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cloths

cloths Sentence Examples

  • She glanced around, noting several objects covered with cloths, as well as a box that sat on a table beside the door.

  • Loaves of bread were rising along one counter beneath thin cloths.

  • Tables were covered with white linen table cloths and adorned with violet colored napkins inside light gray napkin holders.

  • By the time Carmen retrieved the table cloths from the house, Gerald and Alex had crossed the footbridge and were on the path up the hill to the house.

  • Gerald offered to help Carmen with the table cloths and Alex went inside to work in his office until the guests arrived.

  • West Africa.-Cotton has long been grown in the various countries on the west coast of Africa, ginned by hand or by very primitive means, spun into yarn, and woven on simple looms into " country cloths "; these are often only a few inches wide, so that any large cloths have to be made by sewing the narrow strips together.

  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

  • Cotton has not been cultivated in China from such early times as in India, and although cotton cloths are mentioned in early writings it was not until about A.D.

  • The principal manufactures of the Malays are cotton and silk cloths, earthenware and silver vessels, mats and native weapons.

  • The best cotton cloths are those manufactured by the Bugis people in Celebes, and the batek cloths which come from Java and are stamped with patterns.

  • The bodies were interred wrapped in linen cloths, or swathed in bands, and were frequently preserved by embalming.

  • 5 See Machyn's Diary (Camden Soc. 42; London, 1848), p. 208, for St Bartholomew's day, 1559: "All the roods, and Maries and Johns, and many other of the church goods, both copes, crosses, censers, altar cloths, rood cloths, books, banners,.

  • The required thickness of the spread sheet is very often secured by the rubber-faced surfaces of two cloths being united before curing.

  • Worsted cloths for men's wear seem to have been made first about 1870 at nearly the same time in the Washington mills here, in the Hockanum mills of Rockville, Connecticut, and in Wanskuck mills, Providence, Rhode Island.

  • Their horses had severe bits, and were adorned with nose pieces, cheek pieces and saddle cloths.

  • It is one of the chief centres in France for wool combing and spinning, and produces a great variety of cloths.

  • The streets were hung with rich cloths of silk arras and tapestry; the aldermen and principal men of the city threw out of their windows handsful of gold and silver, to signify their gladness at the king's return; and the conduits ran with wine, both white and red.

  • Oleg returned to Kiev laden with golden ornaments, costly cloths, wines, and all manner of precious things.

  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

  • Native cloths and pottery are manufactured.

  • These consist of coarse blankets and cotton cloths made by the villagers inhabiting the southern tract.

  • The principal suks are el-Attarin (market of the perfumers), el-Farashin (carpets and cloths), el-Serajin (saddlery) and el-Birka (jewelry).

  • The town is a centre of the heavy woollen trade, and has extensive manufactures of army cloths, pilot cloths, druggets, flushings, &c. The working up of old material as "shoddy" is largely carried on.

  • It is claimed that the first production in the United States of finished cotton cloths under one roof and under the factory system was not at Waltham in 1816, but at Clinton in 1813; neither place was the first to spin by power, nor the first to produce finished cloths without the factory system.

  • The exports from Batavia to the other islands of the archipelago, and to the ports in the Malay Peninsula, are rice, sago, coffee, sugar, salt, oil, tobacco, teak timber and planks, Java cloths, brass wares, &c., and European, Indian and Chinese goods.

  • The produce of the Eastern Islands is also collected at its ports for re-exportation to India, China and Europe - namely, gold-dust, diamonds, camphor, benzoin and other drugs; edible bird-nests, trepang, rattans, beeswax, tortoiseshell, and dyeing woods from Borneo and Sumatra; tin from Banka; spices from the Moluccas; fine cloths from Celebes and Bali; and pepper from Sumatra.

  • From Bengal are imported opium, drugs and cloths; from China, teas, raw silk, silk piece-goods, coarse China wares, paper, and innumerable smaller articles for the Chinese settlers.

  • Certain duties were reduced (though in no case greatly reduced) such as those upon wool, some woollens, cheaper grades of cotton cloths, iron, steel rails, copper.

  • Before the rebellion Yun-nan Fu had a prosperous aspect; the shops were large and well supplied with native silken goods, saddlery, &c., while English cotton, Russian cloths and raw cotton from Burma constituted the main foreign merchandise.

  • Lampblack is prepared by burning tar, resin, turpentine and other substances rich in carbon, with a limited supply of air; the products of combustion being conducted into condensing chambers in which cloths are suspended, on which the carbon collects.

  • In Mareska and Donny's process the condensation is effected in a shallow iron box, which has a large exposed surface, capable of being cooled by damped cloths.

