Club sentence examples

club
  • In the club all was going on as usual.

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  • His curiosity satisfied and the hunt over, he was ready to leave the noise of the club for the peace of his condo.

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  • "There goes my emeritus status in the Crime Stoppers Club," he said.

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  • 1585) about 1580, reprinted in 1831 for the Bannatyne Club, is not really a life.

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  • I can go to Sam's Club and buy a twenty-pound bag of rice for $10 and a twenty-pound bag of pinto beans for $13.

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  • She did attempt to engage an uninterested climber in a conversation about her Great-aunt Annie being one of the founders of the Ouray Woman's Club, back in 1897 and how she helped form the Ouray Library, with her friend, the famous millionaire, of Hope Diamond fame, Tom Walsh.

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  • While Dean remained distressed over the accident, he knew he must concentrate on the Women's Club debate just hours away.

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  • A modern edition was issued in 1901 from the Grolier Club, New York.

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  • Pierre, from club habit, always left both hat and stick in the anteroom.

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  • She has begun seeing someone; a young man who does grounds keeping work at the Country Club and is a half dozen years her junior.

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  • I have to meet with the Women's Club for an inquisition on Friday.

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  • I have that Women's Club debate, and with Fred starting jury duty, this place will be short-handed.

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  • Two kids plotting against a bully, exploring new haunts, exchanging secrets, making up games and building a club house together.

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  • It'll be a good distraction while we rig the country club and other hotels.

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  • See Statuta Ecclesiae Scoticanae (Bannatyne Club, Edinburgh, 1866).

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  • Bannatyne Club, 1829); "Memoirs of James, Earl of Bothwell," in G.

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  • Other sensory cells with long cilia cover a sort of cushion (n.c.) at the base of the club; the club may be long and the cushion small, or the...

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  • Utterson in 1820 for the Roxburghe Club, and again by H.

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  • Famous for his speeches at the Jacobin club, he was elected a member of the municipality of Paris, then of the Legislative Assembly, and later of the National Convention.

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  • ferns, horse-tails, club mosses, &c., and Phanerogams or Flowering Plants) the main plant-body, that which we speak of in ordinary language as the plant, is called the sporophyte because it bears the asexual reproductive cells or spores.

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  • Bring in the explosives teams to prep the country club and hotels.

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  • Talon's renting out a country club between here and Pembroke Pines, Toni responded.

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  • He Traveled to the same club he visited the night before, hungry.

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  • The club is closed and the police are leaving.

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  • Stevenson for the Roxburghe Club (1849).

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  • It was taking place at the English Club and someone near and dear to him sat at the end of the table.

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  • It's all the Club and his easygoing nature.

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  • He is represented with four arms, and black in colour; in one hand he holds a club and in the others a shell, a discus and a lotus respectively.

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  • cushion large and the club small.

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  • He was dressed as if he'd just come from some club, all in leather with his blond hair in a braid.

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  • Dean tossed it back on the table as Hunter said, "If this were the movies, that matchbook would be to a Hootchy-Cootchy night club where some sexy broad would come on to us both and then get her throat slit by a gangster boyfriend."

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  • But in the meantime the club has rented a little room in a central part of the town, and the books which we already have are free to all. 3.

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  • Among the principal buildings are several attractive churches, the city hall, and the club-house of the Woman's Club of Orange.

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  • It was founded on the 16th of July 17 9 1 by several members of the Jacobin Club, who refused to sign a petition presented by this body, demanding the deposition of Louis XVI.

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  • The statutes of the club were also published in Paris.

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  • Aston Lower Grounds, adjoining the park, contain an assembly hall, and the playing field of the Aston Villa Football Club, where the more important games are witnessed by many thousands of spectators.

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  • Memoirs of Sir John Macky (Roxburghe Club, 18 95), 46.

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  • He presented a famous report in the Constituent Assembly on the organization of the army, but is better known by his eloquent speech on the 28th of February 1791, at the Jacobin Club, against Mirabeau, whose relations with the court were beginning to be suspected, and who was a personal enemy of Lameth.

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  • At the Eighty Club and the.

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  • The bigwigs, the most respected members of the club, beset the new arrivals.

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  • Surely not to the club or to pay calls?

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  • Buchanan (1721); Sir James Melville's Memoirs (Bannatyne Club, 1827); A Lost Chapter in the Hist.

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  • A quarter of an hour later the old count came in from his club, cheerful and contented.

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  • by very flattened ectoderm, and bears no otoliths or sense-cells, but the base of the club rests upon the ex-umbral nerve-ring.

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  • To him the club entrusted the arrangement of the festival in honor of Bagration, for few men knew so well how to arrange a feast on an open-handed, hospitable scale, and still fewer men would be so well able and willing to make up out of their own resources what might be needed for the success of the fete.

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  • Names like The Morning Star, The Monte Carlo, The Clipper, The Cottage and The Club were on the west side.

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  • "The type of men who require an escort for a club like this can't afford someone like you," he said, amused by the idea.

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  • Only a handful of people in the club were above college-aged, and it was in the wrong side of town for the trust-fund kids from Beverly Hills to stop in.

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  • The Chateau of the duc de Luynes, the translator of the Meditations, was the home of a Cartesian club, that discussed the questions of automatism and of the composition of the sun from filings and parings, and rivalled Port Royal in its vivisections.

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  • In many Leptomedusae the otocysts are very small, inconspicuous and embedded completely in the tissues; hence they may be easily overlooked in badly-preserved material, and perhaps are present in many cases where they :: r simplest condition of the otocyst is a freely projecting club, a so-called (figs.

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  • Pierre went home, but Rostov with Dolokhov and Denisov stayed on at the club till late, listening to the gypsies and other singers.

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  • He flipped a switch to display an aerial of the country club on one wall and Dusty's condo on another.

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  • It didn't sound too bad to be part of the strange, private club.

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  • The Jacobins controlled the parent club with its affiliated societies and the whole machinery of terror.

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  • At the end of April the citizens of Marseilles closed the Jacobin club, put its chiefs on their trial and drove out the representatives on mission.

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  • He repeated his speech with more success to the Jacobin Club.

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  • But the Commune and the Jacobin Club were on the alert.

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  • The trial of 130 prisoners sent up from Nantes led to so many terrible disclosures that public feeling turned still more fiercely against the Jacobins; Carrier himself was condemned and executed; and in November the Jacobin Club was closed.

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  • The Jacobin Club was reopened and became once more the focus of disorder.

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  • Fouche closed the Jacobin Club and deported a number of journalists.

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  • He became marechal de camp in 1788; but his ambition was not satisfied, and at the outbreak of the Revolution, seeing the opportunity for carving out a career, he went to Paris, where he joined the Jacobin Club.

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  • The Zumsteinspitze was first climbed in 1820, the Signalkuppe (on top of which there is now a club hut) in 1842, the Nordend in 1861 and the Parrotspitze in 5863.

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  • 8 of the Filson Club Publications; J.

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  • Papuan weapons are the bow and arrow (in the Fly River region, the north and north-east coasts); a beheading knife of a sharp segment of bamboo; a shafted stone club - rayed, disk shaped or ball-headed (in use all over the island); spears of various forms, pointed and barbed; the spear-thrower (on the Finsch coast); and hardwood clubs and shields, widely differing in pattern and ornamentation with the district of their manufacture.

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  • He soon found his way into the fast political society of London, and at the club at Goosetrees renewed an acquaintance begun at Cambridge with Pitt, which ripened into a friendship of the closest kind.

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  • The oldest yacht club in the United Kingdom, the Royal Cork (founded in 1720 as the Cork Harbour Water Club), has its headquarters here, with a club-house, and holds an annual regatta.

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  • He became a member of the Whig club founded by Grattan; and he actively co-operated with Theobald Wolfe Tone in founding the Society of the United Irishmen in 1791, of which he became the first secretary.

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  • A few days later, on the 8th of March 1889, Parnell was entertained at dinner by the Eighty Club, Lords Spencer and Rosebery being present; and he was well received on English platforms when he chose to appear.

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  • A Life by George Robertson and Henry Charteris was reprinted by the Bannatyne Club in 1826.

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  • Their chief was not so much Robespierre, president of the parliamentary and bourgeois club of the Jacobins (q.v.), which had acquired by means of its two thousand affiliated branches great power in the provinces, as the advocate Danton, president of the popular and Parisian club of the Cordeliers.

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  • Public opinion became republican from an excess of patriotism, and owing to the propaganda of the Jacobin club; while the decree of the 25th of August 1792, which marked the destruction of feudalism, now abolished in principle, caused the peasants to rally definitely to the Republic. -

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  • Dantonists, came a limitation to the powers of the Committee of Public Safety, now placed in dependence upon the Convention; and next followed the destruction of the revolutionary system, the Girondin decentralization and the resuscitation of departmental governments; the reform of the Revolutionary Tribunal on the 10th of August; the suppression of the Commune of Paris on the 1st of September, and of the salary of forty sous given to members of the sections; the abolition of the maximum, the suppression of the Guillotine, the opening of the j~rjsons, the closing of the Jacobin club (November if), and the henceforward insignificant existence of the popular societies.

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  • The former had united the Jacobins and the more violent members of the Convention in their club, the Socit du Pantheon; and their fusion, after the closing of the club, with the the zesecret society of the Babouvists lent formidable publicanstrength to this party, with which Barras was secretly ~7ats in league.

