Cloister sentence example

cloister
  • The cloister and monastic buildings lie to the south side of the church.
    67
    32
  • He was defeated, blinded and sent back to die in the cloister of Sahagun.
    23
    20
  • The other half he spent in "Bogucharovo Cloister," as his father called Prince Andrew's estate.
    30
    27
  • The cloister garden was too small for the crowds attending his lectures, and on the 1st of August 1490 he gave his first sermon in the church of St Mark.
    17
    15
  • On the western side of the cloister is another two-story building (N).
    5
    3
    Advertisement
  • Entering the Cistercian cloister Bolbonne, and graduating doctor of theology at Paris, he became in 1311 abbot of Fontfroide, in 1317 bishop of Pamiers and in 1326 of Mirepoix.
    3
    2
  • The final judgment found no proof of heresy, but compelled him to abjure sixteen errors, rather extorted than extracted from his writings, suspended him from his see for five years, and secluded him to the Dominican cloister of Sta Maria sopra Minerva.
    1
    0
  • All were linked by a continuous alley around a cloister garth.
    1
    0
  • William, count of Provence, son of Boso II., again delivered southern France from a Saracen invasion by his victory at Fraxinet in 973, and ended his life in a cloister.
    0
    0
  • It was not, however, until the 5th of June that the case of Huss came up for hearing; the meeting, which was an exceptionally full one, took place in the refectory of the Franciscan cloister.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Merveille (1203-1264) consists of two continuous buildings of three storeys, that on the east containing, one above the other, the hospitium (aumonerie), refectory and dormitory, that on the west the cellar, knights' hall (salle des chevaliers) and cloister.
    0
    0
  • The chapter-house opens out of the same alley of the cloister.
    0
    0
  • Round the cloister (B) were ranged the buildings connected with the monks' daily life.
    0
    0
  • The chapter-house (C) always opened out of the east walk of the cloister in a line with the south transept.
    0
    0
  • In the plan before us this apartment (E) opens from the south cloister walk, adjoining the refectory.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The dormitory, as a rule, was placed on the east side of the cloister, running over the calefactory and chapter-house, and joined the south transept, where a flight of steps admitted the brethren into the church for nocturnal services.
    0
    0
  • Outside the refectory door, in the cloister, was the lavatory, where the monks washed their hands at dinner-time.
    0
    0
  • Returning to the cloister, a vaulted passage admitted to the small cloister (I), opening from the north side of which were eight small cells, assigned to the scribes employed in copying works for the library, which was placed in the upper story, accessible by a turret staircase.
    0
    0
  • To the south of the small cloister a long hall will be noticed.
    0
    0
  • From this cloister opened the infirmary (K), with its hall, chapel, cells, blood-letting house and other dependencies.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At the eastern verge of the vast group of buildings we find the novices' lodgings (L), with a third cloister near the novices' quarters and the original guest-house (M).
    0
    0
  • Closely adjoining to this, so that the eye of the father of the whole establishment should be constantly over those who stood the most in need of his watchful care, - those who were training for the monastic life, and those who had worn themselves out in its duties, - was a fourth cloister (0), with annexed buildings, devoted to the aged and infirm members of the establishment.
    0
    0
  • Advancing into the inner court, the buildings devoted to hospitality are found close to the entrance; while those connected with the supply of the material wants of the brethren, - the kitchen, cellars, &c., - form a court of themselves outside the cloister and quite detached from the church.
    0
    0
  • The church refectory, dormitory and other buildings belonging to the professional life of the brethren surround the great cloister.
    0
    0
  • The small cloister beyond, with its scribes' cells, library, hall for disputations, &c., is the centre of the literary life of the community.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The requirements of sickness and old age are carefully provided for in the infirmary cloister and that for the aged and infirm members of the establishment.
    0
    0
  • This inner gate conducted into the base court (T), round which were placed the barns, stables, cow-sheds, &c. On the eastern side stood the dormitory of the lay brothers, fratres conversi (G), detached from the cloister, with cellars and storehouses below.
    0
    0
  • The long gabled building on the east side of the cloister contained on the ground floor the chapter-house and calefactory, with the monks' dormitory above (M), communicating with the south transept of the church.