  • In Mysore the dew containing it is collected by means of cloths spread on the plant over night, and is used in domestic medicine.

  • In ancient Egyptian cultus the priest, after he has solemnly saluted the gods, begins the daily toilet of the god, which consists in sprinkling his image, clothing it with coloured cloths, and anointing it with oil (Erman, Die aegyptische Religion, p. 49).

  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.

  • The noils are also in great demand for mixing with wool to make fancy effects in wool cloths for the dress goods trade.

  • Coarse linen and woollen cloths are manufactured to a small extent.

  • 1513, is 1 In the Eastern Church four small pieces of cloth marked with the names of the Evangelists are placed on the four corners of the altar, and covered with three cloths, the uppermost (the corporal) being of smaller size.

  • The demand for cloths which require careful handling and regularity in weaving has helped to develop the supply of ring yarns which will stand the strain of the loom better than mule twists.

  • Shirting, which has long since ceased to refer exclusively to shirt cloths, includes a large proportion of Lancashire manufacture.

  • Now, however, Mexicans are often made with lighter wefts, though the name is usually applied to the better class of cloths of the particular character.

  • There is no absolute distinction between the two cloths, but the T cloth is generally lower in quality than the Mexican.

  • The word is sometimes particularly applied to cloths with a comparatively heavy weft, the distinction being made between the even "Mexican make" and the "pin-head" or "medium-make."

  • Printing-cloth is a term with a general significance, but it is also particularly applied to a class of plain cloths in which a very large trade is done both for home trade and export.

  • The Burnley cloths range in width from 2 9 in.

  • Sarong, the Malay ward for a garment wrapped round the lower part of the body and used by both men and women, is now applied to plain or printed cloths exported to the Indian or Eastern Archipelago for this purpose.

  • Some fancy cloths have descriptive names such as herringbone stripe, and there are many arbitrary trade names, such as Yosemite stripe, which may prevail and become the designation of a regular class or die after a few seasons.

  • Various cotton cloths are imitations of other textures and have modified names which indicate their superficial character, frequently produced by finishing processes.

  • Apart from the large class of brocaded cloths made in Jacquard looms there are innumerable simpler kinds, including stripes and checks of various descriptions, such as Swiss, Cord, Satin, Doriah stripes, &c. Mercerized cloths are of many kinds, as the mercerizing process can be applied to almost anything.

  • The following table gives, approximately, in thousands of yards the quantities exported of the four main divisions of cotton cloths: - In the case of cloth, too, the Board of Trade returns must not be taken as an absolute record of imports to the particular countries, as the ultimate recipient is not always determined.

  • - The home trade in cotton cloths is a great and important section, but it is not comparable in volume to the export trade.

  • Some valuable plants are obtained in the mountains of south and southwestern Tibet, yielding the excellent yellow and red colours used to dye the native cloths."

  • If the situation is cool, the stone hard, and the concrete carefully rammed directly it is laid down and kept moist with damp cloths, only just sufficient to moisten the whole mass is required.

  • Cotton cloths are manufactured to some extent, for the dyeing of which the city has attained a high reputation.

  • He was then conducted by them to his appointed chamber, where a bath was prepared hung within and without with linen and covered with rich cloths, into which after they had undressed him he entered.

  • Inferior to this is " cudbear," derived from Lecanora tartarea, which was formerly very extensively employed by the peasantry of north Europe for giving a scarlet or purple colour to woollen cloths.

  • The crushed mass is then placed in hempen cloths and pressed in a screw or hydraulic press.

  • They are also used for drummers' aprons and saddle cloths in the Indian army.

  • Hats, baskets, cloths and rope are woven and are exported to a limited extent; small quantities of copra are also exported.

  • Striped cloths and pekmez, a sweet paste made from grapes, are the principal manufactures; and tobacco and cereals the principal cultures.

  • The manufacture of cloth from flax is of very ancient date, and towards the close of the 16th century Scottish linen cloths were largely exported to foreign countries, as well as to England.

  • There are some cotton factories and sugar mills provided with modern machinery, but the cotton and woollen cloths of the country are commonly coarse and manufactured in the most primitive manner.

  • They have great abundance of silk, from which they weave cloths of silk, and gold of divers kinds, and they also manufacture all sorts of equipments for an army.

  • In the 18th and early r9th centuries the chief industries were huckabacks and coarse cloths, canvas, fustians, pins, glass, sugar-refining and copper.

  • Instead of acting as a little world by itself for the raising of corn, the breeding of cattle, the gathering of wool, the weaving of linen and common cloths, the fabrication of necessary implements of all kinds, the local group began to buy some of these goods and to sell some others, renouncing isolation and making its destiny dependent on commercial intercourse.

