Chronicon sentence example

chronicon
  • Thietmar wrote a Chronicon in eight books, which deals with the period between 908 and 1018.

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  • Nothing else is known of his life except that he was the author of a Historia Hierosolymitanae expeditionis, or Chronicon Hierosolymitanum de bello sacro, a work in twelve books, written between 1125 and 1150.

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  • See Victoria County History, Berkshire; Joseph Stevenson, Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, A.D.

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  • Three other works, entitled Adversaria, Chronicon, 606-960, and Opusculum de vitis Romanorum pontificum, are usually, but wrongly, assigned to Liudprand.

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  • The Chronicon Beccensis abbatiae, a 14th-century compilation, should also be consulted.

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  • Adhemar's life was mainly spent in writing and transcribing chronicles, and his principal work is a history entitled Chronicon Aquitanicum et Francicum or Historia Francorum.

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  • This agrees in many particulars with the Chronicon Angliae, but it is much less hostile to John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster.

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  • In the Chronicon of Fredegarius it is already affirmed that the Franks are descended from the Trojans.

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  • He wrote a Chronicon Angliae temporibus Edwardi II.

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  • It has been maintained by Camden and others that More wrote an account of Edward's reign in French, and that this was translated into Latin by Geoffrey and used by him in compiling his Chronicon.

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  • Recent scholarship, however, asserts that More was no writer, and that the Vita et mors is an extract from Geoffrey's Chronicon, and was attributed to More, who was the author's patron.

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  • His chief work is a Chronicon ad annum 1054, which furnishes important and original material for the history of the emperor Henry III.

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  • He compiled a chronicle called Chronicon ex chronicis which begins with the creation and ends in 1117.

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  • An anonymous account was written perhaps as early as 840 and incorporated in the Chronicon of Georgius Monachus.

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  • See Regino von Pram, "Chronicon," in the Monumenta Germanise historica.

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  • Marianus wrote a Chronicon, which purports to be a universal history from the creation of the world to 1082.

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  • The Chronicon was very popular during the middle ages, and in England was extensively used by Florence of Worcester and other writers.

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  • The result of his studies there was the translation of the Chronicon of Eusebius, with a continuation 1 of twenty-eight homilies of Origen on Jeremiah and 1 Cf.

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  • Bavarian For clerical accounts of Charles's voyage to the Holy Land see the Chronicon (c. 968) of Benedict, a monk of St Andre, and Descriptio qualiter Karolus Magnus clavum et coronam Domini.

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  • Eusebius in his Chronicon gives A.D.

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  • Far more important historically than these is Prosper's Epitoma chronicon.

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  • The name is derived from Chronicon, first suggested by Jerome as a rendering of the title which they bear in and de.

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  • The notice in the Chronicon Paschale preserves one slight reminiscence of the historical facts, namely, that Hippolytus's episcopal see was situated at Portus near Rome.

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  • As a continuation of the Chronicon of Prosper of Aquitaine, Marius wrote a short Chronicon dealing with the period from 455 to 581; and although he borrowed from various sources his work has some importance for the history of Burgundy.

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  • Regarding himself and his land as still under the authority of the Roman empire, he dates his Chronicon according to the years of the Roman consuls and of the East Roman emperors.

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  • The only extant manuscript of the Chronicon is in the British Museum.

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  • Having doubtless done some work on the Latin manuscripts on which the Grandes Chroniques de France are based, William wrote a long Chronicon, dealing with the history of the world from the creation until 1300.

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  • Making use of the large store of manuscripts at St Denis, William was a compiler rather than an author, and with the exception of the latter part of the Chronicon his writings do not add materially to our knowledge of the time.

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  • Both his chronicles, however, became very popular and found several continuators, Jean de Joinville being among those who made use of the Chronicon.

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  • A French translation of the Chronicon is in tome xiii.

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  • The chief chronicles for the reign are Gervase of Canterbury's Gesta regum, Ralf of Coggeshall's Chronicon, Walter of Coventry's Memoriale, Roger of Wendover's Flores historiarum, the Annals of Burton, Dunstaple and Margan - all these in the Rolls Series.

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  • His last work, Chronicon Paschale a mundo condito ad Heraclii imperatoris annum vigesimum (Paris, 1689), was passing through the press when Du Cange died, and consequently it was edited by Etienne Baluze, and published with an eloge of the author prefixed.

