Cognate sentence example

cognate
  • Of these cognate races, which are described by the Greek writers as barbarous or non-Hellenic, the Illyrians and Epirots, he thinks, were respectively the progenitors of the Ghegs, or northern, and the Tosks, or southern, Albanians.
    22
    8
  • Several fraternities - old gilds or new companies, with their respective cognate or heterogeneous branches of industry and trade - were fused into one body.
    9
    1
  • Other authorities suggest that it is going much too far to deny the existence of religion altogether, and instance as proof of the divinity of the supra-normal anthropomorphic beings of the Baiame class, the fact that the Yuin and cognate tribes dance around the image of Daramulun (their equivalent of Baiame) and the medicine men " invocate his name."
    9
    3
  • The fourth region comprised all the Samnites (except the Hirpini), together with the Sabines and the cognate tribes of the Frentani, Marrucini, Marsi, Peligni, Vestini and Aequiculi.
    12
    6
  • But it is a cognate Law.
    14
    10
    Advertisement
  • The application will necessarily be confined to simple cases such as are commonly met with in practice, or are required for reference in cognate subjects.
    5
    1
  • The community we are studying must have reached such a stage of development that its economic functions and those immediately cognate to them form a well-defined group, and adequate means must be available so that we can, as it were, watch the performance of these functions and test our hypotheses and conclusions by observation and experience.
    4
    1
  • These, as has been seen, spoke a cognate dialect, and the tombs which belong to their period show exactly the same culture with Greek and Siberian elements.
    3
    1
  • In all parts of the western hemisphere society was organized on cognate kinship, real or artificial, the unit being the clan.
    5
    3
  • The history of the two cognate names reflects in some measure the development of Indian religious speculation generally.
    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • It is known that to the TibetoChinese modifications of the pure Mongolian type all the eastern Burmese tribes - Chins, Kachins, Shans, &c. - belong (as indeed do the Burmese themselves), and that a cognate race occupies the Himalaya to the eastern limits of Kashmir.
    2
    1
  • About 14% of the population are engaged in agriculture and forestry, 21% in mining and cognate industries.
    1
    0
  • Brjod (to speak), pronounced jod, is cognate to the Burmese pyauhtso, the Garo brot, &c. The word for " cowries " is gron- in written, rum- in spoken Tibetan, and grwa in written Burmese; slop (to learn), spoken lop, is slop in Melam.
    0
    0
  • " Moon " is zlava in written and dawa in spoken language, in which -va is a suffix; the word itself is zla-, cognate to the Mongol ssara, Sokpa sara, Gyarung t-sile, Vayu cholo, &c. The common spoken word for " head " is go, written mgo, to which the Manipuri moko and the Mishmi mkura are related.
    0
    0
  • It appears in several variant forms (brytenwalda, bretenanwealda, &c.), and means most probably "lord of the Britons" or "lord of Britain"; for although the derivation of the word is uncertain, its earlier syllable seems to be cognate with the words Briton and Britannia.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The old industries of macaroni and cognate products maintain their superiority.
    0
    0
  • The Abors, together with the cognate tribes of Miris, Daphlas and Akas, are supposed to be descended from a Tibetan stock.
    0
    0
  • The mother of Yazid, Maisun, belonged to the most powerful tribe in Syria, the Kalb, and it seems that this and the cognate tribes of Qoda'a (Yemenites) had enjoyed certain prerogatives, which had aroused the jealousy of the Qais and the cognate tribes of Modar.
    0
    0
  • We know only in so far as we have within us a nature cognate to the object of knowledge.
    0
    0
  • From this we may infer that they spoke a language cognate with the Scythic. The greater part of the barbarian names occurring in the inscriptions of Olbia, Tanais and Panticapaeum are supposed to be Sarmatian, and as they have been well explained from the Iranian language now spoken by the Ossetes of the Caucasus, these are supposed to be the representatives of the Sarmatae and can be shown to have a direct connexion with the Alani, one of their tribes.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Aryan e became i, as in Irish fir, Welsh gwir, " true," cognate with Latin ver-us.
