How to use Cincinnati in a sentence

cincinnati
  • When we reached Cincinnati, we found the place full of doctors.

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  • In 1832 her father, who had for six years been the pastor of a church in Boston, accepted the presidency of the newly founded Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati.

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  • Columbus is an important railway centre and is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St.

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  • Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Ohio, the Ohio Central, the Norfolk & Western, the Hocking Valley, and the Cleveland, Akron & Columbus (Pennsylvania system) railways, and by nine interurban electric lines.

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  • The city is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Louisville & Nashville, and the Frankfort & Cincinnati railways, by the Central Kentucky Traction Co.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central System), the Lake Erie & Western (New York Central System), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania System) and the Vandalia (Pennsylvania System) railways.

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  • The Baltimore & Ohio railroad was built to protect and further the commercial interests of the city of Baltimore; the Cincinnati Southern railway is still owned by the city of Cincinnati, which built the line in the 'seventies for commercial protection against Louisville, Ky.

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  • He pursued the study of law, partly in the office of Bellamy Storer (1798-1875), a leading lawyer and judge of Cincinnati, and in 1853 he was admitted to the bar.

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  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cincinnati Northern (New York Central system), and a branch of the Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern (Pennsylvania system) railways.

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  • Middletown was laid out in 1802 and was named from its location between Cincinnati and Dayton; it was incorporated in 1833.

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  • His father, Alphonso Taft (1810-1891), born in Townshend, Vermont, graduated at Yale College in 1833, became a tutor there, studied law at the Yale Law School, was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1838, removed to Cincinnati in 1839, and became one of the most influential citizens of Ohio.

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  • William Howard Taft attended the public schools of Cincinnati, graduated at the Woodward High School of that city in 1874, and in the autumn entered Yale College, where he took high rank as a student and was prominent in athletics and in the social life of the institution.

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  • He graduated second (salutatorian) in his class in 1878, and began to study law in Cincinnati College, where he graduated in 1880, dividing the first prize for scholarship. He was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1880.

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  • Phelan to tie up traffic in and around Cincinnati.

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  • The receiver of the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific railway applied for an injunction against Phelan and others, which was granted.

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  • In1896-1900Judge Taft was professor and dean of the law department of the University of Cincinnati.

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  • Parkersburg is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, and the Little Kanawha railways, by electric railway to Marietta, Ohio, and by passenger and freight boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati, intermediate ports, and ports on the Little Kanawha.

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  • Within the Synagogue the reform movement began in 1825, and soon won many successes, the central conference of American rabbis and Union College (1875) at Cincinnati being the instruments of this progress.

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  • Oxford is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railway.

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  • His first literary work, except the bombastic but eloquent Essai sur le despotisme (Neufchatel, 1 775), was a translation of Robert Watson's Philip II., done in Holland with the help of Durival; his Considerations sur l'ordre de Cincinnatus (London, 1788) was based on a pamphlet by Aedanus Burke (1743-1802), of South Carolina, who opposed the aristocratic tendencies of the Society of the Cincinnati, and the notes to it were by Target;, his financial writings were suggested by the Genevese exile, Claviere.

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  • The city is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and is connected with Indianapolis and with Louisville, Ky., by an electric interurban line.

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  • At Cleveland and Cincinnati the winds blow mostly from the S.E.

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  • T he great manufacturing centres are Cleveland, Cincinnati, Youngstown, Toledo, Columbus, Dayton and Akron, and in 1905 the value of the products of these cities amounted to 56.7% of that for the entire state.

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  • Most of the automobiles are manufactured in Cleveland; most of the cash registers and calculating machines in Dayton; most of the rubber and elastic goods in Akron; nearly one-half of the liquors and about three-fourths of the men's clothing in Cincinnati.

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  • East Liverpool leads in the manufacture of pottery; Toledo in flour and grist mill products; Springfield in agricultural implements; Cincinnati and Columbus in boots and shoes; Cleveland in women's clothing.

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  • One of the first great public improvements made within the state was the connexion of these waterways by two canals - the Ohio & Erie Canal from Cleveland to Portsmouth, and the Miami & Erie Canal from Toledo to Cincinnati.

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  • Among the railways are the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania), the Pittsburgh, Ft.

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  • They are Cleveland, Toledo, Sandusky, Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton, and the value of the foreign commerce passing through these in 1909 amounted to $9,483,974 in imports (more than one-half to Cleveland) and $10,920,083 in exports (nearly eight-ninths from Cleveland).

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  • The largest cities are Cleveland, Cincinnati, Toledo, Columbus (the capital), Dayton, Youngstown, Akron, Springfield, Canton, Hamilton, Zanesville and Lima.