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  • Surbiton is the headquarters of the Kingston Rowing Club and the Thames Sailing Club.

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  • He was already known as one of the influential members of the Cordeliers club and of that of the Jacobins.

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  • Out of these materials nothing could be expected to come except such a democratic constitution as might have been made by a Jacobin club in Paris.

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  • During three years he was a member of the Nonsense Club with his two schoolfellows from Westminster, Churchill and Lloyd, and he wrote sundry verses in magazines and translated two books of Voltaire's Henriade.

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  • The Winyah Indigo Society grew out of a social club organized about 1740, and was founded in 1757 by a group of planters interested in raising indigo; it long conducted a school (discontinued during the Civil War) which eventually became part of the city's public school system.

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  • Not the least of the anxieties of the colonial office during this period was the situation in the West Indies, where the canesugar industry was being steadily undermined by the European bounties given to exports of continental beet; and though the government restricted themselves to attempts at removing the bounties by negotiation and to measures for palliating the worst effects in the West Indies, Mr Chamberlain made no secret of his repudiation of the Cobden Club view that retaliation would be contrary to the doctrines of free trade, and he did his utmost to educate public opinion at home into understanding that the responsibilities of the mother country are not merely to be construed according to the selfish interests of a nation of consumers.

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  • By thoroughbred is meant a horse or mare whose pedigree is registered in the StudBook kept by Messrs Weatherby, the official agents of the Jockey Club - originally termed the keepers of the match-bookas well as publishers of the Racing Calendar.

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  • According to the Stud-Book, " Darley's Arabian was brought over by a brother of Mr barley of Yorkshire, who, being an agent in merchandise abroad, became member of a hunting club, by which means he acquired interest to procure this horse."

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  • He was one of the founders of the Free Art League, of the International Copyright League, and of the Authors' Club; was chairman of the New York Tenement House Commission in 18 9 4; and was a prominent member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters, of the Council of the National Civil Service Reform League, and of the executive committee of the Citizens' Union of New York City.

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  • This beautiful tract of country until recent years was comparatively little known to the tourist, but a club (Spessart Klub) through the establishment of finger-posts and the issue of maps, has indicated the more interesting tours to be followed.

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  • His pictures are in many public collections: among them are "A Cosy Corner," in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; "At the Inn," in the Union League Club, New York; and "Between two Fires," in the Tate Gallery, London.

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  • Accordingly, the congregation he founded is of the least conventional nature, rather resembling a residential clerical club than a monastery of the older type, and its rules (never written by Neri, but approved by Paul V.

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  • This was published by the Spalding Club in 1869.

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  • in 1910), and the Woman's Institute (1880) and the Hollywood Inn Club (1897; for working-men) have small libraries.

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  • In 1843 he became a member of the musical club who called themselves "The Juvenals," and for their meetings were written the trios and duets, music and words, which Wennerberg began to publish in 1846.

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  • In January 2006, VH1 continued with the success of the established show Celebrity Fit Club in its third season.

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  • August 2006 brought the second season of Flavor of Love and the fourth season of Celebrity Fit Club.

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  • There is a dance floor open every night of the week, as well as impressive sound and club lighting.

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  • The former began in 1865 in Pulaski, Tennessee, as a social club of young men.

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  • In such varieties as Talavera the spikelets are loose, while in the club and square-headed varieties they are closely packed.

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  • (Roxburghe Club); Whittingham's Brief Discourse of Troubles at Frankfort; Pocock's Troubles connected with the PrayerBook (Camden Soc.).

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  • But still tell him to come to the club--it will all blow over.

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  • "Well then, till tomorrow at Sokolniki," said Dolokhov, as he took leave of Rostov in the club porch.

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  • "Perhaps," coldly and angrily replied Dolokhov, glancing at Sonya, and, scowling, he gave Nicholas just such a look as he had given Pierre at the club dinner.

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  • These visits of Natasha's at night before the count returned from his club were one of the greatest pleasures of both mother, and daughter.

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  • Pierre dined at the club that day and heard on all sides gossip about the attempted abduction of Rostova.

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  • Educated at Reading school and at Winchester college, Henry Vansittart joined the society of the Franciscans, or the "Hellfire club," at Medmenham, his elder brothers, Arthur and Robert, being also members of this fraternity.

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  • The members accidentally discovered that the fear of it had a great influence over the lawless but superstitious blacks, and soon the club expanded into a great federation of regulators, absorbing numerous local bodies that had been formed in the absence of civil law and partaking of the nature of the old English neighbourhood police and the ante-bellum slave patrol.

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  • CLUB OF THE FEUILLANTS, a political association which played a prominent part during the French Revolution.

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  • The members of the club preserved the title of Amis de la Constitution, as being a sufficient indication of the line they intended to pursue.

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the Federal building (containing post-office, custom-house and Federal court-rooms; erected at a cost of $3,000,000); Tomlinson Hall, capable of seating 3000 persons, given to the city by Daniel Tomlinson; the Propylaeum, a club-house for women; the Commercial club; Das Deutsche Haus, belonging to a German social club; the Maennerchor club-house; the Union railway station; the traction terminal building; the city hall, and the public library.

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  • The races, the English Club, sprees with Denisov, and visits to a certain house--that was another matter and quite the thing for a dashing young hussar!

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  • Next day, the third of March, soon after one o'clock, two hundred and fifty members of the English Club and fifty guests were awaiting the guest of honor and hero of the Austrian campaign, Prince Bagration, to dinner.

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  • The men who set the tone in conversation--Count Rostopchin, Prince Yuri Dolgorukov, Valuev, Count Markov, and Prince Vyazemski--did not show themselves at the club, but met in private houses in intimate circles, and the Moscovites who took their opinions from others--Ilya Rostov among them--remained for a while without any definite opinion on the subject of the war and without leaders.

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  • Bagration appeared in the doorway of the anteroom without hat or sword, which, in accord with the club custom, he had given up to the hall porter.

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  • There was never a dinner or soiree at the club without him.

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  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.

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  • Sometimes he consoled himself with the thought that he was only living this life temporarily; but then he was shocked by the thought of how many, like himself, had entered that life and that club temporarily, with all their teeth and hair, and had only left it when not a single tooth or hair remained.

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  • Natasha was in bed, the count at the club, and Pierre, after giving the letters to Sonya, went to Marya Dmitrievna who was interested to know how Prince Andrew had taken the news.

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  • She was off to the library to meet with a book club; she commented that her heart wasn't in it with Martha still missing.

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  • There is record of a club in Haddington in 1709, of Tom Bicket's green in Kilmarnock in 1740, of greens in Candleriggs and Gallowgate, Glasgow, and of one in Lanark in 1750, of greens in the grounds of Heriot's hospital, Edinburgh, prior to 1768, and of one in Peebles in 1775.

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  • In 1848 and 1849, however, when many clubs had come into existence in the west and south of Scotland (the Willowbank, dating from 1816, is the oldest club in Glasgow), meetings were held in Glasgow for the purpose of promoting a national association.

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  • to enclose the club in a protective covering form- ?0 ing a cup or vesicle, at first open distally; finally the opening closes and J' P g, ,.

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  • "Each of their arms is a wooden club," answered the little man, "and I'm sure the creatures mean mischief, by the looks of their eyes.

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  • On that third of March, all the rooms in the English Club were filled with a hum of conversation, like the hum of bees swarming in springtime.

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  • From reading he passed to sleeping, from sleeping to gossip in drawing rooms of the club, from gossip to carousals and women; from carousals back to gossip, reading, and wine.

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  • After the Emperor had left Moscow, life flowed on there in its usual course, and its course was so very usual that it was difficult to remember the recent days of patriotic elation and ardor, hard to believe that Russia was really in danger and that the members of the English Club were also sons of the Fatherland ready to sacrifice everything for it.

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  • In the corner room at the club, members gathered to read these broadsheets, and some liked the way Karpushka jeered at the French, saying: They will swell up with Russian cabbage, burst with our buckwheat porridge, and choke themselves with cabbage soup.

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  • And the memory of the dinner at the English Club when he had challenged Dolokhov flashed through Pierre's mind, and then he remembered his benefactor at Torzhok.

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  • In the spring of 1893 a club was started in Tuscumbia, of which Mrs. Keller was president, to establish a public library.

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  • I knew I'd have to talk to you about it sooner or later, but I didn't want to hold the financial burden of an unplanned pregnancy over your head like a club.

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  • After I hung up the phone, I plodded to the kitchen where I found a half bottle of Canadian Club.

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  • Dusty's eyes returned to the image of the country club.

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  • Josh didn't know about the horse ranch, and she wasn't about to tell him - not as long as he was holding the goats over her head like a club.

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  • She made a lunge and grabbed the broom, wielding the handle like a club.

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  • The idea was like a blow from a club.

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  • Xander returned to the club.

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  • It was better than hunting in a club.

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  • Roland became a member of the Jacobin Club.

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  • This attitude they maintained after the Constituent Assembly had been succeeded by the Legislative, but not many of the new deputies became members of the club.

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  • This was the death-blow of the club.

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  • The name of Feuillants, as a party designation, survived the club.

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  • A numerous British colony resides at Mustapha, where there is an English club.

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  • antennal segment s form a distinct club.

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  • The beetles have feelers with eleven segments, whereof the terminal few are thickened so as to form a club.

