the mass over which the heat developed has to be spread - if by any of these means we raise the temperature developed by the combustion of the coke, it is clear that we increase the proportion of the total heat which is available for this critical work in exactly the way in which we should increase the proportion of the water of a stream, initially too in.
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  • In this process molten pig iron with much silicon but little sulphur has its silicon oxidized to silica and thus slagged off, by means of a blast of air playing on the iron through a blanket of burning coke which covers it.
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  • The coke thus at once supplies by its combustion the heat needed for melting the iron and keeping it hot, and by itself dissolving in the molten metal returns carbon to it as fast as this element is burnt out by the blast, so that the " refined " cast iron which results, though still rich in carbon and therefore easy to melt in the puddling process, has relatively little silicon.
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  • In carrying out the acid Bessemer process, the converter, preheated to about 1200 0 C. by burning coke in it, is turned into the position shown in fig.
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  • Another way of introducing the carbon is Darby's process of throwing large paper bags filled with anthracite, coke or gas-carbon into the casting ladle as the molten steel is pouring into it.
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  • Next comes the deoxidizing and desulphurizing stage, of which the first step is to throw some strongly deoxidizing substance, such as coke or ferro-silicon, upon the molten metal, in order to remove thus the chief part of the oxygen which it has taken up during the oxidation of the phosphorus in the preceding stage.
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  • But this ancient furnace does its fourfold work of deoxidizing, melting, removing the gangue and desulphurizing, so very economically that it is not likely to be driven out in other places until the exhaustion of our coal-fields shall have gone so far as to increase the cost of coke greatly.
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  • The blast of air forced in through the tuyeres near the bottom of the furnace burns the coke there, and the intense heat thus caused melts away the surrounding iron, so that this column of coke and iron gradually descends; but it is kept at its full height by feeding more coke and iron at its top, until all the iron needed for the day's work has thus been charged.
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  • Of the two the cupola is very much the more economical of fuel, thanks to the direct transfer of„ heat from the burning coke to the pig iron with which it is in contact.
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  • But this contact both causes the iron to absorb sulphur from the coke to its great harm, and prevents it from having any large part of its carbon burnt away, which in many cases would improve it very greatly by strengthening it.
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  • - Cast iron naturally has a high carbon-content, usually between 3 and 4%, because while molten it absorbs carbon greedily from the coke with which it is in contact in the iron blast furnace in which it is made, and in the cupola furnace in which it is remelted for making most castings.
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  • " Anthracite " here includes iron made with anthracite and coke mixed, " Bituminous " includes iron made with coke, with raw bituminous coal, or with both, and " Charcoal " in 1900 and 1907 includes iron made either with charcoal alone or with charcoal mixed with coke.
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  • Connellsville is the centre of the Connellsville coke district (in Fayette and Westmoreland counties), which has the largest production in the United States, the output in 1907 (13,089,427 tons) being 32.1% of that of the whole country.
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  • Connellsville coke is the standard grade.
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  • What is called the Lower Connellsville coke region lies in Fayette county S.W.
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  • It is richest near Uniontown, and in 1907 produced 6,310,900 tons of coke, making it second only to Connellsville.
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  • The socalled Upper Connellsville (or Latrobe) district, near Latrobe, produced in 1907, 1,030, 260 tons of coke.
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  • The exports of greatest value are textiles, lace, coal, coke, briquettes, glass, machinery, railway material and fire arms.
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  • While the prisoner defended himself with the calmest dignity and self-possession, Coke burst into the bitterest invective, brutally addressing the great courtier as if he had been a servant, in the phrase, long remembered for its insolence and its utter injustice - "Thou hast an English face, but a 'Spanish heart!"
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  • In 1582 Coke married the daughter of John Paston, a gentleman of Suffolk, receiving with her a fortune of £30,000; but in six months he was left a widower.
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  • Bacon was again his rival, and again unsuccessfully; the wealthy young widow became - not, it is said, to his future comfort - Coke's second wife.
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  • In 1606 Coke was made chief justice of the common pleas, but in 1613 he was removed to the office of chief justice of the king's bench, which gave him less opportunity of interfering with the court.
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  • The change, though it brought promotion in dignity, caused a diminution of income as well as of power; but Coke received some compensation in being appointed a member of the privy council.
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  • Coke declared such conference to be illegal, and refused to give an opinion, except in writing, and even then he seems to have said nothing decided.
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  • A trial was held before Coke in which one of the counsel denied the validity of a grant made by the king to the bishop of Lichfield of a benefice to be held in commendam.
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  • At Coke's request Bacon sent a letter containing the same command to each of the judges, and Coke then obtained their signatures to a paper declaring that the attorney-general's instructions were illegal, and that they were bound to proceed with the case.
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  • Upon this all the judges fell on their knees, seeking pardon for the form of their letter; but Coke ventured to declare his continued belief in the loyalty of its substance, and when asked if he would in the future delay a case at the king's order, the only reply he would vouchsafe was that he would do what became him as a judge.
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  • Coke did not suffer these losses with patience.
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  • But Coke discovered her hiding-place; and she was forced to wed the man whom she declared that of all others she abhorred.
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  • It is said, however, that after his daughter's public penance in the Savoy church, Coke had heart enough to receive her back to the home which he had forced her to leave.
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  • Coke was again a member.
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  • Coke published Institutes (1628), of which the first is also known as Coke upon Littleton; Reports (1600-1615), in thirteen parts; A Treatise of Bail and AI ainprize (1635); The Complete Copyholder (1630); A Reading on Fines and Recoveries (1684).