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  • Of the two chief cities, Cleveland (under a special act providing for the government of Columbus and Toledo, also) in1892-1902was governed under the federal plan, which centralized power in the hands of the mayor; in Cincinnati there was an almost hopeless diffusion of responsibility among the council and various executive boards.

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  • Among the numerous other colleges and universities in the state are Western Reserve University (1826) at Cleveland, the university of Cincinnati (opened 1873) at Cincinnati, and Oberlin College (1833) at Oberlin.

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  • Resentment was aroused by the establishment of branches of the Bank of the United States at Chillicothe and Cincinnati in 1817, and an attempt was made to tax them out of existence.

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  • Their chief settlements were Columbia (1788) and Cincinnati (1789).

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  • Thomson's Bibliography of Ohio (Cincinnati, 1880) is an excellent guide to the study of Ohio's history.

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  • There is considerable material of value, especially for local history, in the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Society Publications (Columbus, 1887), and in Henry Howe, Historical Collections of Ohio (1st ed., Cincinnati, 1847; Centennial edition [enlarged], 2 vols., Columbus, 1889-1891).

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  • Cairo is served by the Illinois Central, the Mobile & Ohio, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the St Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern, and the St Louis South-Western railways, and by river steamboat lines.

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  • To the Theological Seminary, opened in 1835, there came in the same year forty students from Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati, after the discussion of slavery there had been forbidden by its board of trustees.

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  • Lancaster is served by the Hocking Valley, the Columbus & Southern and the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania Lines) railways, and by the electric line of the Scioto Valley Traction Company, which connects it with Columbus.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • Levi Coffin (1798-1877), a native of North Carolina (whose cousin, Vestal Coffin, had established before 1819 a "station" of the Underground near what is now Guilford College, North Carolina), in 1826 settled in Wayne County, Ohio; his home at New Garden (now Fountain City) was the meeting point of three "lines" from Kentucky; and in 1847 he removed to Cincinnati, where his labours in bringing slaves out of the South were even more successful.

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  • The arrests of Sims and of Shadrach in Boston in 1851; of "Jerry" M`Henry, in Syracuse, New York, in the same year; of Anthony Burns in 1854, in Boston; and of the two Garner families in 1856, in Cincinnati, with other cases arising under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, probably had as much to do with bringing on the Civil War as did the controversy over slavery in the Territories.

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  • The city is served by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern; the New York, Chicago & St Louis; the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis; the Pennsylvania; the Erie; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Wheeling & Lake Erie railways; by steamboat lines to the principal ports on the Great Lakes; and by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines.

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  • The constitutional conventions of 1845 and 1875, and the state convention which issued the call for the National Liberal Republican convention at Cincinnati in 1872, met here, and so for some of its sessions did the state convention of 1861-1863.

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  • In 1825 he succeeded his brother as president-general of the Society of the Cincinnati.

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  • Bowling Green is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton and the Toledo & Ohio Central railways, and by the Toledo Urban & Interurban and the Lake Erie, Bowling Green & Napoleon electric lines, the former extending from Toledo to Dayton.

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  • Huntington is served by three railways - the Wabash, the Erie (which has car shops and division headquarters here) and the Cincinnati, Bluffton & Chicago (which has machine shops here), and by the Fort Wayne & Wabash Valley Traction Company, whose car and repair shops and power station are in Huntington.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville, the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by the Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern and the Ohio electric interurban railways.

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  • It is served by the Louisville & Nashville, and the Chesapeake & Ohio railways, and by electric lines to Covington, Cincinnati, Bellevue, Fort Thomas and Dayton.

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  • With Cincinnati and Covington it is connected by bridges.

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  • Newport is essentially a residential suburb of Cincinnati, but it is also industrially important.

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  • Warsaw is served by the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago (Pennsylvania system) and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • It is served by the Central Indiana, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Pittsburg, Chicago & St Louis railways, and also by the Indiana Union Traction System (electric), the general offices and central power plant of which are situated there.

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  • In 1854 he was appointed rabbi at Cincinnati.

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  • In 1848 he conceived the idea of a union, and after a campaign lasting a quarter of a century the Union of American Hebrew Congregations was founded (1873) in Cincinnati.

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  • They held a convention at Cincinnati in May with the intention of nominating for the presidency Charles Francis Adams, who had ably represented the United States at the court of St James's during the Civil War.

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  • The Democrats had despaired of electing a candidate of their own, and hoped to achieve success by adopting the Cincinnati nominee, should he prove to be an eligible person.

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  • It is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Cincinnati, Dayton and Toledo.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley (Pennsylvania Lines), the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways.

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  • Dayton is served by the Erie, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Dayton & Union railways, by ten interurban electric railways, centring here, and by the Miami & Erie canaL The city extends more than 5 m.

