Church-of-england sentence example

church-of-england
  • The struggle between them has been represented as one of a patriotic archbishop resisting the encroachments of the papacy on the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Through the columns of the Independent Reflector, which he established in 1752, Livingston fought the attempt of the Anglican party to bring the projected King's College (now Columbia University) under the control of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In England at the Reformation the alb went out of use with the other "Mass vestments," and remained out of use in the Church of England until the ritual revival of the 19th century.
    0
    0
  • It was the first mission station of the church of England in the Punjab.
    0
    0
  • The Primitive Methodists in Ireland were a small body who in 1817 seceded because they wished to maintain that close connexion with the Church of England which existed at the time of Wesley's death, but in 1878 they rejoined the parent body.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His father was one of a Yorkshire family who, for three generations, had been supporters of the Evangelical movement in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In 1640 Henderson, Baillie, Blair and Gillespie came to London as commissioners from the General Assembly in Scotland, in response to a request from ministers in London who desired to see the Church of England more closely modelled after the Reformed type.
    0
    0
  • In common with the general Presbyterianism of the British Isles, the Presbyterian Church of England has in recent years been readjusting its relation to the Westminster Confession of Faith.
    0
    0
  • As far as the difference in language will permit, there is cordial fellowship and co-operation with the Presbyterian Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England claims as adherents 39% of the population, and the Roman Catholic Church 22%; next in numerical strength are the Wesleyans and other Methodists, numbering 12% i the various branches of the Presbyterians 11%, Congregationalists 2%, and Baptists 2%.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Among institutions are the Battersea Polytechnic, the Royal Masonic Institution for girls, founded in 1788, and Church of England and Wesleyan Training Colleges.
    0
    0
  • The contention brought to a crisis the struggle between the moderate Presbyterians and the Scots on the one side, who decided to maintain the monarchy and fought for an accommodation and to establish Presbyterianism in England, and on the other the republicans who would be satisfied with nothing less than the complete overthrow of the king, and the Independents who regarded the establishment of Presbyterianism as an evil almost as great as that of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • At the decisive battle of Naseby (the 14th of June 1645) he commanded the parliamentary right wing and routed the cavalry of Sir Marmaduke Lang exclusion from pardon of all the king's leading adherents, besides the indefinite establishment of Presbyterianism and the refusal of toleration to the Roman Catholics and members of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • His principal work was Lectures on the Catechism of the Church of England (London, 1769).
    0
    0
  • The Church of England has reverted to early custom in so far as only "Easter Even" is distinguished by a special collect, gospel and epistle.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Wakefield seceded, and joined Lord Lyttelton and John Robert Godley in establishing the Canterbury settlement as a Church of England colony.
    0
    0
  • He conformed to the Church of England and spent a vast sum in restoring Arundel Castle.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England since the Reformation matins is used for the order of public morning prayer.
    0
    0
  • From that period Ward and his associates worked undisguisedly for union with the Church of Rome, and in 1844 he published his Ideal of a Christian Church, in which he openly contended that the only hope for the Church of England lay in submission to the Church of Rome.
    0
    0
  • Ward left the Church of England in September 1845, and was followed by many others, including Newman himself.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the Church of England the term prelate has been since the Reformation applied only to archbishops and bishops.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the use of the mitre was discontinued at the Reformation.
    0
    0
  • The liturgical use of the mitre was revived in the Church of England in the latter part of the 19th century, and is now fairly widespread.
    0
    0
  • Southwark is a bishopric of the Church of England created by act of 1904 (previously a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Rochester), and also of the Roman Catholic Church.
    0
    0
  • Even in England, where the church retained most strongly the Catholic tradition, this distinction of " Protestant" and " Catholic" was clearly maintained, at least till the " Catholic revival " in the Church of England of the 19th century.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In a somewhat narrower sense, too, the Church of England at bast has never repudiated the conception of the Catholic Church as a divinely instituted organization for the safe-guarding and proclamation of the Christian revelation.
    0
    0
  • The original King's chapel (1688, present building 1749-1754) was the first Episcopal church of Boston, which bitterly resented the action of the royal governor in 1687 in using the Old South for the services of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Under the Commonwealth he faced both ways, keeping his ecclesiastical preferment, but publishing from time to time pamphlets on behalf of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England denied him employment, and the Methodists desired his services.
    0
    0
  • Nassau is the seat of a bishopric of the Church of England created in 1861.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • As the chief representative of the Church of England in the House of Lords, his firmness, combined with broadmindedness, in regard to the attitude of the nonconformists towards denominational education, made his influence widely felt.
    0
    0
  • The subject of ecclesiastical vestments has been, ever since the Reformation, hotly debated in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • It runs: "And here it is to be noted that such ornaments of the church and of the ministers thereof at all times of their ministration shall be retained and be in use, as was in the Church of England by the authority of parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward VI."
    0
    0
  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.
    0
    0
  • Nor is the argument that they are a visible manifestation of the continuity of the Church anything but a doubleedged weapon; for, as Father Braun pertinently asks, if these be their symbolism, of what was their disuse in the Church of England for nigh on 3 00 years a symbol?
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • For the vestment question in the Church of England see the Report of the sub-committee of Convocation on The Ornaments of the Church and its Ministers (1908); Hierurgia Anglicana, documents and extracts illustrative of the ceremonial of the Anglican Church after the Reformation, new ed.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England has a flourishing mission, with a native pastorate.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the Church of England adheres closely to the episcopal constitution.
    0
    0
  • The words " in the Church of England " deserve careful notice.
