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cloth

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cloth

cloth Sentence Examples

  • Why don't you get a wet cloth, Miss Spencer?

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  • He wore a fine, dark-blue, silk-lined cloth coat over a sheepskin.

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  • Han watched, handing her a wet wash cloth when she was done.

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  • Grabbing a wash cloth, she moistened it with cold water.

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  • The cool damp cloth did wonders to get her own face back to normal and she finally regained control.

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  • What is this? shouted the regimental commander, thrusting forward his jaw and pointing at a soldier in the ranks of the third company in a greatcoat of bluish cloth, which contrasted with the others.

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  • During the middle ages the Friday market and fair in Whit week, granted by the first charter, were centres for the sale of yarn and cloth called "Dunsters," made in the town.

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  • Men and women do make wool cloth in mills.

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  • All these traveling effects of Prince Andrew's were in very good order: new, clean, and in cloth covers carefully tied with tapes.

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  • Its trade also in books, hops, horses, and cloth is considerable, and a large banking and exchange business is done here.

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  • at the Field of the Cloth of Gold.

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  • He took off its cloth covering, and the harp gave out a jarring sound.

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  • Rob was holding a bloody cloth over his nose.

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  • She dropped the cloth and moved to the next object, which was obviously a painting.

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  • You're letting this saintly man of the cloth off a bit easy, aren't you?

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  • Father was a man of the cloth too, just like Edward, and Reverend Martin.

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  • Honour is shown to an adult when he dies, by wrapping him in a cloth and placing him on a platform in a tree instead of burying him.

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  • She dropped the cloth as she heard tires crunching on gravel.

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  • When he returned, he pulled a chair from the wall nearer her and dipped one cloth in water, tugging her arm away from her.

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  • Dean jerked the towel from his head and pulled a cloth gag from his mouth.

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  • Jonathan secured his wrist, shook a pillow from its case and pulled the cloth over Dean's head.

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  • Up comes the cotton, down goes the woven cloth; up comes the silk, down goes the woollen; up come the books, but down goes the wit that writes them.

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  • He wore a flat gray cloth cap, a dingy wool-colored greatcoat, and cowhide boots.

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  • The price of weapons, of gold, of carts and horses, kept rising, but the value of paper money and city articles kept falling, so that by midday there were instances of carters removing valuable goods, such as cloth, and receiving in payment a half of what they carted, while peasant horses were fetching five hundred rubles each, and furniture, mirrors, and bronzes were being given away for nothing.

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  • I have seen Penobscot Indians, in this town, living in tents of thin cotton cloth, while the snow was nearly a foot deep around them, and I thought that they would be glad to have it deeper to keep out the wind.

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  • But you'd look super in a sack cloth and rags.

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  • Trade is carried on in flax, cloth, cereals, oilseeds, &c.

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  • When Dean returned to the motel, the adjoining doors were open and Cynthia Byrne sat on the edge of her bed with one hand holding a phone and the other with a wet face cloth pressed to her forehead.

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  • The name is also applied to a special kind of wall-paper, which has an appearance almost like cloth, or, in the more expensive kinds, of velvet.

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  • Silk fabrics, coarse woollen cloth, paper and clocks are manufactured.

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  • Besides cottons the products 'nclude woollens and cloth, silks, chemicals, machinery, ironware, beer and flour.

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  • The floor of the stage consisted of smooth boards, at the sides was some painted cardboard representing trees, and at the back was a cloth stretched over boards.

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  • But in spite of this he continued to struggle desperately forward, and from between the backs of those in front he caught glimpses of an open space with a strip of red cloth spread out on it; but just then the crowd swayed back--the police in front were pushing back those who had pressed too close to the procession: the Emperor was passing from the palace to the Cathedral of the Assumption--and Petya unexpectedly received such a blow on his side and ribs and was squeezed so hard that suddenly everything grew dim before his eyes and he lost consciousness.

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  • After Cynthia came out and administered a cold face cloth, Edith seemed somewhat better, enough to decline medical attention, though she remained disoriented even after reaching Ryland's small quarters.

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  • The corpse was covered with a white sheet, but before pulling the cloth back, the attendant again looked at Cynthia, who nodded.

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  • Gerald shook the table cloth out and held it down in the breeze while Carmen clipped it to the table one-handed.

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  • Diapers weren't called "cloth diapers" until disposable ones came out.

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  • Denton dabbed at his mouth with the cloth and stared sourly at the blood.

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  • She tiptoed over to one of the cloth-covered objects, keeping a wary eye on the door, and carefully lifted the cloth.

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  • Sean's body collapsed beneath the blanket, and the ocean's wind whipped the cloth into the air.

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  • Flipping a light on, he guided them to a corner and pulled the cloth from a painting.

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  • The costume of the Tosks differs from that of the Ghegs; its distinctive feature is the white plaited linen fustanella or petticoat, which has been adopted by the Greeks; the Ghegs wear trews of white or crimson native cloth adorned with black braid, and a short, close-fitting jacket, which in the case of wealthy persons is embellished with gold lace.

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  • Local industries include the manufacture of coarse cloth, esparto fabrics, oil and flour.

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  • In the first were the nobility and gentry in their uniforms, in the second bearded merchants in full-skirted coats of blue cloth and wearing medals.

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  • I'll fetch a piece of cloth at once for such an honorable gentleman, or even two pieces with pleasure.

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  • In October he appears dining in the hall there as a guest, and at Christmas 1442 he received a royal livery, five yards of violet cloth, as provost of Eton.

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  • long gilded spear, crossed at the top by a bar from which hung a square purple cloth, richly jewelled.

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  • It has manufactures of coarse cloth, spirits and soap. The nearest railway station is Calasparra, 6 m.

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  • The town has manufactures of tobacco, cloth and hosiery.

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  • He was described by Sir Philip Warwick on this occasion: - "I came into the House one morning well clad and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor; his linen was plain and not very clean;.

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  • He tied a piece of black cloth around his eyes as the sun's rays peeked over the neighboring buildings.

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  • is said to have granted letters of protection to John Kemp, a Flemish weaver who settled in the town; and, although the coarse cloth known to Shakespeare as "Kendal green" is no longer made, its place is more than supplied by active manufactures of tweeds, railway rugs, horse clothing, knitted woollen caps and jackets, worsted and woollen yarns, and similar goods.

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  • It is the principal seat of the linen trade in the county, and has extensive cloth and thread factories, bleachfields and chemical works.

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  • Its cloth and silk manufactures are important, and owing to the opening up of extensive coalfields in the district almost every branch of iron industry is carried on.

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  • Besides manufactures of brandy, flour, oil, soap, linen and cloth, it has an active trade in wheat, wine and fruit, especially melons.

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  • The principal manufactures are firearms, ironmongery, earthenware, woollen cloth, beer, stoneware, zinc goods, colours and salt; in the neighbourhood are iron and coal mines.

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  • In 1520 he was at the Field of the Cloth of Gold; in 1529 and 1530 he went to France and Italy as ambassador to Francis I.

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  • Sail-cloth, horsehair, cloth and webbing are manufactured.

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  • In the Roman Catholic Church mitres are divided into three classes: (1) Mitra pretiosa, decorated with jewels, gold plates, &c.; (2) Mitra auriphrygiata, of white silk, sometimes embroidered with gold and silver thread or small pearls, or of cloth of gold plain; (3) Mitra simplex, of white silk damask, silk or linen, with the two falling bands behind terminating in red fringes.