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  • Woolrych, The Life of Sir Edward Coke (1826); Foss, Lives of the Judges; Campbell, Lives of the Chief Justices; also English Law.
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  • At the bottom of the kiln is a grate of iron bars, and on this wood and coke are piled to start the fire.
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  • A layer of dried slurry is loaded on this, then a layer of coke, then a layer of slurry, and so on until the kiln is filled with coke and slurry evenly distributed.
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  • An ordinary kiln, which will contain about 50 tons of slurry and 12 tons of coke, will take two days to get fairly alight, and will be another two or three days in burning out.
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  • On the continent of Europe, where the last-named requirement has been for a long time more urgent than in Great Britain, another system has been generally preferred, namely, passing the gas through a long series of stoneware receivers, and ultimately through a small tower packed with stoneware or coke, making the acid flow in the opposite direction to the gas.
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  • This is usually effected either by forcing lime-kiln gas through the liquor, contained in a closed iron vessel, or by passing the gases through an iron tower filled with coke or other materials, suitable for subdividing the stream of the gases and that of the vat-liquor which trickles down in the tower.
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  • This is employed in the shape of lime-kiln gases, obtained in a comparatively pure and strong form (up to 33% CO 2), in very large kilns, charged with limestone and coke.
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  • The seams of the lower series are the best, and some of these at Sanktoria, near the Barakar river, are fairly good for coke and gas.
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  • This rich matte is then mixed with coke and salt-cake and melted down in an open hearth furnace.
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  • About one-fifth of the total product is made into coke, the output of which increased from 245,746 tons in 1890 to 1,421,579 tons (including a slight amount from Utah) in 1907; in 1907 the coke manufactured in Colorado (and Utah) was valued at 4,747,436.
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  • Colorado holds the same supremacy for coal and coke west of the Mississippi that Pennsylvania holds for the country as a whole.
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  • Of the other products, iron and steel ($6,108,295), flouring and grist-mill products ($4,528,062), foundry and machine-shop products ($3,986,985), steam railway repair and construction work ($3,141,602), printing and publishing, wholesale slaughtering and meat packing, malt liquors, lumber and timber, and coke were the most important.
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  • Of the total product in 1905 more than four-fifths were represented by the smelting of lead, copper and zinc ores, the manufacture of iron and steel, the production of coke, and the refining of petroleum.
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  • Much of the coal is suitable for coke, of which a considerable amount is manufactured.
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  • In March 1594 it was at last understood that Coke was to be attorney-general.
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  • Coke, who was principal spokesman, managed the case with great want of skill, incessantly allowing the thread of the evidence to escape, and giving the prisoners opportunity to indulge in irrelevant justifications and protestations which were not ineffectual in distracting attention from the real question at issue.
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  • The death of Sir Thomas Fleming made a vacancy in the chief justiceship of the king's bench, and Bacon, after some deliberation, proposed to the king that Coke should be removed from his place in the court of comman pleas and transferred to the king's bench.
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  • The vacancy caused by Coke's promotion was then filled up by Hobart, and Bacon, finally, stepped into the place of attorney-general.
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  • It may be reasonably inferred that his motive for this was the suspicion, or it may be the knowledge, that Coke did not consider the matter treasonable.
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  • At all events when Coke, who as a councillor already knew the facts of the case, was consulted regarding the new proposal of the king, he at once objected to it, saying that " this particular and auricular taking of opinions " was " new and dangerous," and " not according to the custom of the realm."
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  • It is clear that the extraneous influence to be feared was Coke, who, on being addressed by Bacon, again objected to giving his opinion separately, and even seemed to hope that his brother judges after they had seen the papers would withdraw their assent to giving their decisions privately.
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  • What the other judges thought is not definitely known, but Bacon appears to have been unable to put in operation the plan he had devised for swaying Coke's judgment,' or if he did attempt it, he was unsuccessful, for Coke finally gave an opinion consistent with what he seems to have held at first, that the book was not treasonable, as it did not disable the king's title.
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  • If any blame attaches to him, it must arise either from his endeavour to force Coke to a favourable decision, in which he was in all probability prompted by a feeling, not uncommon with him, that a matter of state policy was in danger of being sacrificed to some senseless legal quibble or precedent, or from his advice to the king that a rumour should be set afloat which was not strictly true.
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  • Meanwhile, his great rival Coke, whose constant tendency to limit the prerogative by law and precedent had made him an object of particular dislike to James, had on two points come into open collision with the king's rights.
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  • With all his learning and ingenuity Coke failed in inducing or even forcing the jury to bring in a bill against the court of chancery, and it seems fairly certain that on the technical point of law involved he was wrong.
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  • Bacon communicated first with Coke, who in reply desired that similar notice should be given to the other judges.
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  • The judges, at the conclusion of his speech, fell on their knees, and implored pardon for the manner of their letter; but Coke attempted to justify the matter contained in it, saying that the delay required by his majesty was contrary to law.
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  • To this all gave assent except Coke, who said that " when the case should be, he would do that should be fit for a judge to do."
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  • Coke certainly stands out in a better light, not so much for his answer, which was rather indefinite, and the force of which is much weakened by his assent to the second question of the king, but for the general spirit of resistance to encroachment exhibited by him.
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  • Coke was in disgrace but not in despair; there seemed to be a way whereby he could reconcile himself to Buckingham, through the marriage of his daughter, who had an ample fortune, to Sir John Villiers, brother of the marquess, who was penniless or nearly so.