    0
    0
  • The Anglicans are divided into two parties - those belonging to " the Church of the Province of South Africa," the body in communion with the Church of England, and those who act independently and constitute " the Church of England in Natal."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Church of England since the Reformation has been the chief champion of the principle of Episcopacy against the papal pretensions on the one hand and Presbyterianism and Congregationalism on the other.
    0
    0
  • The "High Church" view, now predominant, is practically identical with that of the Gallicans and Febronians, and is based on Catholic practice in those ages of the Church to which, as well as to the Bible, the formularies of the Church of England make appeal.
    0
    0
  • In the view of the Church of England the ultimate governance of the Christian community, in things spiritual and temporal, was vested not in the clergy but in the "Christian prince" as the vicegerent of God.
    0
    0
  • It has been suggested that this part of his life was 1 See A Testimonie of Antiquitie, sheaving the auncient fayth in the Church of England touching the sacrament of the body and bloude of the Lord here publikely preached, printed by John Day (1567).
    0
    0
  • Retables may be lawfully used in the church of England (Liddell Beale, 1860, 14 P.C.).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In the Church of England the use of incense was gradually abandoned after the reign of Edward VI., until the ritualistic revival of the present day.
    0
    0
  • Dibdin in the 10th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and the exposition given by Sir Lewis Dibdin of the whole question of the use of incense in the Church of England may here be interpolated.
    0
    0
  • The ceremonial use of incense thus became again an undoubted part of the communion service in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding these decisions, it was insisted by those who defended the revival of the ceremonial use of incense that it was a legal custom of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • There remained, nevertheless, a tendency on the part of the clergy who used incense, or desired to do so, to revert to the position they occupied before the Lambeth hearing - that is, to insist on the ceremonial use of incense as a part of the Catholic practice of the Church of England which it is the duty of the clergy to maintain, notwithstanding the decisions of ecclesiastical judges or the opinions or archbishops to the contrary.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • London north of the Thames is within the Church of England bishopric of London, the bishop's palace being at Fulham.
    0
    0
  • In the same year he edited Aids to Faith, a volume written in opposition to Essays and Reviews, the progressive sentiments of which had stirred up a great storm in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • It has been habitually used of the parochial clergy of the Church of England since the end of the 17th century.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England deans are addressed as "very reverend," bishops as "right reverend," archbishops as "most reverend."
    0
    0
  • He had left Oxford just before the beginning of that Catholic revival which has transfigured both the inner spirit and the outward aspect of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He was educated in a school at Jesmond, kept by Mr Ivison, a clergyman of the church of England.
    0
    0
  • The judgment purported to "synodically condemn the said volume as containing teaching contrary to the doctrine received by the United Church of England and Ireland, in common with the whole Catholic Church of Christ."
    0
    0
  • He drew up James's declaration, but the assurances he had inserted concerning the security of the Church of England were cancelled by the priests.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England and its sister and daughter churches the position of the archbishop is defined by the medieval in the Roman Catholic Church, save as modified on the n one hand by the substitution of the supremacy of the crown for that of the Holy See, and on the other by the restrictions imposed by the council of Trent.
    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical government of the Church of England is divided between two archbishops - the archbishop of Canterbury, who is "primate of all England" and metropolitan of the province of Canterbury, and the archbishop of York, who is "primate of England" and metropolitan of the province of York.
    0
    0
  • This sermon had much annoyed Newman and his more advanced disciples, but it was a proof that at that date Manning was loyal to the Church of England as Protestant.
    0
    0
  • He had public and private audiences with the pope on the 9th of April and the 11th of May 1848, but recorded next to nothing in his diary concerning them, though numerous other entries show an eager interest in everything connected with the Roman Church, and private papers also indicate that he recognized at this time grave defects in the Church of England and a mysterious attractiveness in Roman Catholicism, going so far as to question whether he might not one day be a Roman Catholic himself.
    0
    0
  • C. Gorham to the benefice of Brampford Speke in spite of the latter's acknowledged disbelief in the doctrine of baptismal regeneration, brought to a crisis the position within the Church of England of those who believed in that Church as a legitimate part of the infallible Ecclesia docens.
    0
    0
  • In this respect catechisms of modern times, from Luther's down to the recent Evangelical catechism of the Free Churches, and including from their respective points of view both the catechism of the Church of England and the catechism of the council of Trent, are markedly superior to articles and synodical decrees.
    0
    0
  • Guest, bishop of Rochester, shows " an attempt to give greater completeness to the formulary," and to make clearer the Catholic position of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • By the early constitutions of the Church of England a bishop was allowed a space of two months to inquire and inform himself of the sufficiency of every presentee, but by the ninety-fifth of the canons of 1604 that interval has been abridged to twenty-eight days, within which the bishop must admit or reject the clerk.
    0
    0
  • Few orators belonging to the Church of England have acquired so great a reputation as Liddon.
    0
    0
  • The combination of the two appointments gave him extensive influence over the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • No book is fuller of devotion to the Church of England than The Temple, and no poems in our language exhibit more of the spirit of true Christianity.
    0
    0
  • It is impossible exactly to estimate the influence which these teachers exerted on the general trend of religious opinion in England; in any case, however, it was not unimportant, and the Articles of Religion and official homilies of the Church of England show unmistakably the influence of Calvin's doctrine.
    0
    0
  • A conservative Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments and other Rites and Ceremonies after the Use of the Church of England - commonly called the First Prayer Book of Edward VI.
    0
    0
  • As supreme governor of the Church of England the sovereign strictly controlled all ecclesiastical legislation and appointed royal delegates to hear appeals from the ecclesiastical courts, to be a " papist " or to " hear Mass " (which was construed as the same thing) was to risk incurring the terrible penalties of high treason.
    0
    0
  • Attempts to estimate the width of the gulf separating the Church of England in Elizabeth's time from the corresponding institution as it existed in the early years of her father's reign are likely to be gravely affected by personal bias.