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  • 39) have jointed, flexible palps, feelers - often of excessive length - with a short basal segment, and the three terminal segments forming a club, and, in some genera, larvae with legs.

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  • Other important buildings are the Sobranye, or parliament house, the palace of the synod, the ministries of war and commerce, the university with the national printing press, the national library, the officers' club and several large military structures.

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  • Pilgrim Hall, a large stone building erected by the Pilgrim Society (formed in Plymouth in 1820 as the successor of the Old Colony Club, founded in 1769) in 1824 and remodelled in 1880, is rich in relics of the Pilgrims and of early colonial times, and contains a portrait of Edward Winslow (the only extant portrait of a "Mayflower" passenger), and others of later worthies, and paintings, illustrating the history of the Pilgrims; the hall library contains many old and valuable books and manuscripts - including Governor Bradford's Bible, a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, and the patent of 1621 from the Council for New England - and Captain Myles Standish's sword.

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  • 344; Notes of the Privy Council (Roxburghe Club, 1896); Cal.

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  • It took an active part in the movement against the monarchy of the 10th of June and the 10th of August 1792; but after that date the more moderate leaders of the club, Danton, Fabre d'Eglantine, Camille Desmoulins, seem to have ceased attending, and the "enrages" obtained control, such as J.

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  • The club disowned Danton and Desmoulins and attacked Robespierre for his "moderation," but the new insurrection which it attempted failed, and its leaders were guillotined on the 24th of March 1794, from which date nothing is known of the club.

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  • His first efforts in verse-making were inspired by the meetings of the Easy Club (founded in 1712), of which he was an original member; and in 1715 he became the Club Laureate.

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  • The port is the headquarters of the Royal Harwich Yacht Club.

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  • Bibliography.-Sir Thomas Urquhart's Discovery of a most excellent jewel (1652; reprinted in the Maitland Club's edition of Urquhart's Works in 1834) is written with the express purpose of glorifying Scotland.

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  • The foundation of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society (the "Wise Club"), which numbered among its members Campbell, Beattie, Gerard and Dr John Gregory, was mainly owing to the exertions of Reid, who was secretary for the first year (1758).

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  • A sailors' and fishermen's Harbour of Refuge, free library, constitutional club and technical school are maintained.

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  • Like the other two orders, the Teutonic Order began as a charitable society, developed into a military club, and ended as something of a chartered company, exercising rights of sovereignty on the troubled confines of Christendom.

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  • With regard to this point the work of the Smithfield Club deserves recognition.

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  • changed to that of the Smithfield Club in 1802.

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  • The judges, in making their awards at the show held annually in December, at Islington, North London (since 1862), are instructed to decide according to quality of flesh, lightness of offal, age and early maturity, with no restrictions as to feeding, and thus to promote the primary aim of the club in encouraging the selection and breeding of the best and most useful animals for the production of meat, and testing their capabilities in respect of early maturity.

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  • At the centenary show of the Smithfield Club in 1898 the highest average daily gains in weight amongst prize-winning cattle were provided by a Shorthorn-Aberdeen cross-bred steer (age, one year seven months; daily gain 2.4 7 lb); a Shorthorn steer (age, one year seven months; daily gain, 2.44 lb); and an Aberdeen-Shorthorn cross-bred steer (age, one year ten months; daily gain, 2� 33 lb).

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  • It was in 1875 that the Smithfield Club first provided the competitive classes for lambs, and in 1883 the champion plate offered for the best pen of sheep of any age in the show was for the first time won by lambs, a pen of Hampshire Downs.

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  • In 1895 the Smithfield Club instituted a carcase competition in association with its annual show of fat stock, and it has been continued each year since.

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  • Thus, you see, with my herbarium, my vibratory, and my semi-circumgyratory, I am in clover; and you may imagine with what scorn I think of the House of Commons, which, comfortable club as it is said to be, could offer me none of these comforts, or, more perfectly speaking, these necessaries of life."

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  • By means of his trade union, co-operative society or club he may gain some experience in the management of men and business, and in so far as the want of a sufficient income does not constitute an insuperable difficulty, he may share in the public life of the country.

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  • relatifs et l'histoire de l'Ecosse au XVI e siecle (Paris, 3 vols., 1851), for the Bannatyne Club; Hamilton Papers, ed.

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  • In general, however, his views at that time were republican; he belonged to the club of Friends of the Constitution at Valence, spoke there with much acceptance, and was appointed librarian to the club.

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  • Time was on the side of the moderates; they succeeded in placing General Pichegru, already known for his tendencies towards constitutional monarchy, in the presidential chair of the Council of Five Hundred; and they proceeded to agitate, chiefly through the medium of a powerful club founded at Clichy, for the repeal of the revolutionary and persecuting laws.

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  • His oracular reserve, personal honesty and consistency of aim had gained him the suffrages of all who hoped to save France from the harpies of the Directory and the violent rhetoricians of the now reconstituted Jacobin Club.

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  • The Jacobin Club was closed, thanks to the ability of Fouche, the new minister of Police; but the hopes of Sieyes were dashed by the death of General Joubert, commander of the Army of Italy, at the disastrous battle of Novi (15th of August).

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  • Danton left Paris for a little; Desmoulins, however, remained there, appearing occasionally at the Jacobin club.

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  • On the 7th of January 1 794 Robespierre, who on a former occasion had defended Camille when in danger at the hands of the National Convention, in addressing the Jacobin club counselled not the expulsion of Desmoulins, but the burning of certain numbers of the Vieux Cordelier.

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  • Other editions are in the King's Classics (1902) and for the Grolier Club (New York, 1889,1889, ed.

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  • The Bulletin of the Nuttall Ornithological Club was published from 1876 to 1884, when it was superseded by The Auk.

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  • It is greatly frequented as a watering-place, especially by the people of Belfast, and there are golf links and important regattas held by the Royal Ulster Yacht Club.

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  • The importers, therefore, found it necessary to establish a club of their own, the Liverpool Cotton Exchange, which they as rigorously guarded against brokers.

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  • From 1807 to 1816 Elkanah Watson (1758-1842), a prominent farmer and merchant, lived at what is now the Country Club, and while there introduced the merino sheep into Berkshire county and organized the Berkshire Agricultural Society; he is remembered for his advocacy of the building of a canal connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean, and as the author of Memoirs: Men and Times of the Revolution (18J5), edited by his son, W.

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  • The house and grounds are now occupied by a golf club.

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  • The Carnegie Institute in the decade increased the extent of its service to the community; its central library, with 464,313 volumes, had 8 branches, 16 stations, 128 school stations, 10 club stations and 8 playground stations, with a circulation of 1,363,365 books; both the scientific museum and the art department added greatly to their collections; in the school of technology the enrolment grew from 2,102 students in 1909 to 4,982 students in 1920, including those in the departments of science and engineering, arts, industries and the Margaret Morrison school for women.

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  • The Philosophical Society died out before 1874, when Harris founded in St Louis a Kant Club, which lived for fifteen years.

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  • Louis, $2,000,000; the Missouri athletic club, $500,000; the Railway Exchange, $3,000,000, 18 storeys, covering an entire city block; the University club, $600,- 000; the Young Women's Christian Association, $500,000; the Boatmen's bank, $750,000; the Arcade, $1,250,000; the Post-Despatch building, $500,000; the Bevo Manufacturing Company, $r,000,000.

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  • The grounds of the Cedar Rapids country club comprise 180 acres.

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  • In earlier life he was a notable mountain-climber, ascending Mount Ararat in 1876, and publishing a volume on Transcaucasia and Ararat in 1877; in1899-1901he was president of the Alpine Club.

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  • A scandalous riot was inaugurated by the members of the Parisian Jockey Club, who interrupted the performance with howls and dog-whistles; and after the third representation the opera was withdrawn.

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  • 60 An interesting discovery of the late period in Upper Egypt, that of images and other temple objects of precious metals, was also made at Dendera by the diggers for natron (sebakh) and recovered by the Service des Antiquites for the Cairo Museum.61 Outside Egypt proper the work of editing and publishing all the Egyptian inscriptions of Sinai has been begun by Dr. Gardiner and Mr. Peet.62 A worthy completion of the record is the wonderful exhibition of all the finest examples of Egyptian art in Britain outside the British and Ashmolean Museums, held by the Burlington Fine Arts' Club in London in the summer of 1921.63

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  • (1917); (64) Newberry and Hall, Catalogue of an Exhibition of Ancient Egyptian Art; London, Burlington Fine Arts' Club, 1921.

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  • This was an attitude which had few supporters, even in the Jacobin club, and in October Babeuf was arrested and sent to prison at Arras.

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  • The Jacobin club of the Faubourg Saint-Antoine refused to admit Babeuf and Lebois, on the ground that they were "egorgeurs."

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  • After the club of the Pantheon was closed by Bonaparte, on the 27th of February 1796, his aggressive activity redoubled.

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  • Lee) was issued, the simple classification of sporting and non-sporting dog - terriers and toy dogs, being adopted; but although there had been an understanding since 1874, when the first volume of the Kennel Club Stud Book (Frank C. S.

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  • Following petitions to the Kennel Club from exhibitors at the club's own show at the Crystal Palace, and also at the show of the Scottish Kennel Club in Edinburgh during the autumn of 1900, the divisions were decided upon as follows: Sporting.