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  • With courtly adroitness de Beausset half turned and without turning his back to the Emperor retired two steps, twitching off the cloth at the same time, and said:

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  • "Right enough, friend," said he, and, having sat down, took out of his knapsack a scrap of blue French cloth, and wrapped it round his foot.

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  • She crossed to the boxes she had stacked in the corner and covered with a square of cloth.

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  • Alex was wiping Ed down with a cloth.

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  • The boy murmured in wonder at the soft cloth.

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  • Mohair cloth is manufactured, and the town is noted for its honey and fruit.

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  • The decree of the Congregation of Rites (May 18,1819) says nothing about apparels, but only lays down that the alb must be of white linen or hemp cloth.

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  • The opportunity of utilizing the wool for textile industries has not yet been taken, though Sardinian women are accustomed to weave strong and durable cloth.

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  • In later banners the monogram was sometimes embroidered on the cloth.

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  • Cotton, cloth, gold and silver ornaments, copper wares, fancy articles in bone and ivory, excellent saddles and shoes are among the products of the local industry.

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  • It has iron foundries, machinery factories, railway workshops and a considerable trade in cattle, and among its other industries are weaving and malting and the manufacture of cloth.

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  • It is still used locally for making shoes, ships' cables, mats and a kind of spun cloth.

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  • The varied manufactures of the town comprise cloth, linen, wax candles, starch, glass and porcelain.

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  • The casket was opened in 1906, at the instance of the emperor William II., and the draperies enclosing the body were temporarily removed to Berlin, with a view to the reproduction of similar cloth.

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  • It carries on considerable manufactures of woollen cloth.

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  • All the evidence in Barclay's own work goes to prove that he was sincere in his reproof of contemporary follies and vice, and the gross accusations which John Bale 1 brings against his moral character may be put down to his hatred of Barclay's cloth.

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  • The Yarn Market, a picturesque octagonal building with deep sloping roof, in the main street, dates from c. 1600, and is a memorial of Dunster's former important manufacture of cloth.

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  • The manufacture of cloth had disappeared, the harbour is silted up, and there is no special local industry.

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  • The chief industry is the weaving of cloth from native grown cotton.

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  • But, although a gorgeous show of friendship with France was kept up at the Field of Cloth of Gold in 1520, it had been determined before the conference of Calais in 1521, at which Wolsey pretended to adjudicate on the merits of the dispute, to side actively with Charles V.

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  • There is a considerable trade in cotton, in connexion with which there are large steam presses, and some manufacture of cotton cloth.

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  • The woollen industry flourished in the county before the reign of John, when an exclusive privilege of dyeing cloth was conceded to the burgesses of Derby.

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  • We cannot suppose that the policy of the Merchant Adventurers' Company had nothing to do with the woollen industry; that the export trade in woollen cloth was quite independent of the foreign exchanges and international trade relations in those times; that the effect on wages of the state of the currency, the influx of new silver, the character of the harvests, and many other influences can be conveniently ignored.

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  • The chief industries are the manufacture of railway plant, cloth, wool, soap, shoddy, furniture, bricks and cement.

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  • Sonsonate is the centre of a rich agricultural district, and one of the busiest manufacturing towns in the republic. It produces cotton cloth, pottery, mats and baskets, boots and shoes, sugar, starch, cigars and spirits.

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  • Considerable trade was carried on with France and Spain, cloth, Purbeck stone and, later, clay being largely exported.

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  • In the 18th and early part of the 19th century Penrith manufactured checks, linen cloth and ginghams, but the introduction of machinery put an end to this industry, only the making of rag carpets surviving.

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  • The party set out about the 16th of February 1249, with letters from King Louis and the papal legate, and rich presents, including a chapel-tent, lined with scarlet cloth and embroidered with sacred pictures.

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  • According to the account given by Pindar and the tragedians, Agamemnon was slain by his wife' alone in a bath, a piece of cloth or a net having first been thrown over him to prevent resistance.

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  • Commercially, barytes is used in the preparation of barium compounds, as a body for certain kinds of paper and cloth, and as a white pigment ("permanent white").

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  • The prosperity of the town began with the introduction of the cloth trade in the 15th century, when there are said to have been only thirteen houses, which before the end of the 16th century had increased to 520.

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  • Halifax was a borough by prescription, its privileges growing up with the increased prosperity brought by the cloth trade, but it was not incorporated until 1848.

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  • New industries are those of tapestry, brocades, imitation of ancient stuffs, cloth of silver and gold, and Venetian laces.

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  • Forty different kinds of cloth were formerly manufactured in this district, the bulk of which during many years was made from English twist, country thread being used only for the finest muslins.

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  • In 1840 the finest cloth that could be made of the above dimensions weighed about 1600 grains, and was worth Do.

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  • Cloth >>

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  • The Malays wear a loose coat and trousers, and a cap or headkerchief, but the characteristic item of their costume is the sarong, a silk or cotton cloth about two yards long by a yard and a quarter wide, the ends of which are sewn together, a forming a kind of skirt.

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  • Holland (Cloth) >>

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  • The weaving and bleaching of cloth, which is of less importance than formerly, the manufacture of vehicles, and tanning are carried on; there is a large trade in the horses of the district, and granite is worked in the neighbourhood.

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  • The cloth industry was introduced in the 14th century at Iglau, where it soon obtained a great reputation; it developed afterwards at Olmiitz, and since the middle of the 18th century it has its principal centre at Briinn.

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  • Industrial and commercial Industry activity is mainly centred at the Peiraeus, where and corn- 8 cloth and cotton mills, cognac distilleries, 14 steam coerce.

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  • The use of Manchester prints and other European goods is fairly general; and the women, who make a fine native cloth from hemp, introduce coloured threads from the foreign stuffs, so as to produce ornamental devices.

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  • Tobacco of a superior quality is grown extensively on the lower northern slopes and much tobacco is now grown under cloth.

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  • It is now a manufacturing centre (cloth, woollen and cotton stuffs, &c.) and has a considerable trade.

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  • A tribunal and chamber of commerce, a board of trade-arbitrators, a lycee, a branch of the Bank of France, a school of industry, a school of cloth manufacture and a museum of natural history are among its institutions.

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  • The words map and chart are derived from mappa and charta, the former being the Latin for napkin or cloth, the latter for papyrus or parchment.

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  • Maps were thus named after the material upon which they were drawn or painted, and it should be noted that even at present maps intended for use in the open air, by cyclists, military men and others, are frequently printed on cloth.

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  • Montezuma presented Cortes with a map, painted on Nequen cloth, of the Gulf coast.

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  • Its industrial establishments comprise tobacco, yarn, thread, linen and woollen cloth manufactories, bleaching and dyeing works, breweries and oil and flour mills.

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  • Of the stem of the plant were made boats, sails, mats, cloth, cords, and, above all, writing materials.

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  • Ramie fibre and jute are available for coarse cloth; cotton weaving is almost non-existent.

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  • In recent years the growth of the leaf under cloth tents has greatly increased, as it has been abundantly proved that the product thus secured is much more valuable - lighter in colour and weight, finer in texture, with an increased proportion of wrapper leaves, and more uniform qualities, and with lesser amounts of cellulose, nicotine, gums and resins.

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  • Tobacco and cascarilla bark also flourish; and cotton is indigenous and was woven into cloth by the aborigines.

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  • As a decoration, rather than for practical reasons, a fine folded cloth (pannisellus, sudarium, velum, Eng.

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  • Wooden coffins, with skeletons wrapped in coarse hairy cloth, and both pagan and Christian tombstones with runic inscriptions have been found.

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  • Its inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of cloth, starch and machinery, in ironfounding and lithography.