    0
    0
  • Aryan o became a, as in Irish ldr, cognate with AngloSaxon flor, Eng.
    0
    0
  • Probably also Celtic u was advancing or had advanced to a forward position, for it appears in Welsh as I, as in din, " stronghold," from Celtic *dun-on, cognate with Eng.
    0
    0
  • The term is also used of a handful of hemp or other fibre, and is one of the many technical applications of "strike" or "streak," which etymologically are cognate words.
    0
    0
  • In1862-1867he lectured on church history at Andover, and after 1869 taught at the Union Theological Seminary - as instructor in church history in 1869-1870, and professor of theological cyclopaedia and Christian symbolism in 1870-1873, of Hebrew and cognate languages in 1873-1874, of sacred literature in 1874-1887, and of church history in 1887-1893.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Subsequently Ames entered into a controversy in print with Grevinchovius on universal redemption and election, and cognate problems. He brought together all he had maintained in his Coronis ad Collationem Hagiensem - his most masterful book, which figures largely in Dutch church history.
    0
    0
  • Five main cycles of story may be distinguished: (1) the foundation of the citadel Cadmea by Cadmus, and the growth of the Sparti or "Sown Men" (probably an aetiological myth designed to explain the origin of the Theban nobility which bore that name in historical times); (2) the building of a "seven-gated" wall by Amphion, and the cognate stories of Zethus, Antiope and Dirce; (3) the tale of the "house of Laius," culminating in the adventures of Oedipus and the wars of the "Seven" and the Epigoni; (4) the advent of Dionysus; and (5) the exploits of Heracles.
    0
    0
  • 5-8 (on peace-offerings) are obviously out of place here, and are possibly to be restored to the cognate passage xxii.
    0
    0
  • The impulses that promoted a vein of thought cognate to deism were active both before and after the time of its greatest notoriety.
    0
    0
  • Cognate works are his Anleitung zur lateinischen Palaographie (Leipzig, 1869, and again 1886); and Das Schriftwesen im Mittelalter (Leipzig, 1871, and again 1896).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Latin argentum is cognate with the Greek iip y yupos, silver, which in turn is derived from ap-yos, shining.
    0
    0
  • In 1857 he was appointed professor of Sanscrit in the school of languages connected with the National Library in Paris, and in this capacity he produced a Sanscrit grammar; but his attention was chiefly given to Assyrian and cognate subjects, and he was especially prominent in establishing the Turanian character of the language originally spoken in Assyria.
    0
    0
  • Stefan's law of radiation according to the fourth power of the temperature is too difficult to pursue, but if we are content with cognate results we can follow them out mathematically in a hypothetical law of the first power.
    0
    0
  • And that method on which a great scholar 1 insisted when studying the old Persian religion is doubly to be insisted on in the study of the history of baptism and the cognate institution, the eucharist, namely, to avoid equally " the narrowness of mind which clings to matters of fact without rising to their cause and connecting them with the series of associated phenomena, and the wild and uncontrolled spirit of comparison, which, by comparing everything, confounds everything."
    0
    0
  • Here, as a student of theology under Johann Gerhard, he directed his attention especially to Hebrew and the cognate dialects; in 1619 he was made an "adjunctus" of the philosophical faculty, and some time afterwards he received an appointment to the chair of Hebrew.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He had, it is true, a distinct conception of a force analogous to that of gravity, by which cognate bodies tended towards union.
    0
    0
  • Nor can the attempt of the American scholar Muss-Arnolt to explain them as cognate with the Babylonian Tablets of Destiny be pronounced successful.
    0
    0
  • The name, which is said to be derived from an Amazon called Smyrna, is indubitably Anatolian, having been applied also to a quarter of Ephesus, and (under the cognate form Myrina) to a city of Aeolis, and to a tumulus in the Troad.
    0
    0
  • At one time it was held that the constellation names and myths were of Greek origin; this view has now been disproved, and an examination of the Hellenic myths associated with the stars and star-groups in the light of the records revealed by the decipherment of Euphratean cuneiforms leads to the conclusion that in many, if not all, cases the Greek myth has a Euphratean parallel, and so renders it probable that the Greek constellation system and the cognate legends are primarily of Semitic or even pre-Semitic origin.
