How to use Clarke in a sentence

clarke
  • It was here that velvets were first made about 1756, by Jeremiah Clarke, and muslins and cotton quiltings in 1763.

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  • Beyond the introduction of the spider line it is unnecessary to mention the various steps by which the Gascoigne micrometer assumed the modern forms now in use, or to describe in detail the suggestions of Hooke, 4 Wren, Smeaton, Cassini, Bradley, Maskelyne, Herschel, Arago, Pearson, Bessel, Struve, Dawes, &c., or the successive productions of the great artists Ramsden, Troughton, Fraunhofer, Ertel, Simms, Cooke, Grubb, Clarke and Repsold.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • The currents were produced by a magneto-electric machine resembling that of Clarke.

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  • Samuel Clarke, who defended Newton's view of the world against Leibnitz's strictures, is perhaps chiefly interesting to.

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  • Clarke appeals to the immensity of time and space as involving infinity in God.

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  • Wollaston's Religion of Nature, which falls between Clarke's Discourse of the Unchangeable Obligations of Natural Religion and Butler's Sermons, was one of the popular philosophical books of its day.

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  • See John Clarke, Examination of the Notion of Moral Good and Evil advanced in a late book entitled The Religion of Nature Delineated (London, 1725); Drechsler, Ober Wollaston's Moral-Philosophie (Erlangen, 1802); Sir Leslie Stephen's History of English Thought in the Eighteenth Century (London, 1876), ch.

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  • A little farther down the river is St Robert's cave, which is supposed to have been the residence of the hermit, and in 1744 was the scene of the murder of Daniel Clarke by Eugene Aram, whose story is told in Lytton's wellknown novel.

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  • The first commissioner was Sir Marshall Clarke, to whose tact and ability the country owed much.

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  • He was first aroused to serious thought in 1785 by a funeral sermon preached over his elder brother by Adam Clarke.

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  • The antelopes include the beisa oryx, fairly common and widely distributed; the greater and lesser kudu (the greater kudu is not found on the Ogaden plateau); the Somali hartebeest (Bubalis Swaynei), found only in the Haud and Ogo districts; waterbuck, rare except along the Webi Shebeli and the Nogal; the dol or Somali bushbuck; the dibatag or Clarke's gazelle; the giraffe-like gerenuk or Waller's gazelle, very common; the aoul or Soemmering's gazelle, widely distributed; the dero (Gazella Speki); and the small dikdik or sakaro antelope, found in almost every thicket.

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  • The moment news of their activity reached him, whilst still in pursuit of Sir John Moore, he despatched letters to all the members of the Confederation warning them that their contingents might soon be required, and at the same time issued a series of decrees to General Clarke, his war minister, authorizing him to call up the contingent of 1810 in advance, and directing him in detail to proceed with the formation of 4th and 5th battalions for all the regiments across the Rhine.

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  • A dramatic version of the "Alice" books by Mr Savile Clarke was produced at Christmas, 1886, and has since enjOyed many revivals.

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  • Clarke (1889-1893) supposes them to be substitution derivatives of normal aluminium orthosilicate A14(S104)3, in which part of the aluminium is replaced by alkalis, magnesium, iron and the univalent groups (MgF), (A1F2),(AlO), (MgOH); an excess of silica is explained by the isomorphous replacement of H 4 SiO 4 by the acid H4S130s.

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  • The pro-deltidium, a term introduced by Hall and Clarke, signifies a small embryonic plate originating on the dorsal side of the body.

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  • In the summer of 1660 he left England for France, where he lived in seclusion under the name of John Clarke, subsequently removing elsewhere, either (for the accounts differ) to Spain, to Italy, or to Geneva.

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  • Osborn was succeeded as resident commissioner by Sir Marshal Clarke,' who gained the confidence and good will of the Zulu.

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  • He also took a deep interest in religious matters, was a prominent member of the Church of the Disciples (Unitarian; founded in Boston by the Rev. James Freeman Clarke), and was assistant editor for some time of The Christian World, a weekly religious paper.

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  • The first settlements were made at Providence by Roger Williams in June 1636, and at Portsmouth on the island of Aquidneck by the Antinomians, William Coddington (1601-1678), John Clarke (1609-1676), and Anne Hutchinson (191-1643), in March - April 1638.

