Chronicle sentence example

chronicle
  • The Peterborough Chronicle, not content with voicing this sentiment, gives Eustace a bad character.
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  • Here he wrote his Chronicle, containing the history of the house of the Palaeologi from 1258-1476.
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  • It is true that Eusebius, in his Chronicle, dates his first appearance from A.D.
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  • But the whole is more completely presented in the Vatican MS. (clxii.), which contains the third part of the Chronicle of pseudo-Dionysius.
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  • His great historical work - the Syriac Chronicle - is made up of three parts.
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  • It would, however, be a mistake to imagine that Joinville's book is exclusively or even mainly a chronicle of small beer.
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  • The Greyfriars' Chronicle says that Hooper was "sometime a white monk"; and in the sentence pronounced against him by Gardiner he is described as "olim monachus de Cliva Ordinis Cisterciensis," i.e.
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  • Gruel entered the service of the earl of Richmond about 1425, shared in all his campaigns, and lived with him on intimate terms. The chronicle covers the whole period of the duke's life, but the earlier part, up to 1425, is much less full and important than the later, which is based on Gruel's personal knowledge and observation.
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  • But there were few who could write like him, and Jerome's Chronicle itself, or rather portions of it, became, in the age which followed, a sort of universal preface for the monastic chronicler.
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  • Papebroch's criticisms of the chronicle of St Denis, Mabillon prepared this manual for the testing of medieval documents.
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  • According to the German chronicle - which French historians doubt - the king of France declined the combat and fled from Ivois during the night.
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  • Other prominent newspapers of the city are the Dispatch (1846), the Chronicle Telegraph (1841), the Post (1792; daily, 1842), which is one of the few influential Democratic newspapers in Pennsylvania, the Leader (Sunday, 1864; daily, 1870) and the Press (1883).
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  • It is recorded in the Saxon Chronicle for 823 that he was sent with Eahlstan, bishop of Sherborne, and the ealdorman Wulfheard to drive out Baldred, king of Kent, which was successfully accomplished.
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  • On the way Henry halted at Bec, and there made the acquaintance of Robert de Torigni, who mentions their encounter in the preface to his Chronicle.
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  • The dates assigned to this event vary from 1299, given by Urechia, to 1342, given by the monastic chronicle of Putna..
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  • The so-called Chronicle of Hurul is a modern forgery, and up to the 14th century the only valid authorities are Slavonic, Hungarian and Byzantine chroniclers.
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  • An addition to this Chronicle from the time of the Roman Conquest to Attila is ascribed to Tudosie Vestemianul, twice metropolitan of Walachia (1669-73, 1677-1703).
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  • The Chronicle of Capitanul was further continued by Radu Greceanu to 1707, and finally by Radu Popescu to 1720.
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  • In the second we have the chronicle of Dionisie Eclesiarh (1764-1815),.
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  • Similar in tendency is another rhymed chronicle known under the name of Zilot (c. 1825).
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  • He arose instantly with a mind fully made up - "roused into activity," says the Sinhalese chronicle, "like a man who is told that his house is on fire."
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  • Still unsatisfied, he next retired to the jungle of Uruvela, on the most northerly spur of the Vindhya range of mountains, and there for six years, attended by five faithful disciples, he gave himself up to the severest penance and self-torture, till his fame as an ascetic spread in all the country round about "like the sound," says the Burmese chronicle, "of a great bell hung in the canopy of the skies."
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  • Seeing Kassapa, who as the chronicle puts it, was as well known to them as the banner of the city, the people at first doubted who was the teacher and who the disciple, but Kassapa put an end to their hesitation by stating that he had now given up his belief in the efficacy of sacrifices either great or small; that Nirvana was a state of rest to be attained only by a change of heart; and that he had become a disciple of the Buddha.
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  • Beside him others are apt to seem rather theatrical - or if they do not romance they appear, perhaps, to chronicle dully.