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  • It is served by the Michigan Central, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Grand Trunk and the Cincinnati Northern railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • He preached in the Presbyterian church at East Hampton, Long Island (1798-1810, being ordained in 1 799); in the Congregational church at Litchfield, Connecticut (1810-1826), in the Hanover Street church of Boston (1826-1832), and in the Second Presbyterian church of Cincinnati, Ohio (1833-1843); was president of the newly established Lane Theological Seminary at Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, and was professor of didactic and polemic theology there (1832-1850), being professor emeritus until his death.

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  • She was educated at Litchfield Seminary, and from 1822 to 1832 conducted a school for girls at Hartford, Connecticut, with her sister Harriet's assistance, and from 1832 to 1834 conducted a similar school in Cincinnati.

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  • In 1848 he came to London, but passed on in 1849 to America, where he ministered as rabbi in Cleveland,Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Detroit and Newark, New Jersey.

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  • In 1880 he received sixty-five votes on the first ballot for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention at Cincinnati.

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  • Marion is served by the Pennsylvania, the Erie, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Hocking Valley railways, and by interurban electric railway to Columbus.

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  • He was dissatisfied with General Grant's administration, and became its sharp critic. The discontent which he did much to develop ended in the organization of the Liberal Republican party, which held its National Convention at Cincinnati in 1872, and nominated Greeley for the presidency.

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  • It is served by the Pere Marquette, the Michigan Central, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, by electric railways to St Joseph and Niles, Mich., and South Bend, Indiana, and for a part of the year by steamboat lines to Chicago and Milwaukee.

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  • Amongst remarkable American girder bridges may be mentioned the Ohio bridge on the Cincinnati & Covington railway, which is probably the largest girder span constructed.

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  • Distillers and revenue officers in St Louis, Milwaukee, Cincinnati and other cities were implicated, and the illicit gains - which in St Louis alone probably amounted to more than $2,500,000 in the six years 1870-1876 - were divided between the distillers and the revenue officers, who levied assessments on distillers ostensibly for a Republican campaign fund to be used in furthering Grant's re-election.

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  • Olney is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-western, the Illinois Central, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and is a terminus of the Ohio River Division of the last.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South Western and the Cincinnati, Lebanon and Northern railways, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • Norwood has various manufactures, but as one of the hill suburbs of Cincinnati it is primarily a place of residence.

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  • It has a Carnegie library (a branch of the public library of Cincinnati) and a Catholic maternity hospital.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central and the Chicago & Eastern Illinois railways.

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  • Cincinnati has a river-frontage of about 14 m., extends back about 6 m.

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  • The Cincinnati hospital (completed 1869), comprising eight buildings grouped about a central court and connected by corridors, occupies a square of four acres.

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  • The church of St Francis de Sales (in Walnut Hills), built in 1888, has a bell, cast in Cincinnati, weighing fifteen tons, and said to be the largest swinging bell in the world.

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  • The Cincinnati Society of Natural History (incorporated 1870) has a large library and a museum containing a valuable palaeontological collection, and bones and implements from the prehistoric cemetery of the mound-builders, at Madisonville, Ohio.

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  • Parks.-In 1908 Cincinnati had parks covering about 540 acres; there are numerous pleasant driveways both within the city limits and in the suburban districts, and several attractive resorts are within easy reach.

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  • Cincinnati is an important educational centre.

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  • The institution embraces a college of liberal arts, a college of engineering, a college of law (united in 1897 with the law school of Cincinnati College, then the only surviving department of that college, which was founded as Lancaster Seminary in 1815 and was chartered as Cincinnati College in 1819), a college of medicine (from 1819 to 1896 the Medical College of Ohio; the college occupies the site of the old M`Micken homestead), a college for teachers, a graduate school, and a technical school (founded in 1886 and transferred to the university in 1901); while closely affiliated with it are the Clinical and Pathological School of Cincinnati and the Ohio College of Dentistry.

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  • Art, &c. - The large German population makes the city noteworthy for its music. The first Sangerfest was held in Cincinnati in 1849, and it met here again in 1870, when a new hall was built for its accommodation.

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  • Under the leadership of Theodore Thomas (1835-1905), the Cincinnati Musical Festival Association was incorporated, and the first of its biennial May festivals was held in 1873.

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  • Springer (1800-1884), its greatest benefactor, who endowed the Cincinnati College of Music (incorporated in 1878), of which Thomas was director in 1878-1881.

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  • The Sangerfest met in Cincinnati for the third time in 1879, and its jubilee was held here in 1899.