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  • Becoming dissatisfied with conditions at Portsmouth, Coddington and Clarke removed a few miles farther south on the 29th of April 1639, and established a settlement at Newport.

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  • Clarke, appeared in 1833.

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  • The Journal of Australasia (1856-1858), the Australian Monthly Magazine (1865-1867), which contained contributions from Marcus Clarke and was continued as the Colonial Monthly (1867-1869), the Melbourne Review (1876-1885) and the Victorian Review (1879-1886) may also be mentioned.

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  • Newton and Dr Samuel Clarke is laid open, 1732; Glory or Gravity, 1733; The Religion of Satan, or Antichrist Delineated, 1736.

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  • The Horace Mann school in Boston, a public day school for the deaf, the New England industrial school for deaf mutes at Beverly and the Clarke school for the deaf at Northampton are maintained in part by the state.

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  • Clarke, when he, as superintendent of the Royal Carriage Factory, had brought gun mountings to such a pitch of perfection that it could be usefully employed.

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  • The dibatag or Clarke's gazelle (Ammodorcas clarkei), of Somaliland, forms a kind of connecting link between the true gazelles and the gerenuk, this being especially shown in the skull.

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  • Among the many who followed the method of attack first outlined by Hyatt, or who independently discovered his method, only a few can be mentioned here - namely, Waagen (1869), Neumayr (1871), Wiirttemberger (1880), Branco (1880), Mojsisovics (1882), Buckman (1887), Karpinsky (1889), Jackson (1890), Beecher (1890), Perrin-Smith (1897), Clarke (1898) and Grabau (1904).

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  • Clarke, Charles Schuchert and others have re-entered the study of the Palaeozoic geography of the North American continent with work of astonishing precision.

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  • No less than thirty-five answers were directed against this book, the most noteworthy of which were those of Bishop Edward Chandler, Arthur Sykes and Samuel Clarke.

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  • He was attacked in an elaborate treatise by Samuel Clarke, in whose system the freedom of the will is made essential to religion and morality.

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  • During Clarke's lifetime, fearing perhaps to be branded as an enemy of religion and morality, Collins made no reply, but in 1729 he published an answer, entitled Liberty and Necessity.

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  • Elijah Clarke marched against the town in three divisions, and while one division, attacking a neighbouring Indian camp, drew off most of the garrison, the other two divisions entered the town; but British reinforcements arrived before Brown could be dislodged from a building in which he had taken refuge, and Clarke was forced to withdraw.

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  • Clarke's hydrometer, however, remained the standard instrument for excise purposes from 1787 until it was displaced by that of Sikes.

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  • The slider is also provided with scales, marked respectively Dicas and Clarke, which serve to show the readings which would have been obtained had the instruments of those makers been employed.

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  • Troup, which represented the interests of the aristocratic and slave-holding communities; the other, formed by John Clarke (1766-1832) and his brother Elijah, found support among the non-slave-holders and the frontiersmen.

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  • Then the Troup faction under the name of States Rights party, endorsed the nullification policy of South Carolina, while the Clarke faction, calling itself a Union party, opposed South Carolina's conduct, but on the grounds of expediency rather than of principle.

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  • He was an intimate friend of Dr Samuel Clarke, of whom he wrote a life.

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  • Clarke, include General Metaphysics (1890), by John Rickaby, who effectively criticizes Hegel by precise distinctions, which, though scholastic, did not deserve to be forgotten.

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  • His institution of the permanent Committee of Imperial Defence, and of the new Army Council (1904), were reforms of the highest importance, resulting from the report of a "triumvirate" consisting of Lord Esher, Sir John Fisher and Sir George Clarke, appointed in November 1903.

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  • About 1715 he was removed to a private school at St Albans, where he was much influenced by the Presbyterian minister, Samuel Clarke.

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  • A brief survey of its contents will be sufficient to show its general nature and its relations to such works as Clarke's Demonstration and Butler's Analogy.

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  • In the 18th century, after Clarke's Boyle Lectures of 1704-1705, the opposition was less express.

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  • In 1674 he was made "commander-in-chief"; and in connexion with this another unsuccessful attempt, graphically described in Clarke's Life of James, was made to gain from Charles a tacit admission of his legitimacy.

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  • He died a Carter Hall, Millwood, Clarke county, Virginia, on the 12th of September 1813.