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  • The principal industries are brewing, iron-founding and the manufacture of cloth, boots, leather, cigarettes, matches, pottery, preserved meat and confectionery.

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  • The calendered sheets are generally cured between folds of wet cloth, the markings of FIG.

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  • The ordinary macintosh or waterproof cloth is prepared by spreading on the textile fabric layer after layer of indiarubber paste or solution made with benzol or coal-naphtha.

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  • Vulcanization is then effected by steam heat, and, the preparation on the cloth being softened by water, the sheet of rubber is readily removed.

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  • There are manufactures of cloth, paper, machinery, straw hats, leather and tobacco.

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  • For various purposes a manufactured material known as "micanite" or "micanite cloth" is much used; this consists of small sheets of mica cemented with shellac or other insulating cement on cloth or paper.

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  • The market for leather and cloth is important, and Ulm is famous for its vegetables (especially asparagus), barley, beer, pipe-bowls and sweet cakes (Ulmer Zuckerbrot).

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  • It has an Evangelical and a Roman Catholic church, and its industries include cloth, sugar and stocking manufactures, besides breweries and tanneries.

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  • The principal industries are, the metallurgic and textile industries in all their branches, milling, brewing and chemicals; paper, leather and silk; cloth, objets de luxe and millinery; physical and musical instruments; sugar, tobacco factories and foodstuffs.

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  • They also make felts and a rough cloth of sheep's wool.

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  • He was present at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520, and in 1521 he went to Venice with the object of winning the support of the republic for Wolsey, who was anxious at this time to become pope.

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  • A friend of compromise, like most of the men of his cloth, Wallqvist dissuaded all revolutionary expedients at the outset, though when the king proved immovable the bishop materially smoothed the way before him.

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  • It has important cloth factories and a lively trade in fruit and wine.

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  • There are cloth, artificial flower, and cigar factories, glass-works, potteries, and in the neighbourhood large granite quarries.

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  • Pamplona has a flourishing agricultural trade, besides manufactures of cloth, linen stuffs, flour, soap, leather, cards, paper, earthenware, iron and nails.

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  • Its main industries are flax-spinning, linen-weaving and manufactures of cloth, shoes and beer.

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  • Other principal branches of industry are: tobacco manufactories, belonging to the state, tobacco being a government monopoly; iron foundries, mostly in the mining region; agricultural machinery and implements, notably at Budapest; leather manufactures; paper-mills, the largest at Fiume; glass (only the more common sort) and earthenwares; chemicals; wooden products; petroleum-refineries; woollen yarns and cloth manufactories, as well as several establishments of knitting and weaving.

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  • Striped: Albion, La Majestueuse, Sir Walter Scott, Cloth of Silver, Mme Mina.

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  • The loinor waist-cloth prevailed under a very great variety of minor differentiated forms. In Egypt it was the plain short linen cloth wrapped around the loins and tied in front.

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  • The Semites who visited Egypt wore a larger and coloured cloth, ornamented with parallel stripes of patterns similar to those found upon some early specimens of Palestinian pottery.

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  • But a close-fitting skirt or tunic was more usual, and the Semites on the famous Beni-Hasan tombs (about the 10th or 10th century B.C.) wear richly decorated cloth FIG.

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  • At the present day male and female pilgrims at Mecca wear such a cloth (the ihram); it covers the knees and one end of it may be cast over the shoulder.

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  • hagorah; the Arabic equivalent term is a kilt from thigh to knee) varied, as the monuments show, in richness and design, and could be used as a sword-belt or pocket much in the same way as the modern native uses the long cloth twined twice or thrice around his body.

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  • Such a cloth may once have passed between the legs, being kept in position by the waistband (examples in Perrot and Chipiez, Greece, ii.

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  • But the ordinary Semitic head covering was a cloth which sometimes appears with two ends tied in front, the third falling behind.

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  • Or it falls over the nape of the neck and is kept in position with a band; or again as a cloth cap has lappets to protect the ears.

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  • In general, the use of a square or rectangular cloth (whether folded diagonally or not) corresponds to the modern keffiyeh woven with long fringes which are plaited into cords knitted at the ends or worked into little balls sewn over with coloured silks and golden From Palestine Exploration Fund threads.

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  • be accompanied with the relatively modern fez (tarbush) and a woollen cloth.

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  • A woman's head was usually covered by drawing up the iµaTCov (see above), but sometimes instead of this, a separate piece of cloth was made to perform this service, the end of it falling over the himation.

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  • The toga was a piece of woollen cloth in the form of a segment of a circle, 2 the chord of the arc being about three times the height of the wearer, and the height a little less than one-half of this length.

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  • The paenula, which was the garment most commonly worn, especially by soldiers when engaged on peace duties, was an oblong piece of cloth with a hole in the centre for the neck; a hood was usually attached to the back.

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  • The stigmas and a part of the style are carefully picked out, and the wet saffron is then scattered on sheets of paper to a depth of 2 or 3 in.; over this a cloth is laid, and next a board with a heavy weight.

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  • The chief industries are the manufacture of bed and table linen, towelling and woollen cloth, shipbuilding and flax-spinning.

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  • On coming of age he got employment at Hempstead, Long Island, making machines for shearing cloth; three years afterwards he set up in this business for himself, having bought the sole right to manufacture such machinery in the state of New York.

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  • Its industrial establishments include factories for tobacco, cloth, matches, leather, artificial manure, besides breweries and distilleries.

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  • The manufactures are considerable, the chief articles made being cloth, wool, leather, tobacco, pianos and machinery.

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  • In Roman times Cilicia exported the goats'-hair cloth, Cilicium, of which tents were made.

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  • In 1679 the university was established in the old Cloth Workers' Hall, a building dating from 1317, with long arcades and graceful pillars supporting the upper storeys.

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  • Florentine cloth especially was known and sold all over Europe, and the Florentines were regarded as the first merchants of the age.

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  • Florence was in the 14th century a city of about 100,000 inhabitants, of whom 25,000 could bear arms; there were Ito churches, 39 religious houses; the shops of the ante della lana numbered over 200, producing cloth worth 1,200,000 florins; Florentine bankers and merchants were found all over the world, often occupying responsible positions in the service of foreign governments; the revenues of the republic, derived chiefly from the city customs, amounted to some 300,000 florins, whereas its ordinary expenses, exclusive of military matters and public buildings, were barely 40,000.

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  • No shelter had been provided for the inmates: the first arrivals made rude sheds from the debris of the stockade; the others made tents of blankets and other available pieces of cloth, or dug pits in the ground.

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  • Briefly, sugar-refining consists of melting raw or unrefined sugar with water into a syrup of 27° to 28° Beaume, or 1230 specific gravity, passing it through filtering cloth to remove the sand and other matters in mechanical suspension, and then through animal charcoal to remove all traces of colouring matter and lime, thus producing a perfectly clear white syrup, which, cooked in the vacuum pan and crystallized, becomes the refined sugar of commerce.

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  • Any sand or heavy matter in suspension is allowed to fall to the bottom of the pan into the " sandbox " before the melted sugar is run off to the cloth filters.

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  • They consist of tanks or cisterns fitted with " heads " from which a number of bags of specially woven cloth are suspended in a suitable manner, and into which the melted sugar or liquor to be filtered flows from the melting pans.

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  • Each cistern is fitted kith a perforated false bottom, on which a blanket or specially woven cloth is placed, to receive the char which is poured in from the top, and packed as evenly as possible until the cistern is filled.

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  • Woollen and linen cloth, leather, earthenware, paper, and articles in gold and silver are also made in Vicenza, and a considerable trade in these articles, as well as in corn and wine, is carried on.