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  • Among the social clubs of the city are the Queen City Club, organized in 1874; the Phoenix Club, organized in 1856 and the leading Jewish club in the city; the Cuvier Club, organized in 1871 and originally an association of hunters and anglers for the preservation of game and fish; the Cincinnati Club, the Business Men's Club, the University Club, the Art Club, and the Literary Club, of the last of which many prominent men, including President Hayes, have been members.

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  • There are various commercial and trade organizations, the oldest and most influential being the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce and Merchants' Exchange, which dates from 1839.

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  • Among the institutions are the City infirmary (at Hartwell, a suburb), which, besides supporting pauper inmates, affords relief to outdoor poor; the Cincinnati hospital, which is supported by taxation and treats without charge all who are unable to pay; twenty other hospitals, some of which are charitable institutions; a United States marine hospital; the Longview hospital for the insane, at Carthage, Io m.

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  • Cincinnati is a railway centre of great importance and has an extensive commerce both by rail and by river.

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  • Most of these railways use the Union Station; the Pennsylvania and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, have separate stations.

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  • Although the second city in population in the state, Cincinnati ranked first in 1900 as a manufacturing centre, but lost this pre-eminence to Cleveland in 1905, when the value of Cincinnati's factory product was $166,059,050, an increase of 17.2% over the figures for 1900.

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  • In 1829 Mrs Frances Trollope established in Cincinnati, where she lived for a part of two years, a "Bazar," which as the principal means of carrying out her plan to benefit the town was entirely unsuccessful; a vivid but scarcely unbiassed picture of Cincinnati in the early thirties is to be found in her Domestic Manners of the Americans (1831).

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  • The valleys and ridges of eastern Tennessee screened him as he rapidly marched on Louisville and Cincinnati.

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  • Wheat is grown both in the Blue Grass Region and farther west; 'and the best country for fruit is along the Ohio river between Cincinnati and Louisville and in the hilly land surrounding the Blue Grass Region.

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  • The principal lines are the Louisville & Nashville, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Illinois Central, and the Cincinnati Southern (Queen & Crescent route).

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  • Most of the lines run south or south-west from Cincinnati and Louisville, and the east border of the state still has a small railway mileage and practically no wagon roads, most of the travel being on horseback.

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  • Nelson near Richmond and threatened Cincinnati.

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  • S.W., with which St Joseph is connected by electric line, is a terminus of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railway.

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  • Crampton, received his passports, and the exequaturs of the British consuls at New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati were revoked.

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  • When the Democratic national convention met at Cincinnati in June 1856, Pierce was an avowed candidate for renomination, but as his attitude on the slavery question, and especially his subserviency to the South in supporting the pro-slavery party in the Territory of Kansas, had lost him the support of the Northern wing of his party, the nomination went to James Buchanan.

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  • He travelled, lectured, and preached throughout the United States and in England and Scotland; debated with many Presbyterian champions, with Bishop Purcell of Cincinnati and with Robert Owen; and edited a revision of the New Testament.

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  • Sidney is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, and the Western Ohio (electric) railways.

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  • He was admitted to the bar in 1845, and practised law, first at Lower Sandusky (now Fremont), and then at Cincinnati, where he won a very respectable standing, and in1858-1861served as city solioitor.

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  • In 1873 he removed from Cincinnati to Fremont, his intention being to withdraw from public life; but in 1875 the Republican party in Ohio once more selected him as its candidate for the governorship. He accepted the nomination with great reluctance.

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  • Church refused to ordain her because of her sex, and the refusal was upheld by the General Conference at Cincinnati in 1880.

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  • At the old Verplanck mansion in Fishkill Landing the Society of the Cincinnati was organized in 1783.

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  • He was then called to the bar, but in 1836 became professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Cincinnati College.

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  • Kankakee is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central, and the Chicago, Indiana & Southern (controlled by the New York Central) railways.

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  • The principal railways are the lines operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company from New York to Washington through Philadelphia; from Philadelphia to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago and St Louis through Harrisburg and Pittsburg; from Baltimore, Maryland, to Sodus Point on Lake Ontario (Northern Central) through Harrisburg and Williamsport; from Williamsport to Buffalo and to Erie, and from Pittsburg to Buffalo; the Philadelphia & Reading; the Lehigh Valley; the Erie; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg.

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  • In these circumstances, he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and there, in January 1836, founded the Philanthropist, which, in spite of rancorous opposition, became of great influence in the north-west.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Evansville & Terre Haute, and the Vandalia railways.

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  • It is served by the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis and the Cincinnati Northern railways, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • He was intendant (mayor) of Charleston, S.C., from 1835 to 1837, and was president of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston railway from 1837 to 5839.