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  • On his return to India in 1796 he became military secretary to Sir Alured Clarke, commander-in-chief at Madras, and afterwards to his successor General Harris; and in 1798 he was appointed by Lord Wellesley assistant to the resident at Hyderabad.

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  • The philosophy of Descartes was the reigning system at the university; Clarke, however, mastered the new system of Newton, and contributed greatly to its extension by publishing an excellent Latin version of the Traite de physique of Jacques Rohault (1620-1675) with valuable notes, which he finished before he was twenty-two years of age.

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  • Clarke's translation (1697) continued to be used as a text-book in the university till supplanted by the treatises of Newton, which it had been designed to introduce.

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  • It was translated into English in 1723 by his brother Dr John Clarke (1682-1757), dean of Sarum.

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  • Clarke afterwards devoted himself to the study of Scripture in the original, and of the primitive Christian writers.

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  • Whiston informs us that, some time before the publication of this book, a message was sent to him from Lord Godolphin "that the affairs of the public were with difficulty then kept in the hands of those that were for liberty; that it was therefore an unseasonable time for the publication of a book that would make a great noise and disturbance; and that therefore they desired him to forbear till a fitter opportunity should offer itself," - a message that Clarke of course entirely disregarded.

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  • Clarke, in reply, drew up an apologetic preface, and afterwards gave several explanations, which satisfied the Upper House; and, on his pledging himself that his future conduct would occasion no trouble, the matter dropped.

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  • In 1728 was published "A Letter from Dr Clarke to Benjamin Hoadly, F.R.S., occasioned by the controversy relating to the Proportion of Velocity and Force in Bodies in Motion," printed in the Philosophical Transactions.

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  • Soon after his death his brother Dr John Clarke, dean of Sarum, published, from his original manuscripts, An Exposition of the Church Catechism, and ten volumes of sermons.

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  • Three years after his death appeared also the last twelve books of the Iliad, published by his son Samuel Clarke, the first three of these books and part of the fourth having, as he states, been revised and annotated by his father.

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  • In disposition Clarke was cheerful and even playful.

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  • At another time Clarke on looking out at the window saw a grave blockhead approaching the house; upon which he cried out, "Boys, boys, be wise; here comes a fool."

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  • Dr Warton, in his observations upon Pope's line, "Unthought-of frailties cheat us in the wise," says, "Who could imagine that Locke was fond of romances; that Newton once studied astrology; that Dr Clarke valued himself on his agility, and frequently amused himself in a private room of his house in leaping over the tables and chairs ?"

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  • In order to establish his sixth proposition, Clarke contends that time and space, eternity and immensity, are not substances, but attributes - the attributes of a self-existent being.

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  • Edmund Law, Dugald Stewart, Lord Brougham, and many other writers, have, in consequence, represented Clarke as arguing from the existence of time and space to the existence of Deity.

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  • Clarke has been generally supposed to have derived the opinion that time and space are attributes of an infinite immaterial and spiritual being from the Scholium Generale, first published in the second edition of Newton's Principia (1714).

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  • The view propounded by Clarke may have been derived from the Midrash, the Kabbalah, Philo, Henry More, or Cudworth, but not from Newton.

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  • It is a view difficult to prove, and probably few will acknowledge that Clarke has conclusively proved it.

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  • It is said, for example, that Clarke made virtue consist in conformity to the relations of things universally, although the whole tenor of his argument shows him to have had in view conformity to such relations only as belong to the sphere of moral agency.

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  • Herbart (q.v.) improved on Clarke's statement of the case.

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  • To say, however, that Clarke simply confused mathematics and morals by justifying the moral criterion on a mathematical basis is a mistake.

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  • Though Clarke can thus be defended against this and similar criticism, his work as a whole can be regarded only as an attempt to present the doctrines of the Cartesian school in a form which would not shock the conscience of his time.

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  • He also edited the Clarke Papers (1891-1901), and Mrs Hutchinson's Memoirs of Colonel Hutchinson (1885), and wrote an introduction to the Stuart Tracts (1903), besides contributions to the Dictionary of National Biography.

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  • He lectured on Clarke, Butler and Locke, and also delivered a systematic course on moral philosophy, which subsequently formed the basis of his well-known treatise.

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  • The commentaries of Barnes, Clarke and Ernesti are practically superseded; but Heyne's Iliad (Leipzig, 1802) and Nitzsch's commentary on the Odyssey (books i.-xii., Hanover, 1826-1840) are still useful.