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  • Finally, we read the full story in the original draft of Giles Tschudi's chronicle, where the hero is described as "a man of Unterwalden, of the Winkelried family," this being expanded in the final recension of the chronicle (1564) into "a man of Unterwalden, Arnold von Winckelried by name, a brave knight," while he is entered (in the same book, on the authority of the "Anniversary Book" of Stans, now lost) on the list of those who fell at Sempach at the head of the Nidwalden (or Stans) men as "Herr Arnold von Winckelriet, Ritter," this being in the first draft "Arnold Winckelriet."
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  • Berlinger of Basel, and the whole in Werner Steiner's chronicle (written 1532).
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  • In the MS. of the chronicle of Diebold Schilling of Bern (c. 1480) there is in the picture of the battle of Sempach a warrior pierced with spears falling to the ground, which may possibly be meant for Winkelried; while in that of Diebold Schilling of Lucerne (1511), though in the text no allusion is made to any such incident, there is a similar picture of a man who has accomplished Winkelried's feat, but he is dressed in the colours of Lucerne.
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  • Then there is an engraving in Stumpf's chronicle (1548), and, finally, the celebrated one by Hans Rudolf Manuel (1551), which follows the chronicle of 1476 rather than the ballad.
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  • The tale, as told in the 1476 chronicle, is clearly an interpolation, for it comes immediately after a distinct statement that "God had helped the Confederates, and that with great labour they had defeated the knights and Duke Leopold," while the passage immediately following joins on to the former quite naturally if we strike out the episode of the "true man," who is not even called Winkelried.
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  • Assuming this, and rejecting the evidence of the 1476 chronicle as an interpolation and full of mistakes, and that of the song as not proved to have been in existence before 1531, Herr Burkli comes to the startling conclusion that the phalanx formation of the Austrians, as well as the name and act of Winkelried, have been transferred to Sempach from the fight of Bicocca, near Milan (April 27, 1522), where a real leader of the Swiss mercenaries in the pay of France, Arnold Winkelried, reall y met his death in very much the way that his namesake perished according to the story.
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  • Herr Burkli confines his criticism to the first struggle, in which alone mention is made of the driving back of the Swiss, pointing out also that the chronicle of 1476 and other later accounts attribute to the Austrians the manner of attack and the long spears which were the special characteristics of Swiss warriors, and that if Winkelried were a knight (as is asserted by Tschudi) he would have been clad in a coat of mail, or at least had a breastplate, neither of which could have been pierced by hostile lances.
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  • He was admitted to the bar in 1885, but preferred newspaper work, becoming editor of the Raleigh State Chronicle.
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  • Father Souciet entered the field in defence of Freret; and in consequence of this controversy Sir Isaac was induced to prepare his larger work, which was published in 1728, after his death, and entitled The Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms amended, to which is prefixed a short Chronicle from the First Memory of Kings in Europe to the Conquest of Persia by Alexander the Great.
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  • The greater part of this chronicle is merely a copy of the work of Enguerrand de Monstrelet, but Le Fevre is an original authority for the years between 1428 and 1436 and makes some valuable additions to our knowledge, especially about the chivalry of the Burgundian court.
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  • When Cyrus conquered Babylon in 539 he was employed in leading religious ceremonies (Chronicle of Nabonidus), and in the cylinder.
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  • I of Wight fit in happily with the English annals constructed long centuries after by King Alfreds scribes in the first edition of the AngloSaxon Chronicle.
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  • The 7th century was the darkest of all the dark ages, and England is particularly fortunate in possessing the Ecclcsiastica historia of Bede, which, though its author was primarily interested in things religious, yet contains a copious chronicle of things secular.
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  • How he gathered, scholars from the continent, Wales and Ireland; how he collected the old heroic poems of the nation, how he himself translated books from the Latin tongue, started schools, and set his scribes to write up the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is told elsewhere, as are his mechanical inventions, his buildings, and his dealings with missionaries and explorers (see ALFRED).
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  • To know John well was to loathe him, as every contemporary chronicle bears witness.
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  • The famous Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was probably started under the influence of Alfred the Great towards the end of the 9th century.
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  • Even the Chronicle becomes meagre a few years after Alfreds death, and its value depends largely upon the ballads which it incorporates; nor is it materially supplemented by the lives of St Dunstan, for hagiologists have never treated historical accuracy as a matter of moment; and our knowledge of the last century of AngloSaxon history is derived mainly from Anglo-Norman writers who wrote after the Norman Conquest.