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  • On the 4th of May 1898 a sub-committee of the Kennel Club decided that the following breeds should be classified as "toy dogs": - Black and tan terriers (under 7 lb), bull terriers (under 8 lb), griffons, Italian greyhounds, Japanese, Maltese, Pekingese, poodles (under 15 in.), pugs, toy spaniels, Yorkshire terriers and Pomeranians.

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  • All these varieties were represented at the annual show of the Kennel Club in the autumn of 1905, and at the representative exhibition of America held under the management of the Westminster Kennel Club in the following spring the classification was substantially the same, additional breeds, however, being Boston terriers - practically unknown in England, - Chesapeake Bay dogs, Chihuahuas, Papillons and Roseneath terriers.

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  • The latter were only recently introduced into the United States, though well known in Great Britain as the West Highland or Poltalloch terrier; an application which was made (1900) by some of their admirers for separate classification was refused by the Kennel Club, but afterwards it was granted, the breed being classified as the West Highland white terrier.

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  • Lord Orford, however, established the first club at Marham Smeeth near Swaffham, where coursing is still carried on, in 1776.

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  • On the decease of the founder of the club, the members agreed to purchase a silver cup to be run for annually, and it was intended to pass from one to the other, like the whip at Newmarket, but before starting for it, in the year 1792, it was decided that the winner of the cup should keep it and that one should be annually purchased to be run for in November.

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  • At the formation of the club each member assumed a colour, and also a letter, which he used as the initial of his dog's name.

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  • In 1865 a show was held in Paris, and after the National Dog Club - not the Birmingham society - had failed, as the result of a disastrous show at the Crystal Palace, a further exhibition was arranged to be held in June 1870 under the management of G.

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  • A second venture proved to be a little more encouraging, although again there was a loss; but in April 1873, the Kennel Club, which is now the governing body of the canine world, was founded by S.

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  • The progress of the club has been remarkable, and that its formation did much to improve the conditions of the various breeds of dogs, to encourage their use in the field by the promotion of working trials, and to check abuses which were common with regard to the registration of pedigrees, &c., cannot.

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  • The abolition of the cropping of the ears of Great Danes, bull terriers, black and tan terriers, white English terriers, Irish terriers and toy terriers, in 1889 gained the approval of all humane lovers of dogs, and although attempts have been made to induce the club to modify the rule which prohibits the exhibition of cropped dogs, the practice has not been revived; it is declared, however, that the toy terriers and white English terriers have lost such smartness by the retention of the ears that they are becoming.

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  • The club has control over all the shows held in the.

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  • United Kingdom, no fewer than 519 being held in 1905, the actual number of dogs which were entered at the leading fixtures being: Kennel Club show 1789, Cruft's 1768, Ladies' Kennel Association 1306, Manchester 1190, Edinburgh 896 and Birmingham 892.

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  • In 1906, however, no fewer than 1956 dogs were entered at the show of the Westminster Kennel Club, held in Madison Square.

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  • The foreign and colonial clubs which are affiliated to the Kennel Club are: the Guernsey Dog Club, the Italian Kennel Club, the Jersey Dog Club, La Societe Centrale (Paris), Moscow Gun Club of the Emperor Alexander II., New South Wales Kennel Club, Nimrod Club (Amsterdam), Northern Indian Kennel Association, Royal St Hubert's Society (Brussels) and the South African Kennel Club (Cape Town).

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  • Its ramifications therefore extend to all parts of the world; while its rules are the basis of those adopted by the American Kennel Club, the governing body of the "fancy" in the United States.

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  • Most of the leading breeds have clubs or societies, which have been founded by admirers with a view to furthering the interests of their favourites; and such combinations as the Bulldog Club (incorporated), the London Bulldog Society, the British Bulldog Club, the Fox Terrier Club, the Association of Bloodhound Breeders - under whose management the first man-hunting trials were held, - the Bloodhound Hunt Club, the Collie Club, the Dachshund Club, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club, the English Setter Club, the Gamekeepers' Association of the United Kingdom, the International Gun Dog League, the Irish Terrier Club, the Irish Wolfhound Club, the St Bernard Club, the National Terrier Club, the Pomeranian Club, the Spaniel Club, the Scottish Terrier Club and the Toy Bulldog Club have done good work in keeping the claims of the breeds they represent before the dogowning public and encouraging the breeding of dogs to type.

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  • Each club has a standard of points; some hold their own shows; while others issue club gazettes.

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  • There is a ladies' branch of the Kennel Club, and the corresponding clubs in America are the Ladies' Kennel Association of America and the Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts.

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  • The Gazette is the official organ of the Kennel Club.

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  • Jaquet wrote The Kennel Club: a History and Record of its Work, and an edition de luxe of Dogs is edited by Mr Harding Cox; Mr Sidney Turner, the chairman of the Kennel Club committee, edited The Kennel Encyclopaedia, the first number of which was issued in 1907.

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  • When he came into residence in November he was recognized as the father of the Holy Club.

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  • John Gambold, a member of the Holy Club, who afterwards became a Moravian bishop, says "he was blest with such activity as to be always gaining ground, and such steadiness that he Iost none.

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  • John Clayton, afterwards chaplain of the Collegiate Church of Manchester, who remained a strong High Churchman; James Hervey, author of Meditations among the Tombs, and Theron and Aspasio; Benjamin Ingham, who became the Yorkshire evangelist; and Thomas Broughton, afterwards secretary of the S.P.C.K., were members of the Holy Club, and George Whitefield joined it on the eve of the Wesleys' departure for Georgia.

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  • Here, overlooking the harbour, is the khedivial yacht club (built 1903) and the palace, also called Ras et-Tin, built by Mehemet Ali, a large but not otherwise noteworthy building.

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  • Among the clubs of the city are the Pacific Club, founded in 1853 as the British Club; the Scottish Thistle Club (1891), of which Robert Louis Stevenson was a member; the Hawaii Yacht Club, and the Polo, Country and University Clubs.

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  • He became in 1814 a member of a literary society in Cambridge, known as the Anthology Club.

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  • This club began the publication of a monthly magazine, The Monthly Anthology, which gave way in 1815 to The North American Review.

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  • In 1857 he became a regular attendant at the meetings of the famous Boston Saturday Club, to the members of which he dedicated his account of a vacation trip, To Cuba and Back (1857).

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  • During the many years in which he was a member of " The Club " he was one of its most assiduous frequenters, and his loss was acknowledged by a formal resolution.

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  • The accuracy of this law was in 1832 confirmed by Gauss, 3 who employed an indirect but more perfect method than that of Coulomb, and also, as Maxwell remarks, 1 The quotations are from the translation published by the Gilbert Club, London, 1900.

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  • Mottelay, New York, 1893, and for the Gilbert Club, London, 1900); M.

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  • It took the form of a warrior, wearing a girdle of three stars and a lion's skin, and carrying a club and a sword.

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  • He was a member of the moderate club, the Feuillants; but after the overthrow of the monarchy on the 10th of August 1792 he accepted an office in the ministry of foreign affairs, where he sometimes exercised a steadying influence.

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  • Stevenson when a boy used to make holiday occasionally, is a golf-course which was laid out by the Lothianburn Club.

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  • The public golf-course on Braid Hills and the private courses of the Lothianburn club at Swanston and the Barnton club at Barnton are usually full on Saturdays and holidays.

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  • designed by Bernardo Rossellino, and now the Banca d'Italia; the enormous block of the Monte de' Paschi, a bank of considerable wealth and antiquity, enlarged and partly rebuilt in the original style between 1877 and 1881, the old Dogana and Salimbeni palaces; the Palazzo Spannochi, a fine early Renaissance building by Giuliano da Maiano (now the post office); the Loggia di Mercanzia (15th century), now a club, imitating the Loggia dei Lanzi at Florence, with sculptures of the 15th century; the Loggia del Papa, erected by Pius II.; and other fine buildings.

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  • In 1866 the Cobden Club was founded in London, to promote free-trade economics, and it became a centre for political propaganda on those lines; and prizes were instituted in his name at Oxford and Cambridge.

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  • The Journey of the Eighty Club to Hungary in 1906 (London, 1907); R.

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  • No sooner was political life thus resumed than all the Slovene, Croat and Serb deputies of Austria united to form a " Yugoslav parliamentary Club," which entered into close alliance with the Czech Club.

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  • Meanwhile the opposition parties openly allied themselves with the Yugoslav Club in Austria, which agitated for complete national unity, but saved itself from prosecution by occasional references to the dynasty and absolute silence regarding Serbia.

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  • Lord's, as it is called, is the headquarters of the M.C.C. (Marylebone Cricket Club), the governing body of the game; here are played the home matches of this club and of the Middlesex County Cricket Club, the Oxford and Cambridge, Eton and Harrow, and other well-known fixtures.

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  • It appears in old Babylonia as a curved stick, and, like the club, is a distinctive symbol of god and king.

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  • There are a number of art galleries in and about Bond Street and Piccadilly, Regent Street and Pall Mall, such as the New Gallery, where periodical exhibitions are given by the New English Art Club, the Royal Society of Painters in WaterColours, the Royal Institute of Painters in Water-Colours, other societies and art dealers.

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  • A club for soldiers, sailors and marines in London, called the Union Jack Club, was opened in Waterloo Road by King Edward VII.

