Cistercian sentence example

cistercian
  • The country in the neighbourhood of Tubingen is very attractive; one of the most interesting points is the former Cistercian monastery of Bebenhausen, founded in 1185, and now a royal hunting-château.

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  • Though suffering from illness, he at once set out on the journey; finding his strength failing on the way, he was carried to the Cistercian monastery of Fossa Nuova, in the diocese of Terracina, where, after a lingering illness of seven weeks, he died on the 7th of March 1274.

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  • The ruined church at Longpont (13th century) is the relic of an important Cistercian abbey; Urcel and Mont-Notre-Dame have fine churches, the first entirely in the Romanesque style, the second dating from the 12th and 13th centuries, to which period the church at Braisne also belongs.

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  • In 1344, shortly after their return, Ulf died in the Cistercian monastery of Alvastra in East Gothland, and Bridget now devoted herself wholly to religion.

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  • The abbey buildings of Clairvaux are the type of the Cistercian abbey.

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  • In the modern church of St Stephen (1854) are preserved tiles from the former Cistercian abbey of Bordesley, founded in 1138, of which the site may be traced at Bordesley Park, 2 m.

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  • The castle, which occupies the site of a former Cistercian monastery, was, from 1622 to 1779, the residence of the dukes of HolsteinSonderburg-Gliicksburg, passing then to the king of Denmark and in 1866 to Prussia.

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  • Its chief interest is the beautiful remains of the Priory of St John, founded in 1230 by John Bisset of the Aird, for Cistercian monks.

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  • Since the days of Adolf of Holstein and Henry the Lion, a movement of German colonization, in which farmers from the Low Countries, merchants from Lubeck, and monks of the Cistercian Order all played their parts, had been spreading German influence from the Oder to the Vistula, from the Vistula to the Dwina - to Prague, to Gnesen, and even to Novgorod the Great.

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  • The manor of West Ham was settled upon Stratford-Langthorne Abbey, founded by William de Montfichet in 1135 for monks of the Cistercian order.

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  • The Stundenthalshbhe, a popular resort, is in the neighbourhood, and near Gladbach is Altenberg, with a remarkably fine church, built for the Cistercian abbey at this place.

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  • Among other places of interest are Rynsburg, the site of a convent for nobles founded in 1133 and destroyed in the time of Spanish rule; Voorschoten; Wassenaar, all of which were formerly minor lordships; Loosduinen, probably the Lugdunum of the Romans, and the seat of a Cistercian abbey destroyed in 1579; Naaldwyk, an ancient lordship; and 's Gravenzande, which possessed a palace of the counts of Holland in the 12th century, when it was a harbour on the Maas.

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  • After seeing his comrades decimated by the plague at Constantinople he resolved to change his mode of life, and, on his return to Italy, after a rigorous pilgrimage and a period of ascetic retreat, became a monk in the Cistercian abbey of Casamari.

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  • He went to Bologna, and studied under the friendly tutelage of Guido; thence he proceeded to Rome, where he painted, in the Cistercian monastery, the "Miracle of the Loaves."

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  • In the parish of Ardchattan, on the north shore, stands the beautiful ruin of St Modan's Priory, founded in the 13th century for Cistercian monks of the order of Vallis Caulium.

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  • White Ladies was a Cistercian nunnery; and the slight remains are Norman.

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  • The extensive buildings of the Cistercian abbey of Fontfroide, near Bizanet, include a Romanesque church, a cloister, dormitories and a refectory of the 12th century.

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  • A mysterious conversion had been effected in him by an austere Cistercian abbot.

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  • It was not until two centuries afterwards that the second Cistercian house in the immediate neighbourhood of London was founded.

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  • This is famous on account of its Cistercian monastery, founded in 1094.

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  • According to tradition Iestynap-Gwrgan, the last prince of Glamorgan, had a residence somewhere near the present town, but Fitzhamon, on his conquest of Glamorgan, gave the district between the Neath and the Tawe to Richard de Granaville (ancestor of the Granvilles, marquesses of Bath), who built on the west banks of the Neath first a castle and then in 112 9 a Cistercian abbey, to whose monks he later gave all his possessions in the district.