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  • One version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle goes down to 1079 and another to 1154, but their notices of current events are brief and meagre.
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  • Their place is taken by the city chronicle compiled by middle-class laymen, just as the Renaissance was not a revival of clerical learning, but the expression of new intellectual demands on the part of the laity.
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  • Other useful books are Wriothesleys Chronicle and Machyns Diary, and they have numerous successors; some of their works have been edited for the Camden Society, which now takes the place of the Rolls series.
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  • The most important are Holinshed, Stow and Camden; and gradually, with Speed and Bacon, the chronicle develops into the history, and early in the I 7th tentury we get such works as Lord Herberts Reign of Henry VIII., Haywards Edward VI., and, on the ecclesiastical side, Hvlvn.
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  • In the middle ages the stimulus to write was mainly of a moral or ecclesiastical nature, though the patriotic impulse which had suggested the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was perhaps never entirely absent, and the ecclesiastical motive often degenerated into a desire to glorify, sometimes even by forgery, not merely the church as a whole, but the particular monastery to which the writer belonged.
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  • According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle he was eighty years old at his death, but the energy of his administration and the evidence with regard to the ages of his children and relatives render it almost impossible.
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  • In 628 the Chronicle records a battle between him and the West Saxons at Cirencester in that year.
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  • Vasilievski and Jernstedt, St Petersburg, 1896); Yahya of Antioch (contemporary Asiatic chronicle), extracts with Russian translation by Rosen (St Petersburg, 1883); Al Mekin (Elmacinus), Historia Saracenica (ed.
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  • From 1864 to 1884 he was one of the staff of the Morning Chronicle, the chief Liberal paper of the province, and worked at all departments of newspaper life.
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  • As these varieties intercross with each 1 See drawings made to scale by Mr Worthington Smith in the Gardener's Chronicle (25th December 1886).
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  • His historical work was the Book of Tradition (Sepher Haqabala), a chronicle down to the year 1161.
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  • The best are Letopis of Ypek, which ends with the year 1391; Letopis of Koporin, written by Deacon Damyan in 1 453; Letopis of Carlovitz, 1503; and the chronicle of the monastery of Tronosha, 1526.
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  • He also began to write poetry, and printed many of his verses in the Dorset County Chronicle.
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  • This is a free version of the Latin Historia Britonum by Geoffrey of Monmouth, in rhyming octosyllables; it was rendered into English, shortly after 1200, by Layamon, a masspriest of Worcestershire, and is also largely used in the rhymed English chronicle of Robert Mannyng.
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  • Wace's second work, the Roman de Rou, written between 1160 and 1174, has a less fabulous character than the Brut, being a chronicle of the Norman dukes from Rollo to Robert Curthose.
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  • Its use was, however, soon restricted to members of a royal family, and in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle it is used almost exclusively for members of the royal house of Wessex.
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  • His chief work is his Chronicle of events from the creation of the world to the death of Alexius I.
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  • He was the syncellus (cell-mate, the confidential campanion assigned to the patriarchs, sometimes little more than a spy; see Syncellus) or private secretary of Tara(u)sius, patriarch of Constantinople (784-806), after whose death he retired to a convent, and wrote his Chronicle of events from Adam to Diocletian (285).
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  • The Chronicle, which, as its title implies, is rather a chronological table (with notes) than a history, is written with special reference to preChristian times and the introduction of Christianity, and exhibits the author as a staunch upholder of orthodoxy.
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  • For instance, considerable portions of the original text of the Chronicle of Eusebius have been restored by the aid of Syncellus.
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  • He had a taste for puerile amusements, a mania for useless little domestic economies in a court where millions vanished like smoke, and a natural idleness which achieved as its masterpiece the keeping a diary from 1766 to 1792 of a life so tragic, which was yet but a foolish chronicle of trifles.
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  • In 1647 he published The Harmony, Chronicle, and Order of the Old Testament, which was followed in 1655 by The Harmony, Chronicle, and Order of the New Testament, inscribed to Cromwell.