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  • He also wrote a Life of Rev. Cornelius Winter, and Memoirs of Rev. John Clarke.

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  • One of the most valuable of his books, the Life of Samuel Clarke, appeared in 1730.

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  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.

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  • Garrison, Charles Sumner, Theodore Parker and James Freeman Clarke were among her friends; she advocated abolition, and preached occasionally from Unitarian pulpits.

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  • She edited Sex and Education (1874), an answer to Education (1873) by Edward Hammond Clarke (1820-1877); and wrote several books of travel, Modern Society (1880) and Is Polite Society Polite ?

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  • West Africa him associated with Clarke as one of the most active members of the Newport church, and as the date of the organization is uncertain, there is some reason to suspect that he was a constituent member, and that asabaptized man he took the initiative in baptizing and organizing.

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  • Dexter became, with Williams and Clarke, a leading statesman in Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

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  • In 1651 Clarke, Holmes and Joseph Crandall of the Newport church made a religious visit to Lynn, Mass.

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  • While in England on public business in 1652, Clarke published Ill News from New England, which contained an impressive account of the proceedings against himself and his brethren at Lynn, and an earnest and wellreasoned plea for liberty of conscience.

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  • In the evening of the 18th of April 1775 a British force of about Boo men under Lieut.-Colonel Francis Smith and Major John Pitcairn was sent by General Thomas Gage from Boston to destroy military stores collected by the colonists at Concord, and to seize John Hancock and Samuel Adams, then at Parson Clarke's house (now known as the Hancock-Clarke House) in Lexington.

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  • It is, however, to be noted that Shelley's "Letter to Maria Gisborne" (1820), Keats's "Epistle to Charles Clarke" (1816), and Landor's "To Julius Hare" (1836), in spite of their romantic colouring, are genuine Horatian epistles and of the pure Augustan type.

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  • About the same time he began to study with care Samuel Clarke's celebrated Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God, which had been published as the Boyle Lectures a few years previously.

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  • Clarke answered his unknown opponent with a gravity and care that showed his high opinion of the metaphysical acuteness displayed in the objections, and published the correspondence in later editions'of the Demonstration.

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  • Butler acknowledged that Clarke's reply satisfied him on one of the points, and he subsequently gave his adhesion to the other.

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  • In 1718 he took his degree, was ordained deacon and priest, and on the recommendation of Talbot and Clarke was nominated preacher at the chapel of the Rolls, where he continued till 1726.

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  • Without altogether eschewing Samuel Clarke's a priori system, Butler relies mainly on the inductive method, not professing to give an absolute demonstration so much as a probable proof.

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  • Cudworth and Clarke had tried to place ethics on a nobler footing, but their speculations were too abstract for Butler and not sufficiently "applicable to the several particular relations and circumstances1 of life."

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  • Besides the college library, there are in Northampton two public libraries, the Clarke (1850) and the Forbes (1894).

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  • It is noteworthy that in England the Socinian controversy, initiated by Biddle, preceded the Arian controversy initiated by Samuel Clarke's Scripture Doctrine of the Trinity (1712).

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  • Beyond its own borders the body has obtained recognition through the public work of such men as Henry Whitney Bellows and Edward Everett Hale, the remarkable influence of James Freeman Clarke and the popular power of Robert Collyer.

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  • Unpublished correspondence with his Somerset friend, Edward Clarke of Chipley, describes Locke's life in those troubled years.

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  • When he was in Holland he had written letters to his friend Clarke of Chipley about the education of his children.

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  • Letters from Locke to Thoynard, Limborch, Le Clerc, Guenellon, Molyneux, Collins, Sir Isaac Newton, the first and the third Lord Shaftesbury, Lords Peterborough and Pembroke, Clarke of Chipley and others are preserved, many of them unpublished, most of them in the keeping of Lord Lovelace at Horseley Towers, and of Mr Sanford at Nynehead in Somerset, or in the British Museum.

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  • We might give, as a fair illustration of Locke's general conception of ethics, a system which is frequently represented as diametrically opposed to Lockism; namely, that expounded in Clarke's Boyle lectures on the Being 'Clarke.

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  • It is true that Locke is not particularly concerned with the ethico-theological proposition which Clarke is most anxious to maintain, - that the fundamental rules of morality are independent of arbitrary will, whether divine or human.