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  • An interesting sidelight is thrown upon this period by the list of the Thalassocracies in the Chronicon of Eusebius p. 226,226, ed.

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  • See the Chronicon of Fredegarius; "Gesta Dagoberti I.

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  • Speaking of himself in his Chronicon januense, he says, "While he was in his order, and after he had been made archbishop, he wrote many works.

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  • In the same work the archbishop claims to have written his Chronicon januense in the second year of his pontificate (1293), but it extends to 1296 or 1297.

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  • His two chief works are the Chronicon januense and the Golden Legend or Lombardica hystoria.

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  • The chief original sources for John's life are Froissart, the maliciously hostile Chronicon Angliae (1328-1388), and the eulogistic Chronicle of Henry Knighton (both the latter in the Rolls Series).

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  • But the whole question of the Eusebian chronology is very confused and difficult, and the text of the Chronicon is not certain.

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  • The history, which had an apologetic aim, is no longer extant, but copious extracts from it are to be found in the Chronicon of Eusebius, who used it extensively in compiling the early episcopal lists.

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  • There are also fragments in Syncellus, Cedrenus and the Paschale Chronicon.

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  • Pellicanus's Latin autobiography (Chronicon C.P.R.) is one of the most interesting documents of the period.

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  • The chief authority for Conrad's life and reign is Otto of Freising, "Chronicon," in the Monumenta Germaniae historica.

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  • He published several Latin translations of Arabic works, of which the most important was the Chronicon Orientate of Ibnar-Rahib (Paris, 16J3), a history of the patriarchs of Alexandria.

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  • The foundation was secularized in 1544 The valuable annals, Chronicon vetere Cellense majus and Chronicon minus, giving a history of Saxony during the 13th and 14th centuries, were removed to the university library of Leipzig in 1544.

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  • For the Monumenta Germaniae historica he edited the Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, the Gesta Hammenburgensis ecclesiae pontificum of Adam of Bremen and the Chronica Slavorum of Helmold, with its continuation by Arnold of Lubeck.

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  • Early English chronicles, such as the Chronicon e chronicis of Florence of Worcester, who died in 1118, described minutely and without a suggestion of disbelief the flourishing state of Lyonnesse, and its sudden disappearance beneath the sea.

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  • See Florentii Wigorniensis monachi Chronicon ex chronicis, &c., ed.

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  • Otto wrote a Chronicon, sometimes called De duabus civitatibus, an historical and philosophical work in eight books, which follows to some extent the lines laid down by Augustine and Orosius.

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  • He is described in the Chronicon Petroburgense as "blessed both in name and deed."

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  • After the death of Justin he became a heretic - according to Eusebius's Chronicon in 173.

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  • Bibliography.-In addition to the early Greek writings already named, there are the forty books (some fifteen only extant in their entirety) of universal history compiled (about 8 B.C.) by Diodorus Siculus, and arranged in the form of annals; the Pentabiblos of Julius Africanus (about 220-230 A.D.); the treatise of Censorinus entitled De die natali, written 238 A.D.; the Chronicon, in two books, of Eusebius Pamphili, bishop of Caesarea (about 325 A.D.), distinguished as the first book of a purely chronological character which has come down to us; and three important works forming parts of the Corpus Scriptorum Historiae Byzantinae, namely, the Chronographia of Georgius Syncellus (800 A.D.), the Chronographia of Johannes Malalas (9th century), and the Chronicon Paschale.

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  • For a long time the Chronicon imperiale was also attributed to Prosper Tiro, but without the slightest justification.

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  • Manichaeism first penetrated the Greek-Roman Empire about the year 280, in the time of the emperor Probus (see the Chronicon of Eusebius).

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  • A genealogical notice is furnished by the Chronicon of the monk Alberic (Aubry) of TroisFontaines, (Albericus Trium Fontium) in Pertz, Scriptores, vol.

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  • Grimm, in Die deutsche Heldensage (2nd ed., Berlin, 1867), quotes the account given by Jordanes, references in Beowulf, in the Wanderer's Song, Exeter Book, in Parcival, in Dietrichs Flucht, the account given in the Quedlinburg Chronicle, by Ekkehard in the Chronicon Urspergense, by Saxo Grammaticus, &c. See also Vigfusson and Powell, Corpus poeticum boreale, vol.

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