  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

  • They are collected for use at late evening or early morning, while in a dull bedewed condition, by shaking them off the trees or shrubs into cloths spread on the ground; and they are killed by dipping them into hot water or vinegar, or by exposing them for some time over the vapour of vinegar.

  • The chief articles imported are sugar, rice, raw cotton and opium, as well as cotton cloths, iron goods and other European manufactures.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • - 1905 4,954 Owing to the success in the manufacture of the various styles of alpaca cloths attained by Sir Titus Salt and other Bradford manufacturers, a great demand for alpaca wool arose, and this demand could not be met by the native product, for there never seems to have been any appreciable increase in the number of alpacas available.

  • with worsted in the various kinds of carpets, with cotton in tapestries and household cloths, with line and tow yarns for the same fabrics and for paddings, &c., and with wool for horse clothing.

  • For detailed information regarding jute, the cloths made from it and the machinery used, see the following works: Watts's Dictionary of the Economic Products of India; Royle's Fibrous Plants of India; Sharp's Flax, Tow and Jute Spinning; Leggatt's Jute Spinning; Woodhouse and Milne's Jute and Linen Weaving; and Woodhouse and Milne's Textile Design: Pure and Applied.

  • The manufactures consist of fine cloths, silk, cotton, woollen and linen fabrics, girdles and lace, paper, hats, leather, earthenware and soap. There are numerous oil mills and brandy distilleries.

  • The preparation of indigo and the dyeing of cloths are other flourishing industries.

  • There are coal mines in the neighbourhood, and the local industries include tanning and manufactures of soap, coarse linen and cloths.

  • It is collected before sunrise, by shaking the grains of manna on to linen cloths spread out beneath the trees, or by dipping the small branches in hot water and evaporating the solution thus obtained.

  • In the Woldeba district hermits dress in ochre-yellow cloths, while the priests of some sects wear hides dyed red.

  • The manufacture of woollen cloths has long been the staple trade of Trowbridge.

  • The pilgrim enters the Haram in the antique and scanty pilgrimage dress (ihram), consisting of two cloths wound round his person in a way prescribed by ritual.

  • The first woollen mill in the colony was established here, and the tweeds, cloths and other woollen fabrics of the town are noted throughout Australia.

  • To him the city owed her trade in cloths and velvets, from which so much wealth accrued to her 1 Fidelis Expositio Errorum Serveti, sub init.

  • The weaving of blankets, handkerchiefs, and cotton and silk cloths constitutes quite an important industry.

  • The principal product of the mills was plain cloths for printing or converting, of a quality finer than No.

  • The women spin and weave, and with the rudest appliances manufacture a variety of strong and durable cloths of silk,cotton and hemp, and of rofia palm, aloe and banana fibre, of elegant patterns, and often with much taste in colour.

  • The figure shows two of the commonest designs which are used for these cloths, design A being what is often termed the "perfect honeycomb"; in the figure it will be seen that the highest number of successive white squares is seven, while the corresponding highest number of successive black squares is five.

  • The curing of hides, the catching and drying of fish, boat-building, and especially the weaving of cotton into cloths called "pagns," afford employment to a considerable number of persons.

  • The warm meal is then delivered through measuring boxes into closed pressbags ("scourtins" of the "Marseilles" press), or through measuring boxes, combined with an automatic moulding machine, into cloths open at two sides (Anglo-American press), so that the preliminarily pressed cakes can be put at once into the hydraulic press.

  • There the meal is packed by hand in "scourtins," bags made of plaited coco-nut leaves - replacing the woollen cloths used in England.

  • This is done by allowing the oil to cool down to a low temperature and pressing it through cloths in a press, when a limpid oil exudes, which remains proof against cold - "winter oil."

  • Its chief manufactures are silk work, cloths and cloaks, gold and silver ornaments, &c., brass and copper work, furniture and ornamental woodwork.

  • The chief imports are cloths, prints, muslins, raw silk, sugar, rice, &c.

  • She glanced around, noting several objects covered with cloths, as well as a box that sat on a table beside the door.

  • Loaves of bread were rising along one counter beneath thin cloths.

  • Tables were covered with white linen table cloths and adorned with violet colored napkins inside light gray napkin holders.

  • By the time Carmen retrieved the table cloths from the house, Gerald and Alex had crossed the footbridge and were on the path up the hill to the house.

  • Gerald offered to help Carmen with the table cloths and Alex went inside to work in his office until the guests arrived.

  • altar cloths, floors, chairs, garments or ears.

