Clerestory sentence examples

clerestory
  • The Pointed arches rest upon pillars, possibly Norman, and above them, below the Decorated clerestory windows, is a series of semicircular arches with flamboyant tracery, a remarkable feature.

    1
    0
  • The nave passes from Norman to Early English in the course of its eight bays from east to west and also from the arcade through the triforium to the clerestory.

    0
    0
  • The abbey church of St Mary the Virgin is a stately cruciform building with central tower, the nave and choir having aisles and clerestory.

    0
    0
  • In the restoration of 1866 some early mural painting was discovered, and a transition Norman clerestory was discovered, remaining above the later nave.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Mary is fine Early English with Perpendicular clerestory.

    0
    0
  • It is mainly Early English, and a fine example of the style; but some of the windows including the nave clerestory, and the beautiful carved wooden roof, are Perpendicular.

    0
    0
  • The nave and choir have aisles, triforium and clerestory.

    0
    0
  • The nave is of ornate Norman work, with a massive triforium, surmounted by a Perpendicular clerestory and a beautiful wooden roof.

    0
    0
  • There is no triforium, but a high clerestory with wide two-light windows, with simple tracery like those in the nave-aisles and throughout the church, which give sufficient (if anything too much) light.

    0
    0
  • The nave is transitional Norman, with a Decorated superstructure including the clerestory.

    0
    0
  • wide; two rows of Corinthian columns ran down the middle, and the clerestory roof may have stood 50 ft.

    0
    0
  • The nave, on each side, has nine pointed arches in the basement storey, nine round arches in the triforium, and thirty-six pointed arches in the clerestory, through which an arcade is carried on both sides.

    0
    0
  • The large church of St Mary, at the top of the steep High Street, has fine clerestory windows, clustered columns and an elaborate carvedoak ceiling of the 15th century; it contains several interesting monuments of the 17th and 18th centuries, some of which commemorate'members of the family of Philipps of Picton Castle.

    0
    0
  • transept date from the 13th century; the nave, clerestory, upper part of the tower and N.

    0
    0
  • The actual introduction of the pointed arch took place at a much earlier date, as in the nave arcade of the Cistercian Abbey of Buildwas (1140), though the clerestory window above has semicircular arches.

    0
    0
  • accentuated by the lack of a clerestory.

    0
    0
  • All is vaulted in stone and the nave is tall enough to have had a clerestory, but there is blank wall here instead.

    0
    0
  • In the fifteenth century the walls of the nave were raised to form a clerestory and the nave covered with a new low-pitched roof.

    0
    0
  • Even more unusual, the stubby tower hugs a later raised clerestory, quite out of keeping with each other.

    0
    0
  • They show the clerestory (above) and aisle elevations in Bay 4. The different colors indicate the different stone types represented.

    0
    0
  • The first impression is of the great swathe of 14th century aisle, with a pretty clerestory peeping above it.

    0
    0
  • The wealth of those days built the church, particularly the fine 15th century clerestory and aisles.

    0
    0
  • The church is a large building comprising a five bay nave with aisles, a tall polygonal apse, and an exceptionally tall clerestory.

    0
    0
  • Above them towers the perpendicular clerestory, its windows picked out in brick.

    0
    0
  • The church is perpendicular, the windows mostly modern and poor, and those of the north clerestory have carpenters ' frames.

    0
    0
  • The twelfth-century arcade and triforium support a later clerestory and great hammer-beam roof dating from the fifteenth century.

    0
    0
  • clerestory windows, resting upon capitals with stiff foliage.

    0
    0
  • clerestory roofs was made.

    0
    0
  • clerestory body kits which were specially etched for him some years ago.

    0
    0
  • clerestory level.

    0
    0
  • clerestory carriage.

    0
    0
  • clerestory above the north transept arcade.

    0
    0
  • Angels heads were painted in spandrels above the nave clerestory windows.

    0
    0
  • None of the weight goes to the walls, as can be seen from the glass clerestory.

    0
    0
  • nave with 2 aisles and clerestory, chancel.

    0
    0
  • The clerestory has single lancets except at the eastern ends where there are large quatrefoils.

    0
    0
  • The clerestory continues as in the main transepts, i.e. with shaft rings.

    0
    0
  • It was an oblong edifice divided by columns into a central hall and a corridor running round all the four sides with a tribunal opposite the main entrance; and, unlike the usual basilicae, it had, instead of a clerestory, openings in the walls of the corridor through which light was admitted, it being almost as lofty as the nave.

    0
    0
  • Over the south transept aisle, which was the chapel of St Bridget, is the clerestory passage, which ran all round the church.

    0
    0
  • Designed in the geometrical Gothic style, it has paired clerestory windows with tracery.

    0
    0
  • The original triforium is transformed into a clerestory, the original clerestory being lost.

    0
    1
Browse other sentences examples →