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  • From the very beginning of his service in Congress he was prominent as an opponent of the extension of slavery; he was a conspicuous supporter of the Wilmot Proviso, spoke against the Compromise Measures of 1850,1850, and in 1856, chiefly because of the passage in 1854 of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill, which repealed the Missouri Compromise, and his party's endorsement of that repeal at the Cincinnati Convention two years later, he withdrew from the Democrats and joined the newly organized Republican party.

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  • C., was admitted to the bar in 1829, and removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1830.

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  • Warden's Account of the Private Life and Public Services of Salmon Portland Chase (Cincinnati, 1874) deals more fully with Chase's private life.

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  • In 1869 he was admitted to the Ohio bar and began practice in Cincinnati.

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  • He was a judge of the Cincinnati Superior Court from 1879 to 1882.

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  • He then for eight years practised law with great success in Cincinnati.

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  • From 1805 until his death, on the 16th of August 1825, he was president-general of the Society of the Cincinnati.

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  • Peru is served by the Chicago Cincinnati & Louisville, the Lake Erie & Western and the Wabash railways (each of which maintains shops here), and by electric lines to Indianapolis, Warsaw and other cities.

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  • Alexandria is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Lake Erie & Western railways, and by the Indiana Union Traction System (electric).

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  • Soon after returning to Charleston he was appointed professor of mathematics in the United States navy, but he chose instead to serve as assistant engineer of a survey undertaken chiefly for the purpose of finding a pass through the mountains for a proposed railway from Charleston to Cincinnati.

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  • He studied law at Cincinnati, Ohio, and served on the Federal side in the Civil War, becoming colonel in November 1862; he was mustered out in May 1864, and in March 1865 was breveted brigadier-general of volunteers.

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  • It is served by the Chicago, Cincinnati & Louisville, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Toledo, St Louis & Western railways, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Indianapolis, Muncie, Fort Wayne, Kokomo and many other towns and cities.

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  • He died near Cincinnati on the 30th of January 1853.

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  • Madison is served by the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railroad and by river steamboats.

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  • The latter was first made by Nicolas Longworth of Cincinnati.

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  • In 1784 he bitterly attacked the establishment of the order of the Cincinnati on the ground that it was a dangerous menace to democratic institutions.

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  • The Society of the Cincinnati, an organization composed of officers of the late war, chose him as its first president; but he insisted that the Society should abandon its plan of hereditary membership, and change other features of the organization against which there had been public clamour.

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  • It is served by the Wheeling & Lake Erie (Wabash system), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system), and the Pennsylvania railways, and by inter-urban electric railways.

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  • He took up legal practice in Cincinnati, became president in 1873, and until 1877 was receiver, of the Toledo & Wabash & Western.

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  • From 1881 to 1897 he was dean of the Cincinnati law school, and from 1885 to 1889 president of the University of Cincinnati.

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  • He wrote Atlanta (New York, 1882) and The March to the Sea, Franklin and Nashville (New York, 1882), both in the series Campaigns of the Civil War; The Second Battle of Bull Run, as Connected with the Fitz-John Porter Case (Cincinnati, 1882); and the valuable Military Reminiscences of the Civil War (2 vols., New York, 1900) published posthumously.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, South-Western (which has repair shops here), the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Southern Indiana railways, and by the Indianapolis, Columbus & Southern and the Indianapolis & Louisville interurban electric lines.

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  • Troy is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railways, and by the Dayton & Troy and the Springfield, Troy & Piqua electric inter-urban lines.

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  • The city is served by the Chicago & Alton, the Illinois Central, the Cleveland, Chicago, Cincinnati & St Louis, and the Lake Erie & Western railways, and by electric inter-urban lines.

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  • In 1815 Gallitzin was suggested for the bishopric of Bardstown, Kentucky, and in 1827 for the proposed see of Pittsburg, and he refused the bishopric of Cincinnati.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, by an electric line to Wheeling, and by boats to Pittsburg, Cincinnati and intermediate ports.

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  • It is served by the Chicago & Eastern Illinois, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Evansville & Indianapolis, the Evansville & Terre Haute, the Southern Indiana, the Vandalia and several electric interurban railways.

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  • It is served by the Erie, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Ohio Central railways.

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  • William Henry Harrison received a classical education at HampdenSidney College, where he was a student in 1787-1790, and began a medical course in Philadelphia, but the death of his father caused him to discontinue his studies, and in November 1791 he entered the army as ensign in the Tenth Regiment at Fort Washington, Cincinnati.

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  • Newark is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • Newark is the trade centre of an agricultural region, which also abounds in natural gas and coal; natural gas is piped as far as Cincinnati.

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  • He was educated at the university of Heidelberg, studied law, was admitted to the bar, and began to practise at Cincinnati.