    0
    0
  • They had no very pronounced religious leaning, though Maryland was founded as a Roman Catholic refuge, but they had a prevailing leaning to the church of England.
    0
    0
  • In a great sermon on the 10th of April (Easter week) 1588, he stoutly vindicated the Protestantism of the Church of England against the Romanists, and, oddly enough, adduced "Mr Calvin" as a new writer, with lavish praise and affection.
    0
    0
  • The Books of Homilies referred to in the 35th article of the Church of England originated at a convocation in 1542, at which it was agreed "to make certain homilies for stay of such errors as were then by ignorant preachers sparkled among the people."
    0
    0
  • There are a Church of England and a Roman Catholic church in the town, and a training college under the Roman Catholic missionaries of the Societe des Missions Etrangeres at Palau Tikus, a few miles outside the town.
    0
    0
  • In London a Church of England training institution (St John's House) was opened in 1848.
    0
    0
  • In addressing the electors of Midlothian in September 1885, Gladstone had suggested the severance of the Church of England from the state as a subject on which the foundation of discussion had already been laid, and he averred the existence of "a current almost throughout the civilized world, slowly setting in the direction of disestablishment."
    0
    0
  • This stirring of the question deeply moved Lord Selborne, who was strongly opposed alike to disestablishment and disendowment, and in the following year, 1886, he published a work entitled A Defence of the Church of England against Disestablishment, with an introductory letter addressed to Gladstone.
    0
    0
  • The work is throughout characterized by an abundant supply of learning and of information as to the history and the state of the Church of England at that time, and by great dialectical acuteness.
    0
    0
  • In the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England we have (ii.) " Christ suffered.
    0
    0
  • The town was governed largely after the Mosaic law and continued essentially Puritan for fifty years or more; about 1730 Presbyterianism superseded Congregationalism, and in 1734 Colonel Josiah Ogden, having caused a schism in the preceding year, by saving his wheat one dry Sunday in a wet season, founded with several followers the first Episcopal or Church of England Society in Newark - Trinity Church.
    0
    0
  • A few years later, in 1847, Miss Sellon formed for the first time a sisterhood at Devonport in connexion with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • By many churchmen, too, the name of "Protestant" is accepted in what they take to be the old sense as implying repudiation of the claims of Rome, but as not necessarily involving a denial of "Catholic" doctrine or any confusion of the Church of England with non-episcopal churches at home or abroad.
    0
    0
  • He suffered death on the 10th of January on Tower Hill, asserting his innocence of any offence known to the law, repudiating the charge of "popery," and declaring that he had always lived in the Protestant Church of England.
    0
    0
  • About 1 795, persecution led the Methodists to take the first step towards separation from the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Under the royal government the Church of England was established, the people acquired a strong control of their branch of the legislature and they were governed more by statute law and less by executive ordinance.
    0
    0
  • His Diary is therefore a valuable chronicle of contemporary events from the standpoint of a moderate politician and a devout adherent of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the word is applied to a private place of worship, attached either to the palaces of the sovereign, "chapels royal," or to the residence of a private person, to a college, school, prison, workhouse, &c. Further, the word has particular legal applications, though in each case the building might be and often is styled a church.
    0
    0
  • The Anglican catechism with occasional modification, especially in the sacramental section, is used not only in the Church of England but in the Episcopal churches of Ireland, Scotland, the British dominions and the United States of America.
    0
    0
  • Strachan had no difficulty in convincing Lord Bathurst of the justice of his claims on all essential matters, the most important of which was the exclusive right of the Church of England in Canada to the Clergy Reserves.
    0
    0
  • It was, however, to be entirely under the control of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He energetically opposed the act of 1840, which sought to settle the Clergy Reserves question by dividing the proceeds among the different religious denominations, the larger share still remaining with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • It is proposed here to note simply the present legal aspects of nonconformity apart from its history, that is, the matters in which the law as to nonconformists still differs from that applicable to members of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • But in such a case notice must be given in a specified form, which is unnecessary where the burial service is conducted by a clergyman of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In colonies of the former kind the Church of England may still preserve the privileges which attach to her in the mother country; in colonies of the latter kind she is in the same position as any other religious body, simply a voluntary association.
    0
    0
  • Since the Irish Church Act 1869 the Church of Ireland has been practically in the same position as the Church of England in colonies which have representative government.
    0
    0
  • The 28th Article of Religion of the Church of England is as follows: " The Supper of the Lord.
    0
    0
  • But such is not the view of the Church of England in her doctrinal standards, and there is an express rubric directing that any that remains of that which was consecrated is not to be carried out of the church, but reverently consumed.
    0
    0
  • The archbishops gave their decision on the 1st of May 1900 in two separate judgments, to the effect that, in Dr Temple's words, "the Church of England does not at present allow reservation in any form, and that those who think that it ought to be allowed, though perfectly justified in endeavouring to get the proper authorities to alter the law, are not justified in practising reservation until the law has been so altered."
    0
    0
  • Many of the Protestant bodies have abandoned the rite, but it remains among the Lutherans (who, whether episcopal or not, attach great importance to it) and in the group of Churches in communion with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England is strong in the cities, especially Toronto.
    0
    0
  • The Calendar Of The Church Of England Is Therefore From Century To Century The Same In Form As The Old Roman Calendar, Excepting That The Golden Numbers Indicate The Full Moons Instead Of The New Moons.
