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clergyman

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clergyman

clergyman Sentence Examples

  • HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG (1711-1787), GermanAmerican Lutheran clergyman, was born in Einbeck, Hanover, on the 6th of September 1711.

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  • In that case a clergyman refused the communion 1 Stephen's Commentaries, bk.

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  • He was educated in a school at Jesmond, kept by Mr Ivison, a clergyman of the church of England.

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  • After partially fulfilling the duties of the office for one session, he wa.s led to resume the charge of St George's, the clergyman who had been chosen by the congregation as his successor having died before entering on his work.

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  • The friends agreed to visit the Castle twice a week and to look after the sick in any parish where the clergyman was willing to accept their help.

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  • 375) it was held to be not penal for a clergyman to speak of merit by transfer as a "fiction,"or to express a hope of the ultimate pardon of the wicked, or to affirm that any part of the Old or New Testament, however unconnected with religious faith or moral duty, was not written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

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  • clergy," the word "clergyman" is still, at least in the United Kingdom, used of the clergy of the Established Church in contradistinction to "minister."

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  • RICHARD BUSBY (1606-1695), English clergyman, and head master of Westminster school, was born at Lutton in Lincolnshire in 1606.

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  • It was as a theologian that Dr Emmons was best known, and for half a century probably no clergyman in New England exerted so wide an influence.

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  • SAMUEL AUGUSTUS BARNETT (1844-), English clergyman and social reformer, was born at Bristol on the 8th of February 1844, the son of Francis Augustus Barnett, an iron manufacturer.

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  • LYMAN BEECHER (1775-1863), American clergyman, was born at New Haven, Connecticut, on the 12th of October 1775.

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  • His father, a Lutheran clergyman at Leonberg, dabbled in spiritualism, and was deprived of his living in 1771.

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  • No rule of doctrine is to be ascribed to the church which is not distinctly and expressly stated or plainly involved in the written law of the Church, and where there is no rule, a clergyman may express his opinion without fear of penal consequences.

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  • For many years he was the clergyman whom working men.

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  • The term "curate" in the present day is almost exclusively used to signify a clergyman who is assistant to a rector or vicar, by whom he is employed and paid; and a clerk in deacon's orders is competent to be licensed by a bishop to the office of such assistant curate.

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  • Ministers and people with few exceptions - the most notable being the Scotch Highlanders who had settled in the valley of the Mohawk in New York and on Cape Fear river in North Carolina - sided with the patriot or Whig party: John Witherspoon was the only clergyman in the Continental Congress of 1776, and was otherwise a prominent leader; John Murray of the Presbytery of the Eastward was an eloquent leader in New England; and in the South the Scotch-Irish were the backbone of the American partisan forces, two of whose leaders, Daniel Morgan and Andrew Pickens, were Presbyterian elders.

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  • He was the oldest of the four sons of the Rev. David Dudley Field (1781-1867), a well-known American clergyman and author.

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  • An English clergyman named William Jackson, a man of infamous notoriety who had long lived in France, where he had imbibed revolutionary opinions, came to Ireland to nogotiate between the French committee of public safety and the United Irishmen.

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  • SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN (1632-1723), English architect, the son of a clergyman, was born at East Knoyle, Wiltshire, on the 10th of October 1632; he entered at Wadham College, Oxford, in 1646, took his degree in 1650, and in 1653 was made a fellow of All Souls.

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  • THOMAS ARNOLD (1795-1842), English clergyman and headmaster of Rugby school, was born at West Cowes, in the Isle of Wight, on the 13th of June 1795.

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  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.

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  • FRANCIS ASBURY (1745-1816), American clergyman, was born at Hamstead Bridge in the parish of Handsworth, near Birmingham, in Staffordshire, England, on the 10th of August 1 745.