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  • This proposal, though pressed by Coke, was allowed to drop; while the king and Buckingham, acting under the advice of Williams, afterwards lord keeper, agreed to give up the monopolies.
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  • Some illegal practices of certain chancery officials had been detected and punished by the court itself, and generally there was a disposition to overhaul its affairs, while Coke and Lionel Cranfield, earl of Middlesex (1575-1645) directly attacked some parts of the chancellor's administration.
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  • " I am in good hope," said Bacon himself, "that when Sir Edward Coke's reports and my rules and decisions shall come to posterity, there will be (whatsoever is now thought) question who was the greater lawyer."
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  • If Coke's reports show completer mastery of technical details, greater knowledge of precedent, and more of the dogged grasp of the letter than do Bacon's legal writings, there can be no dispute that the latter exhibit an infinitely more comprehensive intelligence of the abstract principles of jurisprudence, with a richness and ethical fulness that more than compensate for their lack of dry legal detail.
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  • The coarse-metal is now smelted, with coke and siliceous fluxes (in order to slag off the iron), and the product, consisting of an impure copper sulphide, is variously known as " blue-metal," when more or less iron is still present, " pimplemetal," when free copper and more or less copper oxide is present, or " fine " or " white-metal," which is a fairly pure copper sulphide, containing about 75% of the metal.
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  • It is made up of the following operations: (z) calcination, (2) smelting in blast-furnaces to form the matte, (3) roasting the matte, (4) smelting in blast-furnaces with coke and fluxes to " black- " or " coarse-metal," (5) refining the coarse-metal.
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  • In reverberatory furnaces it is smelted by fuel in a fireplace, separate from the ore, and in cupolas the fuel, generally coke, is in direct contact with the ore.
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  • At Tilt Cove, Newfoundland, the Cape Copper Company smelted copper ore, with just the proper proportion of sulphur, iron and silica, successfully without any fuel, when once the initial charge had been fused with coke.
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  • Austin, of Denver, Colorado, and both at Leadville and Silverton raw ores are successfully smelted with as low a fuel consumption as 3 of coke to zoo of charge.
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  • This conversion is effected by allowing the ferrous chloride liquors slowly to descend a tower, filled with pieces of wood, coke or quartz, where it meets an ascending current of chlorine.
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  • The phosphide obtained by heating cupric phosphate, Cu 2 H 2 P 2 O 81 in hydrogen, when mixed with potassium and cuprous sulphides or levigated coke, constitutes " Abel's fuse," which is used as a primer.
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  • The tonnage of coke and patent fuel is included in the totals: The chief receiving countries are, in order, Germany, France, Italy, Sweden, Spain, Russian Empire, Denmark, Egypt, Holland, Argentina, Norway and Brazil.
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  • The principal imports with percentage to the whole are: coal and coke 15, grain 8, coffee 4.6, machinery 4, wool, yarn, thread, cotton and woollen goods 9'4; hides and skins 2.5.
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  • The city exports coal, wool, coke, horses, cattle, frozen meat, silver, lead, copper, tallow, hides and country produce.
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  • Gold-dredging is a rich industry, and the coal-mines have attendant industries in coke, bricks and fire-clay.
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  • The total exports (foreign and coastwise) from Swansea during 1907 amounted to 4,825,898 tons, of which coal and coke made up 3, 6 55, 0 5 0 tons; patent fuel, 679,002 tons; tin, terne and black plates, 348,240 tons; liron and steel and their manufactures, 38,438 tons; various chemicals (mostly the by-products of the metal industries), 37,100 tons; copper, zinc and silver, 22,633 tons.
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  • Sir Edward Coke was returned for this borough in 1620, and Edward Gibbon the historian in 1774.
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  • The railways have a heavy tonnage of coal, coke and iron and steel products, and a large portion of the iron ore that is produced in the Lake Superior region is brought to Pittsburg.
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  • Coke, cut cork, rolled brass and copper were other important products in 1905.
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  • This gas is now passed through the Gay-Lussac tower, which somewhat resembles the Glover tower, but is usually filled with coke, over which sulphuric acid of about 80% H2504 trickles down in sufficient quantity to retain the nitrous vapours.
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  • "packing" the towers have been rendered more durable, and in the case of the Gay-Lussac tower the loss of nitre has been diminished by avoiding the use of a coke packing, which acts upon that substance as a reducing agent.
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  • The courts of common law from Lord Coke's time downwards have recognized this " constitution of the pope " (as the queen's bench called it in 1598).
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  • Representatives from the four counties were accordingly called before the privy council, where Sir Edward Coke defended the action of the king, quoted the Tudor precedents and urged that the act of 1484 was to prevent exactions, not voluntary gifts such as James had requested.
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  • The justice-seat is the court of the chief justice in eyre, who, says Coke, "is commonly a man of greater dignity than knowledge of the laws of the forests; and therefore where justice-seats are to be held some other persons whom the king shall appoint are associated with him, who together are to determine omnia placita forestae."
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  • During these years the luke of Bedford, Coke of Nor~olk, and Robert Bakewell were busy in the improvement of stock and agriculture.
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  • This application was opposed by Murdoch on the ground of his priority in invention, and the bill was thrown out, but coming to parliament for a second time in 1810, Winsor succeeded in getting it passed in a very much curtailed form, and, a charter being granted later in 181 2, the company was called the Chartered Gas Light and Coke Company, and was the direct forerunner of the present London Gas Light and Coke Company.