    0
    0
  • One of the most important steps taken at the Reformation was the compilation and provision of a comprehensive service book for general and compulsory use in public worship in all cathedral and parish churches throughout the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He repeated his challenge in 1560, and Dr Henry Cole took it up. The chief result was Jewel's Apologia ecclesiae Anglicanae, published in 1562, which in Bishop Creighton's words is "the first methodical statement of the position of the Church of England against the Church of Rome, and forms the groundwork of all subsequent controversy."
    0
    0
  • In the time of Archbishop Laud, however, the present practice of the Church of England was introduced.
    0
    0
  • The Church party was influential and resolute to maintain close relations with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • On the 4th of May eighteen laymen met at Hull and expressed their conviction that the useful ness of Methodism would be promoted by its continued connexion with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • As to the sacraments and the relations of Methodism to the Church of England the decision was: "We engage to follow strictly the plan which Mr Wesley left us."
    0
    0
  • In the established Church of England the appointment of bishops is vested effectively in the crown, though the old form of election by the cathedral chapter is retained.
    0
    0
  • He greatly aided in the introduction of many useful reforms, in fostering a more catholic and tolerant spirit, and in cementing a firm alliance with the sister church of England.
    0
    0
  • Under William III., Governors Sloughter and Fletcher worked for a law (passed in 1693 and approved in 1697) for the settling of a ministry in New York, Richmond, Westchester and Queen's counties; but the Assembly foiled Fletcher's purpose of establishing a Church of England clergy, although he attempted to construe the act as applying only to the English Church.
    0
    0
  • Similarly in the Church of England the king is legally the supreme ordinary, as the source of jurisdiction.
    0
    0
  • It has since remained, with the exception of the cope (q.v.), the sole vestment authorized by law for the ministers, other than bishops, of the Church of England (for the question of the vestments prescribed by the "Ornaments Rubric" see Vestments).
    0
    0
  • The traditional form of the surplice in the Church of England is that which survived from pre-Reformation times, viz.
    0
    0
  • So far as the Church of England is concerned it may fairly be said to have started afresh in the year following the first observance of the Day of Intercession for Missions, on the 20th of December 1872.
    0
    0
  • The Society for Promoting Female Education in the East (now absorbed by others, chiefly by the Church Missionary Society) was founded in 1834; the Scottish Ladies' Association for the Advancement of Female Education in India (which subsequently became two associations, for more general work, in connexion with the Established and Free Churches of Scotland respectively) in 1837; the Indian Female Normal School Society (now the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission) in 1861 (taking over an association dating from 1852); the Wesleyan Ladies' Auxiliary in 1859; the Women's Association of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, and the Baptist Zenana Mission, in 1867; The London Society's Female Branch, in 1875; the Church of England Zenana Society (an offshoot from the Indian Female Society) in 1880.
    0
    0
  • The Church Missionary Society, besides relying on the above-named Zenana Bible and Medical Mission and Church of England Zenana Missionary Society for women's work at several of its stations in India and China, sent out 500 single women in the fifteen years ending 1900; and the non-denominational missions above referred to have (including wives) more women than men engaged in their work - especially the China Inland Mission, which has sent out several hundreds to China.
    0
    0
  • In the case of the two leading Church of England societies, the bishops (being members) are ex officio on all executive committees; but their labours in other directions prevent their ordinarily attending.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the question was broached in Convocation, shortly after the revival of that body, in 1859; and during the next few years many suggestions were put forth for the establishment of a Board of Missions which should absorb the societies, or at least direct their work.
    0
    0
  • But the Church of England has not yet put missions in the prominent place they occupy in the Nonconformist denominations.
    0
    0
  • In the Straits Settlement the foundations of modern missionary effort were laid by the London Missionary Society pioneers who were waiting to get into China; they were succeeded by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (1856), English Presbyterians (1875), Methodist Episcopalians (1884), who have a fine Anglo-Chinese College at Singapore, and the Church of England Zenana Society (1900).
    0
    0
  • His father, Samuel Seabury (1706-1764), originally a Congregationalist minister in Groton, was ordained deacon and priest in the Church of England in 1731, and was a rector in New London, Conn., from 1732 to 1743, and in Hempstead, Long Island, from 1743 until his death.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the history of the Passion from the gospel according to John is also read; the collects for the day are based upon the bidding prayers which are found in the Ordo Romanus.
    0
    0
  • Of the reformed churches, the Church of England alone includes Palm Sunday in the Holy Week celebrations.
    0
    0
  • The modern revival, in certain churches of an "advanced" type, of the ceremonies of blessing the palms and carrying them in procession has no official warrant, and is therefore without any significance as illustrating the authoritative point of view of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The whole of the work is done in loyal subordination to the diocesan and parochial organization of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He remained at Bridgnorth nearly two years, during which time he took a special interest in the controversy relating to Nonconformity and the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He preached there till the Act of Uniformity took effect in 1662, and was employed in seeking for such terms of comprehension as would have permitted the moderate dissenters with whom he acted to have remained in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • His best prose work is the Historic Proof of the Doctrinal Calvinism of the Church of England (London, 1774).
    0
    0
  • Mersenne begged him not to die outside the Roman Catholic Church, but Hobbes said that he had already considered the matter sufficiently and afterwards took the sacrament according to the rites of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He was always suspected of being a Roman Catholic, and invariably treated Jacobites and Papists better than Dissenters in the Athenae, but he died in communion with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • It marked the emergence of the Church of England from that insularity to which what may be called the territorial principles of the Reformation had condemned her.
    0
    0
  • In the main, then, the expansion of the Anglican Church has followed that of the British empire, or, as in America, of its daughter states; its claim, so far as rights of jurisdiction are concerned, is to be the Church of England and the English race, while recognizing its special duties towards the non-Christian populations subject to the empire or brought within the reach of its influence.