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  • He retired into a Cistercian monastery.

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  • In the neighbourhood are the buildings of the celebrated Cistercian abbey of Morimond.

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  • Berengaria founded a Cistercian monastery at Espau.

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  • It is doubtless to the second half of the life of Vacarius that the composition must be attributed of two works the MS. of which, formerly the property of the Cistercian Abbey of Biddleston, is now in the Cambridge University library.

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  • Near the station are the ruins of the abbey of Cistercian nuns founded by David I.

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  • Alberic Trium Fontium, a monk of the Cistercian monastery of Trois Fontanes in the diocese of Chalons, embodied much poetical fiction in his chronicle (c. 1249).

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  • About 1200 a collection of fables in Latin prose, based partly on Romulus, was made by the Cistercian monk Odo of Sherrington; they have a strong medieval and clerical tinge.

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  • The site of Luckenwalde was occupied in the 12th century by a Cistercian monastery, but the village did not spring up till the reign of Frederick the Great.

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  • Entering the Cistercian cloister Bolbonne, and graduating doctor of theology at Paris, he became in 1311 abbot of Fontfroide, in 1317 bishop of Pamiers and in 1326 of Mirepoix.

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  • Some of these were refounded, and the principal monastic remains now existing are those of the Benedictine priories at Rochester (1089), Folkestone (1095), Dover (1140); the Benedictine nunneries at Malling (time of William Rufus),Minster-in-Sheppey (1130), Higham (founded by King Stephen), and Davington (I 153); the Cistercian Abbey at Boxley (1146); the Cluniac abbey at Faversham (1147) and priory at Monks Horton (time of Henry II.), the preceptory of Knights Templars at Swingfield (time of Henry II.); the Premonstratensian abbey of St Radigund's, near Dover (1191); the first house of Dominicans in England at Canterbury (1221); the first Carmelite house in England, at Aylesford (1240); and the priory of Augustinian nuns at Dartford (1355).

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  • He was born in 1160, educated at the university of Paris, and died in Poland in 1223 as a Cistercian monk.

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  • Berka was once celebrated for its Cistercian nunnery, founded in 1251.

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  • This district suffered terribly in the famine of 1847, and hundreds of victims were buried in pits in the graveyard adjoining the ruined Cistercian cell of Abbeystrowry, a mile west of the town.

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  • After Urban's death he entered the Cistercian monastery at Hautecombe in Savoy.

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  • At Kirklees, in the parish, are remains of a Cistercian convent of the 12th century, in an extensive park, where tradition relates that Robin Hood died and was buried.

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  • It was formerly the church of a Cistercian nunnery, and in modern times has been elaborately restored.

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  • In obedience to Cardinal de Noailles, archbishop of Paris, he left the Cistercian abbey of Sept-Fonds, to which he had retired, and settled in Paris, where he was placed at the head of the famous seminary of Saint Magloire.

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  • The next great monastic revival, the Cistercian, arising in the last years of the 11th century, had a wider diffusion, and a Cistercian.

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  • Owing its real origin, as a distinct foundation of reformed Benedictines, in the year 1098, to Stephen Harding (a native of Dorsetshire, educated in the monastery of Sherborne), and deriving its name from Citeaux (Cistercium), a desolate and almost inaccessible forest solitude, on the borders of Champagne and Burgundy, the rapid growth and wide celebrity of the order are undoubtedly to be attributed to the enthusiastic piety of St Bernard, abbot of the first of the monastic colonies, subsequently sent forth in such quick succession by the first Cistercian houses, the far-famed abbey of Clairvaux (de Clara Valle), A.D.

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  • The characteristic of the Cistercian abbeys was the extremest simplicity and a studied plainness.

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  • The Cistercian monasteries are, as a rule, found placed in deep well-watered valleys.

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  • The usually unvarying arrangement of the Cistercian houses allows us to accept this as a type of the monasteries of this order.

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  • Cistercian houses this was quadrangular, and was divided by pillars and arches into two or three aisles.

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  • The position of the refectory is usually a marked point of difference between Benedictine and Cistercian abbeys.

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  • In the Cistercian monasteries, to keep the noise and smell of dinner still farther away from the sacred building, the refectory was built north and south, at right angles to the axis of the church.