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  • Large gatherings of spectators are attracted to the first-class cricket matches played at Lord's ground, St John's Wood, by the Marylebone Club and the Middlesex County teams, Eton College against Harrow School, and Oxford against Cambridge University; to the Kennington Oval for the matches of the Surrey club, and the Leyton ground for those of the Essex club.

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  • At Queen's Club, West Kensington, the annual Oxford and Cambridge athletic meeting and others take place, besides football matches, and there is covered accommodation for tennis and other games.

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  • At the Mermaid Ben Jonson had such companions as Shakespeare, Raleigh, Beaumont, Fletcher, Carew, Donne, Cotton and Selden, but at the Devil in Fleet Street, where he started the Apollo Club, he was omnipotent.

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  • Northumberland was thus a Jacobite stronghold; and in Manchester, where in 1777 according to an American observer Jacobitism "is openly professed," a Jacobite rendezvous known as "John Shaw's Club" lasted from 1735 to 1892.

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  • Among other societies with similar objects in view are the "Thames Valley Legitimist Club" and the "Legitimist Jacobite League of Great Britain and Ireland."

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  • He took no active share in the political troubles of the time, but from his description of a meeting of the Rota Club, founded by James Harrington.

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  • The Fort Orange Club, the Catholic Union, the Albany Club, the University Club, the City Club of Albany, the Country Club, the German Hall Association and the Adelphi Club are the chief social organizations.

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  • Of the former, two volumes were published by the Maitland Club in1834-1845and one volume by the New Spalding Club in 1890; the latter was published in four volumes by the Maitland Club in 1842-1843.

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  • In January 1790 he returned to Montpellier, was elected a member of the municipality, was one of the founders of the Jacobin club in that city, and on the flight of Louis XVI.

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  • They had, besides, the lance, the club, sometimes studded with pebbles, and the javelin, and they seem to have known the shield.

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  • The Kebo Valley Club has fine golf links here; and since 1900 an annual horse show and fair has been held at Robin Hood Park at the foot of Newport Mountain.

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  • This enterprise, of which the expenses were defrayed by the Jacobin Club, made him well known to the revolutionary leaders; and he made himself still more conspicuous in organizing the great "Fete de la Liberte" on the 1 5th of April 1792, in honour of the released soldiers of Chateau-Vieux, with Collot d'Herbois.

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  • He showed himself a vigorous Thermidorian; he was instrumental in suppressing the Revolutionary Tribunal and the Jacobin Club; he attacked J.

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  • Kennington Oval is the ground of the Surrey County Cricket Club.

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  • In 1848, when the political air was charged with stimulating elements, he founded the Positive Society, with the expectation that it might grow into a reunion as powerful over the new revolution as the Jacobin Club had been in the revolution of 1789.

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  • Tedder, librarian of the Athenaeum Club; and the work was resumed accordingly after his death, five more parts being arranged for, one of which was published in 1910.

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  • Defoe's Review (1704-1713) dealt chiefly with politics and commerce, but the introduction in it of what its editor fittingly termed the "scandalous club " was another step nearer the papers of Steele and the periodical essayists, the first attempts to create an organized popular opinion in matters of taste and manners.

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  • The Anthology Club was established at Boston in 1803 by Phineas Adams for the cultivation of literature and the discussion of philosophy.

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  • Ticknor, Everett and Bigelow were among the members, and were contributors to the organ of the club, the monthly Anthology and Boston Review (1803-1811), the forerunner of the North American Review.

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  • The North American Review, the oldest and most famous of all the American reviews, dates from 1815, and was founded by William Tudor, a member of the previously mentioned Anthology Club.

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    0
  • After two years' control Tudor handed over the review to the club, then styled the North American Club, whose most active members were E.

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  • "Fox lodged in St James's Street, and as soon as he rose, which was very late, had a levee of his followers and of the gaming club at Brooks's - all his disciples.

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  • He did not confine himself to news, but wrote something very like finished essays on questions of policy, trade and domestic concerns; he also introduced a "Scandal Club," in which minor questions of manners and morals were treated in a way which undoubtedly suggested the Tatlers and Spectators which followed.

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  • Brothers' Club, a society of Tory politicians and men of letters, and the same year witnessed the failure of the two expeditions to the West Indies and to Canada promoted by him.

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  • (Roxburghe Club), ii.

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  • south of the town under the control of the Johannesburg Turf Club.

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  • In 1845 a Britton Club was formed, and a sum of £1000 was subscribed and given to Britton, who was subsequently granted a civil list pension by Disraeli, then chancellor of the exchequer.

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  • high, built at a cost of £70,000, and a working-men's club and institute, the gift of a former mayor; a new Carnegie library was in course of erection in 1921.

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  • Together with John Sterling (with whom he founded the Apostles' Club) he migrated to Trinity Hall, whence he obtained a first class in civil law in 1827; he then came to London, and gave himself to literary work, writing a novel, Eustace Conyers, and editing the London Literary Chronicle until 1830, and also for a short time the Athenaeum.

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  • Among the principal buildings are a Carnegie library, the city hall, the Government building, the court house, St Patrick's sanatorium, the masonic temple and the Elks' club.

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  • The emperor is afraid that the fire-brigade might become a "political club," and cautiously contents himself with approving the provision of a fire-engine (34) Trajan's fear of factions and clubs in these two last cases has sometimes been connected with the question of his attitude towards the Christians in Bithynia.

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  • There are also several excellent clubs and societies, social, political, scientific, and sporting; including among the last the famous Royal Ulster Yacht Club.

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  • He was a second cousin to the elder John Adams. His father, whose Christian name was also Samuel, was a wealthy and prominent citizen of Boston, who took an active part in the politics of the town, and was a member of the Caucus (or Caulker's) Club, with which the political term "caucus" is said to have originated; his mother was Mary Fifield.

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  • About 1748 he began to take an important part in the affairs of the town, and became a leader in the debates of a political club which he was largely instrumental in organizing, and to whose weekly publication, the Public Advertiser, he contributed numerous articles.

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  • Quekett Club (2) viii.

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  • In 1874 a statue of Commodus was dug up at Rome, in which he is represented as Hercules - a lion's skin on his head, a club in his right and the apples of the Hesperides in his left hand.

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  • He was a student of medicine at Paris in 1790, became one of the orators of the club of the Cordeliers, and contributed anonymously to the Revolutions de Paris.

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  • In 1737 he had been appointed postmaster at Philadelphia, and about the same time he organized the first police force and fire company in the colonies; in 1749, after he had written Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania, he and twenty-three other citizens of Philadelphia formed themselves into an association for the purpose of establishing an academy, which was opened in 1751, was chartered in 1753, and eventually became the University of Pennsylvania; in 1727 he organized a debating club, the " Junto," in Philadelphia, and later he was one of the founders of the American Philosophical Society (1743; incorporated 1780); he took the lead in the organization of a militia force, and in the paving of the city streets, improved the method of street lighting, and assisted in the founding of a city hospital (1751); in brief, he gave the impulse to nearly every measure or project for the welfare and prosperity of Philadelphia undertaken in his day.

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  • In Queen Victoria Street, which runs along the west side of the gardens, are the Cape University buildings (begun in 1906), the law courts, City club and Huguenot memorial hall.

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  • The Italian Alpine Club has erected a hut S.W.

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  • Among the important buildings are the Federal Building, the County Court House, the City Hall, a County Hall of Records, the Public Library with about 110,000 volumes in 1908, the large Auditorium and office buildings and the Woman's Club.

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  • Among other institutions are the new post office, begun in 1902 and finished in 1907; the Mineria, occupied by the schools of mining and engineering; the military school, occupying a part of the castle of Chapultepec; the Iturbide palace, now occupied as a hotel; the Iturbide theatre, occupied by the chamber of deputies, for which a new legislative palace to cost 2,500,000 pesos was under construction in 1909; the new palace of justice; the old mint, dating from 1537; the new penitentiary, completed in 190o; the Panteon, with its monuments to the most celebrated Mexicans; the new general hospital; the jockey club on Plaza Guardiola, a new university (1910) and new school edifices of modern design.

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  • Laing, are reproduced in the Adversaria of the Bannatyne Club.

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    0
  • Laing (Bannatyne Club 1823; reprinted in "New Club" series, Paisley, 1882); by the Hunterian Club in their edition of the Bannatyne MS., and by A.

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  • After the fall of Robespierre he joined the group of "Thermidorians" and was sent on mission to the south of France, where he closed the Jacobin club at Toulouse and set free a number of imprisoned "suspects."

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  • An unsuccessful attempt was also made to expel him from the Union League Club of New York.

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  • On leaving college he made a short visit to Europe, was elected to the London Alpine Club for climbing the Jungfrau and the Matterhorn, and returning to New York studied law for a brief period in the Law School of Columbia University and in the office of his uncle Robert B.

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  • Roosevelt's brother, the president's father, Theodore Roosevelt (1831-1878), was a glass importer, prominent in city charities, an organizer of the Union League Club, and the founder of the Orthopaedic Hospital.

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  • The German National Union (Nationalverband) agreed to extend temporary hospitality to the Italian university in Vienna, but the Southern Slav Hochschule Club demanded a guarantee that a later transfer to the coast provinces should not be contemplated, together with the simultaneous foundation of Slovene professorial chairs in Prague and Cracow, and preliminary steps towards the foundation of a Southern Slav university in Laibach.

