Coagulation sentence example

coagulation
  • The nature of the coagulation is not yet completely understood.
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  • " Serumalbumin," or " blood-albumin," possibly C450H720N116S60140,, occurs in blood-serum, lymph, chyle, milk, &c.; its coagulation temperature is about 67°.
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  • Fibrinogen is insoluble in water, but soluble in salt solutions; it has three different coagulation temperatures, 56°, 6 7°, 75°.
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  • Fibrin, produced from fibrinogen by a ferment, is a jelly-like substance, coagulable by heat, alcohol, &c. The muscle-albumins include " myosin " or paramyosinogen, a globulin, which by coagulation induces rigor mortis, and the closely related " myosinogen " or myogen; myoglobulin and myoalbumin are also found in muscles.
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  • If a certain minimum charge must be collected in order to start coagulation, it will need the conjunction of 6n monovalent, or 3n divalent, to equal the effect of 2n trivalent ions.
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  • If the latex is warmed or an acid, an alkali or astringent plant juice is added to it, " coagulation " usually takes place more or less readily, the caoutchouc separating in solid flakes or curds.
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  • There is no feasible method at present known of preventing the inclusion of the resin of the latex with the rubber during coagulation, and although the separation of the resin from the solid caoutchouc by means of solvents is possible, it is not practicable or profitable commercially.
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  • The salts of iron quickly cause coagulation of the blood, and the clot plugs the bleeding vessels.
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  • The efficacy of heat or of an acid, an alkali or other agent in promoting coagulation depends on the character of the latex, and varies with that obtained from different plants.
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  • When exposed to air the latex gradually undergoes putrefactive changes accompanied by coagulation of the caoutchouc. The addition of a small quantity of ammonia or of formalin to some latices usually has the effect of preserving them for a considerable time.
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  • It has been compared with that of milk and of blood, which depend essentially on the coagulation or separation in curds of a proteid or albuminous substance, such as takes place when white of egg is warmed.
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  • There is, however, reason to believe that the coagulation of latex into rubber is not mainly of this character.
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  • The globules in the latex are liquid, and the phenomenon of coagulation would seem to consist in the passage of this liquid into solid caoutchouc through the kind of change known as polymerization or condensation, in which a liquid passes into solid without alteration of composition or by condensation with the elimination of the elements of water.
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  • The effect of chemical agents in producing coagulation are in consonance with what is known of other instances of polymeric or condensation changes, whilst the fact that the collection of globules separated by creaming after thorough washing, and therefore removal of all proteid, is susceptible of solidification into caoutchouc by a merely mechanical act such as churning, strongly supports the view that the character of the change is distinct from that of any alteration which may occur in the proteid constituents of the latex.
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  • The point of next importance is the coagulation of the latex so as to produce rubber in the form and of the quality required by the manufacturer.
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  • The coagulated rubber separates as a mass of spongy caoutchouc. If the coagulation has been effected in shallow dishes, the rubber is obtained in a thin cake of similar shape known as a " biscuit."
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  • In order to prevent decomposition of any proteid impurity which may remain incorporated with the rubber, the freshly coagulated rubber is sometimes cured in the smoke of burning wood or a small quantity of an antiseptic such as creosote is added during coagulation.
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  • In two or three minutes coagulation takes place, and the rubber is then exposed to the air on sticks, and allowed to drain for eight days.
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  • The globules in the latex, however, consist more probably of a distinct liquid substance which readily changes into the solid caoutchouc. The coagulation of the latex often originates with the " curding " of the proteids present, and this alteration in the proteid leads to the solidification of the globules into caoutchouc. The latter, however, is probably a distinct effect.
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  • Recent investigations point to the conclusion that the immediate cause of the arrest of vitality, in the first place, and of its destruction, in the second, is the coagulation of certain substances in the protoplasm, and that the latter contains various coagulable matters, which solidify at different temperatures.