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  • The following table will give an approximate idea of the proportions which go to each Nitrogen as ammonia cyanogen in gas and combined in tar in coke .
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  • They may be divided into - (a) Solids, such as the coke and retort carbon; (b) liquids, consisting of the tar and ammoniacal liquor; and (c) gases, consisting of the unpurified `coal gas.
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  • The chief solid residue, coke, is not absolutely pure carbon, as it contains the mineral non-volatile constituents which remain behind as ash when the original coal is burnt, and which, to a Solid great extent, existed in the sap that filled the cells of the plant from which the coal was formed.
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  • This method of firing results in the saving of about one-third the weight of coke used in the old form of furnace per ton of coal carbonized, and enables higher temperatures to be obtained, the heat being also more equally distributed.
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  • The furnace A is built of fire-brick, coke is charged at the top through the iron door B, and near the bottom are placed fire bars C, upon which the fuel lies.
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  • Formerly it was the practice to carry out such operations entirely by hand, men charging the retorts either by means of shovel or hand-scoop, and the coke produced being withdrawn with hand rakes.
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  • For the purpose of discharging the coke from the retort either compressed air or hydraulic machinery is employed, a rake being made to enter the retort and withdraw the coke on returning.
    0
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  • With this method it is necessary that the rake should enter and discharge several times before the retort is clear, and thus the use of a telescopic ram worked by hydraulic power, which pushes the coke before it and discharges it at the other end, is an advantage.
    0
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  • The object aimed at in thus setting retorts is to allow gravity to play the part of charging and discharging the coal and coke, the retorts being inclined at an angle to suit the slip of the class of coal used; this angle is between 28° and 34°.
    0
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  • For the withdrawal of the residual coke at the end of the carbonization, the lower mouthpiece door is opened, the barrier removed and the coke in the lower part of the retort is "` tickled" or gently stirred with an iron rod to overcome a slight adhesion to the retort; the entire mass then readily discharges itself.
    0
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  • Guides are placed in front of the retort to direct its course to the coke hoppers or conveyer below, and to prevent scattering of the hot material.
    0
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  • The vertical retort was one of the first forms experimented with by Murdoch, but owing to the difficulty of withdrawing the coke, the low illuminating power of the gas made in it, and the damage to the retort itself, due to the swelling of the charge during distillation, it was quickly abandoned.
    0
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  • The cause of the failure of Murdoch's original vertical retort was undoubtedly that it was completely filled with coal during charging, with the result that the gas liberated from the lower portions of the retort had to pass through a deep bed of red-hot coke, which, by over-baking the gas, destroyed the illuminating hydrocarbons.
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  • There is no doubt that the question of rapidly removing the gas, as soon as it is properly formed, from the influence of the highly-heated walls of the retort and residual coke, is one of the most important in gas manufacture.
    0
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  • Inclined, , 584 Horizontal „ 570 Of the existing forms of vertical retort it remains a matter to be decided whether the coal should be charged in bulk to the retort or whether it should be introduced in small quantities at regular and short intervals; by this latter means (the characteristic feature of the Settle-Padfield process) a continuous layer of coal is in process of carbcnization on the top, whilst the gas escapes without contact with the mass of red-hot coke, a considerable increase in volume and value in the gas and a much denser coke being the result.
    0
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  • Apart from the by-products coke, coke-breeze, tar and retort carbon, which are sold direct, gas companies are now in many cases preparing from their spent purifying material pure chemical products which are in great demand.
    0
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  • For many years the price of benzol has been falling, owing to the large quantities produced in meat arlch by the coke ovens, and at its present price it is by far the volatile cheapest enriching material that can be obtained.
    0
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  • Coke or anthracite is heated to incandescence by an air blast in a generator lined with fire-brick, and the heated products of combustion as they leave the generator and enter the superheaters are supplied with more air, which causes the combustion of carbon monoxide present in the producer gas and heats up the fire-brick baffles with which the superheater is filled.
    0
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  • The retort E is charged with ordinary bituminous coal which is submitted to destructive distillation by the heat communicated through the flues n 2 n 2, and is thus converted into coke.
    0
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  • From time to time, as the level of the coke in V goes down, some of the freshly formed coke in E is FIG.
    0
    0
  • The fuel employed should be non-bituminous coal anthracite or coke, or at least so much of these materials should be mixed with ordinary coal that no semi-solid cakes of the kind just described are formed.
    0
    0
  • 14 and 15 show Liegel's producer, the special object of which is to deal with any fuel (coal or coke) giving a tough, pasty slag on combustion.
    0
    0
  • Ioo parts coke (of 7000 calories) furnish 4 2% of their heat value as water-gas and 42% as Siemens gas.
    0
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  • Parson imparsonee (persona impersonata) is he that as rector is in possession of a church parochial, and of whom the church is full, whether it be presentative or impropriate (Coke upon Littleton, 300 b).
    0
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  • The Gaslight and Coke Company's works at Beckton are in the parish, and also extensive rubber works.
    0
    0
  • Industrial interests alone benefited, and imported more raw materials, chemicals, and coal and coke, which naturally influenced the exchanges adversely.
    0
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  • He is said to have been imported into England from France by Mr Coke, where, as the editor of the Stud-Book was informed by a French gentlemen, he was so little thought of that he had actually drawn a cart in the streets of Paris.
    0
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  • Mr Coke gave him to a Mr. Williams, who in his turn presented him to the earl of Godolphin.