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  • 23 30,000 Rumanian peasants of the Bukovina got up a great manifesto in favour of the emperor and the empire, and on Dec. 1 patriotic protestations from the Rumanian Club followed.

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  • The Rumanian Club made a similar declaration on Jan.

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  • The town possesses a fine European club, a racecourse, and good golf links.

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  • He said that he did not feel that he belonged to the "Club" of European sovereigns until he received this decoration.

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  • Helena is delightfully situated with Mt Helena as a background in the hollow of the Prickly Pear valley, a rich agricultural region surrounded by rolling hills and lofty mountains, and contains many fine buildings, including the state capitol, county court house, the Montana club house, high school, the cathedral of St Helena, a federal building, and the United States assay office.

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    0
  • In April 1792, summoned again by the Cordeliers' Club, he returned to Paris, and published No.

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    0
  • On returning to Corsica he became the leading speaker in the Jacobin club at Ajaccio.

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    0
  • In the south of France he worked hard for the Jacobinical cause, and figured as "Brutus" in the Jacobin club of the small town of St Maximin (then renamed Marathon).

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  • Furnivall for the Roxburghe Club (1862), and for the Early English Text Society (1901-1903).

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  • The Public Library (opened in 1889) contained about 160,000 volumes in 1910, and the library of the New Jersey Historical Society about 26,000 books, about 27,000 pamphlets and many manuscripts; the Prudential Insurance Company has a law library of about 20,000 volumes; and the Essex County Lawyers' Club has one of 5000 volumes or more.

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  • Yet from the first the leaders of the two parties stood in avowed opposition, in the Jacobin Club as in the Assembly.

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  • They had behind them the revolutionary Commune, the Sections and the National Guard of Paris, and they had gained control of the Jacobin club, where Brissot, absorbed in departmental work, had been superseded by Robespierre.

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  • Among the social clubs of the city are the Queen City Club, organized in 1874; the Phoenix Club, organized in 1856 and the leading Jewish club in the city; the Cuvier Club, organized in 1871 and originally an association of hunters and anglers for the preservation of game and fish; the Cincinnati Club, the Business Men's Club, the University Club, the Art Club, and the Literary Club, of the last of which many prominent men, including President Hayes, have been members.

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  • This club dates from 1849, and is said to be the oldest literary club in the country.

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  • BEEFSTEAK CLUB, the name of several clubs formed in London during the, 8th and 19th centuries.

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  • From this started the Club, the members of which delighted to call themselves "The Steaks."

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  • The rendezvous was the theatre till the fire in 1808, when the club moved first to the Bedford Coffee House, and the next year to the Old Lyceum.

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  • On the burning of the Lyceum, "The Steaks" met again in the Bedford Coffee House till 1838, when the New Lyceum was opened, and a large room there was allotted the club.

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  • These meetings were held till the club ceased to exist in 1867.

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  • Thomas Sheridan founded a Beefsteak Club in Dublin at the Theatre Royal in 1749, and of this Peg Woffington was president.

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  • The modern Beefsteak Club was founded by J.

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  • The city has three well-equipped hospitals, the beautiful Pentucket club house, a children's home, an old ladies' home and numerous charitable organizations.

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  • There are several boat clubs and a country and golf club.

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  • In 1824 he published The Poetical Remains of some of the Scottish Kings, now first collected; and in the same year he edited and presented as a contribution to the Bannatyne Club Robene and Makyne and the Testament of Cresseid, by Robert Henryson.

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  • There is much valuable material in the Register (Frankfort, 1903 seq.) of the Kentucky State Historical Society, and especially in the publications of the Filson Club of Louisville.

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  • The European quarter contains several fine public buildings, including the residence of the governor, club house, barracks and hospital.

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  • One of his favourite places of resort in these years was a club of which Dr Hutton, Dr Black, Dr Adam Ferguson, John Clerk the naval tactician, Robert Adam the architect, as well as Smith himself, were original members, and to which Dugald Stewart, Professor Playfair and other eminent men were afterwards admitted.

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  • The directory of the department, of which the duc de la Rochefoucauld was president, was at this time in pronounced opposition to the advanced views that dominated the Legislative Assembly and the Jacobin Club, and Roederer was not altogether in touch with his colleagues.

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  • The most characteristic weapon of the Mexicans was the maquahuitl or " handwood," a club set with two rows of large sharp obsidian flakes, a well-directed blow with which would cut down man or horse.

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  • Gods are represented with their appropriate attributes - the fire-god hurling his spear, the moon-goddess with a shell, &c.; the scenes of human life are pictures of warriors fighting with club and spear, men paddling in canoes, women spinning and weaving, &c. An important step towards phonetic writing appears in the picture-names of places and persons.

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  • The Greeks have a literary society, and there is a well-organized club to which members of all the native communities, as well as many foreigners, belong.

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  • Quekett Club; C. Wesenberg-Lund, "Danmarks Rotifera," in Vid.

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  • At the Jacobin club he became from 1790 one of the most violent of the anti-royalist orators.

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  • On the 2nd of June 1 793 he proposed a decree of accusation against the Girondists; on the 9th, at the Jacobin club, he outlined a programme which the Convention was destined gradually to realize: the expulsion of all foreigners not naturalized, the establishment of an impost on the rich, the deprivation of the rights of citizenship of all "anti-social" men, the creation of a revolutionary army, the licensing of all officers ci-devant nobles, the death penalty for unsuccessful generals.

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  • Surprised and menaced by the Thermidorian reaction, he denounced its partisans to the Jacobin club.

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  • The Pacific coast Transition zone is noted for its forests of giant conifers, principally Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, Pacific cedar and Western hemlock, Here, too, mosses and ferns grow in profusion, and the sadal (Gaultheria shailon), thimble berry (Rubus nootkamus), salmon berry (Rubus spectabilis) and devils club, (Fatsia horr-ida) are characteristic shrubs.

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  • The Dodge Club (1869), A Humorous Book Of Travel, Appeared, Curiously Enough, A Few Months Before Innocents Abroad.

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  • Heracles burst the bonds which bound him, and, seizing his club, slew Busiris with his son Amphidamas and his herald Chalbes.

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  • James Maxwell of Kirkconnell (c. 1708-1762), the Jacobite, wrote the Narrative of Charles Prince of Wales's Expedition to Scotland in 1745, which was printed for the Maitland Club in 1841.

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  • N.W., an attractive residential suburb and winter resort, in which there are a country club and a large United States arsenal, established in 1831.

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  • Near Augusta, on the site now occupied by the Eli Whitney Country Club, Eli Whitney is said to have first set up and operated his cotton gin; he is commemorated by a mural tablet in the court house.

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  • Among other buildings and institutions are a novitiate of Marist Fathers, a science and art school, a pier with pavilion and concert rooms, and a yacht club.

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  • Bull-fights have never been popular in Rio de Janeiro, but horse-racing is a favourite sport, and the Jockey Club maintains a racecourse in the Sao Francisco Xavier suburb.

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  • His efforts were primarily directed to the prevention of any recrudescence of the tyranny exercised by the Jacobin Club, the commune of Paris, and the revolutionary tribunal.

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  • He persuaded the Committee of Safety to take upon itself the closing of the Jacobin Club, on the ground that it was an administrative rather than a legislative measure.

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  • Stevenson, Maitland Club, Edinburgh, 1836); the Black Prince, a poem by the poet Chandos, composed about 1386, and 'relating the life of the Black Prince from 1346-1376 (re-edited by Francisque Michel, London and Paris, 1883); and, lastly, the different versions of the Brutes, the form and historical importance of which have been indicated by Paul Meyer (Bulletin de la Societe des Anciens Textes, 1878, pp. 104-145), and by F.

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  • Though he approved of the French Revolution, his sympathies were with the more moderate party, and he became a member of the "club of 1789," instituted to support the new form of constitutional monarchy in opposition to the anarchical attempts of the Jacobins.

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  • Three old-established inns, the Bull and Bush, the Spaniards, and Jack Straw's Castle (the name of which has no historical significance), claim many great names among former visitors; while the Upper Flask Inn, now a private house, was the meeting-place of the Kit-Cat Club.

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  • He was known from early life as a cultured musician, and became an enthusiastic golf player, having been captain of the Royal and Antient Golf Club of St Andrews in 1894-1895.

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  • He was one of the promoters of the constitutional club of Salm, formed to counterbalance the royalist club of Clichy, and he supported Barras in 1797 and 17 9 9 in the coups d'etat of 18 Fructidor, and of 18 Brumaire.

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  • and iii.; Registrum Episcopatus Aberdonensis (Spalding Club); Rymer's Foedera.

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  • (1790) (called by the editor "the first genuine edition," because printed from the Advocates' Library text, but carelessly); Jamieson (1820); Cosmo Innes (Spalding Club, 1856); W.

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  • During their struggle with the Girondists, the Montagnards gained the upper hand in the Jacobin Club, and for a time Jacobin and Montagnard were synonymous terms. The Mountain was successively under the sway of such men as Marat, Danton, and Robespierre, and the group finally disappeared after Robespierre's death and the successes of the French arms.

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  • Noteworthy public buildings are the County Court-house, the Public Library (about 85,000 volumes in 1910), the Soldiers' Memorial Building, the Toledo Club and the Toledo Museum of Art (1901).