  • No great silken banners or horses bedecked in armor and gorgeous cloths greeted the English when they finally came upon their foe.

  • bedecked in armor and gorgeous cloths greeted the English when they finally came upon their foe.

  • burp cloths, on a changing mat and for general babycare.

  • The machine - used for weaving cloths like damask - was a British first.

  • Terries can also be used as boosters, burp cloths, on a changing mat and for general babycare.

  • dry cotton wool or cloths will catch on rough surfaces, leaving filaments of fibers behind, and possibly causing damage.

  • cut into strips to make the wiping cloths.

  • cut into strips to make the wiping cloths.

  • Floodlights produce a wide flood of light and are mostly used for lighting cycloramas, sky cloths and other large expanses of set.

  • damask table cloths to tourists.

  • The cloths quickly wipe away dander, dirt, loose hair, dust and odor leaving your pet clean and fresh smelling.

  • The server came by, looked at the now desecrated Fifth Floor restaurant cloths, and made a little notation on her pad.

  • Well dressed tables will be arranged with silver glitter sprinkled over white table cloths.

  • If you use paper napkins and table cloths, make sure they're made from recycled paper.

  • Waiters are clad in purple raiment, likewise tables in red cloths.

  • rick cloths to protect it from sparks.

  • Devon produced serges or " long ells ", unusually long cloths with combed wool warps and carded wool wefts in a twill weave.

  • swaddle>Swaddling cloths which were used to wipe the animals were wrapped around the baby.

  • Use disposable cloths and paper towels where possible, otherwise wash tea towels, regularly.

  • We provide aluminum trussing, flown and ground supported rigging systems, theater drapes, star cloths, venue dressing and advertising banner rigging.

  • A bottle of sub. turps and some clean cotton type cloths.

  • The source could be raw foods, hands, animals, work surfaces, dirty utensils or cloths.

  • Devon produced serges or " long ells ", unusually long cloths with combed wool warps and carded wool wefts in a twill weave.

  • West Africa.-Cotton has long been grown in the various countries on the west coast of Africa, ginned by hand or by very primitive means, spun into yarn, and woven on simple looms into " country cloths "; these are often only a few inches wide, so that any large cloths have to be made by sewing the narrow strips together.

  • These native cloths are exceedingly durable, and many of them are ornamented by using dyed yarns and in other ways: Southern Nigeria (Lagos) and northern Nigeria are the most important cotton countries amongst the British possessions on the coast.

  • Cotton has not been cultivated in China from such early times as in India, and although cotton cloths are mentioned in early writings it was not until about A.D.

  • The principal manufactures of the Malays are cotton and silk cloths, earthenware and silver vessels, mats and native weapons.

  • The best cotton cloths are those manufactured by the Bugis people in Celebes, and the batek cloths which come from Java and are stamped with patterns.

  • The bodies were interred wrapped in linen cloths, or swathed in bands, and were frequently preserved by embalming.

  • As to the use of the word, it must be further stated that it is also technically applied to altar cloths, the altar being "vested" in frontal (antependium) and super-frontal (see Altar).

  • 5 See Machyn's Diary (Camden Soc. 42; London, 1848), p. 208, for St Bartholomew's day, 1559: "All the roods, and Maries and Johns, and many other of the church goods, both copes, crosses, censers, altar cloths, rood cloths, books, banners,.

  • The required thickness of the spread sheet is very often secured by the rubber-faced surfaces of two cloths being united before curing.

  • Worsted cloths for men's wear seem to have been made first about 1870 at nearly the same time in the Washington mills here, in the Hockanum mills of Rockville, Connecticut, and in Wanskuck mills, Providence, Rhode Island.

  • Their horses had severe bits, and were adorned with nose pieces, cheek pieces and saddle cloths.

  • It is one of the chief centres in France for wool combing and spinning, and produces a great variety of cloths.

  • The streets were hung with rich cloths of silk arras and tapestry; the aldermen and principal men of the city threw out of their windows handsful of gold and silver, to signify their gladness at the king's return; and the conduits ran with wine, both white and red.

  • Oleg returned to Kiev laden with golden ornaments, costly cloths, wines, and all manner of precious things.

  • The precipitated gold is washed, treated with salt and sulphuric acid to remove iron salts, roughly dried by pressing in cloths or on filter paper, and then melted with salt, borax and nitre in graphite crucibles.

  • Native cloths and pottery are manufactured.

  • These consist of coarse blankets and cotton cloths made by the villagers inhabiting the southern tract.

  • The principal suks are el-Attarin (market of the perfumers), el-Farashin (carpets and cloths), el-Serajin (saddlery) and el-Birka (jewelry).