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  • Mr and Mrs Williston built up the industry of covering buttons with cloth, at first doing the work by hand, then (1827) experimenting with machinery, and in 1848 building a factory for making and covering buttons.

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  • The industries include brewing, weaving and the manufacture of cloth, carpets, tobacco, sugar, leather-grease, toys and roofingfelt.

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  • Leo Africanus, writing early in the 16th century, gives a favourable picture of the "great city" of Tunis, which had a flourishing manufacture of fine cloth, a prosperous colony of Christian traders, and, including the suburbs, nine or ten thousand hearths; but he speaks also of the decay of once flourishing provincial towns, and especially of agriculture, the once powerful Church.

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  • BARTHOLOMEW LEGATE (c. 1 5751612), English fanatic, was born in Essex and became a dealer in cloth.

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  • There are large woollen factories at Cuzco and Lima, the Santa Catalina factory at the latter place turning out cloth and cashmere for the army, blankets, counterpanes and underclothing.

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  • Most of the earlier astronomical work was done in a darkened room, but here we first find the dark chamber constructed of wooden rods covered with cloth or paper, and used separately to screen the observing-tablet.

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  • A large trade is carried on at Burgdorf in the cheese of the Emmenthal, while among the industrial establishments are railway workis, and factories of cloth, white lead and tinfoil.

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  • In the 17th century Hadleigh was famous for the manufacture of cloth, and in 1618 was sufficiently important to receive incorporation.

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  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.

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  • Cotton yarn and cloth, petroleum, timber and furs are among the chief imports; copper, tin, hides and tea are important exports; medicines in the shape not only of herbs and roots, but also of fossils, shells, bones, teeth and various products of the animal kingdom; and precious stones, principally jade and rubies, are among the other exports.

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  • Besides the large trade carried on there are native manufactories of cloth, carpets and leathern articles.

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  • They are an intelligent and industrious people, growing their own crops, manufacturing their own cloth and mats, and building their own boats, while many read Arabic more or less fluently, although still believers in magic and witchcraft.

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    0
  • In all printing the paper is laid on the upper surface of the block, and the impression rubbed off with a circular pad, composed of twisted cord within a covering of paper cloth and bamboo-leaf, and called the baren.

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  • of England at the interview of the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520; his want of tact goaded the Constable de Bourbon to extreme measures in 1522-1523; and in the Italian campaign of 1525 he proved himself a mediocre, vacillating and foolhardy leader, and by his blundering led the army to the disaster of Pavia (the 25th of February 1525), where, however, he fought with great bravery.

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  • In the 15th and 16th .centuries a weekly market was held at Oswestry for the sale of woollen goods manufactured in North Wales, but in the 17th century the drapers of Shrewsbury determined to get the trade into their own town, and although an Order in the Privy Council was passed to restrain it to Oswestry they agreed in 1621 to buy no more cloth there.

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  • Unlike most Jews, they have no liking for trade, but are skilled in agriculture, in the manufacture of pottery, ironware and cloth, and are good masons.

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    0
  • It possesses excellent wharves, does a large import trade in coal, and has shipbuilding yards, breweries, distilleries, cloth aid paper factories, glass-works, copper-works, soap-works and rice mills.

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    0
  • The third regiment of the New York line under Colonel Peter Gansevoort occupied the fort in April 1777 and completed the repairs begun in 1776; on the 3rd of August in the same year (one month before the official announcement by Congress of the design of the flag) the first flag of the United States, made according to the enactment of the 14th of June and used in battle, was raised here: it was made from various pieces of cloth.

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  • The chief industries are brewing and art metal-working, also printing, metal-founding, and the manufacture of cloth, silk, tools and cards for wooldressing.

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    0
  • The manufacture of woollen cloth has been established since the 15th century, Frome being the only Somerset town in which this staple industry has flourished continuously.

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  • Vitruvius also gives a detailed account of the means of recovering gold, by amalgamation, from cloth into which it had been woven.

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  • The vats are fitted with filters made of coco-nut matting and jute cloth supported on wooden frames.

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  • A loose woollen coat reaching to the knees, and bound round the waist by a thick fold of cotton cloth, forms the dress of the men; the women's dress is a long cloak with loose sleeves.

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    0
  • Zeitz has manufactures of cloth, cottons and other textiles, machinery, wax-cloth, musical instruments, vinegar, cigars, &c.; and wood-carving, dyeing and calico-printing are carried on.

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    0
  • It has manufactures of cloth, leather, chemicals and optical instruments; large quantities of beetroot sugar are produced in the neighbourhood; and there is a considerable transit trade on the Elbe.

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    0
  • In 1798 the town mills were converted into a woollen manufactory, which up to recent times produced large quantities of cloth, and the serge manufacture was introduced early in the 19th century.

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  • Reichenberg is one of the most important centres of trade and industry in Bohemia, its staple industry being the cloth manufacture.

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    0
  • The image was made of felt and cloth, and similar images of his wife and children were set on his left hand and in front of him.

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    0
  • Among its manufactures are foundry and machine-shop products, flour, silk, waggons, shoes, gloves, furniture, wire cloth and cigars.

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    0
  • The chief industries are tanning and the manufacture of weapons, shoes, cloth, hats and artificial flowers.

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    0
  • It is the only proper industrial town in Servia, having numerous small factories for the manufacture of thin cloth (shayak), woollen braid (gaytan), and especially carpets.

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  • The industries of Kamenz include wool-spinning, and the manufacture of cloth, glass, crockery and stoneware.

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  • In many cases a light but air-proof cloth, specially made for the purpose, is used instead of wood for brattices, as being more handy and more easily removed.

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  • Jagerndorf has large manufactories of cloth, woollens, linen and machines, and carries on an active trade.

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  • After the meeting of the Field of the Cloth of Gold (1520) he was engaged in unsuccessful negotiations with Wolsey.

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  • The only manufacture is cotton cloth.

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    0
  • The industries of Arnstadt include iron and other metal founding, the manufacture of leather, cloth, tobacco, weighing-machines, paper, playing-cards, chairs, gloves, shoes, iron safes, and beer, and market-gardening and trade in grain and wood are carried on.

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    0
  • Almost all industries are represented; chief among them are machine-building, the manufacture of india-rubber, linen, cloth, hardware, chemicals, tobacco, pianos, furniture and groceries.

    0
    0
  • The local industries, chiefly developed since 1880, include the manufacture of cotton, linen, wool, ribbons, cloth, chocolate, soap, brandies, leather, cards and nails.

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    0
  • At that age he was apprenticed to a fuller and clothier, to card wool, and to dye and dress the cloth.

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    0
  • The products of the textile industry in America were bark cloth, wattling for walls, fences and weirs, paper, basketry, matting, loom products, needle or point work, net-work, lacework and embroidery.

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    0
  • A crude method consists of straining the liquid through cotton or other cloth, either stretched on wooden frames or formed into long narrow bags ("bag-filters").

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    0
  • Occasionally filtration into a vacuum is practised, but more often, as in filterpresses, the liquid is forced under pressure, either hydrostatic or obtained from a force-pump or compressed air, into a series of chambers partitioned off by cloth, which arrests the solids, but permits the passage of the liquid portions.

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  • The inhabitants are engaged in cattlerearing, the cultivation of corn, hops and fruit, shipbuilding and the shipping trade, and the manufacture of cloth, paper and cutlery.

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    0
  • The local trade is chiefly in coarse cloth, esparto fabrics, wine and farm produce.