    0
    0
  • The small cloister is at W, where were the carols or cells of the scribes, with the library (P) over, reached by a turret staircase.
    0
    0
  • The cloister to the south (4) occupies the whole length of the nave.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the south side of the cloister we have the remains of the old refectory (II), running, as in Benedictine houses, from east to west, and the new refectory (12), which, with the increase of the inmates of the house, superseded it, stretching, as is usual in Cistercian houses, from north to south.
    0
    0
  • The western side of the cloister is, as usual, occupied by vaulted cellars, supporting on the upper story the dormitory of the lay brothers (8).
    0
    0
  • The abbot's house, the largest and most remarkable example of this class of buildings in the kingdom, stands south to the east of the church and cloister, from which it is divided by the kitchen court (K), surrounded by the ordinary domestic offices.
    0
    0
  • These houses, with gardens attached, also surround three sides of the cloister court, which lies north of the outer court.
    0
    0
  • The number of dormitories varies according to the size of the hall, and in the larger ones pillars support the roof on all three sides, forming a sort of cloister running round the hall.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This court was surrounded by wooden columns supporting a roof, like a medieval cloister; on the south side are chambers for attendants (BaXaµoc).
    0
    0
  • The town contains three old churches, of which the early Gothic abbey church with its Romanesque cloister is most notable, and some good houses.
    0
    0
  • The cloister is duly placed on the south side of the church, and the chief buildings occupy their usual positions round it.
    0
    0
  • Each occupied a small detached cottage, standing by itself in a small garden surrounded by high walls and connected by a common corridor or cloister.
    0
    0
  • The enclosure is divided into two courts, of which the eastern court, surrounded by a cloister, from which the cottages of the monks (I) open, is much the larger.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The two courts are divided by the main buildings of the monastery, including the church, the sanctuary (A), divided from B, the monks' choir, by a screen with two altars, the smaller cloister to the south (S) surrounded by the chapter-house (E), the refectory (X) - these buildings occupying their normal position - and the chapel of Pontgibaud (K).
    0
    0
  • The kitchen with its offices (V) lies behind the refectory, accessible from the outer court without entering the cloister.
    0
    0
  • The smaller of the two, the south, presents the usual arrangement of church, refectory, &c., opening out of a cloister.
    0
    0
  • At the Jacobins at Paris, a cloister lay to the north of the long narrow church of two parallel aisles, while the refectory - a room of immense length, quite detached from the cloister - stretched across the area before the west front of the church.
    0
    0
  • The refectory stretches northwards at right angles to the cloister, which lies to the north of the church, having the chapter-house and sacristy on the east.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The cloister and monastic buildings remain tolerably perfect to the north.
    0
    0
  • The prior's lodge is placed to the west of the cloister.
    0
    0
  • Some fragments of the south walk of the cloister of the Grey Friars remained among the buildings of Christ's Hospital (the Blue-Coat School), while they were still standing.
    0
    0
  • The plan given by Viollet-le-Duc of the Priory of St Jean des Bons Hommes, a Cluniac cell, situated between the town of Avallon and the village of Savigny, shows that these diminutive establishments comprised every essential feature of a monastery, - chapel, cloister, chapter-room, refectory, dormitory, all grouped according to the recognized arrangement.
    0
    0
  • But the members of these orders were not less monks than knights, their statutes embodied the rules of the cloister, and they were bound by the ecclesiastical vows of celibacy, poverty and obedience.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Merovingian race thus came to an end in the cloister.
    0
    0
  • About 1588, he determined to fulfil a vow which he had once made to enter a cloister; but being rejected by the Carthusians and the Celestines, he held himself absolved, and continued to follow his old profession.
    0
    0
  • In the later Armenian tradition we find other notices of this celebrated man' - such as, that he was the nephew of Mesrob, that he was publicly complimented by the emperor Marcian, that he had been ordained bishop of Bagrewand by the patriarch Giut, and that he was buried in the church of the Apostolic Cloister at Mush in the district of Taron; but these accounts must be received with great caution.
    0
    0
  • The Franciscan cloister is a fine specimen of late Romanesque; that of the Dominicans is hardly inferior, though of later date.