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  • But in his general view of ethical principles as being, like mathematical principles,' essentially truths of relation, Clarke is quite in accordance with Locke; while of the four fundamental rules that he expounds, Piety towards God, Equity, Benevolence and Sobriety (which includes self-preservation), the first is obtained, just as Locke suggests, by " comparing the idea " of man with the idea of an infinitely good and wise being on whom he depends; and the second and third are axioms self-evident on the consideration of the equality or similarity of human individuals as such.

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  • But though it is an essential point in Clarke's view that what is right is to be done as such, apart from any consideration of pleasure or pain, it is to be inferred that he is not prepared to apply this doctrine in its unqualified form to such a creature as man, who is partly under the influence of irrational impulses.

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  • Thus, on the whole, the impressive earnestness with which Clarke enforces the doctrine of rational morality only rendered more manifest the difficulty of establishing ethics on an independent philosophical basis; so long at least as the psychological egoism of Hobbes is not definitely assailed and overthrown.

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  • Let us grant that there is as much intellectual absurdity in acting unjustly as in denying that two and two make four; still, if a man has to choose between absurdity and unhappiness, he will naturally prefer the former; and Clarke, as we have already seen, is not really prepared to maintain that such preference is irrational.'

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  • Taking the different impulses in detail, he first shows how the individual's happiness is promoted by developing 1 It should be observed that, while Clarke is sincerely anxious to prove that most principles are binding independently of Divine appointment, he is no less concerned to show that morality requires the practical support of revealed religion.

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  • Wollaston's theory of moral evil as consisting in the practical contradiction of a true proposition, closely resembles the most paradoxical part of Clarke's doctrine, and was not likely to approve itself to the strong common sense of Butler; but his statement of happiness or pleasure as a " justly desirable " end at which every rational being " ought " to aim corresponds exactly to Butler's conception of self-love as a naturally governing impulse; while' the " moral arithmetic " with which he compares pleasures and pains, and endeavours to make the notion of happiness quantitatively precise, is an anticipation of Benthamism.

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  • We may take this latter treatise as representing the first in the development of English ethics, at which what were afterwards called " utilitarian" and " intuitional " morality were first formally opposed; in earlier systems the antithesis is quite latent, as we have incidentally noticed in the case of Cumberland and Clarke.

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  • It was obvious, too, that this reaction might take place in either of the two lines of thought, which, having been peacefully allied in Clarke and Cumberland, had become distinctly opposed to each other in Butler and Hutcheson.

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  • Firstly, his conception of " right " and " wrong " as " single ideas " incapable of definition or analysis - the notions " right," " fit," " ought," " duty," " obligation," being coincident or identical - at least avoids the confusions into which Clarke and Wollaston had been led by pressing the analogy between ethical and physical truth.

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  • When we turn to the subject matter of virtue, we find that Price, in comparison with More or Clarke, is decidedly ix.

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  • Finally, Price, writing after the demonstration by Shaftesbury and Butler of the actuality of disinterested impulses in human nature, is bolder and clearer than Cudworth or Clarke in insisting that right actions are to be chosen because they are right by virtuous agents as such, even going so far as to lay down that an act loses its moral worth in proportion as it is done from natural inclination.

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  • Even in Clarke's system, where Indeterminism is no doubt a cardinal notion, its importance is metaphysical It may be observed that in the view of Kant and others (2) and (3) are somewhat confusingly blended.

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  • So again the controversy that Clarke conducted with Spinoza, and afterwards with Leibnitz, was entirely confined to the metaphysical region.

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  • In Bass Strait are several large islands belonging to Tasmania; King's, Flinders, Cape Barren and Clarke Islands are the largest.

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  • If a staunch unreconstructed Thatcherite gets in, the future of people like Clarke and Oatten in the Tory party becomes dubious.

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  • There are no fresh injury worries for Watford, with Clarke Carlisle, Chris Powell and Scott Loach remaining the only absentees.

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  • Next to speak was Malcolm Clarke, who is the Co-Chair of the newly amalgamated Football Supporters Federation.

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  • The Independent reports that Charles Clarke held a special meeting last night in order to persuade backbenchers not to back the rebel amendment.

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  • What then of Clarke's other comments, about the need to include biometrics to meet US standards for its visa waiver scheme.

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  • Mrs Moore and Mr Clarke invited me into their pews and introduced me to the retired brigadier and to Bob the electrician.