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  • The declaration is to the effect that the clergyman has not received the presentation in consideration of any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit directly or indirectly given or promised by him or any one for him to any one; that he has not made any promise of resignation other than that allowed by the Clerical Resignation Bonds Act 1828; that he has not for any money or benefit procured the avoidance of the benefice; and that he has not been party to any agreement invalidated by sec. 3 sub-sec. 3 of the act which invalidates any agreement for the exercise of a right of patronage in favour or on the nomination of any particular person, and any agreement on the transfer of a right of patronage (a) for the retransfer of the right, or (b) for postponing payment of any part of the consideration for the transfer until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (c) for payment of interest until a vacancy or for more than three months, or (d) for any payment in respect of the date at which a vacancy occurs, or (e) for the resignation of a benefice in favour of any person.

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  • Webster was twice married - first in 1898 to Grace, daughter of Rev. Elijah Fletcher, a New Hampshire clergyman.

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  • THOMAS BROWN (1778-1820), Scottish philosopher, was born at Kirkmabreck, Kirkcudbright, where his father was parish clergyman.

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  • In a fragment of autobiography printed in the Athenaeum (12th of January 1850) he says that he was entirely self-taught, and attributes his poetic development to long country walks undertaken in search of wild flowers, and to a collection of books, including the works of Young, Barrow, Shenstone and Milton, bequeathed to his father by a poor clergyman.

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  • When quite young he expressed a wish to become a minister of the gospel, but his aspirations were discouraged by the local clergyman.

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  • One of this good clergyman's sons, Samuel Parkman, became an eminent merchant in Boston, and exhibited much skill in horticulture.

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  • 1854), daughter of George Junkin, president of Washington College, Virginia, and secondly in 1857 to Mary Anna Morrison, daughter of a North Carolina clergyman.

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  • Harris, a Plymouth clergyman, and the well-known Biblical scholar Samuel Prideaux Tregelles.

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  • His father, Johann Gottfried Lessing, was a clergyman, and, a few years after his son's birth, became pastor primaries or chief pastor of Kamenz.

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  • His father, Daniel Doddridge, was a London merchant, and his mother the orphan daughter of the Rev. John Bauman, a Lutheran clergyman who had fled from Prague to escape religious persecution, and had held for some time the mastership of the grammar school at Kingston-upon-Thames.

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  • In a presentative advowson, the patron presents a clergyman to the bishop, with the petition that he be instituted into the vacant living.

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  • The bishop is bound to induct if he find the clergyman canonically qualified, and a refusal on his part is subject to an appeal to an ecclesiastical court either by patron or by presentee.

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  • After three months' schoolmastering for Owen at Wroxeter he read theology, and especially the schoolmen, with Francis Garbet, the local clergyman.

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  • His family had been in America since 1632, and his father, Aaron Bancroft, was distinguished as a revolutionary soldier, clergyman and author.

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  • CHARLES KINGSLEY (1819-1875), English clergyman, poet and novelist, was born on the 12th of June 1819, at Holne vicarage, Dartmoor, Devon.

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  • With the exception of occasional changes of residence in England, generally for the sake of his wife's health, one or two short holiday trips abroad, a tour in the West Indies, and another in America to visit his eldest son settled there as an engineer, his life was spent in the peaceful, if active, occupations of a clergyman who did his duty earnestly, and of a vigorous and prolific writer.

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  • His father, vicar of Charlton and Westport, an illiterate and choleric man, quarrelled, it is said, with a brother clergyman at the church door, and was forced to decamp, leaving his three children to the care of an elder brother Francis, a flourishing glover at Malmesbury.

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  • His elder brother Edward had been a clergyman, but in this year died; and Joseph entreated his father that he might be educated to succeed his brother in the ministry.

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  • On the one hand the famous Gorham judgment was the outcome of his refusal to institute to the living of Brampford Speke a clergyman George Cornelius Gorham (1787-1857), who had openly disavowed his belief in baptismal regeneration; on the other he denounced the equally famous Tract XC. in his episcopal charge of 1843.

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  • Frederick William, whose temper was by no means so ruthlessly Spartan as tradition has painted it,was overjoyed, and commissioned the clergyman to receive from the prince an oath of filial obedience, and in exchange for this proof of "his intention to improve in real earnest" his arrest was to be lightened, pending the earning of a full pardon.