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  • It will be seen from the above account that the arrangement of a Cistercian monastery was in accordance with a clearly defined system, and admirably adapted to its purpose.

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  • The tower, in accordance with the Cistercian rule, is very low.

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  • The English Cistercian houses, of which there are such extensive and beautiful remains at Fountains, Rievaulx, Kirkstall, Tintern, Netley, &c., were mainly arranged of ter the same plan, with slight local variations.

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  • The church here is of the Cistercian t e YP with a short chancel of two squares, and transepts with three eastward chapels to each, divided by solid walls (222).

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  • On the south side of the cloister we have the remains of the old refectory (II), running, as in Benedictine houses, from east to west, and the new refectory (12), which, with the increase of the inmates of the house, superseded it, stretching, as is usual in Cistercian houses, from north to south.

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  • The size and character of this house, probably, at the time of its erection, the most spacious house of a subject in the kingdom, not a castle, bespeaks the wide departure of the Cistercian order from the stern simplicity of the original foundation.

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  • This was the earliest Cistercian house in England, founded in 1128 by William Gifford, bishop of Winchester.

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  • The arrangements are typical of a Cistercian house (see Abbey).

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  • In 1132 the prior and twelve monks of St Mary's abbey, York, being dissatisfied with the easy life they were living, left the monastery and with the assistance of Thurstan, archbishop of York, founded a house in the valley of the Skell, where they adopted the Cistercian rule.

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  • On the 19th of May 1218 he died at the Harzburg after being loosed from the ban by a Cistercian monk, and was buried in the church of St Blasius at Brunswick.

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  • In 1246 Reginald de Mohun, then lord of the manor, founded a Cistercian abbey at Newenham within the parish of Axminster, granting it a Saturday market and a fair on Midsummer day, and the next year made over to the monks from Beaulieu the manor and hundred of Axminster.

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  • The old Franciscan monastery, with fine cloisters, founded in 1250, contains the gymnasium; a Cistercian nunnery of 1214 has been converted into barracks; and the Augustinian monastery of 1390 has been a hospital since 1525.

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  • On the high ground to the west lie ruins of the Cistercian abbey of Merevale, founded in 1149; they include the gatehouse chapel, part of the refectory and other remains exhibiting beautiful details of the 14th century.

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  • The abbey was a Cistercian foundation of 1145, but only scanty remains of the buildings are seen in the mansion which rose on its site.

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  • Valle Crucis Abbey (L lan Egwest) is a Cistercian ruin at the foot of Bronfawr hill, some 2 m.

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  • Finally he removed to Hampole, near Doncaster, invited by an inmate of the Cistercian nunnery of St Mary.

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  • These religious associations, coupled with the fertility of the soil, led to the founding of a Cistercian abbey in 1 217.

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  • It was a Cistercian house, colonized from Rievaulx, and was built in 1140.

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  • At the time when the Ancren Riwle was addressed to them the anchoresses did not belong to any of the monastic orders, but the monastery was under the Cistercian rule before 1266.3 There are extant seven English MSS.

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  • She had been a Cistercian nun in the convent of Nimtzch near Grimma - a convent reserved for ladies of noble birth.

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  • He had been some time in orders when Louis XIV., in 1672, selected him as tutor of the princes of Conti, with such success that the king next entrusted to him the education of the count of Vermandois, one of his natural sons, on whose death in 1683 Fleury received for his services the Cistercian abbey of Loc-Dieu, in the diocese of Rhodez.

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  • Only the site can be traced of the Cistercian priory to which it belonged.

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  • He was in high favour with that sovereign, but renounced the prospect of a bishopric to enter the Cistercian house of Rievaulx in Yorkshire, which was founded in 1131 by Walter Espec. Here Ælred remained for some time as master of the novices, but between the years 1142 and 1146 was elected abbot of Revesby in Lincolnshire and migrated thither.

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  • St Norbert was a friend of St Bernard of Clairvaux - and he was largely influenced by the Cistercian ideals as to both the manner of life and the government of his order.