    0
    0
  • To the left of the church is an exquisite cloister of 1308 with double columns, in which a number of inscriptions relating to the Doria family and also the statue of Andrea Doria by Montorsoli are preserved.
    0
    0
  • Near the cathedral is a small 12th-century (?) cloister.
    0
    0
  • Adjoining the church is a ruined cloister of the 11th century.
    0
    0
  • Six miles to the south is the large Benedictine monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore, founded in 1320, famous for the frescoes by Luca Signorelli (1497-1498) and Antonio Bazzi, called Sodoma (1505), in the cloister, illustrating scenes from the legend of St Benedict; the latter master's work is perhaps nowhere better represented than here.
    0
    0
  • Of the conventual buildings apart from the church nothing has survived but a fragment of the cloister with a richly-carved round-headed doorway and some fine arcading.
    0
    0
  • In the carving of windows, aisles, cloister, capitals, bosses and doorheads no design is repeated.
    0
    0
  • But to these were quickly added subjects of allegory, of classical learning, of witchcraft and superstition and of daily life; scenes of the parlour and the cloister, of the shop, the field, the market and the camp; and lastly portraits of famous men, with scenes of court life and princely pageant and ceremony.
    0
    0
  • In the same year, taking advantage of the general anarchy, Ebroin and Leger left the cloister and soon found themselves once more face to face.
    0
    0
  • Marco (now converted into a national museum), a series of frescoes, beginning towards 1443; in the first cloister is the Crucifixion with St Dominic kneeling; and the same treatment recurs on a wall near the dormitory; in the chapterhouse is a third Crucifixion, with the Virgin swooning, a composition of twenty life-sized figures - the red background, which has a strange and harsh effect, is the misdoing of some restorer; an "Annunciation," the figures of about three-fourths of life-size, in a dormitory; in the adjoining passage, the "Virgin enthroned," with four saints; on the wall of a cell, the "Coronation of the Virgin," with Saints Paul, Thomas Aquinas, Benedict, Dominic, Francis and Peter Martyr; two Dominicans welcoming Jesus, habited as a pilgrim; an "Adoration of the Magi"; the "Marys at the Sepulchre."
    0
    0
  • It was said that after leaving the cloister he studied the black art in Toledo, which had a great reputation in the middle ages as a school of witchcraft.
    0
    0
  • In his youth he was a monk, and left the cloister to claim an inheritance from the count of Boulogne.
    0
    0
  • He retired to the cloister of St Theodore, which he himself had founded, and died there in 829.
    0
    0
  • An elegant portal leads from the church into the small cloister, which has a pretty garden in the centre; the terra-cotta ornaments surmounting the slender marble pillars are the work of Rinaldo de Stauris (1463-1478), who executed similar decorations in the great cloister.
    0
    0
  • This cloister is 412 ft.
    0
    0
  • A fine cloister of the 13th century adjoins the south side of the church.
    0
    0
  • Men bred in the cloister and the lecture-room of the logicians, trained in scholastic disputations, versed in allegorical interpretations of the plainest words and most apparent facts, could not find the key which might unlock those stores of wisdom and of beauty.
    0
    0
  • But ill-health and the death of his parents brought him back to his studious life, and in 1675 he entered the cloister of the Congregation of St Maur at La Daurade, Toulouse, taking the vows there on the 13th of May 1676.
    0
    0
  • A Romanesque cloister containing a collection of old sculpture flanks the church on the north.
    0
    0
  • Some books and papers were seized as suspicious, then given back as innocent; but Rabelais was in all probability disgusted with the cloister - indeed his great work shows this beyond doubt.
    0
    0
  • He had evidently during his long and studious sojourn in the cloister (a sojourn which was certainly not less than five-andtwenty years, while it may have been five-and-thirty, and of which the studiousness rests not on legend but on documentary evidence) acquired a vast stock of learning.
    0
    0
  • The quick-witted peasant lad ran away from the plough at an early age, finally settling down as a friar in the Johannite cloister of Antvorskov near Slagelse.