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  • Through the tuition of the local Protestant clergyman, who was interested in the boy, he got a scholarship in 1756 at Trinity College, Dublin, and subsequently became a fellow.

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  • ARTHUR CUSHMAN MCGIFFERT (1861-), American theologian, was born in Sauquoit, New York, on the 4th of March 1861, the son of a Presbyterian clergyman of Scotch descent.

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  • JOHN HENLEY (1692-1759), English clergyman, commonly known as "Orator Henley," was born on the 3rd of August 1692 at Melton-Mowbray, where his father was vicar.

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  • There is a Roman Catholic church with a resident priest, an Anglican church, visited periodically by a clergyman from the mainland, two native and Chinese schools, and a sailors' club, built by the Roman Catholic mission.

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  • Scientific exploration does not begin before Edward Robinson, an American clergyman, who, after devoting many years to study to fit himself for the work, made a series of journeys through the country, and under the title of Biblical Researches in Palestine (1841-1856) published his itineraries and observations.

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  • For two years he stayed with a Lutheran clergyman of the name of Sartorius, whilst attending the lectures of the Athenaeum Illustre.

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  • There do not appear to be any men in his line of descent given to scholarly or intellectual pursuits till we get back to the 17th century, when we come to Abijah Whitman, a clergyman, settled in Connecticut.

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  • The clergyman is primarily the preacher, renewed by God's power and enlightened by the Spirit, so that he speaks with divine authority.

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  • Prayer and praise also are effective only as the congregation intelligently join in them; hence they are not to be solely by a priest nor in a strange tongue, as the clergyman is simply the leader of the devotions of the people.

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  • About the same time (1747) he finally left the Anglican communion for the Baptist, leaving the church literally as well as figuratively by quitting it as the clergyman began to read the Athanasian creed.

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  • He was a clergyman of the old High Church school, whose adherents, untouched by the influence of the Wesleys, had moulded their piety on the doctrines on the non-jurors and the old Anglican divines.

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  • When General Edward Braddock arrived in Virginia in February 1755, Washington wrote him a diplomatically worded letter, and was presently made a member 1 Weems was a Protestant Episcopal clergyman, who first published a brief biography of Washington in 1800, and later (1806) considerably expanded it and introduced various apocryphal anecdotes.

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  • She was the daughter of a clergyman named Francis Marbury, and, according to tradition, was a cousin of John Dryden.

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  • 1861), the son of a country clergyman.

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  • And it was another clergyman, John Gay, who in a dissertation prefixed to Law's translation of Archbishop King's Origin of Evil (pub.

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  • torturing the prisoner, and of tampering with the judges 4 by consulting them before the trial; nay, he is even represented as selecting this poor clergyman to serve for an example to terrify the disaffected, as breaking into his study and finding there a sermon never intended to be preached, which merely encouraged the people to resist tyranny.'

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  • Smyth was appointed preacher of the city of Lincoln in 1600 as an ordained clergyman, but became a separatist in 1605 or 1606, and, soon after, emigrated under stress of persecution with the Gainsborough Independents to Amsterdam.

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  • COTTON MATHER (1663-1728), American Congregational clergyman and author, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 12th of February 1663.

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  • Cotton Mather's son, Samuel Mather (1706-1785), also a clergyman, graduated at Harvard in 1723, was pastor of the North Church, Boston, from 1732 to 1742, when, owing to a dispute among his congregation over revivals, he resigned to take charge of a church established for him in North Bennett Street.

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  • By many, including Blaine himself, the defeat was attributed to the effect of a phrase, "Rum, Romanism and Rebellion," used by a clergyman, Rev. Samuel D.

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  • At the Assembly's request, however, Knox undertook a long visit to England, where his two sons by his first wife were being educated, and were afterwards to be Fellows of St John's, Cambridge, the younger becoming a parish clergyman.

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  • His father, an Irish clergyman, the Fearleighlinn, or lector, at the university, was said to have been of noble family.

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  • He celebrates marriages in accordance with the provisions of the Foreign Marriage Act 1892, and, where the ministrations of a clergyman cannot be obtained, reads the burial service.