  • The town is a centre of the heavy woollen trade, and has extensive manufactures of army cloths, pilot cloths, druggets, flushings, &c. The working up of old material as "shoddy" is largely carried on.

  • It is claimed that the first production in the United States of finished cotton cloths under one roof and under the factory system was not at Waltham in 1816, but at Clinton in 1813; neither place was the first to spin by power, nor the first to produce finished cloths without the factory system.

  • The exports from Batavia to the other islands of the archipelago, and to the ports in the Malay Peninsula, are rice, sago, coffee, sugar, salt, oil, tobacco, teak timber and planks, Java cloths, brass wares, &c., and European, Indian and Chinese goods.

  • The produce of the Eastern Islands is also collected at its ports for re-exportation to India, China and Europe - namely, gold-dust, diamonds, camphor, benzoin and other drugs; edible bird-nests, trepang, rattans, beeswax, tortoiseshell, and dyeing woods from Borneo and Sumatra; tin from Banka; spices from the Moluccas; fine cloths from Celebes and Bali; and pepper from Sumatra.

  • From Bengal are imported opium, drugs and cloths; from China, teas, raw silk, silk piece-goods, coarse China wares, paper, and innumerable smaller articles for the Chinese settlers.

  • Certain duties were reduced (though in no case greatly reduced) such as those upon wool, some woollens, cheaper grades of cotton cloths, iron, steel rails, copper.

  • Before the rebellion Yun-nan Fu had a prosperous aspect; the shops were large and well supplied with native silken goods, saddlery, &c., while English cotton, Russian cloths and raw cotton from Burma constituted the main foreign merchandise.

  • Lampblack is prepared by burning tar, resin, turpentine and other substances rich in carbon, with a limited supply of air; the products of combustion being conducted into condensing chambers in which cloths are suspended, on which the carbon collects.

  • In Mareska and Donny's process the condensation is effected in a shallow iron box, which has a large exposed surface, capable of being cooled by damped cloths.

  • In Mysore the dew containing it is collected by means of cloths spread on the plant over night, and is used in domestic medicine.

  • In ancient Egyptian cultus the priest, after he has solemnly saluted the gods, begins the daily toilet of the god, which consists in sprinkling his image, clothing it with coloured cloths, and anointing it with oil (Erman, Die aegyptische Religion, p. 49).

  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.

  • The noils are also in great demand for mixing with wool to make fancy effects in wool cloths for the dress goods trade.

  • Coarse linen and woollen cloths are manufactured to a small extent.

  • 1513, is 1 In the Eastern Church four small pieces of cloth marked with the names of the Evangelists are placed on the four corners of the altar, and covered with three cloths, the uppermost (the corporal) being of smaller size.

  • The demand for cloths which require careful handling and regularity in weaving has helped to develop the supply of ring yarns which will stand the strain of the loom better than mule twists.

  • The big price of imported cloths throws the native consumer to some extent upon the local goods, and so stimulates the imports of yarn.

  • Shirting, which has long since ceased to refer exclusively to shirt cloths, includes a large proportion of Lancashire manufacture.

  • Now, however, Mexicans are often made with lighter wefts, though the name is usually applied to the better class of cloths of the particular character.

  • There is no absolute distinction between the two cloths, but the T cloth is generally lower in quality than the Mexican.

  • The word is sometimes particularly applied to cloths with a comparatively heavy weft, the distinction being made between the even "Mexican make" and the "pin-head" or "medium-make."

  • Printing-cloth is a term with a general significance, but it is also particularly applied to a class of plain cloths in which a very large trade is done both for home trade and export.

  • The Burnley cloths range in width from 2 9 in.

  • Sarong, the Malay ward for a garment wrapped round the lower part of the body and used by both men and women, is now applied to plain or printed cloths exported to the Indian or Eastern Archipelago for this purpose.

  • Some fancy cloths have descriptive names such as herringbone stripe, and there are many arbitrary trade names, such as Yosemite stripe, which may prevail and become the designation of a regular class or die after a few seasons.

  • Various cotton cloths are imitations of other textures and have modified names which indicate their superficial character, frequently produced by finishing processes.

  • Apart from the large class of brocaded cloths made in Jacquard looms there are innumerable simpler kinds, including stripes and checks of various descriptions, such as Swiss, Cord, Satin, Doriah stripes, &c. Mercerized cloths are of many kinds, as the mercerizing process can be applied to almost anything.