    0
    0
  • In consequence of his professed attachment to the doctrines of Luther he was first imprisoned in the dungeons of Antvorskov and thence transferred, in the spring of 1525, to the Grey Friars' cloister at Viborg in Jutland, where he preached from his prison to the people assembled outside, till his prior, whom he won over to his views, permitted him to use the pulpit of the priory church.
    0
    0
  • Finding, however, in the cloister neither calm nor solitude, and having gradually turned again to study, he yielded after a year to urgent entreaties from without and within, and went forth to reopen his school at the priory of Maisoncelle (1120).
    0
    0
  • The marble cloister by Fonsega, though rather flamboyant in character, is one of the finest of its kind in existence.
    0
    0
  • After a temporary sepulture elsewhere his remains were transported on the 12th of August to the cloister of St Florentin according to his wish.
    0
    0
  • To the south-east lies the picturesque Little Cloister, with its court and fountain, surrounded by residences of canons and officials.
    0
    0
  • A Scots version of the history was written in 1596 by James Dalrymple of the Scottish Cloister at Regensburg.
    0
    0
  • The cathedral of St Eulalie, a Romanesque building completed about the beginning of the 12th century, has a beautiful cloister in the same style, with interesting sculptures and three early Christian sarcophagi.
    0
    0
  • The remainder of Sarpi's life was spent peacefully in his cloister, though plots against him continued to be formed, and he occasionally spoke of taking refuge in England.
    0
    0
  • Many an earnest heart full of disappointment or enthusiasm has gone through a similar struggle, has learnt to look upon all earthly gains and hopes as worse than vanity, has envied the calm life of the cloister, troubled by none of these things, and has longed for an opportunity of entire selfsurrender to abstinence and meditation.
    0
    0
  • It has two Roman Catholic Churches and a Lutheran Church, a fine medieval inspired town-hall, two interesting old gates, remains of its former environing walls and cloister, several public monuments, including one to the veterans of the Napoleonic wars, and a museum.
    0
    0
  • Among them are the sagas of Thorgils and Haflidi (I118-1121), the feud and peacemaking of two great chiefs, contemporaries of Ari; of Sturla (1150-1183), the founder of the great Sturlung family, down to the settlement of his great lawsuit by Jon Loptsson, who thereupon took his son Snorri the historian to fosterage, - a humorous story but with traces of the decadence about it, and glimpses of the evil days that were to come; of the Onundar-brennusaga (1185-1200), a tale of feud and fire-raising in the north of the island, the hero of which, Gudmund Dyri, goes at last into a cloister; of Hrafn Sveinbiornsson (1190-1213), the noblest Icelander of his day, warrior, leech, seaman, craftsman, poet and chief, whose life at home, travels and pilgrimages abroad (Hrafn was one of the first to visit Becket's shrine), and death at the hands of a foe whom he had twice spared, are recounted by a loving friend in pious memory of his virtues, c. 1220; of Aron Hiorleifsson (1200-1255), a man whose strength, courage and adventures befit rather a henchman of Olaf Tryggvason than one of King Haakon's thanes (the beginning of the feuds that rise round Bishop Gudmund are told here), of the Svinefell-men (1248-1252), a pitiful story of a family feud in the far east of Iceland.
    0
    0
  • Forty-six years of enforced retirement had qualified him for the cloister rather than for the throne, and his first feeling when notified of his accession was one of terror for his brother's vengeance.
    0
    0
  • The sisters were not to be literally shoeless, but to wear sandals of rope; they were to sleep on straw, to eat no meat, to be strictly confined to the cloister, and to live on alms without regular endowment.
    0
    0
  • Waller reprinted Woodhead's translation of The Way of Perfection in "The Cloister Library" (1901).
    0
    0
  • He afterwards inhabited Montpellier (he is sometimes called Alanus de Montepessulano), lived for a time outside the walls of any cloister, and finally retired to Citeaux, where he died in 1 202.
    0
    0
  • There is another castle of Buschtehrad near Hofic. Kladno, which for centuries had been a village of no importance, was sold in 1705 by the grand-duchess Anna Maria of Tuscany to the cloister in Bfewnow, to which it still belongs.
    0
    0
  • One of the ablest who took their part was Chu-hang, a priest of Hang-chow, who had abandoned the literary status for the Buddhist cloister.