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    0
  • It is now a poor place, but has some trade in cotton and indigo, and manufactures of cotton cloth.

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    0
  • Cloth weaving and brewing, which once flourished exceedingly, declined in the beginning of the 16th century.

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    0
  • There are large manufactures of cloth, silk, matting, bricks, and boots and shoes, and a considerable agricultural trade.

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    0
  • Woollen, cloth, cotton and flax mills, steam flour and saw mills, distilleries and breweries, machinery works, paper mills, furniture, tobacco, soap, candle and hardware works are among the chief industrial establishments.

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  • The colonists of the patroons were exempted from all taxes for a period of ten years, but were forbidden to manufacture any cloth whatever.

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  • Its cloth and wool manufactories are among the most extensive in Prussia.

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  • They also weave cloth, make pottery and smelt iron.

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  • The other end of the sounder is stroked outwards with a damp cloth so as to make it sound its fundamental.

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    0
  • If the wire is stretched across a room and stroked in the middle with a damp cloth the fundamental is easily obtained, and the first harmonic can be brought out by stroking it at a quarter the length from one end.

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  • A glass or brass rod free at both ends may be held by the hand in the middle and excited by stroking one end outwards with a damp cloth.

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  • 39, middle and rubbing it lengthwise FIG with a bit of cloth powdered with resin, till the rod gives a distinct note; the vibrations are communicated to the plate, which consequently vibrates transversely, and causes the sand to heap itself into one or more concentric rings.

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  • Velvet, cloth, machinery, bricks and candles are manufactured, and there are flour-mills, breweries, distilleries and lignite mines.

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  • 5, 6; the young man who, when Jesus was arrested, followed, "having a linen cloth cast about him," xiv.

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  • Woollen cloth and buckskin are woven at Kamenz, Bischofswerda and Grossenhain, all in the northeast, woollen and half-woollen underclothing at Chemnitz, Glauchau, Meerane and Reichenbach; while Bautzen and Limbach produce woollen stockings.

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  • The neighbouring fields of clay, afford material for the manufacture of bricks and pottery; coarse cloth is woven in the town; and there is a considerable trade in farm produce.

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  • The second is represented above the bottom by a series of piles with burnt heads, and in the bottom by a layer of charcoal mixed with corn, apples, cloth, bones, pottery and implements of stone and bone, separated from the first layer of charcoal by 3 ft.

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    0
  • No spindle-whorls were found, but there were many varieties of cloth, platted and woven, bundles of yarn and balls of string.

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    0
  • Saw-milling, boat-building and flaxstripping are carried on, together with trade in cereals, cloth, potatoes, &c.

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    0
  • It possesses manufactures of cloth, table-linen and earthenware, and has an active trade in wine, linen, cattle and grain.

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    0
  • Another industry now practically extinct was the manufacture of woollen cloth.

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  • The national costume of the Siamese is the panung, a piece of cloth about 1 yd.

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  • It is remarkable chiefly for its fine Halles or cloth market, with a façade of over 150 yds.

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  • In the neighbourhood large quantities of wheat, hemp, fruit and cider are produced; and there are important coal and iron mines, foundries, and factories for the manufacture of coarse cloth.

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  • Its manufactures include coarse cloth, pottery and Indian feather ornaments.

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    0
  • Among the chief articles brought to these fairs (which were largely frequented by Italian, French and Swiss merchants) were cloth, silk, armour, groceries, wine, timber and salt, this last coming mainly from Provence.

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  • In the early 15th century the town of Fribourg made an alliance with Geneva for commercial purposes (the cloth warehouses of Fribourg at Geneva being enlarged in 1432 and 1465), as the cloth manufactured at Fribourg found a market in the fairs of Geneva (which are mentioned as early as 1262, and were at the height of their prosperity about 1450).

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  • Its chief industries are cotton and wool-spinning and the weaving of cloth, but machinery of various kinds, paper and a few other articles are also manufactured.

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    0
  • Other manufactures consist of a strong coarse cotton cloth called kham (which forms the dress of the common people, and for winter wear is padded with cotton and quilted), boots and shoes, saddlery, felts, furs and sheepskins made up into cloaks, and various articles of domestic use.

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  • At the end of the 14th century we find all the great trade gilds established there, and the cloth manufactured at Cracow was eagerly sought after, from Prague to Great Novgorod.

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  • At the same time, by the compact of Rastawica, the sejm undertook to allow the Cossacks, partly as wages, partly as compensation, 40,000 (raised by the compact of Kurukow to 60,000) gulden and 170 wagons of cloth per annum.

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  • There are manufactures of cloth, machinery and tobacco, and an active trade in grain and horses.

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    0
  • Woollen cloth mills, and extensive collieries in the neighbourhood, employ the large industrial population.

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    0
  • The principal manufactories are of tobacco, boatbuilding, agricultural implements, foundries and cloth factories.

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    0
  • The manufacture of cloth is the chief industry; lace, starch, machines, cigars and chemicals are also produced, while spinning, dyeing, brewing and printing are carried on.

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  • 9, where Goliath's sword is wrapped in a cloth in the sanctuary of Nob behind the ephod.

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  • Cotton, silks, woollen cloth, and felt are manufactured, also boots, saddles, cutlery and weapons, pottery and various oils.

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  • To these may be added wool-weaving, centred at Sedan, and minor industries such as the manufacture of basket-work, wooden shoes, &c. Coal and raw wool are prominent imports, while iron goods, cloth, timber, live-stock, alcohol and the products of the soil are exported.

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  • "There is no augury in Jacob and no divination in Israel; in due time it is told to Jacob and to Israel what God cloth work" (Num.

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  • In two romances, the prose Tristan and the Parzival, the place of the Round Table proper is taken, on a journey, by a silken cloth laid on the ground, round which the knights are seated.

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  • The weaving establishments (mainly broadcloth) of Leiden at the close of the 15th century were very important, and after the expulsion of the Spaniards Leiden cloth, Leiden baize and Leiden camlet were familiar terms. These industries afterwards declined, and in the beginning of the 19th century the baize manufacture was altogether given up. Linen and woollen manufactures are now the most important industries, while there is a considerable transit trade in butter and cheese.

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  • ell (cloth measure), abolished after 1553; known later as the Scotch ell = 37.06.

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  • Cloth ell of 45 in., used till 1600.

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  • = the foot of the Scotch or English cloth ell of 37.06 in., or 3 x 12.353.

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  • The clerk marshal has the supervision of the accounts of the department before they are submitted to the Board of Green Cloth, and is in waiting on the sovereign on state occasions only.

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  • The industries comprise the manufacture of cloth, industrial machines, sugar-refining, jute fabrics and brewing.

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  • The cotton factories of 1905 were equipped with 22,021 looms having 678,058 spindles, and with 38 stamping machines, employed 30,162 operatives, and turned out 13,731,638 pieces of cloth.

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  • The woollen trade was established here through the agency of Flemish immigrants in Edward III.'s reign, and in Elizabeth's time this industry was of such importance that an aulneger was appointed to measure and stamp the woollen cloth.

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  • His family are somewhat grandiloquently spoken of as "cloth merchants ruined by the Revolution," but it seems that at the actual time of his birth his father was a locksmith.

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  • There were formerly five trade gilds in the town, the chief industries being cloth and leather manufactures.

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  • Fairs on the 17th of July and the 6th of November were held under grant of Henry VII., and were important for the sale of leather and of woollen cloth, both made in the town.