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  • Other churches grew up in Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Boston and New York, and the General Convention, which meets annually, was formed at Philadelphia in 1817.

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  • Washington is served by the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio, the Chartiers Valley branch of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (Pennsylvania system) and the Waynesburg & Washington railways and a connecting line for freight service, and by electric railway to Pittsburg.

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  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (which has large shops here) and the Ohio Central railways; also by the Dayton, Springfield & Urbana electric railway.

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  • Resigning his commission in 1857, McClellan became successively chief engineer and vice-president of the Illinois Central railroad (1857-1860), general superintendent of the Mississippi & Ohio railroad, and, a little later, president of the eastern branch of the same, with his residence in Cincinnati.

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  • It is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Erie railways, and by an interurban electric railway.

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  • Crampton (1805-1886), received his passports, and the exequaturs of the British consuls at New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati were revoked.

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  • The denomination has publishing houses in Cincinnati, St Louis, Louisville and Nashville.

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  • Lima contains railway shops of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton and the Lake Erie & Western railways.

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  • It is served by the Louisville & Nashville, the Southern, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific, the Lexington & Eastern, and electric railways.

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  • The Miami and Erie canal, leading from Maumee river to Cincinnati, 2441m., with a branch to Port Jefferson, 14 m., with locks 90 by 15 by 4 ft., connects with Lake Erie through Toledo.

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  • The proximity of such good markets as Chicago, Cincinnati, St Louis and Louisville, in addition to the local markets, and the unusual opportunities afforded by the railways that traverse every portion of the state, have been important factors in the rapid agricultural advance which has enabled Indiana to keep pace with the newly developed states farther west.

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  • In April 1783 he had drafted a scheme of a society to be formed by the American officers and the French officers who had served in America during the war, and to be called the "Cincinnati"; of this society he was the first secretarygeneral (1783-1799) and in 1805 became vice-president-general.

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  • Fish was vice-presidentgeneral of the Society of the Cincinnati from 1848 to 1854, and president-general from 1854 until his death.

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  • Patterson, Life of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak or Black Hawk (Boston, 1834), purporting to be Black Hawk's story as told by himself; and Benjamin Drake, Life of Black Hawk (Cincinnati, 1846).

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  • The city is served by the Baltimore & Ohio South-Western, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Louisville, Henderson & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Chicago, Indiana & Louisville, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Southern and the Louisville & Nashville railways; by steamboat lines to Memphis, Cairo, Evansville, Cincinnati and Pittsburg; by an extensive system of inter-urban electric lines; and by ferries to Jeffersonville and New Albany, Indiana, two attractive residential suburbs.

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  • Alton is served by the Chicago & Alton, the Chicago, Peoria & St Louis, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Illinois Terminal railways.

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  • Speaking at Cincinnati on the 23rd of February 1880, he declared that the first thing necessary was to undermine English power by destroying the Irish landlords.

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  • The city is served by the Alabama Great Southern (Queen and Crescent), the Cincinnati, New Orleans & Texas Pacific (partly controlled by the Southern), the Nashville, Chattanooga & St Louis (controlled by the Louisville & Nashville), and its leased line, the Western & Atlantic (connecting with Atlanta, Ga.), the Central of Georgia, and the Chattanooga Southern railways, and by freight and passenger steamboat lines on the Tennessee river, which is navigable to and beyond this point during eight months of the year.

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  • It is served by the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Fort Wayne, Cincinnati & Louisville railways, and by the Indianapolis & Cincinnati Traction line (electric).

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  • Goshen is served by the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, and the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern railways, and is connected by electric railway with Warsaw and South Bend.

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  • In 1860 he became legislative correspondent at Columbus for several Ohio newspapers, including the Cincinnati Gazette, of which he was made city editor in 1861.

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  • In 1882 he became first lieutenant and was stationed at Cincinnati, where he was engaged in improving the channel of the Ohio river.

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  • Later he taught engineering at West Point for several years, but returned to Cincinnati in 1889.

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  • Its principal importance is as a railway and manufacturing centre; it is served by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the Chicago & Alton, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis, the Illinois Central, the Wabash, and the Litchfield & Madison railways, and by electric lines connecting with St Louis and the neighbouring towns.

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  • The principal railways operating in the state in 1910 were the Louisville & Nashville, the Nashville, Chattanooga & St Louis, the Cincinnati Southern and the Southern.