    0
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  • In 1731, being then the property of Mr. Coke, he was teazer to Hobgoblin, and on the latter refusing his services to Roxana, the mare was put to the Godolphin, and the produce was Lath (1732), the first of his get, and the most celebrated race-horse of his day after Flying Childers.
    0
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  • There are about 50o coke ovens in operation at Fernie, which supply most of the smelting plants in southern British Columbia with fuel.
    0
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  • The coal is of the soft or " bituminous " kind, generally of excellent quality, and much of it suitable for conversion into gas and coke, of which latter 468,092 long tons were produced in 1905.
    0
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  • Among the other important manufacturing industries of the state and the value of their products in 1905 are: men's clothing, $2,961,581; patent medicines, $2,680,610; cotton-seed oil and oil cake, $3,743,927 tobacco, $404,241; artificial ice, $727,263; agricultural implements, $768,895; and coke, $809,801.
    0
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  • The prisoners are kept at labour principally in the state coal-mines, in manufacturing coke, on farms, or at contract labour within the prison walls; not more than 199 prisoners are to be leased to any one firm or corporation, or to be employed in any one business within the walls.
    0
    0
  • Among such substances are fireclay and firebricks, certain sandstones, silica in the form of ganister, and Dinas stone and bricks, ferric oxide and alumina, carbon (as coke and graphite), magnesia, lime and chromium oxide - their relative importance being indicated by their order, the last two or three indeed being only of limited use.
    0
    0
  • Coke dust or graphite is used for the same purpose in crucible making (see Firebrick).
    0
    0
  • Small air-furnaces with hot plates or sand bath flues were formerly much employed in chemical laboratories, as well as small blast furnaces for crucibles heated with charcoal or coke.
    0
    0
  • I was almost glad I was driving, except I had an aftertaste of cleaning fluid in my coke.
    0
    0
  • It burns anthracite or coke and will perform well with modern smokeless fuels.
    0
    0
  • One's just ordered a cappuccino, another's got a coke and a few others have bottles of Smirnoff Ice.
    0
    0
  • Vessels carrying coke cargoes take a considerable deck cargo tonnage in addition to full holds.
    0
    0
  • During the memorial scene Naomi Watts snorts coke in the bathroom.
    0
    0
  • I won't drink diet coke, or eat a rice cake.
    0
    0
  • In the old days, not so long ago, a lot of people used to burn coke on their fires.
    0
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  • However, you simply cannot just " click X to buy coke!
    0
    0
  • And no, Cheeky Chester, I don't like vanilla coke, thanks for asking.
    0
    0
  • To be successful, Coca-Cola sells more coke, Corus more steel.
    0
    0
  • After a while I would wake up in the night and stuff myself full of chocolate and bread and cherry coke and biscuits.
    0
    0
  • Probably even longer after I've drank this pint of ice cold coke sitting right next to me here.
    0
    0
  • And its refreshing, whereas normal coke makes me more thirsty.
    0
    0
  • There are a large number of coke ovens, which convert about half the output into coke ovens, which convert about half the output into coke.
    0
    0
  • As for coke zero, it's coke zero, it's coke light under a different guise.
    0
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  • Can anyone tell us how the petroleum coke formerly delivered by rail gets from the ship to the works?
    0
    0
  • Go and sit in a comfy chair, drink coke and watch soap operas on TV!
    0
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  • Left: Cwm colliery picture in 1977 cwm colliery picture in 1977 Cwm coke works opened in 1958.
    0
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  • Sir John Danvers carried to the Lords for their Concurrence, the Ordinance for pardoning the delinquency of Mr. Coke.
    0
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  • The combination of these events left CMU Coke lovers sufficiently disgruntled that no one has bothered to wire up the new machine.
    0
    0
  • The coke (essentially impure carbon) burns in the blast of hot air to form carbon dioxide - a strongly exothermic reaction.
    0
    0
  • Hasn't Fox modeled himself on self-confessed former coke fiend George W Bush...?
    0
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  • Well, I'm usually a rum and coke fan, but maybe I'm feeling a bit more flighty this evening.
    0
    0
  • A coke furnace was kept burning 24 hours a day to draw a continuous flow of air through the sewer.
    0
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  • Never refill coke or drink bottles with chemical substances as these can be mistaken for drink and accidentally ingested.
    0
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  • Then I washed them down with 2 cans of coke, and ate some jelly beans.
    0
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  • Here is produced the well known " Pease's West " coke.
    0
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  • He blew the whistle and Meegan moved onto the side next to the coke ovens.
    0
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  • Failing that, Diet Coke (' Un Coca Lite, s'il vous plait ' ).
    0
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  • The most popular form of coke is a white crystalline powder.
    0
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  • Yet, for 12 years we have been allowed to carry on whatever liquids we wanted, ranging from nail varnish remover to Coke.
    0
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  • At first in the shop I thought Coke had just repackaged Diet Coke.
    0
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  • The scrubber is fitted with substantial cast-iron doors. having machined faces, through which cleaning or charging of the coke scrubber may be effected.
    0
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  • On view is the original Darby furnace where he first used his coke fired iron smelter.
    0
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  • My group chose to buy alphabet spaghetti, pasta sauce and cans of coke.
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  • Our current housemaster of Coke House, Mr Gordon Cardew, also retires this summer.
    0
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  • Then, after a few swigs of diet coke, I set to work.
    0
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  • More efficient is the Gill kiln which uses coke as a fuel.
    0
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  • In the latter half of the century another Norfolk farmer, Thomas William Coke of Holkham, earl of Leicester, 1.13 a (1752-1842), figures as a pioneer of high-farming.