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  • The apostle spreads a linen cloth on a bench, lays on it bread of blessing (eNv yia), and says: " Jesus Christ, Son of God, who hast made us worthy to commune in the Eucharist of thy holy body and precious blood, Lo, we venture on the thanksgiving (Eucharistia) and invocation of thy blessed name, come now and communicate with us.

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  • Much of the wool is sold, like the native cotton, to Indian and Ladino women, who manufacture coarse cloth and linen in their homes.

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  • They rode bareback, or on a cloth or skin strapped to the horse.

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  • Woollen cloth, machinery and spirits are manufactured; there is an extensive salt-mine in the neighbouring Zillenberg; the salmon and lamprey fisheries are important; and a fair amount of commercial activity is maintained.

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  • It was formerly noted for its cloth manufacture.

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  • In the middle ages Malmesbury possessed a considerable cloth manufacture, and at the Dissolution the abbey was bought by a rich clothier and fitted with looms for weaving.

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  • It has an interesting church, dating from the 12th century, and notable tanneries and leather factories, woollen and cloth mills.

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  • The cover of the root, according to its quality, was silk, either embroidered or plain, cotton cloth or paper."

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  • Manufactures are almost confined to the spinning of hemp, and the making of coarse cloth, porcelain, earthenware and cutlery.

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  • The medieval importance of these markets and fairs for the sale of wool and wine and later of cloth has gone.

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  • The once flourishing cloth and woollen trades have declined, but there are large breweries, roperies, potteries, and, in the neighbourhood, marble, granite, asphalt and lime works.

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  • After trying many experiments to obviate the irregularities arising from this cause, I find reason to prefer the simple one of carefully wiping the whole instrument, and especially the stem, with a clean cloth.

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  • The chief industries are linen weaving, cloth making and coal mining.

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  • Other industries are engineering, shipbuilding and brewing, and there are cloth, jute, hat, wood-pulp and paper factories.

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  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.

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  • For some purposes - making of gauzes, crapes, flour-bolting cloth and for what is termed " souples " - the silk is not scoured, and for silks to be dyed certain dark colours half-scouring is practised.

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    0
  • There is some weaving of silk cloth, and export trade in sugar.

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    0
  • Cloth, linen, paper, flour and brandy are manufactured, and there are iron foundries and saw-mills.

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    0
  • The manufacture of cloth was at one time carried on in Ripon, but was almost lost in the 16th century when the town was visited by Leland.

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  • The making of spurs succeeded the cloth manufacture and became so noted that the saying "as true as Ripon rowells" was a well-known proverb.

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  • The wauke plant (Broussonetia papyrifera), and to a less extent the mamake (Pipturus albidus) and Boehmeria stipularis, furnished the bark out of which the famous kapa cloth was made, while the olopa (Cheirodendron gaudichaudii) and the koolea (Myrsine lessertiana) furnished the dyes with which it was coloured.

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  • In the days of idolatry the only dress worn by the men was a narrow strip of cloth wound around the loins and passed between the legs.

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  • Women wore a short petticoat made of kapa cloth (already referred to), which reached from the waist to the knee.

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  • Even at the time when they were first known to Europeans, they had stone and lava hatchets, shark's-tooth knives, hardwood spades, kapa cloth or paper, mats, fans, fish-hooks and nets, woven baskets, &c., and they had introduced a rough sort of irrigation of the inland country with long canals from highlands to plains.

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  • In order to satisfy it relics were made by placing pieces of cloth on the gravesof the saints, which were afterwards taken to their homes and venerated by the pilgrims.

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  • Trade with France in wine and cloth was carried on as early as 1284, but was probably much increased on the erection of the Cobb, first mentioned in 1328 as built of timber and rock.

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  • In the beginning of the Lug .,(Ca Carlisle ".; xe/loduJr u m 'Aber/l ava Yinovro (8tne/uster)t 4th century the skilled artisans and builders, and the cloth and corn of Britain were equally famous on the continent.

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  • This had developed by the 14th or 15th century into a cerecloth, or waxed cloth, on the table itself; and three linen coverings one above the other, two of about the size of the table and one rather wider than the altar, and long enough to hang down at each end.

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  • In front was often a hanging panel of embroidered cloth (the frontal; but frontals of wood, ornamented with carving or enamel, &c., are also to be found).

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  • 1513, is 1 In the Eastern Church four small pieces of cloth marked with the names of the Evangelists are placed on the four corners of the altar, and covered with three cloths, the uppermost (the corporal) being of smaller size.

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  • speaks of burgesses industriously exercising the manufacture of cloth.

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  • COTTON GOODS AND YARN The two great sections of the cotton industry are yarn and cloth, and in Great Britain the production of both of these is mainly in South Lancashire, though the area extends to parts of Cheshire, Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and there is a Scottish branch, besides certain isolated ventures in other parts of the country.

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  • Yarns are sold according to their "actual" counts, though when they are woven into cloth they frequently attain nominal or brevet rank.

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  • The average yearly values of the exports of cotton, yarn and cloth from Great Britain for the decades 1881-1890 and 1891-1900 respectively, are given by Professor Chapman in his Cotton Industry and Trade, in million pounds: 1881-1890.1891-1900 .

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  • Cloth £ 60 4 £ 57'3 Yarn 12.3 9'3 Total..

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  • £7 2.7 £66.6 During the earlier decade the prices of cotton were comparatively high The whole of the cloth exports represent, of course, a corresponding home trade in yarns.

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  • Grey cloth is a comprehensive term that includes unbleached cotton cloth generally.

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  • Sheeting has two meanings in the cotton trade: (I) the ordinary bed sheeting, usually a stout cloth of anything from 45 in.

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  • In the Mexican the yarns were originally of nearly the same weight and number of threads to the 4 in., an arrangement which gave the cloth an even appearance, thus differing from the "pin-head" or medium makes.

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  • T Cloth is a plain grey calico, similar in kind to the Mexican and exported to the same markets.

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  • There is no absolute distinction between the two cloths, but the T cloth is generally lower in quality than the Mexican.

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  • In Great Britain it is employed rather loosely, but commonly to describe the kind of cloth which if exported would be called a Mexican.

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  • Wigan is a name derived from the town Wigan and seems to have been originally applied to a stiff canvas-like cloth used for lining skirts.

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  • Double-warp, as its name implies, is a cloth with a twofold warp. It is usually a strong serviceable material and may be either twilled or plain.

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  • The jacconet is a plain cloth, lighter than a shirting and heavier than a mull.

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  • It is a light, narrow cloth made with a coloured border which is often so elaborate as to require a dobby loom for its manufacture.

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  • Madapolam or Madapollam is a name derived from a suburb of Narsapur in the Madras presidency where the cloth was first made.

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  • Jean, said to be derived from Genoa where a kind of fustian with this title was made, is a kind of twilled cloth.

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  • The cloth is woven "one end up and two ends down," and as there are more picks of weft per inch than ends of warp the diagonal lines pass from selvage to selvage at an angle of less than 45 degrees.

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  • The weft surface is the face or wearing surface of the cloth.

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  • Oxford is a plain-woven cloth usually with a coloured pattern, and is used for shirts and dresses.

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  • Harvard is a twilled cloth similar to the Oxford.

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    0
  • Regatta is a stout, coloured shirt cloth similar in make to a jeanette.

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  • Fancy cotton goods are of great variety, and many of them have trade names that are used temporarily or occasion produced on the surface of the cloth by needles placed in a sliding frame; lustre, a light dress material with a lustrous face sometimes made with a cotton warp and woollen weft; zephyr, a light, coloured dress material usually in small patterns; bobbinnet, a machine-made fabric, originally an imitation of lace made with bobbins on a pillow.