    0
    0
  • The congress, of course, had no power to decide or to legislate for the Church, its main value being in drawing its scattered members closer together, in bringing the newer and more isolated branches into consciousness of their contact with the parent stem, and in opening the eyes of the Church of England to the point of view and the peculiar problems of the daughter-churches.
    0
    0
  • With such views it was not to be wondered at that, from first to last, as has already been indicated, he never lost an opportunity of supporting a policy of width, toleration and comprehension in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • A form of exhortation which "preachers and ministers shall move the people to join with them in prayer" is given in the 55th canon of the Church of England (1603).
    0
    0
  • Stephen's Church of England school, Westminster, where he was trained as an elementary schoolmaster; but at the age of 20 he preferred to emigrate to Australia and to make his living as he could until he succeeded in entering political life as a member of the Labour party.
    0
    0
  • In 1817 he was invited to become pastor of the chapel of St Paul at Jersey, but he declined, being unwilling to subscribe to the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The first contains a collection and exegesis of all the texts in the New Testament relating to the doctrine of the Trinity; in the second the doctrine is set forth at large, and explained in particular and distinct propositions; and in the third the principal passages in the liturgy of the Church of England relating to the doctrine of the Trinity are considered.
    0
    0
  • He took a keen interest in all the work of the college, presented to it the Marmor Homericum, and finally bequeathed the reversion of £6000 for the endowment of a chair of philosophy of mind and logic. The emoluments of this sum were, however, to be held over and added to the principal if at any time the holder of the chair should be "a minister of the Church of England or of any other religious persuasion."
    0
    0
  • But she possessed the homely virtues; she was deeply religious, attached to the Church of England and concerned for the efficiency of the ministry.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the cassock, which with the gown is prescribed by the above-mentioned canon of 1604 as the canonical dress of the clergy, has been continuously, though not universally, worn by the clergy since the Reformation.
    0
    0
  • If a priest becomes a convert to the Church of England he need not be re-ordained.
    0
    0
  • The act of 1829 provides that nothing therein contained is to enable a Roman Catholic to hold the office of guardian and justice of the United Kingdom, or of regent of the United Kingdom; of lord chancellor, lord keeper, or lord commissioner of the great seal of Great Britain or Ireland or lord lieutenant of Ireland; of high commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, or of any office in the Church of England or Scotland, the ecclesiastical courts, cathedral foundations and certain colleges.
    0
    0
  • The act of 1829 forbids the assumption by any person, other than the person authorized by law, of the name, style or title of an archbishop, bisop or dean of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Union Chapel, originally founded by evangelical members of the Church of England and Nonconformists acting in harmony, became during Allon's co-pastorate definitely Congregational in principle and fellowship, and exercised an ever-expanding influence.
    0
    0
  • By committing herself to this system the Church of Scotland established between herself and the Church of England a division which became more and more apparent and was the cause of much of her subsequent sufferings.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding this circumstance, he was ordained deacon in the Church of England in 1730 and priest in 1731.
    0
    0
  • This Commission was authorized to " inquire into the origin, nature, amount and application of the temporalities, endowments and other; properties of the Church of England in Wales and Monmouthshire; and into the provision made and the work done by the Churches of all denominations in Wales and Monmouthshire for the spiritual welfare of the people, and the extent to which the people avail themselves of such provision."
    0
    0
  • It refused, moreover, to recognize the validity of Anglican orders, and consequently to follow the example of the other Old Catholics in establishing intercommunion with the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In 1907, the site of the abbey with the remains of the buildings, which had been in private hands since the granting of the estate to Sir Peter Carew by Elizabeth in 1559, was bought by Mr Ernest Jardine for the purpose of transferring it to the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the practice has been less consistent.
    0
    0
  • There is, however, no mention of ceremonial candles in the detailed account of the services of the Church of England given by William Harrison (Description of England, 1570); and the attitude of the Church towards their use, until the ritualistic movement of the 17th century, would seem to be authoritatively expressed in the Third Part of the Sermon against Peril of Idolatry, which quotes with approval the views of Lactantius and compares " our Candle Religion " 3 This is common to the Eastern Church also.
    0
    0
  • Bishop Colenso of Natal and other Anglicans did not accept the authority of the provincial synod, regarding themselves as in all respects members of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • By 1901, however, the majority of the " Church of England party were represented in the provincial synod.
    0
    0
  • While at this academy Butler became dissatisfied with the principles of Presbyterianism, and after much deliberation resolved to join the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • To Butler the Christian religion, and by that he meant the orthodox Church of England system, was a moral scheme revealed by a special act of the divine providence, the truth of which was to be judged by the ordinary canons of evidence.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the potestas ordinis is conferred by consecration.
    0
    0
  • The bishops also exercise a certain jurisdiction over marriages, inasmuch as they have by the canons of the Church of England a power of dispensing with the proclamation of banns before marriage.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the appointment and rights of coadjutor bishops were regulated by the Bishops' Resignation Act of 1869.
    0
    0
  • In the Church of England the status of suffragan bishops was regulated by the Act 26 Henry VIII.
    0
    0
  • This sect, based upon the theories of various German religious mystics, and having for its primary object the spiritualization of the matrimonial state, was founded in 1846 by the Rev. Henry James Prince, a clergyman of the Church of England (1811-1899).
    0
    0
  • It was now decided that Prince, Starkey (whose sister Prince had married as his second wife) and the Rev. Lewis Prince should leave the Church of England and preach their own gospel; Prince opened Adullam Chapel, Brighton, and Starkey established himself at Weymouth.
    0
    0
  • He was born in 1852, of an old Somersetshire county family, and, after a varied career as university man, sailor before the mast, soldier, coffee-planter, curate in the Church of England and evangelist in the Salvation Army, was converted about 1897 to the views of Prince.