    0
    0
  • A monk, who was exclaustrated alter the death of Alphonso, but re turned to the cloister on the birth of his daughter Petronilia.
    0
    0
  • Nicholas went to Paris and finally became a monk of the cloister of St Rufus near Arles.
    0
    0
  • He left his cloister on several occasions, and speaks of having visited Croyland, Worcester, Cambrai (I105) and Cluny (1132).
    0
    0
  • Another time in the night I heard him above my cell walking on the cloister, but as I knew it was the devil I paid no attention to him and went to sleep."
    0
    0
  • Books might also have been kept in the Sacristy or in the adjacent cloister alley.
    0
    0
  • First thought: Nun reading a Bible in some secluded cloister.
    0
    0
  • They leave the cloister and wander off in search of an abundance of food.
    0
    0
  • Melrose Abbey is unusual tho not unique in having the cloister to the north of the church.
    0
    0
  • Early in 2001 a northern cloister was opened where once the monastic cloister stood.
    0
    0
  • Running along the north side of the abbey church, where the original cloister would have been, a garden has been laid out.
    0
    0
  • Breakfast is in the cool colonnades of the old cloister; the restaurant is in the dimly lit wine cellars.
    0
    0
  • John Paslew, last abbot of Whalley, was also responsible for the commissioning of a separate mansion, east of the great cloister.
    0
    0
  • The gallows appear to have been set up in some sort of cathedral cloister.
    0
    0
  • If you are visiting it is worth finding time roam aroundthe 16th century cloister and Italian renaissance garden.
    0
    0
  • They comprise a quadrangle surrounded by a cloister walk with a well in the center of the square.
    0
    0
  • To work only for self, to cloister oneself in the seeking of spiritual rapture, is to run from this responsibility.
    0
    0
  • Besides the celebrated school of the Palace, where Alcuin had among his hearers the members of the imperial family and the dignitaries of the empire as well as talented youths of humbler origin, we hear of the episcopal schools of Lyons, Orleans and St Denis, the cloister schools of St Martin of Tours, of Fulda, Corbie, Fontenelle and many others, besides the older monasteries of St Gall and Reichenau.
    0
    0
  • The doors of St Mark's were hastily secured, and Savonarola discovered that his adherents had secretly prepared arms and munitions and were ready to stand a siege The signory sent to order all laymen to quit the cloister, and a special summons to Valori.
    0
    0
  • Beyond the cloister, at the extreme verge of the convent area to the south, stands the "factory" (Z), containing workshops for shoemakers, saddlers (or shoemakers, sellarii), cutlers and grinders, trencher-makers, tanners, curriers, fullers, smiths and goldsmiths, with their dwellings in the rear.
    0
    0
  • This includes two cloisters, the great cloister surrounded by the buildings essentially connected with the daily life of the monks, - the church to the south, the refectory or frater-house here as always on the side opposite to the church, and farthest removed from it, that no sound or smell of eating might penetrate its sacred precincts, to the east the dormitory, raised on a vaulted undercroft, and the chapter-house adjacent, and the lodgings of the cellarer to the west.
    0
    0
  • The dormi- tory, as a rule, was placed on the east side of the cloister, running over the calefactory and chapter-house, and joined the south transept, where a flight of steps admitted the brethren into the church for nocturnal services.
    0
    0
  • In the former,';as at Canterbury, the refectory ran east and west parallel to the nave of the church, on the side of the cloister farthest removed from it.
    0
    0
  • We have the cloister (H) to the south, with the threeaisled chapter-house (I) and calefactory (L) opening from its eastern walk, and the refectory (S), with the kitchen (Q) and buttery (T) attached, at right angles to its southern walk.
    0
    0
  • But the cloister garth, as at Chichester, is not rectangular, and all the surrounding buildings are thus made to sprawl in a very awkward fashion.
    0
    0
  • Between the cell and the cloister gallery (A) is a passage or corridor (B), cutting off the inmate of the cell from all sound or movement which might interrupt his meditations.
    0
    0
  • The door leading from the south aisle into a herbaceous garden, formerly the cloister, is an exquisite copy of one which had become greatly decayed.