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  • Cotton linings include silesia, originally a linen cloth made in Silesia and now usually a twilled cotton cloth which is dyed various colours; Italian cloth, a kind of jean or sateen produced originally in Italy.

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  • butter cloth, mosquito netting, handkerchief, blanket, towelling, bagging.

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  • The following table gives, approximately, in thousands of yards the quantities exported of the four main divisions of cotton cloths: - In the case of cloth, too, the Board of Trade returns must not be taken as an absolute record of imports to the particular countries, as the ultimate recipient is not always determined.

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  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.

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  • Various finishing processes, and particularly the mercerizing of yarn and cloth, have increased the possibilities in cotton materials, and while staples still form the bulk of our foreign trade, it seems that as the stress of competition in these grows acute, more and more of our energy may be transferred to the production of goods which appeal to a growing taste or fancy.

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  • Of course by far the larger part of the yarn spun in Lancashire is woven in Lancashire, but of the cotton cloth woven in Lancashire it is roughly estimated that about 20% is used in Great Britain.

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  • Certain kinds of light goods made for India and other Eastern markets are not used in the home trade, and the typical Eastern staples are not generally used in their particular "sizings," but with these exceptions and various specialities almost every kind of cotton cloth is used to some extent in Great Britain.

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  • There is a considerable amount of re-selling both in yarn and cloth, and, though the bulk of cotton goods finds the way through regular and normal channels to the consumer, these channels are not always direct.

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    0
  • The cloth and woollen industries are concentrated at Bielitz, Jagerndorf and Engelsberg; linen is manufactured at Freiwaldau Freudenthal and Bennisch; cotton goods at Friedek.

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    0
  • The taxes paid to the Lhasa government are mostly in kind, sheep, ponies, meal, butter, wool, native cloth, &c., and the coin paid is said to be about 130,000 ounces of silver a year.

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  • The industries are confined to the manufacture of woollen cloth of various degrees of fineness and colour, and called truk, tirma and lawa, to that of small rugs, pottery of an inferior quality, utensils of copper and iron, some of which show considerable artistic skill in design, and to such other small trades as are necessary to supply the limited wants of the people.

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    0
  • The exports from Tibet are silver, gold, salt, wool, woollen cloth, rugs, furs, drugs, musk.

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    0
  • The formerly considerable manufacture of the heavier kinds of cloth has died out.

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    0
  • It has an important cloth industry, and manufactures of sugar, ropes, machinery and agricultural implements.

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    0
  • The industries include cotton and flax-spinning, and the manufacture of linen cloth, carpets, furniture, machinery, sugar, tobacco and leather.

    0
    0
  • The town has important manufactures of cloth, leather and machinery; it has also dyeworks, worsted mills and soap-boiling works.

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    0
  • It is a rectangular piece of cloth which is wrapped round the neck, shoulders and breast.

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  • The vestment was at first a perfectly plain white cloth, but in the 12th century the custom arose of decorating the upper border with a band of embroidery, the parure (parura) or "apparel."

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    0
  • fano, " cloth," Goth.

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    0
  • fana, " cloth," Mod.

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  • The fanone was originally a cloth like the amice and was wrapped round neck and From Braun, Liturgische Gewandung.

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  • Upon a table covered by a cloth lay two books in the relative positions shown in figure.

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  • If the two hands be placed flat upon the table, in the angle between the two books, and the cloth pushed towards the corner, it will at once be rucked up into a fold which will follow a curve not unlike that of the Alps.

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  • The precise character and form of the folds produced will depend upon the nature of the cloth and other accidental circumFIG.

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  • wide, and should be put on during spring before the blossom buds begin to expand; they should have attached to them scrim cloth (a sort of thin canvas), which admits light pretty freely, yet is sufficient to ward off ordinary frosts; this canvas is to be let down towards evening and drawn up again in the morning.

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  • Aschaffenburg manufactures fancy goods, Augsburg and Hof produce excellent cloth, and Munich has a great reputation for scientific instruments.

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  • The exports consist chiefly of corn, potatoes, hops, beer, wine, cloth, cotton goods, glass, fancy wares, toys, cattle, pigs and vegetables.

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  • The park was presented in 1862 by the widow of Joseph Locke, M.P. The manufacture of iron and steel, and the weaving of linen and other cloth, are the two principal industries; but there are also bleachfields, printfields, dyeworks, sawmills, cornmills and malt-houses; and the manufacture of glass, needles and wire is carried on.

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  • Vesey set up here a cloth trade which, however, soon became neglected.

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  • Cloth, drugget, cotton, leather, gloves and tapes are also made.

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  • 1 Stout, old-fashioned boxcloth is almost the only cloth that (after a soft, heavy lining has been added to it) affords even two Quantities of Fur needed, in Square Feet.

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  • Boldon Book, dated 1183, contains the first mention of Darlington as a borough, rated at 5, while half a mark was due from the dyers of cloth.

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  • Saxonville manufactures worsted cloth.

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  • The name "atlas," an Arabic word meaning "smooth," applied to a smooth cloth, is sometimes found in English, and is the usual German word, for "satin."

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  • Gold and silver articles, silk, plush, cloth, leather, soap, starch, chemicals and carriages are among the chief manufactures.

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  • The first mention of the cloth trade for which Kidderminster was formerly noted occurs in 1334, when it was enacted that no one should make woollen cloth in the borough without the bailiff's seal.

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  • The cloth of Aix-la-Chapelle and the silk of Crefeld form important articles of export.

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  • The imports consist mainly of raw material for working up in the factories of the district, while the principal exports are coal, fruit, wine, dyes, cloth, silk and other manufactured articles of various descriptions.

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  • Cotton is the principal product of the mills at Lodz and Lask, both in Piotrkow; though woollen cloth, silk and linen are also produced.

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  • Brass and other metal wares, silk and cotton cloth and sugar are among the manufactures.

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  • The town has railway, machine and electrical works; cloth, gloves and buttons are also manufactured here, and there are spinning-mills.

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  • The imports consist chiefly of English goods, indigo, cloth, boots, leather, sugar, salt, iron and copper, from Hindustan, and of shawls, carpets, "Barak" (native woollen cloth), postins (coats made of skins), shoes, silks, opium and carpets from Meshed, Herat and Turkestan.

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  • The falls in the river afford motive power to the cloth and cotton mills (spinning and weaving)-the staple industries-and to factories for sugar, paper, lithography, tobacco and carpets, joinery works and breweries.

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  • Cloth was formerly a staple of trade, but manufactures of nails and buttons are now pre-eminent, while the river Salwarpe works a number of mills in the neighbourhood, and near the town are carriage works belonging to the Midland railway.

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  • Wine and herrings were the chief articles of her commerce; but her weavers had been in repute from time immemorial, and exports of cloth were large, while her goldsmiths and armourers were famous.

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  • It is the chief seat of the textile industry in south Germany, and its cloth, cotton goods and linen manufactories employ about 10,000 hands.

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  • La Estrada is the chief town of a densely-populated mountainous district; its industries are agriculture, stockbreeding, and the manufacture of linen and woollen cloth.

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  • In 1895 almost a million persons (half of them women) were employed in this branch of industry, and in 1897 the value of the cloth, buckskin and flannel manufacture was estimated at 18,000,000.

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  • In this age Hainaut was known as "the poor land of a proud people," and it was not until the beginning of the 14th century that Mons was converted into a trading town by the establishment of a cloth market.

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  • Mons is now a flourishing town with a good trade in cloth, lace, sugar refinery, &c.; but its chief importance is derived from its proximity to the Borinage (place of boring), district containing mines of the finest coal in Belgium.