    0
    0
  • The Catholic reaction represented by the Oxford movement in the Church of England early raised the question of a possible union between the Anglican and Eastern Orthodox Churches.
    0
    0
  • The state church, the Church of England as by law established, represents the tradition of a time when church and state were regarded as two aspects of one divinely ordered organism.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England is thus theoretically coextensive with the English nation, each unit of which is legally assumed to belong to it unless proof be brought to the contrary.
    0
    0
  • In practice the Church of England is no longer regarded as coextensive with the state; nor is nonconformity any longer, as it once was, an offence against the law.
    0
    0
  • In the matter of the estimation of their relative strength the main grievance of the Nonconformists is that the law classes as members of the Church of England that enormous floating population which is really conscious of no ecclesiastical allegiance at all.
    0
    0
  • In spite of the fact that the Church of England is collectively one of the wealthiest in Christendom, a large proportion of the " livings " are extremely poor.
    0
    0
  • It may be prefaced by stating that, according to returns made in 1905, the Church of England provided sitting accommodation in parish and other churches for 7,177,144 people; had an estimated number of 2, 0 53,455 communicants, 206,873 Sunday-school teachers, and 2,538,240 Sunday scholars.
    0
    0
  • His Pantheisticon, sive formula celebrandae sodalitatis socraticae, of which he printed a few copies for private circulation only, gave great offence as a sort of liturgic service made up of passages from heathen authors, in imitation of the Church of England liturgy.
    0
    0
  • There is nothing in the book inconsistent with Swift's professed and real character as a sturdy Church of England parson, who accepted the doctrines of his Church as an essential constituent of the social order around him, battled for them with the fidelity of a soldier defending his colours, and held it no part of his duty to understand, interpret, or assimilate them.
    0
    0
  • The true state of the case may easily be collected from his next publications - The Sentiments of a Church of England Man, and On the Reasonableness of a Test (1708).
    0
    0
  • In deference to his mother's Protestantism he was baptized in the chapel of the British embassy, thus becoming a member of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He wrote against the liturgy of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The prevailing legal view of the position of the Church of England in regard to canon law has been just stated, and that is the view taken by judicial authority for the past three centuries.
    0
    0
  • It is said by this school of legal historians that, from the Conquest down to Henry VIII., the Church of England was regarded by churchmen not as in any sense as separate entity, but as two provinces of the extra-territorial, super-national Catholic Church, and that the pope at this period was contemplated as the princeps of this Catholic Church, whose edicts bound everywhere, as those of Augustus had bound in the Roman empire.
    0
    0
  • This communion was subject to " all the laws of the Church of England applicable to its situation " (Murray Hoffman, A Treatise on the Law of the Protestant Episcopal Church, New York, 1850, p. 17).
    0
    0
  • To Joseph Trapp's attack on the Methodists he published in 1739 A Preservative against Unsettled Notions, in which the clergy of the Church of England were denounced with some bitterness; he also published shortly afterwards The Spirit and Doctrine and Lives of our Modern Clergy, and a reply to a pastoral letter of the bishop of London in which he had been attacked.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England holds in this matter as in others a central position.
    0
    0
  • It is, however, maintained by some that, except in the case of the sick, the only legitimate method of receiving absolution in the Church of England is in the public services of the congregation; and the Church of Ireland has recently made important alterations even in the passages that concern the sick, while the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States has omitted that part of the visitation service altogether.
    0
    0
  • The other chief difficulty arose from the absence of any authoritative restraint on the hearing of confessions by young and unqualified priests, the Church of England merely directing the penitent who wishes for special help to resort to any "discreet and learned minister."
    0
    0
  • Williams dealings with the Church of England were no less important than his dealings with social organization.
    0
    0
  • The old complaints which had been raised against the Church of England in the days of Edward I.
    0
    0
  • Whilst the worship of the Church of England was proscribed, every illiterate or frenzied enthusiast was allowed to harangue at his pleasure.
    0
    0
  • The predominance of the Church of England was the prime article of their political creed; they dreaded the Roman Catholics; they hated and despised the dissenters.
    0
    0
  • H., afterwards Cardinal, Newman was the chief, but who numbered among their leaders Hurrell Froude, the brother of the historian, and Keble, the author of the Christian Yearendeavoured to prove that the doctrines of the Church of England were identical with those of the primitive Catholic Church, and that every Catholic doctrine might be held by those who were within its pale.
    0
    0
  • Somewhat unnecessarily the prime minister went on to condemn the clergymen of the Church of England who had subscribed the Thirty-nine Articles, who have been the most forward in leading their own flocks, step by step, to the very, edge of the precipice.
    0
    0
  • In a looser sense the word is employed to denote abstinence from certain kinds of food merely; and this meaning, which in ordinary usage is probably the more prevalent, seems also to be at least tolerated by the Church of England when it speaks of " fast or abstinence days," as if fasting and abstinence were synonymous.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England cannot be said, from a legal point of view, to have a corporate existence or even a representative assembly.
    0
    0
  • Law of the Church of England (2nd ed., edited by Sir Walter Phillimore, 2 vols., London, 1895).
    0
    0
  • The Articles of the Church of England (19, 26) speak of the visible Church, but unless by inference do not assert a Church invisible.
    0
    0
  • Beresford-Hope, Lord Lyttelton and Lord John Manners (chairman), to exertions which restored sisterhoods to the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • And the influence of the liberal divines of the Church of England afterwards showed itself in his spiritual development.
    0
    0
  • There is a surmise that early in his Oxford career he contemplated taking orders in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Chillingworth, Jeremy Taylor, Glanvill and other philosophical thinkers in the Church of England urged toleration in the state, in conjunction with wide comprehension in the church, on the ground of our necessary intellectual limitation and inability to reach demonstration in theological debates.