    0
    0
  • The position assigned to logic by Kant is not, in all probability, one which can be defended; indeed, it is hard to see how Kant himself, in consistency with the critical doctrine of knowledge, could have retained many of the older logical theorems, but the precision with which the position was stated, and the sharpness with which logic was marked off from cognate philosophic disciplines, prepared the way for the more thoughtful treatment of the whole question.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Apparently an early version of Bran the Blessed, (not to be confused with Brian Blessed) and clearly cognate with Beli.
    0
    0
  • I.e. the " l " sound is not cognate.
    0
    0
  • Admission criteria: Students are normally required to have a 2.1 or better in Politics or a cognate discipline at first degree level.
    0
    0
  • For example, we will provide an etymology for each word, regardless of whether it has a cognate form in English.
    0
    0
  • Students may elect to follow pathways, which focus on particular specialisms or cognate areas.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Their history is therefore not the history of a single people, centralizing and absorbing its constituent elements by a process of continued evolution, but of a group of cognate populations, exemplifying divers types of constitutional developments.
    0
    0
  • Though on more than one occasion personal rancour against the men of the Moderate Left prevented the Right from following Sellas advice and regaining, by timely coalition with cognate parliamentary elements, a portion of its former influence, the bulk of the party, with singular inconsistency, drew nearer and nearer to the Liberal cabinets.
    0
    0
  • The original inhabitants of Ariana were no doubt of the Aryan family, and immediately cognate with the Persian race, but they were probably intermixed at a very early period with the Sacae and Massagetae, who seem to have held the mountains from Kabul to Herat from the first dawn of history, and to whom must be ascribed - rather than to an infusion of Turco-Tartaric blood introduced by the armies of Jenghiz and Timur - the peculiar broad features and flattish countenance which distinguish the inhabitants of Herat, Seistan and the eastern provinces of Persia from their countrymen farther to the west.
    0
    0
  • According to Maxwell, priority in showing the necessity for slipping over the boundary rests with Reynolds, who also discovered the cognate fact of thermal transpiration, meaning thereby that gas travels up the gradient of temperature in a capillary tube, owing to surface-actions, until it establishes such a gradient of pressure (extremely minute) as will prevent further flow.
    0
    0
  • It is probably cognate with the Lat.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Lehm; the ultimate origin is the root lai-, meaning "to be sticky," which is seen in the cognate "lime," Lat.
    0
    0
  • It is cognate with Lat.
    0
    0
  • Spra or spreu (a monkey), now altered into deu at Lhasa, teu in Lahul, Spiti and Tsang, is still more recognizable in the Gyarung shepri and in the following degenerated forms - shreu in Ladak, streu-go in Khams and in cognate languages, soba in Limbu, saheu in Lepcha, simai in Tablung Naga, sibeh in Abor Miri, shibe in Sibsagar Miri, sarrha in Kol, sara in Kuri, &c. Grog-ma (ant), now altered into the spoken t'oma, is still kyoma in Bhutan, and, without the suffix, korok in Gyarung, k'oro- in Sokpa, k'orok, k'alek in Kiranti, &c. Grang-po- (cold), spoken t' ammo, is still grang-mo in Takpa, k'yam in Burmese, &c. A respectful word for " head " is ii, written dbu, which finds its cognates in Murmi thobo, Sibsagar Miri tub, &c. Bya (bird), spoken cha, is still pye in Gyarung.
    0
    0
  • The word plagium is used in the Digest of the offence of kidnapping or abduction, and the ultimate source is probably to be found in plaga, net, snare, trap, cognate with Gr.
    0
    0
  • Having at last got into trouble with the authorities he fled from Sicily, and visited in succession Greece, Egypt, Arabia, Persia, Rhodes - where he took lessons in alchemy and the cognate sciences from the Greek Althotas - and Malta.
    1
    1
  • In all, there is a wonderful amount of specialization, though perhaps in a very straight line from generalized forms; but the affinity to Australian or Polynesian types is in many cases clearly traceable, and it cannot be supposed but that these last are of cognate origin with those of New Zealand.