    0
    0
  • To the saintliness of the cloister he added the wisdom of the man of the world; he was constant in misfortune, not elated by prosperity, never "carrying things to the sweating-point'," but preserving, in a time of universal corruption, unreality and self-indulgence, a nature sweet, pure, self-denying, unaffected.
    1
    2
  • Eckhart was a distinguished son of the Church; E but in reading his works we feel at once that we have passed into quite a different sphere of thought from that of the churchly mystics; we seem to leave the cloister behind and to breathe a freer atmosphere.
    1
    2
  • It differs from the normal type in many respects, as it includes residences for various sects, so that portions of it, with the several storeys externally, resemble an immense mansion or warehouse, and this would seem to have led to an important change inside, as instead of a cloister of two or more aisles there are four immense halls all covered with pointed barrel vaults.
    2
    3
  • The extensive buildings of the Cistercian abbey of Fontfroide, near Bizanet, include a Romanesque church, a cloister, dormitories and a refectory of the 12th century.
    1
    2
  • A curious polygonal church of the i ith century at Rieux-Minervois, the abbey-church at St Papoul, with its graceful cloister of the 14th century, and the remains of the important abbey of St Hilaire, founded in the 6th century and rebuilt from the 12th to the 15th century, are also of antiquarian interest.
    2
    3
  • His cloister, sanctified by memories of St Antonine and adorned with the inspired paintings of Fra Angelico, seemed to him a fore-court of heaven.
    1
    2
  • Educated in the Augustinian cloister at Fiesole, he was transferred in 1519 to the convent of St John of Verdara near Padua, where he graduated D.D.
    1
    2
  • Appointed teacher (1522) in the cloister school of Cappel, he lectured on Melanchthon's Loci Communes (1521).
    1
    2
  • To the south of the church there is a cloister (latter half of the 15th century) with graceful arcades.
    1
    2
  • The cloister, one of the purest and most graceful works of the 13th century, is surrounded by double lines of slender columns carrying pointed arcades, between which delicate floral designs are carved.
    2
    3
  • Of the many historians of the middle ages, besides the authors of biographies, chronicles, cloister annals, &c., may be mentioned Haymo, Anastasius, Adam of Bremen, Ordericus Vitalis, Honorius of Autun, Otto of Freising, Vincent of Beauvais and Antoninus of Florence.
    1
    1
  • The archbishop's palace and a Romanesque cloister adjoin the cathedral on its south side.
    1
    1
  • Its of peace ceased when the life of the cloister had to be exchanged for the discipline of the camp; so in the sketch of the the older orders, which preserved to their members certain constitutional rights.
    1
    2
  • This has been mostly rebuilt, and but little now remains except ruins of some of the towers, a great part of the monks' dormitory and frater, and the splendid cloister, completed about 1200.
    1
    1
  • Immediately adjacent to the gateway is a two-storied guest-house, opening from a cloister (C).
    1
    2
  • Opening from the western side of the cloister, but actually standing in the outer court, is the refectory (G), a large cruciform building, about loo feet each way, decorated within with frescoes of saints.
    1
    1
  • The general distribution of the buildings may be thus described :- The church, with its cloister to the south, occupies the centre of a quadrangular area, about 430 feet square.
    1
    1
  • These essential elements of monastic life are ranged about a cloister court, surrounded by a covered arcade, affording communication sheltered from the elements between the various buildings.
    1
    1
  • Each has a covered cloister surrounded by the usual buildings, i.e.
    1
    1
  • From some local reasons, however, the cloister and monastic buildings are placed on the north, instead, as is far more commonly the case, on the south of the church.
    1
    1
  • In immediate contact with this, on the north side, lie the cloister and the group of buildings devoted to the monastic life.
    1
    1
  • A passage under the dormitory leads eastwards to the smaller or infirmary cloister, appropriated to the sick and infirm monks.
    1
    1
  • Eastward of this cloister extend the hall and chapel of the infirmary, resembling in form and arrangement the nave and chancel of an aisled church.
    1
    1
  • Opposite the refectory door in the cloister are two lavatories, an invariable adjunct to a monastic dining-hall, at which the monks washed before and after taking food.