    0
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  • In this latter passage Lord Coke records how, notwithstanding an agreement asserted to have been made in 1575 between the justices of the King's Bench and the judge of the admiralty, the judges of the common law courts successfully maintained their right to prohibit suits in admiralty upon contracts made on shore, or within havens, or creeks, or tidal rivers, if the waters were within the body of any county, wheresoever such contracts were broken, for torts committed within the body of a county, whether on land or water, and for contracts made in parts beyond the seas.
    0
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  • As a matter of experience, it is found that caking coals lose that property when exposed to the action of the air for a lengthened period, or by heating to about 300° C., and that the dust or slack of non-caking coal may, in some instances, be converted into a coherent coke by exposing it suddenly to a very high temperature, or compressing it strongly before charging it into the oven.
    0
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  • - Though the electric processes which have been proposed for extracting the iron from iron ore, with the purpose of displacing the iron blast furnace, have not become important enough to deserve description here, yet it should be possible to devise one which would be useful in a place (if there is one) which has an abundance of water power and iron ore and a local demand for iron, but has not coke, charcoal or bituminous coal suitable for the blast furnace.
    0
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  • The attorney-generalship had fallen vacant and Bacon became a candidate for the office, his most formidable rival being his life-long antagonist, Edward Coke, who was then solicitor.
    0
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  • He gives several reasons for this in his letter to the king, but in all probability his chief motive was that pointed out by Spedding, that in the court of king's bench there would be less danger of Coke coming into collision with the king on questions of prerogative, in handling which Bacon was always very circumspect and tender.
    0
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  • Before the introduction of coal and coke as fuel in the forges and furnaces the cutting of young trees for the manufacture of charcoal was a profitable industry, and the process of deforestation reached its maximum.
    0
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  • In modern practice degreased bones (see Gelatin), or bone-ash which has lost its virtue as a filtering medium, &c., or a mineral phosphate is treated with sufficient sulphuric acid to precipitate all the calcium, the calcium sulphate filtered off, and the filtrate concentrated, mixed with charcoal, coke or sawdust and dried in a muffle furnace.
    0
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  • In the regenerative system of firing, a mixture of carbon monoxide and nitrogen is produced by passing air through incandescent gas coke in a generator placed below the bench of retorts, and the heating value of the gases so produced is increased in most cases by the admixture of a small proportion of steam with the primary air supply, the steam being decomposed by contact with the red-hot coke in the generator into water gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen (see Fuel: Gaseous).
    0
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  • The object aimed at in thus setting retorts is to allow gravity to play the part of charging and discharging the coal and coke, the retorts being inclined at an angle to suit the slip of the class of coal used; this angle is between 28° and 34°.
    0
    0
  • Tully and now in use at Truro, in which tar is injected into the incandescent fuel in a water-gas generator and enriches the water gas with methane and other hydrocarbons, the resulting pitch and carbon being filtered off by the column of coke through which the gas passes.
    0
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  • Hundreds of people listened to speeches and danced to samba rhythms as four " waitresses " passed through the crowd offering Coke blood drinks.
    0
    0
  • Over and above these tonnages there are foreign shipments of coal, coke and pitch.
    0
    0
  • Obviously, outlawing Coke cans and tampon applicators is the next step in protecting America 's youth from the scourge of pot.
    0
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  • That way I keep hydrated and do n't get tempted to indulge in cans of coke.
    0
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  • The expanded internal railroad system was used for the transportation of coal, coke, iron ore and limestone.
    0
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  • The Jack and Coke is one of the simplest drinks to make, but men seem to love it.
    0
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  • Back in the 1950s, when Coca-Cola was served at lunch counters and made from a mixture of syrup carbonized with pressurized soda water, grenadine was the popular additive that turned a simple Coke into a Cherry Coke.
    0
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  • Coke, on the other hand, is a very pure form used in the steel industry where high temperatures are required.
    0
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  • In 1991, she made a Diet Coke commercial where she "danced" with Gene Kelly.
    0
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  • If you asked four different coca cola bottle collectors what the term antique coke bottle means to them, you most likely will get four different answers.
    0
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  • The twelfth bottle on the page is an extremely rare Hutchinson Coke with the words Coca-Cola in script.
    0
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  • There are nine basic styles of straight sided coke bottles.
    0
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  • To view examples of each of these S-S styles visit Antique Coke Bottles.
    0
    0
  • Is it safe to drink Diet Coke during pregnancy?
    0
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  • Find out how much caffeine is safe to consume and whether Diet Coke is suitable for your pregnancy diet.
    0
    0
  • Diet Coke contains aspartame and although the FDA says that it is safe to use during pregnancy, it does suggest a moderate intake of the sweetener.
    0
    0
  • It's interesting to note that Diet Coke contains more caffeine than both Diet Pepsi and Coca-Cola Classic.
    0
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  • Diet Coke contains about 47 milligrams of caffeine and professionals offer conflicting information about how much caffeine is safe.
    0
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  • Is caffeine-free Diet Coke a good alternative to consider?
    0
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  • In the South, many people call all soft drinks "Coke" even if they are ordering Dr. Pepper!
    0
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  • We tried the cola flavor and enjoyed it more than Coke or Pepsi.
    0
    0
  • Open the diet coke bottle and immediately insert a Mentos candy.
    0
    0
  • You can do this experiment with any soda, but many find diet coke preferable because it's less sticky.