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  • In 1238 Llewelyn, growing aged and infirm, summoned all his vassals to a conference at the famous Cistercian abbey of Strata Florida, whereat David, his son by the Princess Joan of England, was acknowledged his heir by all present.

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  • In the days of medieval abbeys, when the provident Cistercian monks attached great importance to pond culture, they gave the first place to the tench and bream, the carp still being unknown in the greater part of Europe.

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  • In the immediate vicinity are the ruins of the Cistercian monastery of Altenzella, or Altzella, founded in 1145, and a noted school of philosophy during the 13th-15th centuries.

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  • Amongst its principal buildings are the cathedral, the episcopal palace, several convents, of which the most noteworthy is the Jesuit convent, now a Cistercian secondary school with a handsome church, and the county hall.

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  • On his way home Malachy revisited Clairvaux, and took with him from there four members of the Cistercian order, by whom the abbey of Mellifont (in the county of Louth) was afterwards founded in 1141.

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  • But perhaps his chief claim to distinction is that of having opened the first Cistercian monastery in Ireland, five more being soon afterwards established.

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  • South-west of the town, at a distance of 31 m., stands the Cistercian abbey of Holy Cross, one of the finest ruins in Ireland.

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  • Besides the ruins of a Cistercian abbey founded by Pribislaus, prince of Mecklenburg, in 1173, and secularized in 1552, it possesses an Evangelical Gothic church of the 14th century, one of the finest in north Germany, a grand-ducal palace, a theatre, an exchange and a concert hall.

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  • He is said to have then entered the Cistercian monastery at Gloucester; but in 1538 a John Hooper appears among the names of the Black friars at Gloucester and also among the White friars at Bristol who surrendered their houses to the king.

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  • Interest also attaches to the once celebrated Cistercian abbey of Eberbach, founded in 1116; to Eltville, a favourite residence of the archbishops of Mainz in the 14th and 15th centuries; and to the family seats of Eppstein, Katzenelnbogen and Scharfenstein.

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  • The monastic remains in Bedfordshire include the fine fragment of the church of the Augustinian priory at Dunstable, serving as the parish church; the church (also imperfect) of Elstow near Bedford, which belonged to a Benedictine nunnery founded by Judith, niece of William the Conqueror; and portions of the Gilbertine Chicksands Priory and of a Cistercian foundation at Old Warden.

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  • Mazan has remains of a Cistercian abbey founded in the 12th century to which its vast church belongs.

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  • Of these the most noteworthy is the abbey of Lokkum in Hanover, founded as a Cistercian house in 1163 by Count Wilbrand of Hallermund, and reformed in 1593.

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  • In 1148 the brotherhood joined the Cistercian order.

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  • By a succession of gifts the abbey became one of the richest in England and was the largest Cistercian foundation in the kingdom.

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  • The abbot was one of the twenty Cistercian abbots summoned to the parliament of 1264, but was not cited after 1330, as he did not hold of the king in capite per baroniam.

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  • Having entered the Cistercian order, Otto became abbot of the Cistercian monastery of Morimond in Burgundy about 1136, and soon afterwards was elected bishop of Freising.

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  • He enjoyed the favour of Conrad's successor, Frederick I.; was probably instrumental in settling the dispute over the duchy of Bavaria in 1156; was present at the famous diet at Besancon in 1157, and, still retaining the dress of a Cistercian monk, died at Morimond on the 22nd of September 1158.

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  • The pope's efforts failed, for in the 14th century several Cistercian abbeys excluded Irishmen, and as late as 1436 the monks of Abingdon complained bitterly that an Irish abbot had been imposed on them by lay violence.

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  • He became a Cistercian at the monastery of Paradiz in Poland, and was sent by the abbot to the university of Cracow, where he became master in philosophy and doctor of theology.

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  • The actual introduction of the pointed arch took place at a much earlier date, as in the nave arcade of the Cistercian Abbey of Buildwas (1140), though the clerestory window above has semicircular arches.

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  • Near the landward side of the dike is the church of St Mary, finely situated, occupying the site of a Cistercian monastery of 1198.

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  • Kirkstead Abbey (Cistercian) was founded in 1139.