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  • Blunkett is a political bruiser, the Ken Clarke of NL.

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  • It remarked upon Clarke's " Damascene conversion to the joys of sterling " .

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  • The paper says Clarke gives a " devastating critique " of Blair's government.

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  • Clarke had gone out with Mr. Reed, I believe, under the pretense of assisting the emigrants.

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  • The familiar ritual began on BBC with Kenneth Clarke trying to put a brave face on things.

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  • The current shambles illustrates the folly of allowing Mr Clarke to stay on to sort out the mess.

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  • Sir Denis Forman explains the genesis of the best of ITV's traditions to Steve Clarke.

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  • So I sent Arthur C Clarke to investigate the Mysterious goings on at Logs.

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  • Back at Stoke, tho not in the same theater, where Allan Clarke had said his final goodbyes.

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  • Former Home Secretary Charles Clarke has lobbed a hand grenade into the fragile peace with a brutal, personal attack on Chancellor Gordon Brown.

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  • Charles Clarke's words appear to represent a revival of the government's hostility to grammar schools.

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  • Thomas Clarke is described a man with a rather intemperate habit.

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  • As a boy, John Clarke started work at the mill by feeding the livestock going on to become master baker.

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  • Weren't we supposed to be discovering strange monoliths on the moon by this stage - there goes Arthur C. Clarke's scientific credibility!

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  • Home secretary Charles Clarke said he considered the problem to be serious indeed, maybe as serious as drug peddling.

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  • The RCS collection includes two scrapbooks of First World War Memorabilia belonging to Captain Arthur O. Temple Clarke, R.A.S.C. (RCMS 319 ).

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  • The controversial and gritty portrayal of teenage life in west London was written by actor screenwriter Noel Clarke.

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  • In 1818 he wrote a reply to Dr. Adam Clarke's doctrine of the eternal sonship which caused some dispute within the Church.

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  • Clarke's position soon seemed tenable only to himself and he was sacked.

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  • Charles Clarke's hold on office looks increasingly tenuous.

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  • Clarke struck in the 26th minute to seal the win for Wolves in what was an otherwise tepid cup tie.

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  • On one recent afternoon the offerings included Nicky Clarke electric hair straighteners, a leather three-piece suite and a barely used 20GB iPod.

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  • I have seen some of the others mentioned visiting there; Thomas J. Clarke had a tobacconist 's shop at 75a Parnell Street.

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  • Around this time a Frenchman who had met Henry Clarke during his army service called on him riding a French velocipede.

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  • Cook was on hand to capitalize, lifting a left-footed volley over Matt Clarke.

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  • Clarke, one of the great wordsmiths of wine, writes delightful articles on the major varieties... .

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  • The author died 1672, and left the book unfinished; but the language of the title occurs in the first sentence; so it is undoubtedly Wilkins's, as well as sanctioned by his editor and connexion through marriage, Tillotson, afterwards the archbishop. We meet with " Natural Religion " again in Samuel Clarke's works, and notably in Bishop Joseph Butler's Analogy (1736).

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  • It is Clarke's defence of free will, Clarke's idealist theory of eternal " fitness " as the basis of ethical distinctions, perhaps Clarke's teaching on immortality, that Butler regards as " the common known arguments " and authoritative enunciations of truth in the regions of philosophy or Natural Theology.'

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  • Clarke's Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God is really a priori.

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  • Besides these works he wrote A Letter to Mr Dodwell, arguing that it is conceivable that the soul may be material, and, secondly, that if the soul be immaterial it does not follow, as Clarke had contended, that it is immortal; Vindication of the Divine Attributes (1710); Priestcraft in Perfection (1709), in which he asserts that the clause "the Church.

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  • Clarke's hydrometer, as afterwards constructed for the purposes of the excise, was provided with thirty-two weights to adapt it to spirits of different specific gravities, and eleven smaller weights, or "weather weights" as they were called, which were attached to the instrument in order to correct for variations of temperature.

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  • Clarke, then inspector-general of fortifications, Itrongly urged this plan, and proposed to begin at once a metre gauge railway from Suakin, to be constructed by Indian labor ander officers skilled in laying desert lines.

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  • Captain Beaufort was the first to visit several places on the sea-coast, and the remarkable rock-hewn tombs of Telmessus had been already described by Dr Clarke, but it was Sir Charles Fellows who first discovered and drew attention to the extraordinary richness of tile district in ancient remains, especially of a sepulchral character.