  • Among the fancy cloths made in cotton may be mentioned: matting, which includes various kinds with some similarity in appearance to a matting texture; matelasse, which is in some degree an imitation of French dress goods of that name; pique, also of French origin, woven in stripes in relief, which cross the width of the piece, and usually finished stiff; Bedford cord, a cheaper variety of pique in which the stripes run the length of the piece; oatmeal cloth, which has an irregular surface suggesting the grain of oatmeal, commonly dyed cream colour; crimp cloth, in which a puckered effect is obtained by uneven shrinkage; grenadine, said to be derived from Granada, a light dress material originally made of silk or silk and wool; brilliant, a dress material, usually with a small raised pattern; leno, possibly a corrupt form of the French linon or lawn, a kind of fancy gauze used for veils, curtains, &c.; lappet, a light material with a figure or pattern as lawn, batiste, serge, huckaback, galloon, and a large number of names are of obvious derivation and use, such as umbrella cloth, apron cloth, sail cloth, book-binding cloth, shroud cloth, 1 Including Federated Malay States.

  • Among the miscellaneous cloths made or made partly of cotton may be mentioned: waste cloths, made from waste yarns and usually coarse in texture; khaki cloth, made largely for military clothing in cotton as well as in woollen; cottonade, a name given to various coarse low cloths in the United States and elsewhere; lasting, which seems to be an abbreviation of "lasting cloth," a stiff, durable texture used in making shoes, &c.; bolting cloth, used in bolting or sifting; brattice cloth, a stout, tarred cloth made of cotton or wool and used for bratticing or lining the sides of shafts in mines; sponge cloths, used for cleaning machinery; shoddy and mungo, which though mainly woollen have frequently a cotton admixture; and splits, either plain or fancy, usually of low quality, which include any cloth woven two or three in the breadth of the loom and "split" into the necessary width.

  • The following table gives, approximately, in thousands of yards the quantities exported of the four main divisions of cotton cloths: - In the case of cloth, too, the Board of Trade returns must not be taken as an absolute record of imports to the particular countries, as the ultimate recipient is not always determined.

  • - The home trade in cotton cloths is a great and important section, but it is not comparable in volume to the export trade.

  • Some valuable plants are obtained in the mountains of south and southwestern Tibet, yielding the excellent yellow and red colours used to dye the native cloths."

  • If the situation is cool, the stone hard, and the concrete carefully rammed directly it is laid down and kept moist with damp cloths, only just sufficient to moisten the whole mass is required.

  • Cotton cloths are manufactured to some extent, for the dyeing of which the city has attained a high reputation.

  • He was then conducted by them to his appointed chamber, where a bath was prepared hung within and without with linen and covered with rich cloths, into which after they had undressed him he entered.

  • Inferior to this is " cudbear," derived from Lecanora tartarea, which was formerly very extensively employed by the peasantry of north Europe for giving a scarlet or purple colour to woollen cloths.

  • The crushed mass is then placed in hempen cloths and pressed in a screw or hydraulic press.

  • They are also used for drummers' aprons and saddle cloths in the Indian army.

  • Hats, baskets, cloths and rope are woven and are exported to a limited extent; small quantities of copra are also exported.

  • Striped cloths and pekmez, a sweet paste made from grapes, are the principal manufactures; and tobacco and cereals the principal cultures.

  • The manufacture of cloth from flax is of very ancient date, and towards the close of the 16th century Scottish linen cloths were largely exported to foreign countries, as well as to England.

  • There are some cotton factories and sugar mills provided with modern machinery, but the cotton and woollen cloths of the country are commonly coarse and manufactured in the most primitive manner.

  • They have great abundance of silk, from which they weave cloths of silk, and gold of divers kinds, and they also manufacture all sorts of equipments for an army.

  • In the 18th and early r9th centuries the chief industries were huckabacks and coarse cloths, canvas, fustians, pins, glass, sugar-refining and copper.

  • Instead of acting as a little world by itself for the raising of corn, the breeding of cattle, the gathering of wool, the weaving of linen and common cloths, the fabrication of necessary implements of all kinds, the local group began to buy some of these goods and to sell some others, renouncing isolation and making its destiny dependent on commercial intercourse.

  • The exports are: - Cereals, cotton, cotton seed, dried fruits, drugs, fruit, gall nuts, gum tragacanth, liquorice root, maize, nuts, olive oil, opium, rice, sesame, sponges, storax, timber, tobacco, valonia, walnut wood, wine, yellow berries, carpets, cotton yarn, cocoons, hides, leather, mohair, silk, silk stuffs, rugs, wax, wool, leeches, live stock, minerals, &c. The imports are: - Coffee, cotton cloths, cotton goods, crockery, drysalteries, fezzes, glass-ware, haberdashery, hardware, henna, ironware, jute, linen goods, manufactured goods, matches, petroleum, salt, sugar, woollen goods, yarns, &c.