    0
    0
  • According to the legend, little "Mikey" from the popular Life cereal commercials ate pop rocks and drank a large quantity of coke.
    0
    0
  • My Coke Rewards allows you to collect codes from the caps of Coke products to be redeemed for prizes such as magazine subscriptions, coupons for free video rentals, or Coke-branded merchandise.
    0
    0
  • If you're a regular drinker of Coke products, visit the My Coke Rewards Web site to redeem your points for free Blockbuster video coupons.
    0
    0
  • Coca Cola, for example, uses red and white to brand "regular" coke, while silver and red are the colors used in the branding strategy for Diet Coke.
    0
    0
  • However tha acid in a can of Coke or a lemon juice and salt solution have been proven as tarnish removers.
    0
    0
  • Log every bite of food that goes into your mouth, even if it is just a finger full of frosting, a sip of non-diet coke or a handful of potato chips.
    0
    0
  • As with the Coke vs. Pepsi argument, wearers of boxers and briefs have firm reasons for their stances.
    0
    0
  • Pennington has appeared in ads and commercials for dozens of well-known brands, including Sprite, Levi's, Diet Coke, Macy's, and Bayer.
    0
    0
  • In 1900 the Birmingham district produced six-sevenths of the total pig iron exported from the United States, and in 1902 nine-tenths of Alabama's coal, coke and pig iron; in 1905 Jefferson county produced 67.5% of the total iron and steel product of the state, and 62.5% of the pig iron produced by the state.
    2
    2
  • With another form of gas stove coke is used in place of the perforated asbestos; the fire is started with the gas, which, when the coke is well alight, may be dispensed with, and the fire kept up with coke in the usual way.
    2
    2
  • Charcoal, coke or anthracite coal are the fuels generally used in slow combustion heating stoves.
    8
    9
  • Coal, coke, &c 7,018 9,883 10,539
    3
    3
  • Vessels go to Porman to land coke and coal, and to load iron ore and lead.
    6
    6
  • Sir Edward Coke finds in Magna Carta a full and proper legal answer to every exaction of the Stuart kings, and a remedy for every evil suffered at the time.
    2
    2
  • The earliest commentator of note was Sir Edward Coke, who published his Second Institute, which deals with Magna Carta, by order of the Long Parliament in 1642.
    2
    2
  • The long hauls in the United States make it specially important that the cars should carry a load in both directions, and so bcx cars which have carried grain or merchandise one way are filled with wool, coal, coke, ore, timber and other coarse articles for the return journey.
    1
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  • Then, poor but not discouraged, he resolved to be a lawyer, and after reading Coke upon Littleton and the Virginia laws for a few weeks only, he strongly impressed one of his examiners, and was admitted to the bar at the age of twentyfour, on condition that he spend more time in study before beginning to practise.
    1
    2
  • In 1784 John Wesley, in disregard of the authority of the Established Church, took the radical step of appointing the Rev. Thomas Coke (1747-1814) and Francis Asbury superintendents or "bishops" of the church in the United States.
    1
    2
  • Dr Coke was ordained at Bristol, England, in September, and in the following December, in a conference of the churches in America at Baltimore, he ordained and consecrated Asbury, who refused to accept the position until Wesley's choice had been ratified by the conference.
    1
    2
  • The amalgamations mentioned were effected subsequently to 1860, and there are now three principal companies within the county, the Gas Light & Coke, South Metropolitan and Commercial, though certain other companies supply some of the outlying districts.
    0
    1
  • A certain proportion of soda ash (carbonate of soda) is also used in some works in sheet-glass mixtures, while " decolorizers " (substances intended to remove or reduce the colour of the glass) are also sometimes added, those most generally used being manganese dioxide and arsenic. Another essential ingredient of all glass mixtures containing sulphate of soda is some form of carbon, which is added either as coke, charcoal or anthracite coal; the carbon so introduced aids the reducing substances contained in the atmosphere of the furnace in bringing about the reduction of the sulphate of soda to a condition in which it combines more readily with the silicic acid of the sand.
    0
    1
  • A somewhat impure silicon (containing 90-98% of the element) is made by the Carborundum Company of Niagara Falls (United States Patents 745 122 and 842273, 1908) by heating coke and sand in an electric furnace.
    0
    1
  • The tendency of the later law has been to put the offence of sacrilege in the same position as if the offence had not been committed in a sacred building Thus breaking into a place of worship at night, says Coke, is burglary, for the church is the mansion house of Almighty God.
    0
    1
  • In his letters he spoke of her always as Mrs Armistead, and some of his friends - Mr Coke of Holkham, afterwards Lord Leicester, with whom he stayed every year, being one of them - would not invite her to their houses.
    1
    2
  • It is near the great mineral deposits of Virginia, Tennessee, West Virginia, Kentucky and North Carolina; an important distributing point for iron, coal and coke; and has tanneries and lumber mills, iron furnaces, tobacco factories, furniture factories and packing houses.
    0
    1
  • The property of caking or yielding a coherent coke is usually absent, and the ash is often very high.
    0
    1
  • When coal is heated to redness out of contact with the air, the more volatile constituents, water, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen are in great part expelled, a portion of the carbon being also volatilized in the form of hydro carbons and carbonic oxide,-the greater part, however, remaining behind, together with all the mineral matter or ash, in the form of coke, or, as it is also called, " fixed carbon."
    0
    1
  • The former class undergo an incipient fusion or softening when heated, so that the fragments coalesce and yield a compact coke, while the latter (also called free-burning) preserve their form, producing a coke which is only serviceable when made from large pieces of coal, the smaller pieces being incoherent and of no value.