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  • The total silence of the contemporary chronicle, called by the name of Isidore of Beja, shows that in the south of Spain, where the writer lived, nothing was known of the resistance made in the north.
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  • A Syrian official record from this reign, preserved in the Edessene Chronicle, gives a somewhat detailed account of a violent flood (autumn, 201) of the Daisan river which did much damage, destroying 1 The inscription, which is difficult to read, connects the structure with Shalmat the queen, daughter of Ma`nu, who cannot be identified with certainty, and refers to some image(s), which probably excited the pious vandalism of the Arabs.
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  • In the opening years of the 6th century the Persian-Roman War (502-506) found a chronicler in the anonymous Edessene history known till recently as the Chronicle of Joshua Stylites.
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  • Anushirwan succeeded in 540, according to the last entry in the Edessene Chronicle, in exacting a large tribute from Edessa; but in 544 he besieged it in vain.
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  • The valuable Syriac Chronicle just referred to probably was compiled in the latter half of this century.
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  • To the latter part of the century belongs the activity of Edessa's bishop Jacob, whose chronicle is unfortunately lost.
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  • His energy in preserving his influence is shown by several entries in the Chronicle.
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  • According to the Saxon Chronicle, Penda began to reign in 626, and fought against the West Saxons at Cirencester in 628.
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  • According to the Chronicle he invaded Wessex as far as Ashdown in Berkshire in the year 661.
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  • Even though it would be a short trip, it was an opportunity to photograph the floral spectacle, with the added opportunity to meet another participant in the Dawkins family chronicle.
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  • Nature's Chronicle was one of the many books in which Professor Ainslie Gray had enforced the negative doctrines of scientific agnosticism.
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  • It has not been stated in this chronicle that he had large outstanding ears, rather like the handles of a Greek amphora.
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  • There will be time in this chronicle to explain yaa baa.
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  • This chronicle might have gone on, had a large company of migrating birds not come and invested the area.
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  • A tour-de-force of montage illustrating a vast, cunning chronicle worthy of Nabokov.
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  • I remark you the Korean War that came after I wrote the original chronicle in 1945.. .
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  • Bath still existed in 577 AD, according to the Anglo-Saxon chronicle.
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  • However the book manages to stand on its own as a purely visual document, a fascinating chronicle of David Carson's creative mind.
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  • Also helpful is the detailed chronicle of his music, arranged by type and date of composition.
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  • A short chronicle concerning the Parish of Croydon in the County of Surrey.
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  • There are few san francisco chronicle the customer is tape recorder.
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  • Rubin seeks to go beyond a mere chronicle of the most notorious host desecration episodes.
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  • Are there books or sites that chronicle the " classic and timeless " that you are particularly enamored of?
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  • The Cambridge Chronicle reported that " the vicarage, which has a pleasing approach, consists of white brick with red brick facings.
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  • Norfolk Chronicle - 11th July 1863 The mill's eventual fate seems to have been a removal and conversion to drainage use.
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  • Norfolk Chronicle - 20th April 1833 Charles Clare was the next miller.
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  • It brings the massive oeuvre and the chronicle of the life into manageable proportions, one illumining the other.
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  • The first viking raid was on Lindisfarne, recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
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  • The Saxon Chronicle, which is a less reliable authority for Northumbrian history, places his death in the year 588.
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  • On the seaward side of the Ness there is a large ancient earthwork which is attributed to the Norsemen through a reference in the Saxon Chronicle (894) under the name Sceobrig.
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  • Based on material borrowed from the Sachsische Weltchronik (formerly called Repgowische Chronik from its dubious assignment to Eime von Repgow), the oldest prose chronicle of the world in German (c. 1248 or 1260).
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  • See Bede, Historia Ecclesiastica, ii., iii., iv., v., edited by C. Plummer (Oxford, 1896); Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by Earle and Plummer (Oxford, 1899).
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  • Reginald de Mohun granted the first charter between 1245 and 1247, which diminished fines and tolls, limited the lord's "mercy," and provided that the burgesses should not against their will 1 The date of Dunstan's birth here given is that given in the Anglo-Saxon chronicle and hitherto accepted.