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  • OCTAVIUS BROOKS FROTHINGHAM (1822-1895), American clergyman and author, was born in Boston on the 26th of November 1822, son of Nathaniel Langdon Frothingham (1793-1870), a prominent Unitarian preacher of Boston, and through his mother's family related to Phillips Brooks.

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  • This sect, based upon the theories of various German religious mystics, and having for its primary object the spiritualization of the matrimonial state, was founded in 1846 by the Rev. Henry James Prince, a clergyman of the Church of England (1811-1899).

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  • In 1830 he became assistant to a country clergyman, and nine months later accepted the post of professor in the high school at Maulbronn, having to teach Latin, history and Hebrew.

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  • ROBERT ISAAC WILBERFORCE (1802-1857), English clergyman and writer, second son of William Wilberforce, was born on the 19th of December 1802.

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  • In 1831 he published a tract on tithes, "to correct the prejudices of the lower order of farmers," and in the following year a collection of hymns for use in his parish, which had a large general circulation; a small volume of stories entitled the Note Book of a Country Clergyman; and a sermon, The Apostolical Ministry.

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  • HOSEA BALLOU (1771-1852), American Universalist clergyman, was born in Richmond, New Hampshire, on the 30th of April 1771.

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  • MALCOLM MACCOLL (c. 1838-1907), British clergyman and publicist, was the son of a Scottish farmer.

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  • His earliest known ancestor was Richard Edwards, Welsh by birth, a London clergyman in Elizabeth's reign.

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  • Another brother, Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg (1753-1815), was a prominent Lutheran clergyman, and was pastor of a church in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, from 1779 to his death; but he is best known as a botanist, and published Catalogus plantarum Americae septentrionalis (1813) and Descriptio uberior graminum et plantarum calamariarum Americae septentrionalis indignarum et circurum (1817).

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  • Swift was to be his chaplain and secretary, but upon reaching Ireland Berkeley gave the secretaryship to a Mr Bushe, who had persuaded him that it was an unfit post for a clergyman.

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  • JAMES WHITESIDE (1804-1876), Irish judge, son of William Whiteside, a clergyman of the Church of Ireland, was born on the 12th of August 1804, and was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, being called to the Irish bar in 1830.

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  • The class did not survive the Revolution; but the courtesy title of abbe, having long lost all connexion in people's minds with any special ecclesiastical function, remained as a convenient general term applicable to any clergyman.

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  • SIR CHARLES BELL (1774-1842), Scottish anatomist, was born at Edinburgh in November 1774, the youngest son of the Rev. William Bell, a clergyman of the Episcopal Church of Scotland; among his brothers were the anatomist, John Bell, and the jurist, G.

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  • This is neither assignable by the clergyman during his life, nor can it be seized by his creditors.

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  • time offence was given to the Puritans by an order that every clergyman should read the Declaration of Sports, in which the king directed that no one should be prevented from dancing or shooting at the butts on Sunday afternoon.

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  • Hence the Conventicle Act (1664) imposed penalties on those taking part in religious meetings in private houses, and the Five Mile Act (1665) forbade an expelled clergyman to come within five miles of a corporate borough, the very place where he was most likely to secure adherence, unless he would swear his adhesion to the dbctrmn.e of non-resistance.

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  • JOHANN SALOMO SEMLER (1725-1791), German church historian and biblical critic, was born at Saalfeld in Thuringia on the 18th of December 1725, the son of a clergyman in poor circumstances.

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  • His disciple Thomas Firmin (1632-1697), mercer and philanthropist, and friend of Tillotson, was weaned to Sabellian views by Stephen Nye (1648-1719), a clergyman.

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  • On the other hand Locke was defended with vigour by Samuel Bolde, a Dorsetshire clergyman.

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  • On the 29th of November the Assembly decreed that every nonjuring clergyman must take within eight days the civic oath, substantially the same as the oath previously administered, on pain of losing his pension and, if any troubles broke out, of being deported.