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  • Melksham possesses cloth-mills where coco-nut fibre and hair cloth are woven, flour-mills and dye-works.

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  • Woollen mills, distilleries and breweries and manufactures of leather, locomotives and iron-work, furniture, agricultural implements, cloth and paper are the chief.

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  • There are manufactures of cloth, linen, leather, caps, boots, soap, candles, ropes; as well as breweries and distilleries.

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  • The old cloth industry is almost extinct.

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  • The elder takes the Gospel off the white cloth, where it has lain all through the ceremony, and places it on the postulant's head, and the other good men present place their right hands on his head; they shall say the parcias (spare), and thrice the "Let us adore the Father and Son and Holy Spirit," and then pray thus: "Holy Father, welcome thy servant in thy justice and send upon him thy grace and thy holy spirit."

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  • The Perfect kept it wrapped up in a bag of pure white cloth, tied round the neck, and sent it long distances to regions which through persecution they could not enter.

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  • The service was called apparellamentum, because a table was covered with a white cloth and the Gospel laid on it.

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  • The centre of the cloth manufacture is Kano.

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  • The cloth is made of the cotton grown in the country, woven on small handlooms and dyed either with indigo or with a magenta dye obtained from the bark of a tree.

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  • If the Hausa history, which exists in written form, be correct, the manufacture of this cloth has been carried on in Kano since the 9th century.

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  • Over all is worn a long cloth robe, the gibbeh (or jibbeh) somewhat resembling the kaftan in shape, but having shorter sleeves, and being open in front.

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  • The head-dress is the red cloth fez or tarbush round which a turban is usually worn.

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  • Cloth is woven at Parachin, 5 m.

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  • It lies in the heart of one of the busiest industrial districts in Germany, and carries on important manufactures of the finer kinds of cloth, wool, yarn and felt, and also of iron and steel goods.

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  • The manufacture and export of native cloth have now been almost entirely superseded by the introduction of European piece goods.

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  • The principal branches are brewing, distilling, flour-milling, sugar, leather, paper, petroleumrefineries, cloth and earthenwares.

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  • The town has a Gothic church (1581), a château, schools, cloth and cigar factories, iron-foundries, flour and saw mills and factories for machine building.

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  • Magdeburg is the central market in Germany for sugar and chicory, but trades extensively also in cereals, fruit, vegetables, groceries, cattle, horses, wool, cloth, yarn, leather, coal and books.

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  • The "Field of the Cloth of Gold," where Henry VIII.

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  • Peter and Paul, which was maintained until within recent years, when fairs were also held at the feast of St Mark, chiefly for linen cloth, under grant from Charles I.

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  • Wolsey used this antagonism to make England arbiter between them; and both monarchs sought England's favour in 1520, Francis at the Field of Cloth of Gold and Charles V.

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  • The manufacture of cloth from flax is of very ancient date, and towards the close of the 16th century Scottish linen cloths were largely exported to foreign countries, as well as to England.

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  • At the time of the Union the annual amount of linen cloth manufactured in Scotland is supposed to have been about 1,500,000 yards.

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  • The Union gave a considerable impetus to the manufacture, as did also the establishment of the Board of Manufactures in 1727, which applied an annual sum of £2650 to its encouragement, and in 1729 established a colony of French Protestants in Edinburgh, on the site of the present Picardy Place, to teach the spinning and weaving of cambric. From the 1st of November 1727 to the 1st of November 1728 the amount of linen cloth stamped was 2,183,978 yds., valued at £103,312, but for the year ending the 1st of November 1822, when the regulations as to the inspection and stamping of linen ceased, it had increased to 36,268,530 yds., valued at £1,396,296.

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  • The monuments of the type of the Midas tomb are obviously imitated from patterns which were employed in cloth and carpets and probably also in the tilework on the inside of chambers varying slightly according to the material.

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  • Their clothing is simple: a loin cloth for the men and for the women a girdle or petticoat of leaves.

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  • Their cloth is generally ornamented with geometrical patterns.

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  • The manufactures include linen fabrics, cloth, toys, buttons, optical instruments, agricultural machines, knives, mineral waters, condensed soups and condensed milk.

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  • Caine was formerly one of the chief centres of cloth manufacture in the west of England, but the industry is extinct.

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  • There are manufactures of cotton cloth and brass= ware.

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  • Blome in 1673 speaks of Warrington market as an important one "for linen cloth, corn, cattle, provisions and fish, being much resorted to by the Welshmen," and in 1730 Defoe says the market was especially famous for "a sort of table linen called Huk-a-back or Huk-abuk."

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  • Its chief manufactures are skates, files, locks and similar articles, and it has also cloth and cotton factories.

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  • Other industries are the cultivation of tobacco, rice, Indian corn and hemp, and the manufacture of sinamay, a coarse hemp cloth.

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  • The industries include manufactures of pottery, bricks, oil, linen and woollen cloth, fire-hose and paper.

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  • Its industries consist of iron founding and cloth weaving, and there are considerable horse and cattle markets.

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  • The chief crops are cotton and flax; the chief manufactures are blankets and cotton cloth.

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  • His dress was of" plain cloth "on the day of his inauguration.

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  • The industries embrace distilleries, iron foundries and manufactures of cloth.

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  • The dress of the Berbers was formerly made of home-woven cloth, and the manufacture of woollen stuffs has always been.

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  • They weave and dye several kinds of cloth, tan and dress leather and manufacture oil and soap. Without the assistance of the wheel the women produce a variety of pottery utensils, often of very graceful design, and decorated with patterns in red and black.

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  • Sugar-cane is grown only in the rich plains; and though cotton is grown in the warmer tracts, most of the cotton cloth is imported.

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  • But now the larger part of the cotton goods used in India is manufactured in mills in that country or in England, and the handloom weavers' output is confined to the coarsest kinds of cloth, or to certain special kinds of goods, such as the turbans and " saris " of Bombay, or the muslins of Arni, Cuddapah, and Madura in Madras, and of Dacca in Bengal.

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  • It is calculated that an Indian power-loom weaver working 72 hours a week can turn out 70 lb of cloth, while a European working 54 hours can turn out 468 lb, and that one Lancashire weaver can do the work of six Indian power-loom weavers and nine hand-loom weavers.

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  • About half the total crop is exported, and the remainder used in the jute mills centred round Calcutta, which supply cloth and bags for the grain export trade.

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  • Each village has at least one resident trader, who usually combines in his own person the functions of money-lender, grain dealer and cloth seller.

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  • As his name is still cherished in India, so his tomb is still honoured, being covered by a cloth presented by Lord Northbrook when viceroy in 1873.

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  • The first, made of a single piece of cloth 20 to 30 in.

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  • The lungi is made of cloth of a special kind manufactured mostly in Ludhiana.

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  • It is a single piece of cloth 6 to 8 in.

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  • The methods of binding the pagri are innumerable, each method having a distinctive name as arabi (Arab fashion); mansabi (official fashion, much used in the Deccan); mushakhi (sheik fashion); chakridar (worn by hadjis, that is those who have made the pilgrimage to Mecca); khirki-dar (a fashion of piling the cloth high, adopted by retainers of great men); latudar (top-shaped, worn by kayasths or writers); joridar (the cloth twisted into rope shape) (Plate I.

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  • The chira is a pagri of checked cloth.

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  • The mandil is of gold or highly ornamented cloth; it is worn by nobles and persons of distinction.

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  • It is made of cut and sewn cloth.

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  • The material is always of kashida, a kind of embroidered cloth.

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