    1
    1
  • The small cloister lies to the south-east of the larger cloister, and still farther to the east we have the remains of the infirmary with the table hall, the refectory of those who were able to leave their chambers.
    1
    1
  • To the south was the great cloister (A), surrounded by the chief monastic buildings, and farther to the east the smaller cloister, opening out of which were the infirmary, novices' lodgings and quarters for the aged monks.
    12
    13
  • To the south of the church, so as to secure as much sun as possible, the cloister was invariably placed, except when local reasons forbade it.
    2
    3
  • Sofia, a circular edifice of about 760, now modernized, the roof of which is supported by six ancient columns, is a relic of the Lombard period; it has a fine cloister of the 12th century constructed in part of fragments of earlier buildings; while the cathedral with its fine arcaded facade and incomplete square campanile (begun in 1279) dates from the 9th century and was rebuilt in 1114.
    2
    4
  • At an early age he entered the cloister; and in 423 he became bishop of Cyrrhus, a small city in a wild district between Antioch and the Euphrates, where, except for a short period of exile, he spent the remainder of his life.
    4
    6
  • On the 30th of June 1532 the council of two hundred had ordained that in every church and cloister of the city "the pure Gospel" should be preached; against this order the bishop's vicar led the opposition.
    1
    3
  • The great court on the,north side has a lofty cloister round it, so that in many respects it follows the normal type.
    1
    3
  • In the time of Archbishop Egbert (732-766) and of Alcuin, at first a scholar and afterwards master of the cloister school, York became one of the most celebrated places of education in Europe.
    1
    3
  • He became a monk of Corbie, near Amiens in Picardy, in 814, and assumed, the cloister name of Paschasius.
    1
    3
  • It is certainly not impossible that a Christian Saxon, sufficiently educated to read Latin easily, may have chosen to follow the calling of a stop or minstrel instead of entering the priesthood or the cloister; and if such a person existed, it would be natural that he should be selected by the emperor to execute his design.
    1
    3
  • Abjuring pomps and vanities, its citizens observed the ascetic regime of the cloister; half the year was devoted to abstinence and few dared to eat meat on the fasts ordained by Savonarola.
    2
    4
  • The rest of the exterior is built in bands of red and white, with slightly projecting pilasters along the walls; it has a noble cloister, with two storeys of arcading.
    0
    2
  • The early palaces of Verona, before its conquest by Venice, were of noble and simple design, mostly built of fine red brick, with an inner court, surrounded on the ground floor by open arches like a cloister, as, for example, the Palazzo della Ragione, an assize court, begun in the r 2th century.
    0
    2
  • In 1884-86 portions of a number of fine mosaic pavements were discovered extending over a very large area under the cloister and other parts of the cathedral, about 7 ft.
    0
    2
  • His ascetic tendencies are exhibited in the Moralia and Regulae, ethical manuals for use in the world and the cloister respectively.
    2
    4
  • It has many domes and a spacious cloister, and its central court can be seen from the neighbouring streets.
    0
    2
  • Zwingli, moreover, never knew anything of those spiritual experiences which drove Luther into a cloister and goaded him to a feverish "searching of the Scriptures" in the hope of finding spiritual peace.
    0
    2
  • Before the cathedral is the pretty cloister garth, with the chapel of St Anne, erected in 1321 and restored in 1888.
    1
    3
  • The enceinte comprises two large open courts, surrounded with buildings connected with cloister galleries of wood or stone.
    2
    4
  • The inner court is surrounded by a cloister (EE), from which open the monks' cells (II).
    0
    2
  • On the south side of the cloister stood the refectory (P), an immense building, loo ft.
    4
    6
  • At the age of sixteen he was sent to the celebrated Saxon cloister school of Pforta (Schulpforta).
    2
    5
  • The choir opens into a beautiful cloister, the massive vaulting of which is supported on heavy piers adorned with statuary, between which intervene slender columns arranged in pairs and surmounted by delicately carved capitals.
    10
    13
  • In early manhood he entered the cloister as a catechumen, receiving baptism about 370.
    1
    4
  • A Gothic cloister adjoins the church.
    5
    8