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  • He graduated at Brown University in 1807, was successively a school teacher and an actor, completed a course at the Andover Theological Seminary in September 1810, and was at once licensed to preach as a Congregational clergyman.

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  • 1856), a clergyman of northern Iceland, has, in a series of novels and short stories, given accurate, but somewhat dry, descriptions of the more gloomy sides of Icelandic country life.

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  • PARSON, a technical term in English law for the clergyman of the parish.

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  • C., in 1827, and named in honour of Richard Furman (1755-1825), a wellknown Baptist clergyman of South Carolina, whose son, James C. Furman (1809-1891), was long president of the University.

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  • Sturminster for the office of one Coombs at Dorsetshire, where he continued his evening education with another kindly clergyman.

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  • 'AUSTIN PHELPS - (1820-1890), American Congregational minister and educationalist, was born on the 7th of January 1820 at West Brookfield, Massachusetts, son of Eliakim Phelps,' a clergyman, who, during the boyhood of his son was principal of a girls' school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and later pastor of a Presbyterian church in Geneva, New York.

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  • Frank, 1907), as well as his perilous relation to Eleonore Grunow, the wife of a Berlin clergyman, are proof and illustration.

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  • A clergyman was threatened for visiting a parishioner who was under the ban of the League.

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  • The father, who appears to have been a conscientious clergyman with no special interest in his sons, died in 1756 and was buried in the Cowper tomb at Panshanger.

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  • This family consisted of Morley Unwin (a clergyman), his wife Mary, and his son (William) and daughter (Susannah).

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  • Turning to another field, Milman published in 1829 his History of the Jews, which is memorable as the first by an English clergyman which treated the Jews as an Oriental tribe, recognized sheikhs and arnirs in the Old Testament, sifted and classified documentary evidence, and evaded or minimized the miraculous.

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  • THEOPHILUS PARSONS (1750-1813), American jurist, was born in Byfield, Massachusetts, on the 24th of February 1750, the son of a clergyman.

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  • FRANCIS LISTER HAWKS (1798-1866), American clergyman, was born at Newbern, North Carolina, on the 10th of June 1798, and graduated at the university of his native state in 1815.

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  • Its policy "was to avoid notoriety and public attitudes; to secure privileges without attracting needless 1 A collection of these laws was published in his General History of Connecticut (London, 1781), by the Rev. Samuel Peters (1735-1826), a Loyalist clergyman of the Church of England, who in 1774 was forced by the patriots or Whigs to flee from Connecticut.

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  • clergyman's daughter, to turn up her nose at you!

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  • clergyman's elder son - Captain J A Hope of the 2nd.

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  • clergyman of the parish, that cannot be expected from me.

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  • The Rev. Bernard Sylvester Child, B.A., is the present officiating clergyman.

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  • On the left, my maternal great-great-great-grandfather, Ballard Ezekiel Gibson, an ordained clergyman.

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  • The following February, Catherine's mother informed William that her daughter was to marry a clergyman, who was fifteen years her senior.

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  • He does not even appoint a clergyman to preside there.

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  • Reverend Jenkins on September 11th 1826 became the first clergyman appointed to the Holy Trinity Church.

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  • At the scaffold he was approached by a Protestant clergyman who asked him to confess his treason.

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  • In 1861 the then " central authorities " refused to appoint an evangelical clergyman to St Thomas ' Newcastle.

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  • I am a retired clergyman who is somewhat disillusioned with the established Church.

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  • The six pages are a response to doubts about his theory expressed by the campaigning Victorian clergyman the Rev William Denton.

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  • It was worn by a senior clergyman during special religious processions.

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  • His father was a merchant and his mother the daughter of an English clergyman.

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  • Figures of £ 25,000 pounds have been proposed as the cost of a parish clergyman.

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  • Monica le Doux Newton was born in Belper, Derbyshire in 1912; the daughter of a country clergyman.

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  • His framework is a book by a 19th century clergyman, the Rev Edward Duke, The Druidical Temples of the County of Wiltshire.

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  • clergyman directed neat houses to be built for four clergymen's widows, to whom he bequeathed £ 10 per annum.