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  • The Oriental point of view for the 13th century appears in Jelaleddin's history of the Ayyubite sultans of Egypt, written towards the end of the 13th century; in Maqrizi's history of Egypt, written in the middle of the 15th century; and in the compendium of the history of the human race by Abulfeda (f1332); while the omniscient Abulfaragius (whom Rey calls the Eastern St Thomas) wrote, in the latter half of the 13th century, a chronicle of universal history in Syriac, which he also issued, in an Arabic recension, as a Compendious History of the Dynasties.
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  • In these last the ballad-mongers, not to let their native hero be outdone by the Amadises, the Esplandians, and the Felixmartes, engage him in the most extravagant adventures - making war upon the king of France and upon the emperor, receiving embassies from the soldan of Persia, bearding the pope at Rome, and performing other feats not mentioned even in the Poem or the Chronicle.
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  • The one manuscript of John's chronicle is a 13th century copy; MS. C. C. C. Cambridge, cxxxix.
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  • Kervyn de Lettenhove's text includes the portions of the chronicle covering the periods September 1419, October 1422, January 1430 to December 1431, 1451-1452, July 1454 to October 1458, July 1461 to July 1463, and, with omissions, June 1467 to September 1470; and three volumes of minor pieces of considerable interest, especially Le Temple de Boccace, dedicated to Margaret of Anjou, and the Deprecation for Pierre Breze, imprisoned by Louis XI.
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  • There is no good life of Lord Hood, but a biographical notice of him by M'Arthur, his secretary during the Mediterranean command, is in the Naval Chronicle, vol.
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  • In the settlement of the Latin empire after the truce with Lascaris, Villehardouin received the fief of Messinople (supposed to be Mosynopolis, a little inland from the modern Gulf of Lagos, and not far from the ancient Abdera) from Boniface of Montferrat, with the record of whose death the chronicle abruptly closes.
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  • Before the end of the 9th century a monk of St Gall drew up a chronicle De gestis Karoli Magni, which was based partly on oral tradition, received from an old soldier named Adalbert, who had served in Charlemagne's army.
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  • Hardyng's testimony is, moreover, suspicious as reflecting the prejudices of the Percys after they had turned against Henry IV., for Hardyng himself expressly says that the earl of Northumberland was the source of his information (see note, p. 353 of his Chronicle).
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  • The chief authorities whom Nennius followed were Gildas' De excidio Britonum, Eusebius, the Vita Patricii of Murichu Maccu Machtheni, the Collectanea of Tirechan, the Liber occupationis (an Irish work on the settlement of Ireland), the Liber de sex aetatibus mundi, the chronicle of Prosper of Aquitaine, the Liber beati Germani.
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  • Among his more famous hoaxes were the " Edict of the King of Prussia " (1773), already described; the fictitious supplement to the Boston Chronicle, printed on his private press at Passy in 1782, and containing a letter with an invoice of eight packs of 954 cured, dried, hooped and painted scalps of rebels, men, women and children, taken by Indians in the British employ; and another fictitious Letter from the Count de Schaumberg to the Baron Hohendorf commanding the Hessian Troops in America (1777) - the count's only anxiety is that not enough men will be killed to bring him in moneys he needs, and he urges his officer in command in America " to prolong the war.
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  • In 1877 he received the degree of docteur es lettres with two remarkable theses, a dissertation De Macario magnete, and an Etude sur le Liber pontificalis, in which he explained with unerring critical acumen the origin of that celebrated chronicle, determined the different editions and their interrelation, and stated precisely the value of his evidence.
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  • In actual picturesqueness as well as in general veracity of picture, the book cannot approach Carlyle's; while as a mere chronicle of the events it is inferior to half a dozen prosaic histories older and younger than itself.
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  • With incredible patience, sometimes with a happy audacity of conjecture which itself is almost genius, he succeeded in reconstructing the lost Chronicle of Eusebiusone of the most precious remains of antiquity, and of the highest value for ancient chronology.
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  • One of the most critical spirits of the age, his chronicle of King Manoel, the Fortunate Monarch, which he introduced by one of Prince John, afterwards King John II., is worthy of the subject and the reign in which Portugal attained the apogee of its greatness.