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  • J., founded in 1812 by the General Assembly; the Auburn Theological Seminary at Auburn, N.Y., founded in 1819 by the synod of Geneva, and afterwards associated with the New School; a school at Hampden Sidney, Virginia, founded by the synod of Virginia in 1824, named Union Theological Seminary in Virginia after 1826, supported after 1828 by the synods of Virginia and North Carolina, and in 1898 removed to Richmond, Va.; the Western Theological Seminary, founded at Allegheny (Pittsburg), Pa., in 1827 by the General Assembly; the Presbyterian Theological Seminary at Columbia, South Carolina, founded in 1828 by the synod of South Carolina; Lane Theological Seminary, founded independently in 1829 by the New School at Cincinnati, Ohio; and Union Theological Seminary, founded in 1836 by independent action of New School men, in New York City.

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  • Henry Preserved Smith, professor of Hebrew and Old Testament exegesis in Lane Seminary, for a pamphlet published in 1891 denying the inerrancy but affirming the inspiration of the Scriptures, was suspended in 1892 by the presbytery of Cincinnati, and was unsuccessful in his appeal to the synod and to the General Assembly.

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  • In 1859 he made two speeches in Ohio - one at Columbus on the 16th of September criticising Douglas's paper in the September Harper's Magazine, and one at Cincinnati on the 17th of September, which was addressed to Kentuckians, - and he spent a few days in Kansas, speaking in Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison and Leavenworth, in the first week of December.

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  • I am too happy to write letters; but I must tell you about our visit to Cincinnati.

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  • Cincinnati is in the southwestern corner of Ohio on the northern shore of the Ohio River.

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  • Bicycle playing cards, made in Cincinnati, Ohio, by the United States Playing Card Company, are most commonly found in red and blue, but there are so many other designs out there!

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  • The Cincinnati Outlet Mall, also known as Cincinnati Premium Outlets, is part of the Simon Property Group's chain of outlet stores.

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  • The regular shopping hours for the Cincinnati Outlet Mall is Monday through Saturday, 10am to 9pm and Sunday 10am to 6pm.

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  • The exact address is 400 Premium Outlets Drive, Monroe, OH 45050, just 30 miles northeast of downtown Cincinnati.

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  • Whether you live in the Cincinnati area and are looking for a fun day trip, or simply love visiting malls across the country, make sure to plan a trip to this outlet mall to score big savings on your favorite brands.

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  • His father was an anchorman in Cincinnati, his aunt is the legendary singer and actress, Rosemary Clooney and his cousin is actor Miguel Ferrer.

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  • After attending Princeton High School in Sharonville, Ohio, she studied at the School for Creative and Performing Arts in Cincinnati.

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  • He attended high school at Cincinnati's prestigious School for the Creative and Performing Arts.

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  • Prior to his talk show hosting duties, he was the democratic mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • After his political career fizzled, he was a news anchor for an NBC affiliate in Cincinnati, then took on the role as daytime talk show host.

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  • Trump's first job was with his father's Trump Organization, where he revitalized a Cincinnati, Ohio apartment complex and after it was sold, profited $6 million.

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  • Jennifer Grey has also appeared in HBO's John from Cincinnati.

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  • Doris Day was born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff on April 3, 1922, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • She was performing in the Cincinnati area, and it was at this time that she adopted the stage name "Doris Day."

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  • There is a long tradition of actors from Cincinnati, Ohio, from classic cowboys to talent that came up in the old studio system of Hollywood.

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  • Cincinnati is listed as the first booming city in America's heartland, and the acting icons to be born and bred there are just a few of the reasons why.

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  • Roy Rogers was born under the name of Leonard Franklin Slye in Cincinnati, where his family lived in a tenement building.

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  • They lived in various towns throughout Ohio before returning to Cincinnati when Rogers was 17.

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  • The star of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show wasn't born in Cincinnati, but began married life and her career there.

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  • Butler after beating him in a shooting competition, and the two lived in Cincinnati before joining Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

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  • Cincinnati is the birthplace of Tyrone Power, the screen legend known for The Mark of Zorro and The Razor's Edge.

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  • He began acting as a child, and after his parents divorced, moved with his mother and sister back to the Cincinnati area where he continued his acting.

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  • Screen legend Doris Day was also born in Cincinnati, Ohio, under the name of Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff.

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  • Although her father was a music teacher and choir master, Day became interested in dance, and partnered with Jerry Doherty, performing around Cincinnati.

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  • Other actors from Cincinnati, Ohio, can only hope to someday follow in the footsteps of Roy Rogers and Doris Day.

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  • With the list of legends who have been born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, as well as the long list of up-and-coming artists and future legends, it's clear that the town has the ability to raise fine actors.

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  • However, students can transfer their credits to nearby public four-year schools, including Cleveland State University and University of Cincinnati.

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  • Some (like the University of Cincinnati and Boston University) may even have stronger graduate learning programs than undergraduate programs--something to keep in mind for your long-term future.

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  • The University of Cincinnati offers a meeting/event planner program that is classified as an administrative management technology option.