  • They are collected for use at late evening or early morning, while in a dull bedewed condition, by shaking them off the trees or shrubs into cloths spread on the ground; and they are killed by dipping them into hot water or vinegar, or by exposing them for some time over the vapour of vinegar.

  • The chief articles imported are sugar, rice, raw cotton and opium, as well as cotton cloths, iron goods and other European manufactures.

  • Bradford is still the great spinning and manufacturing centre for alpacas, large quantities of yarns and cloths being exported annually to the continent and to the United States, although the quantities naturally vary in accordance with the fashions in vogue, the typical "alpaca-fabric" being a very characteristic "dress-fabric."

  • - 1905 4,954 Owing to the success in the manufacture of the various styles of alpaca cloths attained by Sir Titus Salt and other Bradford manufacturers, a great demand for alpaca wool arose, and this demand could not be met by the native product, for there never seems to have been any appreciable increase in the number of alpacas available.

  • with worsted in the various kinds of carpets, with cotton in tapestries and household cloths, with line and tow yarns for the same fabrics and for paddings, &c., and with wool for horse clothing.

  • For detailed information regarding jute, the cloths made from it and the machinery used, see the following works: Watts's Dictionary of the Economic Products of India; Royle's Fibrous Plants of India; Sharp's Flax, Tow and Jute Spinning; Leggatt's Jute Spinning; Woodhouse and Milne's Jute and Linen Weaving; and Woodhouse and Milne's Textile Design: Pure and Applied.

  • The manufactures consist of fine cloths, silk, cotton, woollen and linen fabrics, girdles and lace, paper, hats, leather, earthenware and soap. There are numerous oil mills and brandy distilleries.

  • The preparation of indigo and the dyeing of cloths are other flourishing industries.

  • There are coal mines in the neighbourhood, and the local industries include tanning and manufactures of soap, coarse linen and cloths.

  • It is collected before sunrise, by shaking the grains of manna on to linen cloths spread out beneath the trees, or by dipping the small branches in hot water and evaporating the solution thus obtained.

  • In the Woldeba district hermits dress in ochre-yellow cloths, while the priests of some sects wear hides dyed red.

  • The manufacture of woollen cloths has long been the staple trade of Trowbridge.

  • The pilgrim enters the Haram in the antique and scanty pilgrimage dress (ihram), consisting of two cloths wound round his person in a way prescribed by ritual.

  • The first woollen mill in the colony was established here, and the tweeds, cloths and other woollen fabrics of the town are noted throughout Australia.

  • To him the city owed her trade in cloths and velvets, from which so much wealth accrued to her 1 Fidelis Expositio Errorum Serveti, sub init.

  • The weaving of blankets, handkerchiefs, and cotton and silk cloths constitutes quite an important industry.

  • The principal product of the mills was plain cloths for printing or converting, of a quality finer than No.

  • The women spin and weave, and with the rudest appliances manufacture a variety of strong and durable cloths of silk,cotton and hemp, and of rofia palm, aloe and banana fibre, of elegant patterns, and often with much taste in colour.

  • The figure shows two of the commonest designs which are used for these cloths, design A being what is often termed the "perfect honeycomb"; in the figure it will be seen that the highest number of successive white squares is seven, while the corresponding highest number of successive black squares is five.

  • The curing of hides, the catching and drying of fish, boat-building, and especially the weaving of cotton into cloths called "pagns," afford employment to a considerable number of persons.

  • It was firmly believed in, for the incombustible cloths woven of flexible asbestos were popularly thought to be made of its hair or plumage, and were themselves called by the same name (cf.

  • The warm meal is then delivered through measuring boxes into closed pressbags ("scourtins" of the "Marseilles" press), or through measuring boxes, combined with an automatic moulding machine, into cloths open at two sides (Anglo-American press), so that the preliminarily pressed cakes can be put at once into the hydraulic press.

  • There the meal is packed by hand in "scourtins," bags made of plaited coco-nut leaves - replacing the woollen cloths used in England.

  • This is done by allowing the oil to cool down to a low temperature and pressing it through cloths in a press, when a limpid oil exudes, which remains proof against cold - "winter oil."

  • Its chief manufactures are silk work, cloths and cloaks, gold and silver ornaments, &c., brass and copper work, furniture and ornamental woodwork.

  • The chief imports are cloths, prints, muslins, raw silk, sugar, rice, &c.