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  • About the same time the Chronicle of Croyland referred to a benevolence as a "nova et inaudita impositio muneris ut per benevolentiam quilibet claret id quod vellet, immo verius quod nollet."
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  • The kingdom was in the desperate state described in the last melancholy pages of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, when life and property were nowhere safe from the objectless ferocity of feudal tyrants when every shire was full of castles and every castle filled with devils and evil men, and the people murmured that Christ and his saints slept.
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  • Sathas, London, 1899); George Cedrenus (Chronicle, transcribed from the work of John Scylitzes, vol.
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  • Grimm, in Die deutsche Heldensage (2nd ed., Berlin, 1867), quotes the account given by Jordanes, references in Beowulf, in the Wanderer's Song, Exeter Book, in Parcival, in Dietrichs Flucht, the account given in the Quedlinburg Chronicle, by Ekkehard in the Chronicon Urspergense, by Saxo Grammaticus, &c. See also Vigfusson and Powell, Corpus poeticum boreale, vol.
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  • At his death, which did not take place until 725, he left the kingdom to his sons Aethelberht, Eadberht and Alric. After the annal 694 in the Chronicle there is inserted a grant of privileges to the church, which purports to have been issued by Wihtred at a place called Baccancelde.
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  • Wright, The Chronicle of Joshua the Stylite (1882); Bayer, Historia Osrhoena et Edessena (St Petersburg, 1784), collects the references in classical authors; for the coinage see references in von Gutschmid (see below).
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  • The first Viking raid was on Lindisfarne, recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
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  • Norfolk Chronicle - 31st January 1846 TO MILLERS To be SOLD by Private Contract, To be removed off the Premises.
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  • Invite your children to illustrate the story as you chronicle the wonderful times your family shared together.
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  • Star Wishing, in business since 1992, catalogs all stars with the Millennium Chronicle, an online catalog that includes over 10,000 stars with numerical designations.
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  • Christie Keith, of the San Francisco Chronicle, makes the statement that World's Best is the best non-clay litter that clumps.
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  • If you plan to chronicle the entire year leading up to graduation, you need to get all of your scrapbooking supplies early and keep a camera handy at all times.
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  • It can chronicle the entire year leading up to the graduation.
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  • This is a fun way to chronicle your relationship from the engagement to the wedding.
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  • For intimate gatherings, consider adding photos of the bridal couple as children and young adults or chronicle their dating relationship through photos.
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  • The Richland College newspaper, the Richland Chronicle has won numerous awards through the years for content and design.
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  • Carlo Dati had read an entry about it in a Latin Chronicle found in a Pisa monastery.
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  • Chronicle mode starts off fun, but slowly grows monotonous after a few hours of play.
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  • Wine and Spirits recently gave the 2003 Quail Cuvee Pinot Noir 94 points and just last week the San Francisco Chronicle wrote an article about the 2004 Pinot being worth trying.
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  • You will have many changes to chronicle.
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  • The San Francisco Chronicle is the San Francisco Bay Area's (not to mention Northern California's) most widely read daily newspaper.
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  • In fact, more than 1,175,000 people read the Chronicle every day, making it the eleventh largest newspaper in the United States.
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  • Believe it or not, the Chronicle was begun by two boys who weren't even in their teens when they got the idea to "publish a bold, bright, fearless and truly independent newspaper, independent in all things, neutral in nothing."
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  • In 1868, The Daily Dramatic Chronicle became The Morning Chronicle.
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  • Two years later, the Chronicle hired a writer whose name would go on to become synonymous with both the paper and San Francisco-Herb Caen.
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  • In 1965, the Chronicle merged with its greatest competitor-the San Francisco Examiner-and formed an operations-managing agency together.
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  • In 1993, the Chronicle's online version made its debut, where it began operating under the domain name SFGate.com.
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  • After being owned and operated by the DeYoung family for its first 135 years, the Hearst Corporation took over the reins of the San Francisco Chronicle in 2000.
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  • On a typical weekday in the San Francisco Chronicle, you will find-of course-of course the front page, which mainly covers national and international news, but also big Bay Area stories.