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  • He regarded the monstrous system of misrule for which they were primarily responsible with indignation, made no secret of his sentiments, and soon gathered round him a band of young officers of strong royalist proclivities, whom he formed into a club, the so-called Svenska Botten (Sweden's groundwork).

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  • The club was suppressed by the dominant "Caps," who also sought to ruin Sprengtporten financially by inciting his tenants in Finland to bring actions against him for alleged extortion, not in the ordinary courts but in the riksdag itself, where Sprengtporten's political adversaries would be his judges.

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  • high, a town-hall, corn exchange, public libraries, assembly rooms, fever hospital, sheriff court buildings, people's club and institute, high school (1894) - on the site of the ancient burgh school (1582) - the Beveridge hall and free library, and the Adam Smith memorial hall.

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  • till 1575 (Bannatyne Club, 1833); Robert Birrell's "Diary" in Sir J.

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  • Stevenson (Edinburgh, 1883); Sir James Melville's Memoirs of his own Life (Bannatyne Club, 1827); Richard Bannatyne, Memoriales of Transactions in Scotland (Edinburgh, 1836); William Camden's Annales (Eng.

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  • Sport and athletics are provided by a number of clubs, notably the Touring Club Italiano, founded in 1894.

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  • The first was the English Alpine Club (founded in the winter of 1857-1858), followed in 1862 by the Austrian Alpine Club (which in 1873 was fused, under the name of the German and Austrian Alpine Club, with the German Alpine Club, founded in 1869), in 1863 by the Italian and Swiss Alpine Clubs, and in 1874 by the French Alpine Club, not to mention numerous minor societies of more local character.

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  • It was by the members of these clubs (and a few others) that the minute exploration (now all but complete) of the High Alps was carried out, while much has been done in the way of building club huts, organizing and training guides, &c., to smooth the way for later corners, who benefit too by the detailed information published in the periodicals (the first dates from 1863 only) issued by these clubs.

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  • by the Italian Alpine Club in 1899); A.

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  • by the French Alpine Club); J.

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  • (1902-1905) by the Swiss Alpine Club under the name of Clubfiihrer to the Alps of Glarus and Uri, and V.

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  • The German and Austrian Alpine Club is publishing a very fine set of maps (scale I: 50,000) of the Eastern Alps, which are clearer and better than the Austrian Government's Topographische Detailkarten (11 sheets, scale 1: 50,000).

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  • In the centre of the town is the Beursplein, or Exchange Square, with the large general post office (1875), the "Amicitia" club, and the exchange itself (1723).

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  • The museums of the city comprise an ethnographical museum, the maritime museum established by the Yacht Club in 1874, and the Boyman's Museum (1867) containing pictures, drawings and engravings, as well as the town library.

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  • Among the remaining buildings must be mentioned the town hall (17th century; restored 1823), the court-house, the concert-hall of the "Harmonic" club, the record office (1900), the leeskabuiet, or subscription library and reading-rooms, and the ten-storeyed Witte Huis (1897), which is used for offices and is one of the highest private buildings on the Continent.

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  • the Equisetales (Horse-tails), the Lycopodiales (Club mosses), the Filicales (Ferns) and Cycadofilices, the Sphenophyllales and Cordaitales.

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  • See Chartulary of the Monastery of Paisley, published by the Maitland Club (1832); J.

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  • In the Convention, in the Jacobin Club, and among the populace his relations with Robespierre became known, and he was dubbed the "St John of the Messiah of the People."

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  • The idea was accepted by several gentlemen in the habit of working together, and a meeting was held at the Carlton Club shortly afterwards, consisting Lord Randolph Churchill, Sir H.

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  • Many of the commercial and private buildings are also worthy of notice, especially the Queensland National Bank, a classic Italian structure, the massive treasury buildings, one of the largest erections in Australia, the Queensland Club with its wide colonnades in Italian Renaissance style, and the great buildings of the Brisbane Newspaper Company.

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  • In 1790 he joined the Jacobin Club, in which the moderate elements still predominated, and was assiduous in attendance at the debates of the National Assembly.

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  • The principal modern pleasure grounds are Kennington Park (20 acres), and Brockwell Park (127 acres) south of Brixton, and near the southern end of Kennington Road is Kennington Oval, the ground of the Surrey County Cricket Club, the scene of its home matches and of other important fixtures.

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  • Some of these, in 1764, formed themselves into a club, which gradually became a formidable power in the commonwealth of letters.

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  • Soon after the club began to exist, Johnson formed a connexion less important indeed to his fame, but much more important to his happiness, than his connexion with Boswell.

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  • He retained the full use of his senses during the paralytic attack, and in July he was sufficiently recovered to renew his old club life and to meditate further journeys.

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  • Johnson's "Club" ("The Club") still exists, and has contained ever since his time a large proportion of the public celebrities of its day.

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  • A "Johnson Club," which has included many Johnson scholars and has published papers, was founded in 1885.

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  • This club was denounced by Barnave in the Assembly (January 21st, 1791), and on the 28th of March it was attacked by a mob, whereupon it was closed by order of the Assembly.

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  • He joined a club called the "Revolutionists," and associated much with Lord Stanhope, Horne Tooke and Holcroft.

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  • In the case of membership of a voluntary association (club, &c.) the right of expulsion depends upon the rules, and must be exercised in good faith.

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  • rejected; the whole of the Polish club, followed by the Tirolese and Slovenes, left the House, which consequently consisted of Ito members - the Germans and German representatives from Bohemia and Moravia.

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  • Twenty-seven members of the diet led by Gregr and Stadkowsky, being outvoted in the Czech Club, resigned their seats.

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  • Against them were 227 Constitutionalists, and it seemed to matter little that they were divided into three groups; there were 105 in the Liberal Club under the leadership of Herbst, 57 Constitutionalists, elected by the landed proprietors, and a third body of Radicals, some of whom were more democratic than the old Constitutional party, while others laid more stress on nationality.

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  • Liechtenstein, separated from Hohenwart's party and founded their own club, so that they could act more freely.

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  • Both the new Clerical Club and the remainder of the Conservatives were much affected by the reaction against the doctrines of economic Liberalism.

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  • As is so often the case in Austria, the movement began in the university of Vienna, where a Leseverein (reading club) of German students was formed as a point of cohesion for Germans, which had eventually to be suppressed.

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  • After 1878 a heightening of racial feeling began among the Radicals, and in 1881 all the German parties in opposition joined together in a club called the United Left, and in their programme put in a prominent place the defence of the position of the Germans as the condition for the existence of the state, and demanded that German should be expressly recognized as the official language.

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  • The German Club, e.g., congratulated Bismarck on his measures against the Poles; the German Austrians refused to take cognizance of events outside Austria with which they had nothing to do.

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  • Even the German Club was not sufficiently decided for Herr von Schbnerer and his friends, who broke off from it and founded a " National German Union."

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  • When in 1888 the two clubs, the German Austrians and the Germans, joined once more under the name of the " United German Left " into a new club' with eighty-seven members, so as the better to guard against the common danger and to defeat the educational demands of the Clericals, the National Germans remained apart with seventeen members.

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  • The Slovenes were, however, members of the Hohenwart Club, so Hohenwart and his followers supported the request, which was adopted by the ministry.

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  • Southern Slav Club Croats .

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  • Rumanians Rumanian Club Jews Zionists .

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  • He contributed to various periodicals, notably to the National Observer and the Bookman, and also to the Book of the Rhymers Club - the English Parnasse Contemporain of the early 'nineties.

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  • Hunter's Quay is the yachting headquarters, the Royal Clyde Yacht Club's house adjoining the pier.

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  • The wooden club, a somewhat primitive weapon, seems to have been considered characteristic of foreigners from very early times, and, in scenes dating from the Middle Kingdom, belong principally to the levies from the surrounding barbarians.

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  • club; of foreigners.

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  • Striking ToolsThe wooden mallet of club form (I) was used in the VIth and XIIth Dynasties; of the modern masons form (2) ~n.

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  • Wessel, who up to that time had only been known as the president of a club of wits, immediately wrote Love without Stockings (1772), in which a plot of the most abject triviality is worked out in strict accordance with the rules of French tragedy, and in most pompous and pathetic Alexandrines.

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  • The muniments of the abbacy, preserved in the archives of the earl of Morton, were edited by Cosmo Innes for the Bannatyne Club and published in 1837 under the title of Liber sancte Marie de Melros.

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  • The Chronica de Mailros, preserved among the Cotton MSS., was printed at Oxford in 1684 by William Fulman and by the Bannatyne Club in 1835 under the editorship of John Stevenson.

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  • At Cambridge he founded the "Whig Club," and the "Amicable Society," and became very intimate with Byron, who accompanied him on a tour in Spain, Greece and Turkey in 1809.

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  • He had taken a prominent part in politics as a Liberal since his university days, especially in work for the Eighty Club, and in 1886 was elected member of parliament for East Fife, a seat which he retained in subsequent elections.

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  • This announcement, however, was no sooner made than it was explained away by the supporters of both, and early in 1902 Lord Rosebery spoke at the National Liberal Club in a way which indicated that an understanding might still be arrived at.

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  • The best collection of Henry's portraits was exhibited at the Burlington Fine Arts Club in 1909, and the catalogue of that exhibition contains the best description of them; several are reproduced in Pollard's Henry VIII.

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  • Lang, Roxburghe Club, London, 1902).