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  • The parent company, Great American Financial Resources, Inc., has its company headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • After receiving his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati, Ohio, he went on to complete his ophthalmology residency at Indiana University Medical Center.

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  • King's Island first opened in 1972, 24 miles northeast of Cincinnati as a replacement park for the nearby Coney Island that suffered from floods and lack of space.

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  • There are two Great Wolf Lodge locations in Ohio, one near Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky and the other near King's Island in Mason, close to Cincinnati.

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  • In nearby Cincinnati, Ohio, King's Island opened its gates and offered customers a larger variety of thrill rides and attractions.

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  • Kings Island was born in the wake of the demise of another regional theme park, Cincinnati’s Coney Island.

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  • They took their time with the planning until 1968, when actor Fess Parker announced his own plans to build a theme park in his Northern Kentucky home, very close to Cincinnati.

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  • Tafts then purchased 1,6000 acres of land in Deerfield Township, Ohio – just north of Cincinnati – and began construction on the park in 1970.

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  • Kings Island is located off Interstate 77, approximately 25 miles northeast of Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • At Cincinnati Children's hospital, cases of EE were examined in patients from Hamilton County.

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  • A University of Cincinnati one-year study of the drug in patients with bipolar I disorder found that it provided sustained relief of depressive symptoms.

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  • Unfortunately, there are incidences, such as what happened to a woman from Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • The Kroger brand began in 1883, when Barney Kroger used his life savings to open a grocery store in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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  • Major cities in the Ohio Valley include Cincinnati, Columbus, and Cleveland, Ohio; Lexington, Louisville, Covington, and Bowling Green, Kentucky; and Fort Wayne, South Bend, and Indianapolis, Indiana.

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  • Use Cincinnati Zoo coupons to receive lower rates on admission to this family-favorite Ohio zoo.

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  • The Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau has listings for special offers, combination deals and hotel packages that can save you money on your family vacation in Cincinnati.

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  • Next, visit the Warren County Convention & Visitors Bureau, which has special offers and information listed for area attractions, including the Cincinnati Zoo.

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  • In addition to coupons, the Cincinnati Zoo itself offers a variety of ticketing packages for your day at the Zoo that offer significant savings.

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  • Several levels of membership are available to patrons of the Cincinnati Zoo.

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  • Kroger grocery store patrons with the KrogerPlus card are able to buy family memberships to the Cincinnati Zoo at a discounted price in their stores.

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  • Create more savings by visiting the Cincinnati Zoo's calendar to learn about special events and offers.

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  • According to his biography at Soap Central, David Canary got his start as a football player, attending the University of Cincinnati on a scholarship, and graduating with a degree in music.

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  • The success of the album was tempered, however, by a shooting in Cincinnati after a show, which left the rapper's friend and personal assistant dead.

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  • Taking the Stage is an MTV reality show that follows the lives of a small group of students at Cincinnati's School for the Creative and Performing Artst (SCPA).

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  • She would like to get out of the Cincinnati area and a dance scholarship is her only way to do it.

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  • He holds many Cincinnati Bengals franchise records.

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  • With its corporate headquarters based in Cincinnati, Ohio, the Cintas Corporation is the largest supplier of uniforms in North America.

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  • Delaware is served by the Pennsylvania, the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central system), and the Hocking Valley railways, and by two interurban lines.

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  • More or less closely connected with the Northern Church are the theological seminaries at Princeton, Auburn, Pittsburg (formerly Allegheny - the Western Seminary), Cincinnati (Lane), New York (Union) and Chicago (McCormick), already named, and San Francisco Seminary (1871) since 1892 at San Anselmo, Cal., a theological seminary (1891) at Omaha, Nebraska, a German theological seminary (1869) at Bloomfield, New Jersey, the German Presbyterian Theological School of the North-west (1852) at Dubuque, Iowa, and the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Kentucky, which is under the control and supervision of the northern and southern churches.

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  • Mrs Stowe passed eighteen years in Cincinnati under conditions which constantly thrust the problem of human slavery upon her attention.

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  • He was prepared for college by a private tutor, studied for two years at the Farmers' College, near Cincinnati, and in 1852 graduated from Miami University, at that time the leading educational institution in the State of Ohio.

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  • For a few months he worked as a legal reporter for the Cincinnati Times (owned by his brother C. P. Taft), and then for the Cincinnati Commercial.

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  • Early in 1881 he was appointed assistant prosecuting attorney of Hamilton (disambiguation)|Hamilton county (in which Cincinnati is situated), but resigned in 1882 on being appointed collector of internal revenue of the United States for the first district of Ohio.

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  • Adeline is well and she can go to Cincinnati Monday with me.

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  • I will go to Cincinnati in May and buy another child.

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