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  • For a look at the Chronicle's online version, visit SFGgate.com, or go to SFGate/Chronicle.
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  • A good place to find out what's going on is at San Francisco Chronicle's website under events.
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  • According to an article by Jack Ryan on the Post Chronicle from August 19, 2008, the swimsuits had to have sequins but could not have "accessories".
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  • The company was also named "Atlanta's Favorite Specialty Items Store" by the Atlanta Business Chronicle.
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  • Other print publishing found in Llanview include The Chronicle, Mania Magazine, and Craze Magazine.
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  • Yoga instructor Meredith Medland helped make nude yoga world famous when she got the San Francisco Chronicle to do a story on this emerging style of yoga.
    0
    0
  • There are blogs, where members chronicle their daily life on the program, and a message board.
    0
    0
  • Along with what your eat, chronicle how you feel including your energy level.
    0
    0
  • The songs chronicle Ruess' break-up with his longtime girlfriend (the title refers to the fact that every time Ruess and his girlfriend got back together, they bought a dog in hopes of "fixing" their relationship).
    0
    0
  • A four side (or part) compilation, the album features a chronicle history of Joel's legacy in music.
    0
    0
  • If your teen will graduate soon, or is in the band, on the soccer team, or in any other activity, invite some of her friends to start a scrapbook that will chronicle this time in their lives.
    0
    0
  • Producers wanted to chronicle the Hulk's progress as he prepared for his return to the wrestling ring in 2002 (in a match against The Rock).
    0
    0
  • Other episodes chronicle the love lives of NYC Prep stars from PC's blind date to the developing love triangle between Sebastian, Kelli and Taylor.
    0
    0
  • Kids and Counting is the third installment in the TLC network's chronicle of the large -and seemingly ever expanding- Duggar family.
    0
    0
  • This hardback volume includes maps, paintings, sketches and 1,000 photos used to chronicle not only the weapons introduced in Lord of the Rings, but every battle ground and type of warrior who fought upon it.
    0
    0
  • Of the other plays written by Ford alone, only The Chronicle Historie of Perkin Warbeck.
    64
    64
  • Of this second division of John's History, in which he had probably incorporated the socalled Chronicle of Joshua the Stylite, considerable portions are found in the British Museum MSS.
    43
    43
  • He wrote additions and appendices to the chronicle of Sigebert of Genblours, covering the period A.D.
    0
    1
  • Elias bar Shinaya, who in 1008 became Nestorian bishop of Nisibis, was the author of a valuable Chronicle, to which are prefixed numerous chronological tables, lists of popes, patriarchs, &c., and which covers by its narrative the period from A.D.
    0
    1
  • Another important Chronicle is that of Michael I., who was Jacobite patriarch from 1166 to 1199.
    0
    1
  • Its range extends from the Creation to the author's own day, and it was largely used by Barhebraeus in compiling his own Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • Herodotus further states that Pheidon established a system of weights and measures throughout Peloponnesus, to which Ephorus and the Parian Chronicle add that he was the first to coin silver money, and that his mint was at Aegina.
    0
    1
  • Like many other French histories, it was a pamphlet as well as a chronicle, and the subjects of Lamartine's pen became his models in politics.
    0
    1
  • At the beginning of the 5th century the Roman legions left Britain, and the Saxon Chronicle gives the exact date, stating that never since A.D.
    0
    1
  • After this entry there is no further mention of London in the Chronicle for a century and a half.
    0
    1
  • In answer to this contention it may be said that, although the silence of the Chronicle is difficult to understand, it is almost impossible to believe that the very existence of the most important city in the country could suddenly cease and the inhabitants disappear without some special notice.
    0
    1
  • When the city is next referred to in the Saxon Chronicle it appears to have been inhabited by a population of heathens.
    0
    1
  • The defeated chiefs retired on the city, led by Ansgar the Staller, under whom as sheriff the citizens of London had marched to fight for Harold at Senlac. They elected Edgar Atheling, the grandson of Edmund Ironside, as king, which the Saxon Chronicle says " was indeed his natural right."