    1
    2
  • As a matter of experience, it is found that caking coals lose that property when exposed to the action of the air for a lengthened period, or by heating to about 300° C., and that the dust or slack of non-caking coal may, in some instances, be converted into a coherent coke by exposing it suddenly to a very high temperature, or compressing it strongly before charging it into the oven.
    0
    1
  • The essence of this process is that the coke and lime are only heated to the point of combination, and are not 3 to 82 5 to 72 13 to 75 4 to 22 5 to 13 colours.
    0
    1
  • In the 'eighties he was interested in the development of the coal, coke and iron industry of Western Pennsylvania and was often associated in various enterprises with Henry C. Frick.
    1
    2
  • The principal manufactures are coke, chemicals and boots and shoes; among others are iron and structural steel.
    0
    1
  • According to the U.S. Census of Manufactures (1905), "the coke industry in Everett is unique, inasmuch as illuminating gas is the primary product and coke really a by-product, while the coal used is brought from mines located in Nova Scotia."
    0
    1
  • The former includes electrodes, lamp carbons, &c. Coke, or some other form of amorphous carbon, is mixed with a little tar, and the required article moulded in a press or by a die.
    0
    1
  • The articles are slacked transversely in a furnace, each being packed in granular coke and covered with carborundum.
    0
    1
  • The bituminous is of excellent quality for the manufacture of coke and gas, but up to 5902 had been mined only in small quantities.
    0
    1
  • But with the exception of that mined in Hopkins and Bell counties, very little is fit for making coke; in 1880 the product was 4250 tons of coke (value $12,250), in 1890, 12,343 tons ($22,191); in 1900, 95,532 tons ($235,505); in 1902, 126,879 tons ($3 1 7, 8 75), the maximum product up to 1906; and in 1907, 67,068 tons ($157,288).
    0
    1
  • Besides those already mentioned the persons of note born in the town include Henry Stafford, duke of Buckingham; Hugh Price, founder of Jesus College, Oxford; Dr Thomas Coke, the first Wesleyan missionary bishop in America; and Theophilus Jones, the historian of the county.
    0
    1
  • Slowly sip the cafe's signature chocolate cream Coke or a peanut butter cup milkshake while you take inthe view.
    5
    5
  • In 1785, at Abingdon, Maryland, he laid the corner-stone of Cokesbury College, the project of Dr Coke and the first Methodist Episcopal college in America; the college building was burned in 1795, and the college was then removed to Baltimore, where in 1796, after another fire, it closed, and in 1816 was succeeded by Asbury College, which lived for about fifteen years.
    0
    2
  • He spent his time in making chemical experiments and in speculating upon legal abuses, rather than in reading Coke upon Littleton and the Reports.
    0
    2
  • Drew continued to work at his trade till 1805, when he entered into an engagement with Dr Thomas Coke, a prominent Wesleyan official, which enabled him to devote himself entirely to literature.
    0
    2
  • Among Drew's lesser writings are a Life of Dr Thomas Coke (1817), and a work on the deity of Christ (1813).
    0
    2
  • In September 1784 Wesley ordained his clerical helper, Dr Coke, superintendent (or bishop), and instructed him to ordain Asbury as his colleague.
    0
    2
  • Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey were ordained by Wesley, Coke and Creighton to administer the sacraments in America.
    0
    2
  • His full-length of Lady Mary Coke is remarkable for the skill and delicacy with which the white satin drapery is managed; while in the portrait of his brown-eyed wife, the eldest daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Evelick, in the Scottish National Gallery, we have a sweetness and tenderness which shows the painter at his highest.
    0
    2
  • In de Lambilly's process air and steam is led over white-hot coke, and carbon dioxide or monoxide removed from the escaping gases according as ammonium formate or carbonate is wanted.
    0
    2
  • Mehner patented heating the oxides of silicon, boron or magnesium with coal or coke in an electric furnace, and then passing in nitrogen, which forms, with the metal liberated by the action of the carbon, a readily decomposable nitride.
    0
    2
  • The Rhymney railway to Cardiff was completed in 1858 and the trade of the port so vastly increased that the shipment of coal and coke went up from 4562 tons in 1839 to 1,796,000 tons in 1860.
    0
    2
  • The total exports of the Cardiff docks in 1906 amounted to 8,767,502 tons, of which 8, 433, 629 tons were coal, coke and patent fuel, 151,912 were iron and steel and their manufactures, and 181,076 tons of general merchandise.
    0
    2
  • The distillation of 1000 lb charge lasts 5-6 hours, requires 500-600 lb coke or 30 gallons reduced oil, and yields about to% metallic zinc and I% blue powder - a mixture of finely-divided metallic zinc and zinc oxide.
    0
    2
  • The bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, on the other hand, derive their orders from Thomas Coke, a presbyter of the Church of England, who in 1784 was ordained by John Wesley, assisted by two other presbyters, "superintendent" of the Methodist Society in America.
    0
    2
  • Gas-lighting was introduced on one side of Pall Mall in 1807, and in 1810 the Gas Light & Coke Company received a charter, and developed gas-lighting in Westminster.
    0
    2
  • Wasteful competition ensued until in 1857 an agreement was made between the companies to restrict their services to separate localities, and the Gas Light & Coke Company, by amalgamating other companies, then gradually acquired all the gas-lighting north of the Thames, while a considerable area in the south was provided for by another great gas company, the South Metropolitan.
    0
    2