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  • And it remains to be seen, how far the death of any form of living matter, at a given temperature, depends on the destruction of its fundamental substance at that heat, and how far death is brought about by the coagulation of merely accessory compounds.
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  • The ferment thus set free brings about the coagulation of the serum, which acts as a protective and temporary scaffolding to the injured tissues.
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  • The second operation is the coagulation of the albumen, and the separation of it with other impurities from the Maceration or Imbibition.
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  • Natural arrest of haemorrhage arises from (I) the coagulation of the blood itself, (2) the diminution of the heart's action as in fainting, (3) changes taking place in the cut vessel causing its retraction and contraction.
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  • Some of these colloids dissolve in water or other liquids to form solutions called by Graham hydrosols; Graham named the solids formed by the setting or coagulation of these liquids hydrogels.
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  • Solidification of the first kind may be termed "setting," that of the second "coagulation."
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  • The power of coagulation of colloids shown by electrolytes depends in a curious manner on the chemical valency of the effective ion.
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  • If we assume that a certain minimum electric charge must be brought into contact with a group of colloid particles to produce coagulation, twice as many univalent ions must collect to produce the same effect as a number of divalent ions, and three times as many as an effective number of trivalent ions.
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  • The ordinary surface energy of a two-phase system tends to diminish the area of contact, and thus to help the growth of the larger aggregates required for coagulation.
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  • The function of the electrolyte may be to annul such a natural charge and thus allow the non-electric surface energy to produce coagulation.
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  • But recent experiments have shown that the simple theory of coagulation here outlined needs amplification in certain directions.
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  • Brodie, in ascertaining the physiological properties of nucleo-proteids, found that when they were intravascularly injected into pigmented rabbits, coagulation of the blood resulted, but of the eight albinoes which they used, none clotted.
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  • Pickering showed that the three synthesized colloids of Grimaux in the same way produced coagulation in pigmented animals, but failed to do so in albinoes.
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  • Pickering, still later, showed, in the case of four Norway hares, two of which were injected while in their pigmented or summer coat, and two while in their albino or winter coat, that coagulation occurred in the former cases but not in the latter.
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  • Only about 9% of them thus failed absolutely to manifest any trace of coagulation.
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  • But about 7% showed an exceedingly limited coagulation, in which the clot was colourless and flocculent, and confined to the heart.
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  • The rest gave a typical and more or less wide-spread coagulation.
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  • Moreover, it was found that all the failures of coagulation occurred when the nucleo-proteid used was obtained from pigmented animals.
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  • In the intravascular coagulation experiments above described, all the rabbits were carefully weighed, and the amount of nucleoproteid injected until coagulation occurred was measured.
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  • The media are used either in a fluid or solid condition, the latter being obtained by a process of coagulation, or by the addition of a gelatinizing agent, and are placed in glass tubes or flasks plugged with cotton-wool.
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  • To mention examples, blood serum solidified at a suitable temperature is a highly suitable medium, and various media are made with extract of meat as a basis, with the addition of gelatine or agar as solidifying agents and of non-coagulable proteids (commercial " pep tone ") to make up for proteids lost by coagulation in the preparation.
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  • If disseminated intravascular coagulation is present, the patient should be treated with heparin.
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  • If the wound had been caused earlier, silk-like bloodstains would have appeared because of the effect of blood coagulation.
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  • It forms a feedback loop that uses Protein C and Protein S to slow down the coagulation cascade.
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  • Next, blood coagulation rapidly replaces this unstable platelet plug with a stable fibrin clot.
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  • The skin is opened using cutting diathermy and the subcutaneous tissue using coagulation diathermy.
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  • " Serumalbumin," or " blood-albumin," possibly C450H720N116S60140,, occurs in blood-serum, lymph, chyle, milk, &c.; its coagulation temperature is about 67°.
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  • Fibrinogen is insoluble in water, but soluble in salt solutions; it has three different coagulation temperatures, 56°, 6 7°, 75°.