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  • clergyman the first emigrants were clergymen of the Presbyterian church who settled in Virginia.

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  • clergyman series in the archive provide information on the careers of beneficed clergymen.

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  • daughter of a clergyman, but found it heard to embrace traditional Christianity.

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  • dissolute son of a clergyman and up to his neck in debt.

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  • officiate. Bernard Sylvester Child, B.A., is the present officiating clergyman.

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  • officiatelic church in Rothesay is dependent upon North Bute, the clergyman officiating there being the assistant of its minister.

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  • presideshould then keep to their plan to ensure that the clergyman or officiant presiding at the ceremony knows which couple is which!

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  • He did not use any scruples with the young clergyman.

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  • son of a Dutch clergyman.

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  • widow of the clergyman.

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  • The term is in use in the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland to designate an assistant clergyman, and also to a certain extent in the American Episcopal Church, though "assistant minister" is usually preferred.

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  • William Chichester (1813-1883), ISt Baron O'Neill, a clergyman, on succeeding to the estates as heir-general, assumed by royal licence the surname and arms of O'Neill; and in 1868 was created Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle.

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  • He was a member of the provincial congress which met at New Brunswick in July 1 774; presided over the Somerset county committee of correspondence in 1774-1775; was a member of the New Jersey constitutional convention in the spring of 1776; and from June 1776 to the autumn of 1779 and in1780-1783he was a member of the Continental Congress, where he urged the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, being the only clergyman to sign it.

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  • 534, which affirmed that a man regularly married according to the rites of the Irish Presbyterian Church, and afterwards regularly married to another woman by an episcopally ordained clergyman, could not be convicted of bigamy, because the English law required for the validity of a marriage that it should be performed by an ordained priest.

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  • After the bishop or his commissary has instituted the presentee, he issues a mandate under seal, addressed to the archdeacon or some other neighbouring clergyman, authorizing him to induct the clerk into his benefice, - in other words, to put him into legal possession of the temporalities, which is done by some outward form, and for the most part by delivery of the bell-rope to the clerk, who thereupon tolls the bell.

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  • A benefice is avoided or vacated - (1) by death; (2) by resignation, if the bishop is willing to accept the resignation: by the In cumbents' Resignation Act 1871, Amendment Act 188 7, any clergyman who has been an incumbent of one benefice continuously for seven years, and is incapacitated by permanent mental or bodily infirmities from fulfilling his duties, may, if the bishop thinks fit, have a commission appointed to consider the fitness of his resigning; and if the commission report in favour of his resigning, he may, with the consent of the patron (or, if that is refused, with the consent of the archbishop) resign the cure of souls into the bishop's hands, and have assigned to him, out of the benefice, a retiring-pension not exceeding one-third of its annual value, which is recoverable as a debt from his successor; (3) by cession, upon the clerk being instituted to another benefice or some other preferment incompatible with it; (4) by deprivation and sentence of an ecclesiastical court; under the Clergy Discipline Act 1892, an incumbent who has been convicted of offences against the law of bastardy, or against whom judgment has been given in a divorce or matrimonial cause, is deprived, and on being found guilty in the consistory court of immorality or ecclesiastical offences (not in respect of doctrine or ritual), he may be deprived or suspended or declared incapable of preferment; (5) by act of law in consequence of simony; (6) by default of the clerk in neglecting to read publicly in the church the Book of Common Prayer, and to declare his assent thereto within two months after his induction, pursuant to an act of 1662.

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  • On his return, "distrust of his own resolutions and convictions" led him to abandon for the time his intention of being a clergyman, and he settled down to the study of the law, "with a firm determination not to suffer it to engross my time so as to prevent me from pursuing other branches of knowledge."

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  • He was able, impetuous, frank, perfectly fearless in controversy, a speaker and preacher of much eloquence, a supporter of missions to the Oneida Indians in his diocese, and the compiler of the following devotional works: A Companion for the Altar (1804), Festivals and Fasts (1804), A Companion to the Book of Common Prayer (1805), and A Clergyman's Companion (1805).