    0
    0
  • Locke went far to unite in a higher principle elements in the broad Anglican and the Puritan theories, while he recognized the individual liberty of thought which distinguishes the national church of England.
    0
    0
  • After he became president the action of the king in replacing the expelled fellows with Roman Catholics agitated him to such a degree as to hasten his end; to the priests sent to persuade him on his death-bed to be received into the Roman Church he declared that he " never had been and never would be of that religion," and he died in the communion of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The Bishop of Lincoln" it was decided in 1890 that the singing of the Agnus Dei in English by the choir during the administration of the Holy Communion, provided that the reception of the elements be not delayed till its conclusion, is not illegal in the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Its institutions included a post-graduate theological college (opened in connexion with the Church of England in 1892, until 1907, when it was removed to Llandaff).
    0
    0
  • In 1622 he published a controversial Discourse of the Religion anciently Professed by the Irish and British, designed to show that they were in agreement with the Church of England and opposed to the Church of Rome on the points in debate between those churches.
    0
    0
  • A test act requiring members of the assembly to conform to the Church of England and to take the sacrament of the Eucharist according to the rites and usages of that Church (1704) was defeated only through the intervention of the Whig House of Lords in England.
    0
    0
  • By an act of the 30th of November 1706, which remained in force until the War of American Independence, the Church of England was made the established religion.
    0
    0
  • In 1863 the Church of England began work in the island through the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel and the Church Missionary Society.
    0
    0
  • From time to time ministers of the Church of England have lived on the island and to their efforts is mainly due the education of the children.
    0
    0
  • The practice of confession in the Church of England practically dates from his two sermons on The Entire Absolution of the Penitent, in 1846, in which the revival of high sacramental doctrine is complemented by the advocacy of a revival of the penitential system which medieval theologians had appended to it.
    0
    0
  • He engaged Gilbert Burnet to write The History of the Reformation of the Church of England and provided him with much material.
    0
    0
  • At the latter is a Church of England mission station under a native Indian catechist attached to the diocese of Rangoon.
    0
    0
  • Its aim was to secure for the Church of England a definite basis of doctrine and discipline, in case either of disestablishment or of a determination of High Churchmen to quit the establishment, an eventuality that was thought not impossible in view of the States' recent high-handed dealings with the sister established Church of Ireland.
    0
    0
  • He now recognized that the position of Anglicans was similar to that of the semi-Arians in the Arian controversy; and the arrangement made at this time that an Anglican bishopric should be established in Jerusalem, the appointment to lie alternately with the British and Prussian governments, was to him further evidence of the non-apostolical character of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Special religious instruction is allowed to be given after school hours by teachers duly authorized by the various religious denominations, and this privilege is somewhat extensively used by the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • In 1727 the Church of England was permitted to organize in the colony, and in 1729 a similar privilege was granted to the Baptists and Quakers.
    0
    0
  • The first published was Documentary Annals of the Reformed Church of England from 1546 to 1716, which appeared in 1839.
    0
    0
  • There are two cathedrals, Church of England and Roman Catholic, and a Presbyterian church, besides the cantonment church buildings for worship. Religious buildings and lands, indeed, occupy an area in Rangoon out of all p oportion to its size.
    0
    0
  • All of this would seem directly applicable to the present Church of England debate about the ordination of Women to the Episcopate.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England demands to have its say; threats of mutiny come from the officer caste.
    0
    0
  • He is a member of General Synod and the Church of England Evangelical Council, and is an inveterate chocoholic.
    0
    0
  • They are intended for widows (and ex-wives) and retired clergy of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • There are times of mass disobedience among people who claim to be God's people [witness the Church of England at present] .
    0
    0
  • His policy faltered and, like his brother before him, he allied himself with religious dissenters against the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • I have promised to uphold the doctrine of the Church of England in which scripture is supreme; I hope I shall do so.
    0
    0
  • Here is a church of England Mission Room, in which divine service is conducted by lay evangelists.
    0
    0
  • The Church of England is desperate to give birth to fresh expressions of church.
    0
    0
  • We need to be aware that liberal theologians in the Church of England are already supporting heterosexual immorality.
    0
    0
  • Do not let your concern for the Church of England become ingrown.
    0
    0
  • I have been in full time ordained ministry in the Church of England for nearly two years.
    0
    0
  • How does a person from overseas become an ordinand in the Church of England?
    0
    0
  • Of course, the Church of England is not the only Church to have had debates over female ordination.
    0
    0
  • In most parts of the Church of England parishes which have opted for extended episcopal oversight are very small in number.
    0
    0
  • D. W. The use of saints ' relics has not been in the main line of the post-Reformation Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He is the first Conservative leader to espouse a doctrine which the Church of England finds entirely repulsive.
    0
    0
  • Radical Puritans separated themselves from the Church of England and were called separatists.
    0
    0
  • He joined the separatists, a Puritan religious group who were highly critical of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • I added a few words, exhorting them to continue steadfast in the communion of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • They were to be occupied by six poor widows who were members of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The legality of rood screens or rood lofts in the Church of England depends on the law of the Church with regard to images, i.e.
    0
    0
  • After the Revolution and during the reign of William and Mary the hatred of the Church of England to the Presbyterians and other dissenters had been obliged to lie dormant.
    0
    0
  • In the course of his studies he discovered what he thought important variance between the teaching of the Church of England and that of the Bible, and he did not conceal his convictions.
    0
    0
  • But while the Church of England has declined communion with non-episcopal churches, she has been involved in a long controversy with the Church of Rome on the validity of her own orders.