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  • Meanwhile complex intrigues occurred, and were betrayed, between " the Club " (the advanced constitutionalists) and the Jacobites.

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  • Upon the fall of the Empire, through the revolution of the 4th of September, Blanqui established the club and journal La patrie en danger.

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  • He was an ardent supporter of the ideas of the Revolution, a member of the Jacobin Club, and one of the founders of the club of the Cordeliers.

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  • After the fall of Robespierre, Legendre took part in the reactionary movement, undertook the closing of the Jacobin Club, was.

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  • Along the shore of Lakes Fowler and La Belle are some beautiful country estates, several large hotels and fine club houses, and two sanatoria.

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  • Among its attractions is a golf club, established in 1888, with a course of 18 holes.

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  • There is a Roman Catholic church with a resident priest, an Anglican church, visited periodically by a clergyman from the mainland, two native and Chinese schools, and a sailors' club, built by the Roman Catholic mission.

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  • The ancient Greeks symbolized it as a man walking, with his right hand grasping a club, and his left extending upwards and holding the leash of two dogs, which are apparently barking at the Great Bear.

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  • The Centro Asturiano, a club with a membership of some ten or fifteen thousand (not limited to Asturians), 1 Renamed Paseo de Marti by the republic, but the name is never used.

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  • It is reported that Mahmud marched through Ajmere to avoid the desert of Sind; that he found the Hindus gathered on the neck of the peninsula of Somnath in defence of their holy city; that the battle lasted for two days; that in the end the Rajput warriors fled to their boats, while the Brahman priests retired into the inmost shrine; that Mahmud, introduced into this shrine, rejected all entreaties by the Brahmans to spare their idol, and all offers of ransom; that he smote the image with his club, and forthwith a fountain of precious stones gushed out.

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  • Until the British invasion of Afghanistan in 1839, the club of Mahmud and the wood gates of Somnath were preserved at the tomb of the great conqueror near Ghazni.

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  • The club has now disappeared, and the gates brought back to India by Lord Ellenborough are recognized to be a clumsy forgery.

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  • (1904); Latest Literary Essays and Addresses (1891); The Old English Dramatists (1892); Conversations on some of the Old Poets (Philadelphia, David M`Kay; reprint of the volume published in 1843 and subsequently abandoned by its author, 18 93); The Power of Sound: a Rhymed Lecture (New York, privately printed, 1896); Lectures on English Poets (Cleveland, The Rowfant Club, 1899).

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  • On the eastern slope of First Mountain are Hutton Park, containing the grounds of the Essex County Country Club, and Llewellyn Park, a beautiful residential tract of 750 acres, named in honour of its originator, Llewellyn S.

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  • The city contains a large number of handsome edifices, both public and private, among which are the Bolsa, Government House, municipal hall, cathedral, Cabildo, Hospital de Caridad, insane asylum, Italian hospital, Teatro Solis, Athenaeum, and the Club Uruguayo.

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  • The ground of the Essex County Cricket Club is at Leyton.

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  • In the vicinity (near Forest Row station) is the golf course of the Royal Ashdown Forest Golf Club.

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  • This was edited (1904) for the Roxburghe Club by W.

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  • In 1769 the son entered the college of New Jersey (nor Princeton University), where, in the same year, he founded the well-known literary club, "The American Whig Society."

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  • He took a vigorous share in the debates of a local Whig club, and in 1772, he wrote a pamphlet embodying the grievances of excisemen and supporting their demands for an increase of pay.

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  • Both records were printed by the Bannatyne Club in 1834.

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  • The derivation of the word "ragman" has never been satisfactorily explained, but various guesses as to its meaning and a list of examples of its use for legal instruments both in England and Scotland will be found in the preface to the Bannatyne Club's volume, and in Jamieson's Scottisk Dictionary, s.v.

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  • The principal buildings of the university are Packer Hall (1869), largely taken up by the department of civil engineering, the chemical and metallurgical laboratory, the physical and electrical engineering laboratory, the steam engineering laboratory, Williams Hall for mechanical engineering, &c., Saucon Hall for the English department, Christmas Hall, with drawing-rooms and the offices of the Y.M.C.A., the Sayre astronomical observatory, the Packer Memorial Church, the university library (1897), dormitories (1907) given by Andrew Carnegie, Drown Memorial Hall, a students' club, the college commons, and a gymnasium.

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  • 1861) stands at the entrance of the Hamilton Club in Clinton Street and one of U.

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  • Grant (also by Partridge) stands at the entrance of the Union League Club in Bedford Avenue.

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  • above the city, but the Pennsylvania canal was subsequently abandoned, and in 1888 the dam was bought and repaired by the South Fork hunting and fishing club, and Conemaugh lake was formed.

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  • The Lives of the Bishops was reprinted for the Bannatyne Club, Edin., 1825, in a limited edition of sixty copies.

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  • Of these Hurlingham Park is the headquarters of the Hurlingham Polo Club and a fashionable resort; and Queen's Club, West Kensington, has tennis and other courts for the use of members, and is also the scene of important football matches, and of the athletic meetings between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and those between the English and American Universities held in England.

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  • of Thomas Earl of Ailesbury (Roxburghe Club, 1890); Eng.

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  • The learned societies of Washington are to a large degree more national than local in their character; among them are: the Washington Academy of Sciences (1898), a "federal head" of most of the societies mentioned below; the Anthropological Society (founded 1879; incorporated 1887), which has published Transactions (1879 sqq., with the co-operation of the Smithsonian Institution) and The American Anthropologist (1888-1898; since 1898 published by the American Anthropological Association); the National Geographic Society (1888), which since 1903 has occupied the Hubbard Memorial Building, which sent scientific expeditions to Alaska, Mont Pelee and La Souffriere, and which publishes the National Geographic Magazine (1888 sqq.), National Geographic Monographs (1895) and various special maps; the Philosophical Society of Washington (1871; incorporated 1901), devoted especially to mathematical and physical sciences; the Biological Society (1880), which publishes Proceedings (1880 sqq.); the Botanical Society of Washington (1901); the Geological Society of Washington (1893): the Entomological Society of Washington (1884), which publishes Proceedings (1884 sqq.); the Chemical Society (1884); the Records of the Past Exploration Society (1901), which publishes Records of the Past (1902 sqq.); the Southern History Association (1896), which issues Publications (1897 sqq.); the Society for Philosophical Inquiry (1893), which publishes Memoirs (1893 sqq.); the Society of American Foresters (1900), which publishes Proceedings (1905 sqq.); and the Cosmos Club.

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  • He was a regular attendant at the meetings of the Royal Society, of which he became a fellow in 1760, and he dined every Thursday with the club composed of its members.

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  • cap. 2.2 He invented the versorium or 1 Gilbert's work, On the Magnet, Magnetic Bodies and the Great Magnet, the Earth, has been translated from the rare folio Latin edition of 1600, but otherwise reproduced in its original form by the chief members of the Gilbert Club of England, with a series of valuable notes by Prof. S.

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  • The results of her study of German philosophy were seen in philosophical essays; in lectures on "Doubt and Belief," "The Duality of Character," &c., delivered in1860-1861in her home in Boston, and later in Washington; and in addresses before the Boston Radical Club and the Concord school of philosophy.

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  • She was one of the organizers of the American Woman-Suffrage Association and of the Association for the Advancement of Women (1869), and in 1870 became one of the editors of the Woman's Journal, and in 1872 president of the New England Women's Club.

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  • Many routes to the summit are now known, but that usually taken (from the Payer Club hut, easily accessible from either Sulden or Trafoi) from the north is daily traversed in summer and offers no difficulties to moderately experienced walkers.

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  • He was the author of Old London Town (1910); History of the Manhattan Club (1915) and "Marse Henry": an Autobiography (1919).

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  • There is, however, a fashionable modern club of the same name.

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  • The chief buildings are a church, club, hospital and a Lawrence asylum school for the children of British soldiers.

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  • In 1790 he attracted attention by some pamphlets, and became a prominent member 'of the club of the Cordeliers in 1791.

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  • An annual regatta is held early in August by the Royal Swedish Yacht Club (Svenska Segelsallkapet).

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  • The Stockholm General Skating Club (Almdnna Skridskoklubb) is the leading institution for the most favoured winter sport.

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  • A kind of philosophical club had been formed, including among its members Simon de Vries, John Bresser, Louis Meyer, and others who appear in Spinoza's correspondence.

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  • had been communicated to the philosophical club there before February 1663.

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  • This Historie was published by the Wodrow Society and by the Maitland Club in 1842.

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  • Government offices and private villas are on either side of the palace, and beyond, on the east, are the Sudan Club, the military hospital, and the Gordon Memorial College.

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  • The numerous inland waters and sheltered channels within the skargard have caused the high development of sailing as a summer sport, the Royal Swedish Yacht Club having its headquarters in Stockholm.

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  • The headquarters of the Swedish Touring Club (Svenska Turistf oreningen) are in Stockholm, but its organization extends throughout the country, and is of special value to travellers in the far north.

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  • vers., Stockholm, 1904); Bidrag till Sveriges officiela statistik (Stockholm, 1857 seq.); Statistisk Tidskrift, periodically from 1862; Publications (year-book, guides, &c.) of the Svenska Turistforeningen (Swedish Touring Club) Stockholm; periodical Bulletin of the Geological Institute of Upsala University, in which may be noted K.

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