Clarendon sentence example

clarendon
  • In the beginning of January 1644, however, for reasons which are variously reported by himself and Clarendon, he resigned his governorship and commissions and went over to the parliament.

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  • He was now recognized as one of the chief opponents of Clarendon and the High Anglican policy.

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  • He appears to have taken no part in the attempt to impeach Clarendon on a general charge of treason.

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  • His manual on Graphical Statics and his Elements of Projective Geometry (translated by C. Leudesdorf), have been published in English by the Clarendon Press.

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  • She withdrew from the king's society, and in spite of Clarendon's attempts to moderate her resentment, declared she would return to Portugal rather than consent to a base compliance.

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  • He also edited Captain Cook's Journals, and Clarendon's Diary and Letters (1763).

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  • According to Clarendon he told the latter in 1641 that if the Grand Remonstrance had not passed "he would have sold all he had the next morning and never have seen England more."

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  • According to Clarendon the latter, though frequently victorious in a charge, dale, subsequently falling upon and defeating the royalist centre, and pursuing the fugitives as far as the outskirts of Leicester.

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  • He appointed visitors for the universities and great public schools, and defended the universities from the attacks of the extreme sectaries who clamoured for their abolition, even Clarendon allowing that Oxford "yielded a harvest of extraordinary good and sound knowledge in all parts of learning."

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  • Complete toleration in fact was only extended to Protestant nonconformists, who composed the Cromwellian established church, and who now meted out to their antagonists the same treatment which they themselves were later to receive under the Clarendon Code of Charles II.

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  • He was introduced to public life and to court by his neighbour in Yorkshire, George, 2nd duke of Buckingham, was elected M.P. for York in 1665, and gained the "first step in his future rise" by joining Buckingham in his attack on Clarendon in 1667.

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  • A motion was passed for his committal by the Lords, who, as in Clarendon's case, voted his banishment.

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  • The Constitutions of Clarendon, in 1164, made the appeal from the court of the archdeacon lie to the court of the bishop.

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  • This recourse in England sometimes took the form of the appeal to the king given by the Constitutions of Clarendon, just mentioned, and later by the acts of Henry VIII.; sometimes that of suing for writs of prohibition or mandamus, which were granted by the king's judges, either to restrain excess of jurisdiction, or to compel the spiritual judge to exercise jurisdiction in cases where it seemed to the temporal court that he was failing in his duty.

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  • In England the Constitutions of Clarendon (by chap. viii.) prohibited appeals to the pope; but after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury Henry II.

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  • The Constitutions of Clarendon provided that these causes should be heard only in the king's court (c. 1).

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  • In regard to the execution of these promises, the jurisdiction of the ecclesiastical courts was possibly traversed by c. 15 of the Constitutions of Clarendon; but allowed by the statute 13 Edw.

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  • The subject was dealt with in the Constitutions of Clarendon, formally revoked after the murder of St Thomas of Canterbury.

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  • His chief public activity at Oxford was in connexion with the hebdomadal council, and with the Clarendon Press, of which he was for many years secretary.

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  • A document was published in London purporting to be a "Declaration of Mr Alexander Henderson made upon his Death-bed "; and, although this paper was disowned, denounced and shown to be false in the General Assembly of August 1648, the document was used by Clarendon as giving the impression that Henderson had recanted.

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  • He smoothed the way for Palmerston to succeed rim, and while the earl of Clarendon remained at the foreign office he aided him with advice and was consulted on matters of moment.

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  • Clarendon esteemed his influence on the parliamentary side greater than that of Laud on the royalist.

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  • John Strype's Life of Parker, originally published in 1711, and' re-edited for the Clarendon Press in 1821 (3 vols.), is the principal source for Parker's life.

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  • He immediately began to complain to Hyde, earl of Clarendon, of the poverty of the see, and based claims for a better benefice on a certain secret service, which he explained on the 20th of January 1661 to be the sole invention of the Eikon Basilike, The Pourtraicture of his sacred Majestic in his Solitudes and Sufferings put forth within a few hours after the execution of Charles I.

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  • To which Clarendon replied that he had been before acquainted with the secret and had often wished he had remained ignorant of it.

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  • The evidence in favour of Gauden's authorship rests chiefly on his own assertions and those of his wife (who after his death sent to her son John a narrative of the claim), and on the fact that it was admitted by Clarendon, who sould have had means of being acquainted with the truth.

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  • In 1693 further correspondence between Gauden, Clarendon, the duke of York, and Sir Edward Nicholas was published by Mr Arthur North, who had found them among the papers of his sister-in-law, a daughter-in-law of Bishop Gauden; but doubt has been thrown on the authenticity of these papers.