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  • An Irish clergyman named Samuel O'Malley Cluff had adopted views similar to those of Pearsall Smith, who preached a doctrine of sanctification called "Death to Nature" as an antidote to the supposed prevalent Laodiceanism, and when these were repudiated seceded with his followers.

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  • The medicine is so simple in application and so easily available that it is served out almost automatically and indifferently, to every law-breaker; the pickpocket and the burglar are locked up next door to the clergyman at variance with his bishop; the weak-kneed and self-indulgent drunkard rubs shoulders with the political zealot who has endangered the peace of nations.

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  • York was scandalized at its clergyman's indecency, and indignant at his caricature as "Slop" of a local physician (Dr John Burton); London was charmed with his audacity, wit and graphic unconventional power.

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  • EZRA STILES (1727-1795), American clergyman and educationalist, seventh president of Yale College, was born on the 29th of November 1727 in North Haven, Connecticut, where his father, Isaac Stiles (d.

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  • The 2nd Viscount Sidmouth (1794-1864) was a clergyman of the Church of England; he was succeeded as 3rd Viscount by his son, William Wells Addington (b.

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  • My grandfather was a clergyman, a Church of England rector in a parish in Norfolk.

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  • Herman Boerhaave was born at Voorhout about 15 Km from Leyden in 1668; the son of a Dutch clergyman.

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  • Unfortunately, the message was delivered to the widow of the clergyman.

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  • Talk to your pastor, preacher, or clergyman for advice and recommendations on agencies that handle Christian adoptions.

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  • Friends and family of problem gamblers may also benefit from regular visits with a counselor or clergyman.

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  • Books of marriage records will usually contain the information from a license: name, date and clergyman or judge.

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  • One ghost tale surrounding this graveyard involved a local clergyman who was allegedly murdered, and only his head was buried in the graveyard.

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  • Before this there had been translations into French dialects, as by Philippe de Thaun (1121), by Guillaume, "clerc de Normandie," also, about the same period, by Pierre, a clergyman of Picardy.

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  • COLIN MACLAURIN (1698-1746), Scottish mathematician, was the son of a clergyman, and born at Kilmodan, Argyllshire.

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  • After a fortnight more at Shawbury, he wrote to John Newton and another clergyman friend in London for advice.

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  • John Thoreau, his father, who married the daughter of a New England clergyman, was the son of a John Thoreau of the isle of Jersey, who, in Boston, married a Scottish lady of the name of Burns.

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  • The Danish residents may include, besides a coloni-bestyrer and his assistant, a missionair or clergyman, at a few places also a doctor, and perhaps a carpenter and a schoolmaster.

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  • It was visited by whalers, chiefly Dutch, but nothing in the form of permanent European settlements was established until the year 1721, when the first missionary, the Norwegian clergyman Hans Egede, landed, and established a settlement near Godthaab.

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  • His first ministerial charge was over a small village parish, West Roxbury, a few miles from Boston; here he was ordained as a Unitarian clergyman in June 1837 and here he preached until January 1846.

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  • The murder of three men of the Baltic Landeswehr led to the coup of April 16 1919, by the proclamation of the Government of a Lettish clergyman, Needra.

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  • ROBERT COLLYER (1823-), American Unitarian clergyman, was born in Keighley, Yorkshire, England, on the 8th of December 1823.

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  • Never since Principal Carstairs had any Scottish clergyman been on such terms with his sovereign.

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  • The interest which Shaftesbury took in his studies, and the desire that he should be specially fitted for the profession which he had selected, that of a clergyman of the Church of England, are marked features of the letters.

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  • At the conclusion of his philosophical studies at the university, some geometrical figures, which fell in his way, excited in him a passion for mathematical pursuits, and in spite of the opposition of his father, who wished him to be a clergyman, he applied himself in secret to his favourite science.

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  • FREDERIC DAN HUNTINGTON (1819-1904), American clergyman, first Protestant Episcopal bishop of central New York, was born in Hadley, Massachusetts, on the 28th of May 1819.