  • The best sort is gathered by the hand like opium; sometimes the resinous exudation of the plant is made to stick first of all to cloths, or to the leather garments of men, or even to their skin, and is then removed by scraping, and afterwards consolidated by kneading, pressing and rolling.

  • They were a real cereal fruit which I ripened, and they had to my senses a fragrance like that of other noble fruits, which I kept in as long as possible by wrapping them in cloths.

  • Among them were grooms leading the Tsar's beautiful relay horses covered with embroidered cloths.

  • Waiters are clad in purple raiment, likewise tables in red cloths.

  • On three sides of the mansion the furniture saved was piled and covered with rick cloths to protect it from sparks.

  • Devon produced serges or " long ells ", unusually long cloths with combed wool warps and carded wool wefts in a twill weave.

  • Swaddling cloths which were used to wipe the animals were wrapped around the baby.

  • We provide aluminum trussing, flown and ground supported rigging systems, theater drapes, star cloths, venue dressing and advertising banner rigging.

  • A bottle of sub. turps and some clean cotton type cloths.

  • The source could be raw foods, hands, animals, work surfaces, dirty utensils or cloths.

  • Burp Cloths and Bibs: New parents can never have too many of these items.

  • You can also order a diaper cake which contain a number of diapers -- either disposable or cloth -- along with other cute items like wash cloths or burp cloths.

  • Monogrammed items could be a diaper bag, blanket, burp cloths, clothing items, Bible, books, assorted nursery decorations, or an ornament.

  • For babies of either gender you might consider personalized pajamas, shorts sets, burp cloths, jackets, socks, and jumper suits.

  • There's diapers, clothing, toys, cribs, strollers, walkers, changing tables and pads, burp cloths, etc. You get the picture!

  • Set up a table at the baby shower, and invite guests to decorate the diapers for burp cloths to give to the mom-to-be.

  • Burp Cloths-You know how much laundry one baby goes through, so think about doubling those dirty burp cloths.

  • Purchase storage baskets for diapers, shoulder cloths, ointments, creams and lotions.

  • Decorate the tables with red and white checked table cloths.

  • For example, add filler items to the inside of the cake, such as baby wipes, wash cloths, etc. On the outside, add baby supplies and accessories either attached to the cake or scattered around its base.

  • Common materials include paint, wallpaper, tools (e.g. hammer, nails and paintbrushes), drop cloths, linens, drapes and toys.

  • Wash cloths and hooded towels-Baby will love the softness of these linens.

  • Common feeding items to find in a baby gift basket are bibs (the cuter the slogan, the better!), burp cloths, a bottle (although this is becoming less common as most mothers prefer to choose one specific brand of bottle), and a pacifier.

  • Every baby needs bibs and burp cloths, so if you're not sure of the philosophy of the mother on bottles and pacifiers, skip these items and go for a few cute bibs and cloths; it's impossible to have too many of these!

  • Place a variety of monogrammed items into the basket, such as bibs, hats, socks, shoes, shirts, cloth diaper covers, burp cloths, blankets, towels, and washcloths.

  • Diaper supplies - Fill a wicker basket with diaper supplies, including several packs of diapers, wipes, diaper cream, disposable changing pads and extra washable cloths.

  • Don't forget that essentials also make greats presents, such as diapers, wipes, diaper creams, and burp cloths.

  • Being outside, the lens can attract dust and dirt, so using special cloths and cleaning liquid will help you keep the lens free of dirt and scratches.

  • For a big piece of inexpensive fabric, look for table cloths in a variety of sizes to be used as window scarves or panels.

  • Be sure to have a paint tray, brushes, rollers and drop cloths on hand.

  • Visit any drugstore and you'll find packages of these convenient cloths lining the shelves!

  • If you've tried one, you've tried them all - at least that's what it may seem like when it comes to these ubiquitous cloths.

  • Here's a rundown of some cloths on the market today.

  • Some removal cloths do more than just whisk away makeup.

  • If you're on a mission to slow the effects of time, try Olay's Total Effects Age Defying Cleansing Cloths.

  • If they won't let you, grab a few bedsheets or table cloths and hang them from the walls.

  • Andie changed her cloths in the car, as she didn't want to walk around New York with brown stains on her pants.

  • For backyard weddings, pick up some table clips to keep lightweight cloths on.Table decorating ideas can incorporate your colors, theme or the great outdoors.

  • Consider matching your wedding colors or getting cloths in pastel blue, ivory, or coral-colors that match the coastline.

  • Get clips to hold down the cloths so that wind does not blow them off.

  • Dress up your tables and chairs by using matching cloths, linens, and covers; alternatively, play up a rustic location by using wooden picnic tables and mismatched chairs.

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