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  • These disputes involved questions of principle which had long occupied Henry's attention, and Becket's defiant attitude was answered by the famous Constitutions of Clarendon, in which the king defined, professedly according to ancient use and custom, the relations of Church and State.

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  • Dr William Bright's Chapters of Early English Church History (3rd ed., Clarendon Press, 1897) is indispensable.

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  • He moderated the lord-deputy's policy of deporting the Irish, and unlike him he paid some attention to the interests of the English settlers; moreover, again unlike Fleetwood, he appears to have held the scales evenly between the different Protestant sects, and his undoubted popularity in Ireland is attested by Clarendon.

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  • It had indeed been alleged, on Clarendon's authority, that he proposed to murder Hamilton and Argyll; but this is in all probability only one of Clarendon's many blunders.

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  • His private record was not as good as his public. In December 1660 he admitted to having contracted, under discreditable circumstances, a secret marriage with Anne Hyde (1637-1671), daughter of Lord Clarendon, in the previous September.

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  • Zyrowski, Lamartine (1896); and perhaps best of all in the Preface to Emile Legouis' Clarendon Press edition of Jocelyn (1906), where a vigorous effort is made to combat the idea of Lamartine's sentimentality and femininity as a poet.

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  • In Piccadilly Clarendon House, erected in 1664 by Edward Hyde, earl of Clarendon, became Albemarle House when acquired by the duke of Albemarle in 1675.

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  • A complete transcript, Brief Lives chiefly of Contemporaries set down by John Aubrey between the Years 1669 and 1696, was edited for the Clarendon Press in 1898 by the Rev. Andrew Clark from the MSS.

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  • In January 1667 he was one of three appointed to manage the evidence at the hearing of the impeachment of Lord Mordaunt, and in November of the same year spoke in defence of Clarendon, so far as the sale of Dunkirk was concerned, and opposed his banishment, and this appears to have been the last time that he addressed the house.

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  • On the 10th of August 1660 he was chosen public orator of the university, and in 1661 domestic chaplain to Lord Clarendon.

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  • The plenipotentiaries of Great Britain, France, Austria, Russia, Sardinia and Turkey recorded in a protocol, at the instance of Lord Clarendon, their joint wish that "states between which any misunderstanding might arise should, before appealing to arms, have recourse so far as circumstances might allow (en tant que les circonstances l'admettraient) to the good offices of a friendly power."

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  • According to Clarendon, a worse choice could not have been made, for Lenthall was of a "very timorous nature."

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  • The encounter, which lasted from the 18th to the 10th of February and ranged from Plymouth to Calais, is commonly named the "Three Days' Battle" and was described by Clarendon as "stupendous."

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  • The Cretaceous system includes the Waipara series, a belt of chalky limestones with some phosphate beds at Clarendon in eastern Otago.

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  • He continued to show the same zeal and severity as before, and with so much success that Lord Clarendon, writing in his praise, expressed the opinion that "if Bancroft had lived, he would quickly have extinguished all that fire in England which had been kindled at Geneva."

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  • An increasing number of workers in this field of plant biology in England, on the Continent and in America has produced a great mass of observations, which have recently been brought together in Dr Paul Knuth's classic work, Handbook of Flower Pollination, an English translation of which has been published (1908) by the Clarendon Press.

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  • In the reign of James II., during the earl of Clarendon's absence in Ireland, he acted as one of the commissioners of the privy seal.

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  • The delegates of the Clarendon Press in Oxford, and the syndics of the Pitt Press in Cambridge, entered into a liberal arrangement with the revisers, by which the necessary funds were provided for all their expenses.

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  • The Greek Text of the New Testament adopted by the Revisers was edited for the Clarendon Press by Archdeacon Palmer (Oxford, 1881).

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  • The most important of his other pamphlets is the "Narrative of the Earl of Clarendon's Settlement and Sale of Ireland" (Louvain, 1668).

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  • The Conquest of Ireland was republished in 1892 by Goddard Henry Orpen, under the title of The Song of Dermot and the Earl (Oxford, Clarendon Press).

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  • The Plantagenet abjured the Constitutions of Clarendon, recognized the rights of the pope over the Church of England, and augmented the privileges and domains of the archbishopric of Canterbury.

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  • Between 1650 and 1660 George Fox and a few other prominent members of the Society of Friends had begun to urge the establishment of a colony in America to serve as a refuge for Quakers who were suffering persecution under the " Clarendon Code."

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  • He was bitterly disappointed that Becket, on whom he bestowed the primacy, left vacant by the death of Theobald (1162), at once became the champion of clerical privilege; he and the archbishop were no longer on speaking terms when the Constitutions of Clarendon came up for debate.

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  • On the list of the corporation the first name is the earl of Clarendon, while the Hon.