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  • Vitamin K is essential in the synthesis of at least six of 13 proteins needed for coagulation.
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  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder caused by an abnormally low level of blood platelets, small disc-shaped cells essential to blood clotting (coagulation).
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  • Coagulation, or clotting, is a complex process in which specific proteins found in blood plasma combine with other blood components, including platelets, to form clots and prevent blood loss.
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  • The platelet plug then binds coagulation proteins to form a clot that stops bleeding.
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  • Coagulation tests, including clotting time, will be performed to determine the ability of the child's blood to form a clot.
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  • Clotting factors-Substances in the blood, also known as coagulation factors, that act in sequence to stop bleeding by triggering the formation of a clot.
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  • Parents can ask the pediatrician when in doubt and understand that simple blood and coagulation tests can be performed to rule out ITP.
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  • Low level of platelets (tiny cellular elements in blood that are an important part of coagulation).
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  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which blood clots occur within blood vessels in a number of tissues.
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  • Infants who later develop CP, along with their mothers, are more likely than other mother-infant pairs to have coagulation disorders (coagulopathies) that put them at increased risk for bleeding episodes or blood clots.
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  • Certain coagulation disorders are inherited while others may be deficiencies in essential clotting factors or defects in the coagulation process.
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  • Coagulation tests may be performed if the child is going to have surgery.
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  • Sometimes curable by bone marrow transplant, but potentially fatal, aplastic anemia is characterized by decreased production of red and white blood cells and platelets (disc-shaped cells that are a key component of blood coagulation).
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  • Kidney function tests, coagulation tests, and stool examinations for occult blood may also be performed.
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  • Coagulation disorders (coagulopathies) are disruptions in the body's ability to control blood clotting, an essential function of the body designed to prevent blood loss.
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  • The most commonly known coagulation disorder is hemophilia, a condition in which a critical component of blood coagulation is missing, causing individuals to bleed for long periods of time before clotting occurs.
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  • There are numerous other coagulation disorders stemming from a variety of causes.
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  • Coagulation, or clotting, is a complex process (called the coagulation cascade) that involves 12 coagulation factors (designated by Roman numerals as factors I through XII) found in blood plasma and several other blood components.
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  • Coagulation disorders arise from different causes and involve different complications.
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  • Hemophilia or hemophilia A (factor VIII deficiency) is an inherited coagulation disorder, affecting about 20,000 Americans.
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  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation, also known as consumption coagulopathy, is not a disease in itself but a clinical emergency that occurs as a result of other diseases and conditions.
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  • Thrombocytopenia, the most common cause of coagulation disorder, is characterized by reduced numbers of circulating platelets in the blood.
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  • It is the most common inherited coagulation disorder.
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  • Other coagulation disorders include factor XI deficiency (hemophilia C), and factor VII deficiency.
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  • Thrombocytopenia is the most common coagulation disorder.
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  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) occurs when the malfunction of clotting factors causes platelets to form clots in small blood vessels throughout the body.
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  • When DIC occurs, the individual bleeds abnormally even though there is no history of coagulation abnormality.
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  • As of 2004 it was not precisely understood why or how these various disorders lead to uncontrolled intravascular coagulation.
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  • These include severe infection, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and cirrhosis of the liver.
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  • Prothrombin, under the right conditions, is converted to thrombin, which activates fibrin and begins the process of coagulation.
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  • Coagulation disorders are usually discovered when an injury or surgery initiates bleeding and the bleeding does not stop.
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  • Diagnostic blood tests are performed in the clinical laboratory, including assays of the specific clotting factors, to help detect various coagulation disorders.
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  • If acquired coagulation disorders are suspected, information such as prior or current diseases and medications are important to help determine the cause of the blood disorder.
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  • Serial tests may also be recommended, because a single coagulation parameter measured at any one moment may not reveal the rapidly progressive intravascular process.
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  • Tests for thrombocytopenia include coagulation tests that may reveal a decreased platelet count and prolonged bleeding time.
