How to use Cimbri in a sentence

cimbri
  • As governor of Gallia Narbonensis, he plundered the temple of the Celtic Apollo at Tolosa (Toulouse), which had joined the Cimbri.

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  • In 105, Caepio suffered a crushing defeat from the Cimbri at Arausio (Orange) on the Rhone, which was looked upon as a punishment for his sacrilege; hence the proverb Aurum Tolosanum habet, of an act involving disastrous consequences.

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  • From 104 to for he served again under Marius in the war with the Cimbri and Teutones and fought in the last great battle in the Raudian plains near Verona.

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  • Ridgeway (Early Age of Greece, 1901) considers that the Belgic tribes were Cimbri, "who had moved directly across the Rhine into north-eastern Gaul."

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  • In 101 the Cimbri were defeated on the Raudine plain, near Vercellae, by the united armies of Catulus and Marius.

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  • Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally C. Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and the needy rabble.

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  • It was proposed that all the land north of the Padus (Po) lately in possession of the Cimbri, including that of the independent Celtic tribes which had been temporarily occupied by them, should be held available for distribution among the veterans of Marius.

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  • This was unjust, since the land was really the property of the provincials who had been dispossessed by the Cimbri.

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  • By this time Marius was generally recognized as the ablest general of the day, and was appointed to the chief command against the Cimbri and Teutones.

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  • In 102 B.C. its neighbourhood was the scene of the defeat inflicted on the Cimbri and Teutones by Marius.

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  • If the Teutoni really came from the same quarter as the Cimbri, it is possible that their name may have been preserved in that of the district called until recently Thyland or Thythsyssel in the extreme north-west of Jutland.

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  • Thus there can be little doubt that the Cimbri and their allies, who invaded Illyriculn, Gaul and Italy in the last years of the preceding century, were for the most part of Teutonic nationality.

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  • One of the chief objects of veneration among the Cimbri is said to have been a brazen bull.

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  • Among all Teutonic peoples from the time of the Cimbri onwards we frequently hear also of holy women whose duties were concerned chiefly with divination.

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  • At all sacrifices it seems to have been customary to practise divination; in connexion with human sacrifice we have record of this rite from the time of the Cimbri.

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  • About the same time the Roman fleet voyaged along the northern coast apparently as far as the north of Jutland, and received the nominal submission of several tribes in that region, including the Cimbri and the Charudes.

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  • The Cimbri and Charydes are mentioned in the Monumentum Ancyranum as sending embassies to Augustus in A.D.

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  • Pomponius Mela says that the Cimbri and Teutones dwelt on the Sinus Codanus, the latter also in Scandinavia (or Sweden).

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  • The Romans believed that these Cimbri and Teutones were the same as those who invaded Gaul and Italy at the end of the 2nd century B.C. The Cimbri may probably be traced in the province of Aalborg, formerly known as Himmerland; the Teutones, with less certainty, may be placed in Thyth or Thyland, north of the Limfjord.

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  • Again the victorious Cimbri turned away from Italy, and, after attempting to reduce the Arverni, moved into Spain, where they failed to overcome the desperate resistance of the Celtiberian tribes.

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  • Near Rouen the Cimbri were reinforced by the Teutoni and two cantons of the Helvetii.

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  • Thereupon the host marched southwards by two routes, the Cimbri moving on the left towards the passes of the Eastern Alps, while the newly arrived Teutoni and their allies made for the western gates of Italy.

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  • The Cimbri were the first in the long line of the Teutonic invaders of Italy.

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  • The original home of the Cimbri has been much disputed.

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  • Several early writers agree in saying that the Cimbri occupied a peninsula, and in the map of Ptolemy Jutland appears as the Cimbric Chersonese.

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  • As Ptolemy seems to have regarded the district north of the Liimfjord (Limfjord) as a group of islands, the territory of the Cimbri, the northernmost tribe of the peninsula, would be included in the modern county (Amt) of Aalborg.

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  • Strabo and other early writers relate a number of curious facts concerning the customs of the Cimbri, which are of great interest as the earliest records of the manner of life of the Teutonic nations, SouRcEs.

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  • Orange (Arausio), capital of the Cavari, was in 105 B.C. the scene of the defeat of a Roman army by the Cimbri and Teutones.

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  • The Teutons, whose name is generic for Germans, appear in history along with the Cimbri, universally held to be Celts, but coming from the same region as the Guttones (Goths) by the shores of the Baltic and North Sea.

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  • Ancient writers spoke of all these Gauls as Cimbri, and identified them with the Cimmerians of earlier date, who in Homeric times dwelt on the ocean next to the Laestrygones, in a region of wintry gloom, but where the sun set not in summer.

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  • Servilius Caepio of having brought about the defeat of his army by the Cimbri through rashness, and also of having plundered the temple of Tolosa.

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  • Sometimes the storm had burst over Gaul, and there had been need of a Marius to stem the torrent of Cimbri and Teutons, or of a Caesar to drive back the Helvetians into their mountains.

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  • The reports of gold and plunder spread by the Cimbri and Teutones on their way to southern Gaul induced the Helvetii to follow their example.

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  • In 102 the Helvetii joined the Cimbri in the invasion of Italy, but after the defeat of the latter by Marius they returned home.

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  • Quintus Lutatius Catulus, Roman general and consul with Marius in 102 B.C. In the war against the Cimbri and Teutones he was sent to defend the passage of the Alps but found himself compelled to retreat over the Po, his troops having been reduced to a state of panic (see Marius, GAIus).

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  • The prisoners at Aquae Sextiae and Vercellae were 90,000 Teutons and 60,000 Cimbri.

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  • For authorities see Cimbri; also Pliny, xxxvii.

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