    0
    0
  • Very large were the concessions made by Richelieu in his personal interviews with Amyraut; but, as with the Worcester House negotiations in England between the Church of England and nonconformists, they inevitably fell through.
    0
    0
  • It is not the business of the court to pronounce upon the absolute truth or falsehood of any given opinion, but simply to say whether it is formally consistent with the legal doctrines of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The brief Act of Supremacy confirmed the king's claim to be reputed the " only supreme head in earth of the Church of England "; he was to enjoy all the honours, dignities, jurisdictions and profits thereunto appertaining, and to have full power and authority to reform and amend all such errors, heresies and abuses, as by any manner of spiritual authority might lawfully be reformed, or amended, most to the pleasure of Almighty God, and the increase of virtue in Christ's religion, " foreign authority, prescription, or any other thing or things to the contrary hereof, notwithstanding."
    0
    0
  • As to the word "Protestant," it was never applied to the Church of England or to any other, save unofficially and in the wide sense above indicated, until the style "Protestant Episcopal Church" (see below) was assumed by the Anglican communion in the United States.
    0
    0
  • At the same time the circumstances of the period, the fact that various schemes of union with Rome were abroad, that the missions of Panzani and later of Conn were gathering into the Church of Rome numbers of members of the Church of England who, like Laud himself, were dissatisfied with the Puritan bias which then characterized it, the incident mentioned by Laud himself of his being twice offered the cardinalate, the movement carried on at the court in favour of Romanism, and the fact that Laud's changes in ritual, however clearly defined and restricted in his own intention, all tended towards Roman practice, fully warranted the suspicions and fears of his contemporaries.
    0
    0
  • Brawling in a church was an offence which formerly fell solely under the cognizance of the spiritual courts, but by the Ecclesiastical Courts Jurisdiction Act 1860 any person guilty of brawling in churches or chapels of the Church of England or Ireland, or in any chapel of any religious denomination, is liable on conviction to a fine or imprisonment (see Brawling), while clergymen of the Church of England may also be dealt with under the Clergy Discipline Act 1892.
    0
    0
  • These letters were issued in compliance with the second recommendation (1906) of the Royal Commission on Ecclesiastical Discipline, viz.: that " Letters of business should be issued to the Convocations with instructions: (a) to consider the preparation of a new rubric regulating the ornaments (that is to say, the vesture) of the ministers of the church, at the times of their ministrations, with a view to its enactment by parliament; and (b) to frame, with a view to their enactment of parliament, such modifications in the existing law relating to the conduct of Divine Service, and to the ornaments and fittings of churches as may tend to secure the greater elasticity which a reasonable recognition of the comprehensiveness of the Church of England and of its present needs seems to demand."
    0
    0
  • In England, for instance, the chancels were for the most part disused after the Reformation (see Harrison, op. cit.), but presently they came into use again, and on the Catholic revival in the Church of England in the 19th century it is certain that the medieval churches exercised an influence by giving a sense of fitness, which might otherwise have been lacking, to the restoration of medieval ritual.
    0
    0
  • But the growing power of the Scotch-Irish, the resentment of the Quakers against the proprietors for having gone back to the Church of England and many other circumstances strengthened the anti-proprietary power, and the assembly strove to abolish the proprietorship and establish a royal province; John Dickinson was the able leader of the party which defended the proprietors; and Joseph Galloway and Benjamin Franklin were the leaders of the anti-proprietary party, which was greatly weakened at home by the absence after December 1764 of Franklin in England as its agent.
    0
    0
  • The British party was strong because of the loyalty of the large Church of England element, the neutrality of many Quakers, Dunkers, and Mennonites, and a general satisfaction with the liberal and free government of the province, which had been won gradually and had not suffered such catastrophic reverses as had embittered the people of Massachusetts, for instance.
    0
    0
  • In 1808 he was consecrated assistant and successor to the bishop of Brechin, in 1810 was preferred to the sole charge, and in 1816 was elected primus of the Episcopal Church of Scotland, in which capacity he greatly aided in the introduction of many useful reforms, in fostering a more catholic and tolerant spirit, and in cementing a firm alliance with the sister church of England.
    0
    0
  • Of the non-Roman Churches in the West the surplice has continued in regular use only in the Lutheran churches of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and in the Church of England (see below).
    0
    0
  • The Church of England itself is the subject of a separate article (see Church of England); and it is not without significance that for more than two centuries after the Reformation the history of Anglicanism is practically confined to its developments within the limits of the British Isles.
    0
    0
  • The church of England has passed through several disputes regarding the question whether the Thirty-Nine Articles are Calvinistic or not; while there is some ambiguity in the language, it seems to favour Calvinism.
    0
    0
  • There resulted a widespread and violent though ephemeral controversy, after the subsidence of which he published a Lecture on Tradition, which passed through several editions, and a volume on The Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • The Reformation abolished in all Protestant countries those processions associated with the doctrine of transubstantiation (Corpus Christi); "the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper," according to the 28th Article of Religion of the Church of England "was not by Christ's ordinance reserved, carried about, lifted up, or worshipped."
    0
    0
  • The Roman Catholic missionaries have about 3000 adherents; the Church of England is confined to the Europeans and kanakas in the towns; the Indian coolies are divided between Mahommedans and Hindus.
    0
    0
  • My grandfather was a clergyman, a Church of England rector in a parish in Norfolk.
    0
    0
  • I moved from being a long term member of a fundamentalist Christian sect to a much broader minded member of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • Radical Puritans separated themselves from the Church of England and were called Separatists.
    0
    0
  • He joined the Separatists, a Puritan religious group who were highly critical of the Church of England.
    0
    0
  • He trained for ordination into the Church of England at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford and was ordained in 1996.
    0
    0