    2
    3
  • The oldest tradition they possess refers to a time shortly after the overthrow of the Majapahit dynasty in Java, about the middle of the 15th century; but it has been supposed that there must have been Indian settlers here before the middle of the 1st century, by whom the present name, probably cognate with the Sanskrit balin, strong, was in all likelihood imposed.
    1
    2
  • Rejoining his regiment, then in the garrison at Auxonne, after a furlough of twenty-one months, the young officer went through a time of much privation, brightened only by the study of history and cognate subjects.
    1
    1
  • This advantage, recalled by an old though erroneous 1 Servus is not cognate with servare, as has often been supposed; it is really related to the Homeric E'lpepos and the verb Etpw, with which the Latin sero is to be connected.
    1
    2
  • From some of these peoples and at one of these holy places, a group of Israelite tribes adopted the religion of Yahweh, the God who, by the hand of Moses, had delivered them from Egypt.2 The tribes of this region probably belonged to some branch of the great Arab stock, and the name Yahweh has, accordingly, been connected with the Arabic hawa, " the void " (between heaven and earth), " the atmosphere," or with the verb hawa, cognate with Heb.
    0
    1
  • It is born of causes cognate with those which have begotten frugality.
    1
    1
  • Phonetic values known, Assyrian was found to be a Semitic language cognate to Hebrew.
    2
    2
  • In larger or smaller numbers of cognate kindred, for shorter or longer periods of time, near or far from home, the aborigines developed their legislatures, courts, armies, secret societies and priesthoods.
    0
    1
  • In "geodesy," and the cognate subject "figure of the earth," the matter of greatest moment with regard to the sphere is the determination of the area of triangles drawn on the surface of a sphere - the so-called "spherical triangles"; this is a branch of trigonometry, and is studied under the name of spherical trigonometry.
    1
    2
  • Mention may also be made of his Elementary Greek Accidence and Lex Rex, a list of cognate words in Greek, Latin and English.
    1
    2
  • It is derived from hal, hale, whole, and cognate with "health."
    2
    2
  • The existence of a tribe called Thyni in Thrace is well attested, and the two cognate tribes of the Thyni and Bithyni appear to have settled simultaneously in the adjoining parts of Asia, where they expelled or subdued the Mysians, Caucones, and other petty tribes, the Mariandyni alone maintaining themselves in the northeast.
    2
    2
  • (d) A fourth controversy arose out of the restrictive renderings of the term "baptize" and its cognate terms, adopted by William Carey and his colleagues in their famous "Serampore Versions," towards publishing which the society had contributed up to 1830 nearly £30,000.
    0
    1
  • This significance remains to be discussed; the cognate question of how far the development of the Eucharist was influenced by the pagan mysteries is discussed in the article Sacrament.
    0
    1
  • The cognate industry of bleaching has been carried on since early in the 18th century, and large ironworks grew up in the latter half of the 19th century.
    2
    4
  • Like the Arabic jar (which is philologically cognate to ger), the ger attached himself as a client to an individual or as a protected settler to the community.
    0
    2
  • About 15% of the population are supported by agriculture and forestry, and about 18% by mining and cognate industries.
    2
    4
  • He was pastor of the Presbyterian church of Roselle, New Jersey, 1869-1874, and professor of Hebrew and cognate languages in Union Theological Seminary 1874-1891, and of Biblical theology there from 1891 to 1904, when he became professor of theological encyclopaedia and symbolics.
    1
    3
  • Persistent efforts have also been made to introduce Polynesian islanders, as being of a cognate race with the Hawaiians, but the results have been wholly unsatisfactory.
    0
    2
  • Cognate with this work is Paulus's Historia romana, a continuation of the Breviarium of Eutropius.
    0
    2
  • The cognate trades of bleaching, dyeing and machine-making have been long carried on.
    1
    4
  • By some British writers the Tringinae have been indicated as " Stints," a term cognate with Stunt and wholly inapplicable to many of them, while American writers have restricted to them the name of " Sandpiper," and call the Totaninae, to which that name is especially appropriate, " Willets."
    0
    3