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  • There is a 1 Clarendon, State Papers, iii.

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  • On the 29th of July 1693 he was condemned in the vice-chancellor's court for certain libels against the late earl of Clarendon, fined, banished from the university until he recanted, and the offending pages burnt.

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  • In 1865 the Clarendon Press published Two Saxon Chronicles (A and E) Parallel, with supplementary extracts from the others, by the Rev. John Earle.

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  • Middleton, Tarbat and Clarendon overcame Charles's reluctance to restore episcopacy; Lauderdale fell into the background; The Rev. James Sharp, hitherto the agent of the Resolutioners, or milder party among the preachers, turned his coat, and took the archbishopric of St Andrews.

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  • In 1869 the Russian government had assured Lord Clarendon that they regarded Afghanistan as completely outside the sphere of their influence; and in 1872 the boundary line of Afghanistan on the north-west had been settled between England and Russia so far eastward as Lake Victoria.

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  • Darwin Swift (Clarendon Press, 1894), in which are many references to authorities.

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  • On the 27th of April Anne gave a solemn assurance of her fidelity to the Hanoverian succession to Sir William Dawes, archbishop of York; in June she sent Lord Clarendon to Hanover to satisfy the elector.

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  • The Itala was published by Pierre Sabatier at Paris in 1751, and is reproduced in the Book of Tobit by Neubauer (Clarendon Press, 1878).

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  • Such persons were now, accordingly, destined to supplant the older and responsible ministers of the type of Clarendon and Ormonde, men of high character and patriotism, who followed definite lines of policy, while at the same time the younger men of ability and standing were shut out from office.

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  • The first period of Charles II.'s reign (1660-1667) was that of the administration of Lord Clarendon, the principal author of the Restoration settlement.

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  • Charles was in favour of religious toleration, and a declaration issued by him in October 1660 aroused great hopes; but he made little effort to conciliate the Presbyterians or to effect a settlement through the Savoy conference, and his real object was to gain power over all the factions and to free his co-religionists, the Roman Catholics, in favour of whom he issued his first declaration of indulgence (26th of December 1662), the bill to give effect to it being opposed by Clarendon and defeated in the Lords, and being replied to by the passing of further acts against religious liberty.

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  • The treaty of Breda with Holland (21st of July 1667) removed the danger, but not the ignominy, and Charles showed the real baseness of his character when he joined in the popular outcry against Clarendon, the upright and devoted adherent of his father and himself during twenty-five years of misfortune, and drove him into poverty and exile in his old age, recalling ominously Charles I.'s betrayal of Strafford.

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  • To Clarendon now succeeded the ministry of Buckingham and Arlington, who with Lauderdale, Ashley (afterwards Lord Shaftesbury) and Clifford, constituted the so-called Cabal ministry in 1672.

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  • In 1661 under Clarendon's rule, the evil precedent had been admitted of receiving money from France, in 1662 Dunkirk had been sold to Louis, and in February 1667 during the Dutch war a secret alliance had been made with Louis, Charles promising him a free hand in the Netherlands and Louis undertaking to support Charles's designs " in or out of the kingdom."

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  • As a youth, says Clarendon, " the ill-bred familiarity of the Scotch divines had given him a distaste " for Presbyterianism, which he indeed declared " no religion for gentlemen," and the mean figure which the fallen national church made in exile repelled him at the same time that he was attracted by the " genteel part of the Catholic religion."

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  • Lord Clarendon was impeached, inter alia, for causing many persons to be imprisoned against law and to be conveyed in custody to places outside England.

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  • York House was given to Lord Clarendon by Charles II., was probably the occasional residence of James II.

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  • Clarendon observes that here Charles had no visible party or fixed quarter.

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  • The printing of his observations was delayed by disputes about their ownership; but they were finally issued from the Clarendon Press, Oxford, in two folio volumes (1798, 1805).

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  • First among the lay nobles he signed the Constitutions of Clarendon, he sought to reconcile Henry and Archbishop Becket, and was twice in charge of the kingdom during the king's absences in France.

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  • To the pope this meant that the Constitutions of Clarendon were disavowed; to the king, who maintained that they were in the main a mere restatement of the customs of William I., it bore no such general interpretation.

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  • Nor did even the renewal of parliamentary impeachment, which ended in the banishment of Lord Chancellor Clarendon (1667), bring on any direct collision with the king.

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  • In the state the Tory inherited the ideas of Clarendon, and, without being at all ready to abandon the claims of parliaments, nevertheless somewhat inconsistently spoke of the king as ruling by a divine and indefeasible title, and wielding a power which it was both impious and unconstitutional to resist by force.

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  • In the new ministry Lord Aberdee,n became first lord of the treasury, Gladstone chancellor of the exchequer, Lord John Russell foreign ministerthough he was almost immediately replaced in the foreign office by Lord Clarendon, and himself assumed the presidency of the council.