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  • In 1842-1855 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church of Boston, and in 1855-1860 was preacher to the university and Plummer professor of Christian Morals at Harvard; he then left the Unitarian Church, with which his father had been connected as a clergyman at Hadley, resigned his professorship and became pastor of the newly established Emmanuel Church of Boston.

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  • Thus the finally fixed meaning of the word homily as an ecclesiastical term came to be a written discourse (generally possessing the sanction of some great name) read in church by or for the officiating clergyman when from any cause he was unable to deliver a sermon of his own.

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  • Cleveland, a clergyman of the Presbyterian Church, was of good colonial stock, a descendant of Moses Cleveland, who emigrated from Ipswich, England, to Massachusetts in 1635.

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  • Especially from England did they receive sympathy and help. An English clergyman, Dr Gilly, visited the valleys in 1823, and by his writings on the Vaudois church attracted considerable attention, so that he was enabled to build a college at La Torre.

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  • JEREMY BELKNAP (1744-1798), American author and clergyman, was born at Boston on the 4th of June 1744, and was educated at Harvard College, where he graduated in 1762.

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  • They are anomalies to the English ecclesiastical law, have no parish rights, and can be converted to other than religious purposes, but a clergyman may be licensed to perform duty in such a place of worship. In the early and middle part of the 19th century such proprietary chapels were common, but they have practically ceased to exist.

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  • Here he wrote his Neue Apologie des Socrates (1772), a work occasioned by an attack on the fifteenth chapter of Marmontel's Belisarius made by Peter Hofstede, a clergyman of Rotterdam, who maintained the patristic view that the virtues of the noblest pagans were only splendida peccata.

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  • The testimony of Livingstone confirms them, and even a Dutch clergyman, writing in 1869, described the system of apprenticeship of natives which obtained among the Boers " as slavery in the fullest sense of the word."

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  • A suit on the complaint of a neighbouring clergyman ensued and after various complications Denison was condemned by the archbishops' court at Bath (1856); but on appeal the court of Arches and the privy council quashed this judgment on a technical plea.

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  • His associations there, however, were almost exclusively with Episcopalians, including Mr Cartwright and the Rev. Dr. Stuart, for a time the only clergyman in the district.

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  • But in such a case notice must be given in a specified form, which is unnecessary where the burial service is conducted by a clergyman of the Church of England.

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  • His father, Rev Henry Lyon Davis (1775-1836), was a prominent Protestant Episcopal clergyman of Maryland, and for some years president of St John's College at Annapolis.

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  • When tables were substituted for altars in the English churches, these were not merely movable, but at the administration of the Lord's Supper were actually moved into the body of the church, and placed table-wise - that is, with the long sides turned to the north and south, and the narrow ends to the east and west, - the officiating clergyman standing at the north side.

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  • Some felt that they could not go to the Lord's Table where the clergyman was a worldly man; others went, but with much fear and doubt.

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  • He was expelled from the conference and joined the Wesleyan Methodist Association in 1836, but shortly afterwards became a clergyman in Manchester.

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  • PHILLIPS BROOKS (1835-1893), American clergyman and author, was born in Boston, Mass., on the 13th of December 1835.

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  • Before burial takes place the clergyman or other person conducting the funeral or religious service must have the registrar's certificate that the death of the deceased person has been duly registered, or else a coroner's order or warrant.

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  • Failing the certificate, the clergyman cannot refuse to bury, but he must forthwith give notice in writing to the registrar.

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  • He had been a tutor of Balliol and a clergyman since 1842, and had devoted himself to the work of tuition with unexampled zeal.

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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.

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  • JACOB ALBRIGHT (1759-1808), American clergyman, was born near Pottstown, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of May 1759.

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  • Antrim, Ireland, on the 12th of September 1788, and was the son of Thomas Campbell (1763-1854), a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Presbyterian "Seceders."

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  • BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DE COSTA (1831-1904), American clergyman and historical writer, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, on the 10th of July 1831.

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  • Some years ago, the State met me in behalf of the Church, and commanded me to pay a certain sum toward the support of a clergyman whose preaching my father attended, but never I myself.

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