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  • Other coagulation factors may be measured.
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  • Factor XI deficiency is determined by measuring the specific coagulation factor as well as other coagulation tests including prothrombin time and clotting time.
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  • This aspect of self-care made life easier for those with coagulation problems; in every other respect as of 2004, bleeding or coagulation disorders should not be self-managed.
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  • Christmas disease is treated similarly to hemophilia A, with a mix of synthetic products and human blood products to provide coagulation factors as needed.
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  • When disseminated intravascular coagulation occurs, progression can be rapid, and treatment is complicated by the large variety of possible underlying causes.
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  • Vitamin K may also be given to stimulate coagulation, and in bleeding episodes, fresh plasma products may be transfused.
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  • The prognosis for individuals with mild forms of coagulation disorders is normally good.
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  • Hemorrhage from a coagulation disorder, particularly into the brain or digestive track, can prove fatal.
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  • There is no single prevention method although treatment of the underlying disorder or disease may prevent episodes of bleeding and subsequent coagulation problems.
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  • Knowledge that a child has an inherited or acquired coagulation disorder that may lead to potentially dangerous bleeding episodes is of great concern to parents.
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  • Effective management of coagulation disorders by physicians can help the child to lead a relatively normal life with some cautions about avoiding injury.
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  • Counseling is available to help children handle the psychosocial aspects of living with a coagulation disorder.
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  • Coagulation tests may be performed if the child requires surgery.
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  • Postoperative complications are common, including wound infections and lack of healing, persistent sepsis and bowel necrosis, and a serious internal bleeding disorder known as disseminated intravascular coagulation.
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  • Hemophilia is a coagulation disorder arising from a genetic defect of the X chromosome; the defect can either be inherited or result from spontaneous gene mutation.
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  • In each type of hemophilia (hemophilias A, B, and C), a critical coagulation protein is missing, causing individuals to bleed for long periods of time before clotting occurs.
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  • In the complex coagulation process, the absence or inactivity of just one clotting factor can greatly increase bleeding time.
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  • Hemophilia A is the most common type of coagulation disorder and involves decreased activity of factor VIII.
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  • The treatment of hemophilia involves replacing or supplementing the deficient coagulation factors.
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  • Cryoprecipitate, for example, is a single- or multiple-donor human plasma preparation rich in coagulation factors; it is made available as a frozen concentrate.
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  • The frequency of treatment with coagulation factors depends on the severity of the individual's disease.
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  • Individuals who receive coagulation factors prepared from pooled donor blood were once at risk for serious infections that could be passed through the infusion of human blood products, such as the hepatitis virus and HIV.
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  • When a child has an inherited coagulation disorder such as hemophilia, parents will be concerned about the possibility of trauma or injury that may lead to potentially dangerous bleeding episodes.
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  • Coagulation factors-Specific coagulation proteins in the blood required for clotting.
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  • Coagulation proteins are designated with roman numerals I through XIII.
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  • These include the coagulation disorders hemophilia A and hemophilia B, and von Willebrand's disease, a bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in von Willebrand factor, an essential component of the coagulation system.
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  • Kidney function tests, coagulation tests, and stool examinations for occult (hidden) blood may also be performed.
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  • Hemophilia-Any of several hereditary blood coagulation disorders occurring almost exclusively in males.
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  • Getting enough vitamin K is important for proper coagulation of blood, as well as the prevention of oxidative cell damage.
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  • Known as the "clotting vitamin," vitamin K is a biomolecule essential for proteins related to blood coagulation.
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  • While K1 helps with blood coagulation, K2 is associated with bone health.
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  • Depending on the kind of cheese you are making, rennet is also added to enhance the coagulation.
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  • As a secondary function we may recognize, in certain cases, the power of closing wounds, which results from the rapid coagulation of exuded latex in contact with the air.
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  • This " coagulation " leads to the formation of the river-sludges that form deltas.
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