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  • Lord Clarendon, the head of the British foreign office, told the French ambassador, who read him this despatch, that no consideration on earth would induce the British parliament to pass a measure for the extradition of political refugees, but he added that it was a question whether the law was as complete and as stringent as it should be, and he stated that the government had already referred the whole subject to the law officers of the crown for their consideration.

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  • The House of Commons, reflecting the spitit of the country, blamed Lord Clarendon for neglecting to answer Count Walewskis despatch, and blamed Lord Palmerston for introducing a bill at French dictation.

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  • Lord Granville, who had succeeded Lord Clarendon at the foreign office, protested against this proceeding.

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  • Horace Walpoles Letters (Clarendon Press, 16 vols.) are the best comment on the history of the period; his Memoirs are not so good, though they are superior to Wraxall, who succeeds him.

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  • Introduced at or before the time of Henry I., the view was regulated by the Assize of Clarendon of 1166 and by Magna Carta as reissued in 1217.

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  • He was greatly interested in the welfare of Oxford University, of which he became chancellor in 1667, succeeding Clarendon (1609-1674).

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  • Though purporting to be a reissue of the Assize of Clarendon (1166), it contains in fact many new provisions.

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  • Clarendon, A Sketch of the Revenue and Finances of Ireland (1791); the annual reports of the Flax Supply Association and other local bodies, published at Belfast; reports by the Department of Agriculture on Irish imports and exports (these are a new feature and contain much valuable information).

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  • Calculating on his loyal subservience, James appointed his brother-in-law, Lord Clarendon, to succeed Ormonde.

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  • The tories at once emerged from their hiding-places, and Clarendon found Ireland in a ferment.

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  • At this period, on the initiative of the 4th earl of Clarendon, then foreign secretary, an understanding was come to between the British and French governments by which it was agreed that each power should respect the independence of Madagascar; and the future of the country appeared to be bound up in the gradual consolidation of the central Hova authority over the whole island.

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  • Henry II.s quarrel with Thomas Becket, archbishop of Canterbury, which ran its course in France (1164-1171) as a struggle for the independence and reform of the Church, both threatened by the Constitutions of Clarendon, and ended with the murder of Becket in 1172, gave Louis yet another advantage over his rival.

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  • In January 1751 Clarendon was summoned by the ministry in his father's barony.

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  • Clarendon had high moral views that were at variance with the moral laxity of Charles II court.

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  • Pupils at The Clarendon School had the chance to meet the self-made millionaires, who are now giants in the computer gaming world.

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  • He opposed unsuccessfully the appropriation proviso introduced into the supply bill as hindering the due administration of finance, and this opposition seems to have brought about a reconciliation with Clarendon.

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  • She was still in England at the Revolution, having delayed her return to Portugal to prosecute a lawsuit against the second earl of Clarendon, formerly her chamberlain.

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  • He was not an orator, and though he could express himself forcibly on occasion, his speech was incoherent and devoid of any of the arts of rhetoric. Clarendon notes on his first appearance in parliament that "he seemed to have a person in no degree gracious, no ornament of discourse, none of those talents which use to reconcile the affections of the standers by; yet as he grew into place and authority his parts seemed to be renewed."

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  • According to Clarendon he was "a brave bad man," with "all the wickedness against which damnation is pronounced and for which hell fire is prepared."

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  • The best edition of the latter is the Clarendon Press, 1740-1743, which contains additions by the author and others.

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  • The Constitutions of Clarendon recognize this appeal (c. viii.).

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  • But the Constitutions of Clarendon (c. 9) reserved the preliminary question, of " frankalmoign " or not, for a jury in the king's court.

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  • Wood was prosecuted eventually for insinuations against the judicial integrity of the earl of Clarendon.

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  • Marlborough itself, however, is mentioned by Clarendon as "the most notoriously disaffected [town] in Wiltshire," and was captured by the royal forces in 1642, and partly burnt.

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  • This was only a preliminary skirmish; the main battle opened in the following year, when the king, quite aware that he must for the future look on Thomas as his enemy, brought forward the famous Constitutions of Clarendon, of which the main purport was to assert the jurisdiction of the state over clerical offenders by a rather complicated procedure, while other clauses provided that appeals to Rome must not be made without the kings leave, that suits about land or the presentation to benefices, in which clerics were concerned, should be tried before the royal courts, and that bishops should not quit the realmunless they had obtained permission to do so from the king (see CLARENDON, CONSTITUTIONS OF).

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  • But since healso declared the Consti tutions of Clarendon uncanonical and invalid, Henry was equally offended, and opened negotiations with the emperor and the antipope.

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