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  • In November 1637 John Clarke (1609-1676), a physician, of religious zeal and theological acumen, arrived at Boston, where, instead of the religious freedom he was seeking, he found the dominant party in the Antinomian controversy on the point.

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  • More » Brown attempts to heal leadership rift By David Clarke...

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  • The RCS collection includes two scrapbooks of First World War Memorabilia belonging to Captain Arthur O. Temple Clarke, R.A.S.C. (RCMS 319).

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  • Aiton and Death kept pace, Aiton winning comfortably against Kibble, Death aided by a broken down Clarke sextuple attempt.

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  • One such piece in the exhibition is the snakeskin rocker jacket by designer Ossie Clarke.

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  • Clarke turns down NUT offer Education secretary Charles Clarke has sparked controversy by snubbing an invitation to speak at the NUT 's annual dinner.

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  • In 1818 he wrote a reply to Dr. Adam Clarke 's doctrine of the Eternal Sonship which caused some dispute within the Church.

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  • Clarke 's position soon seemed tenable only to himself and he was sacked.

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  • Charles Clarke 's hold on office looks increasingly tenuous.

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  • Clarke, one of the great wordsmiths of wine, writes delightful articles on the major varieties....

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  • Prepaid Visa debit cards offered to members through Harland Clarke Corp are not products directly distributed by Score FCU.

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  • Members can obtain prepaid debit cards by visiting a local branch or requesting a prepaid debit card using the link on the main Score FCU website to Harland Clarke Corp.

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  • Online reports Tommy Lee, Jason Newsted, Gilby Clarke, CBS and Mark Burnett Productions were served with an injunction which prohibits them from using the name Supernova to profit in any way.

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  • Karen Clarke is an expert in the field of children's special occasion clothes, having decked out hundreds of youngsters including the opera singing sensation Jackie Evancho.

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  • Providing home care services to Virginia seniors residing in Northern Fairfax, Loudoun and Clarke Counties, Visiting Angels tailors services to the needs of the client.

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  • Clarke, P., et al. "DTP immunization of steroid treated preterm infants."

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  • In partnership with Mr. Doug Clarke, the two men have introduced a new product that will make you wonder how you ever spent a day at the beach without it!

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  • Another interesting movie is Frank Clarke's 1991 drama Blonde Fist.

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  • Many actors and actresses have come and gone over the years including actor John Clarke who retired in 2004 from the role of Mickey Horton.

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  • Melinda Clarke plays Julie Cooper-Nichol, the mother of Marissa and Kaitlin Cooper.

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  • Her father John Clarke played original cast member Mickey Horton on Days of Our Lives from 1965 to 2004.

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  • The daughter of veteran actor John Clarke (Mickey Horton), Melinda spent three years from 1987 to 1990 as Faith Taylor.

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  • In 2010, Clarke was a series regular on the CW series Nikita.

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  • If you think Clarke looks old school, that's because he is.

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  • Formed in 1980, Depeche Mode's original lineup consisted of Dave Gahan (vocals), Martin Gore (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Vince Clarke (keyboards), and Andew Fletcher (keyboards).

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  • Alan Wilder replaced Vince Clarke after he left to eventually form Erasure.

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  • Although they had a more upbeat, dance club sound in the beginning (thanks to Erasure's Clarke), Depeche Mode's music grew darker and more intense over the years.

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  • Front man Dave Gahan was joined by Martin Gore (keyboard, guitar, and the brain behind most of Depeche Mode's song lyrics), Andrew Fletcher (keyboards and bass) and Vince Clarke (keyboards).

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  • Clarke, who actually penned the band's first songs, left the group in 1981 and was replaced by Alan Wilder, who played - you guessed it - keys.

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  • Her partner in Yaz, Vince Clarke, eventually went on to form synth royalty band Erasure.

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  • Moyet's vocals and Clarke's way around a synthesizer made Yaz one of the genre's most inventive acts.

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  • Clarke. Together they expanded on Clarke's short stories to write the novel version of 2001, which was written simultaneously with the screenplay.

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  • One major inspiration for 2001 was a Clarke short story, The Sentinel, published in 1951.

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  • To quote Clarke, "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

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  • Twas the Night Before Christmas, also called A Visit from St. Nicholas, was written by Clement Clarke Moore in 1822.

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