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  • It contains the ruins of a Cistercian monastery called Himmelpfort am See, founded in 1180 and dissolved in 1542; a handsome parish church, formerly the monasterial chapel, restored in 1872-1877; and a fine statue of the emperor Frederick III.

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  • Of the Cistercian priory, founded about 1165 by Cospatric of Dunbar, and destroyed by the 1st earl of Hertford in 1545, which stood a little to the east of the present market-place, no trace remains; but for nearly four hundred years it was a centre of religious fervour.

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  • At first he tried pacific conversion, and in 1198 and 1199 sent into the affected regions two Cistercian monks, Regnier and Guy, and in 1203 two monks of Fontfroide, Peter of Castelnau and Raoul (Ralph), with whom in 1204 he even associated the Cistercian abbot, Arnaud (Arnold).

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  • The ' white gate ' belonged to Vale Royal abbey, once the largest Cistercian abbey in England.

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  • It is believed that King John established Beaulieu as an act of penance after he dreamt that he was being flogged by Cistercian abbots.

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  • Cistercian nunneries probably accommodated about fourteen nuns and several male helpers.

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  • Cistercian monk who guards the abbey's treasure, hidden in a secret tunnel.

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  • His composition of three meditations to a hermit makes him the only Cistercian in England during this period to attempt a purely spiritual work.

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  • Most other large museums hold later pieces, such as Cistercian wares, slipwares and tin-glazed earthenwares, which are to be found countrywide.

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  • Visitors were served a rather frugal fare in the Cistercian guesthall.

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  • A visit to Caldey Island with its Cistercian monastery is a must.

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  • The Abbey was founded in 1150 by King David I and was colonized by Cistercian monks.

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  • Founded by 12th century Cistercian monks, the abbey sits serenely amid the hills of the Wye river valley.

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  • Some of the chapel stonework including the Italian marble altar reredos more than likely came from the Cistercian Abbey at Llantarnam.

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  • Dateable material included residual Period 2 to Period 7 ceramic and a sherd of Cistercian Ware.

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  • The foliate spandrels of the cusping to the central arch is another step away from Cistercian austerity.

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  • In theory, Cistercian nuns wore the characteristic habit of undyed wool.

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  • It was suppressed with the Cistercian abbeys in 1539, and granted on the 11th of December 1546 to Christ Church, Oxford, who sold it to Sir Thomas Pope in 1553 for St John's College.

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  • The country in the neighbourhood of Tubingen is very attractive; one of the most interesting points is the former Cistercian monastery of Bebenhausen, founded in 1185, and now a royal hunting-château.

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  • No people were more bountiful to ecclesiastical bodies on both sides of the Channel; the foundation of a Benedictine monastery in the i Ith century, of a Cistercian monastery in the 12th seemed almost a matter of course on the part of a Norman baron.

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  • Siger of Brabant and Gottfried of Fontaines, chancellor of the university of Paris, taught Thomism at the Sorbonne; and through Humbert, abbot of Prulli, the doctrine won admission to the Cistercian order.

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  • At the instigation, it is said, of his second wife, Constance of Burgundy, he brought the Cistercians into Spain, established them in Sahagun, chose a French Cistercian, Bernard, as the first archbishop of Toledo after the reconquest in 1085, married his daughters, legitimate and illegitimate, to French princes, and in every way forwarded the spread of French influence - then the greatest civilizing force in Europe.

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  • Its celebrity is due to the abbey founded in 1115 by St Bernard, which became the centre of the Cistercian order.

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  • He was in high favour with that sovereign, but renounced the prospect of a bishopric to enter the Cistercian house of Rievaulx in Yorkshire, which was founded in 1131 by Walter Espec. Here Ælred remained for some time as master of the novices, but between the years 1142 and 1146 was elected abbot of Revesby in Lincolnshire and migrated thither.

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  • The Cistercian abbeys at Kirkstead, Louth Park, Revesby, Vaudey and Swineshead, and the Cistercian nunnery at Stixwould were founded in the reign of Stephen, and at the time of the Dissolution there were upwards of a hundred religious houses in the county.

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  • This was St Bernard's College, founded by Chicheley under licence in mortmain in 1437 for Cistercian monks, on the model of Gloucester Hall and Durham College for the southern and northern Benedictines.

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