    0
    1
  • In August 1077 occurred a most extensive fire, such a one, says the Chronicle, as " never was before since London was founded."
    0
    1
  • The Maha Yazawin or " Royal Chronicle," forms the great historical work of Burma.
    0
    1
  • The chronicle of the Sinhalese kings, the Mahavamsa, however, asserts that mirrors of glittering glass were carried in procession in 306 B.C., and beads like gems, and windows with ornaments like jewels, are also mentioned at about the same date.
    0
    1
  • One of these is the so-called " Synchronous History of Assyria and Babylonia," consisting of brief notices, written by an Assyrian, of the occasions on which the kings of the two countries had entered into relation, hostile or otherwise, with one another; a second is the Babylonian Chronicle discovered by Dr Th.
    0
    1
  • From a Babylonian chronicle in the British Museum 9 we now know that Dynasty II.
    0
    1
  • The same chronicle informs us that Ilu-shuma, an early Assyrian patesi, was the contemporary of Su-abu, the founder of Dynasty I.
    0
    1
  • In 455 the Saxon Chronicle records a battle between Hengest and Horsa and Vortigern at a place called Aegaels threp, in which Horsa was slain.
    0
    1
  • Both the Saxon Chronicle and the Historia Brittonum record three subsequent battles, though the two authorities disagree as to their issue.
    0
    1
  • According to the Chronicle, which probably derived its information from a lost list of Kentish kings, Hengest died in 488, while his son Aesc continued to reign until 512.
    0
    1
  • The first certain prince of the Jafnid house was Harith ibn Jabala, who, according to the chronicle of John Malalas, conquered Mondhir (Mundhir) of Hira in 528.
    0
    1
  • Holinshed's Chronicle was the chief source of Shakespeare's account of Hotspur in Henry IV.
    0
    1
  • To this circumstance we probably owe the compilation of his chronicle.
    0
    1
  • This is the foundation for the tale of his discovery by the faithful minstrel Blondel, which first occurs in a French romantic chronicle of the next century.
    0
    1
  • Stubbs (London, 1874) Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by C. Plummer (Oxford, 1892-1899).
    0
    1
  • The public was at first greatly mystified by the nature and object of this poem, which was not merely a chronicle of Tennyson's emotions under bereavement, nor even a statement of his philosophical and religious beliefs, but, as he long afterwards explained, a sort of Divina Commedia, ending with happiness in the marriage of his youngest sister, Cecilia Lushington.
    0
    1
  • Cave appears to have been the first 2 The first series of the Gentleman's Magazine or Trader's Monthly Intelligencer, extended from January 1731 to December 1 735, 5 vols.; the Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Chronicle from January 1736 to December 1807, vols.
    0
    1
  • The Merchants' Magazine was united in 1871 with the Commercial and Financial Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • In the next century the influence of Geoffrey is unmistakably attested by the Brut of Layamon, and the rhyming English chronicle of Robert of Gloucester.
    0
    1
  • Not merely his literary and historical importance, but almost all that is known about him, comes from his chronicle of the fourth crusade, or Conquete de Constantinople.
    0
    1
  • In the foregoing account only those particulars which bear directly on Villehardouin himself have been detailed; but the chronicle is as far as possible from being an autobiography, and the displays of the writer's personality, numerous as they are, are quite involuntary, and consist merely in his way of handling the subject, not in the references (as brief as his functions as chronicler will admit) to his own proceedings.
    0
    1
  • The chronicle of Villehardouin is justly held to be the very best presentation we possess of the spirit of chivalry - not the designedly exalted and poetized chivalry of the romances, not the self-conscious and deliberate chivalry of the 14th century, but the unsophisticated mode of thinking and acting which brought about the crusades, stimulated the vast literary development of the 12th and 13th centuries, and sent knights-errant, principally though not wholly of French blood, to establish principalities and kingdoms throughout Europe and the nearer East.
    0
    1
  • There is a great gap in style, though none in subject, between the really poetical prose of the first historian of the fifth crusade and the Latin empire and the awkward mannerism (so awkward that it has been taken to represent a "disrhymed" verse chronicle) of his follower.
    0
    1
  • Together with John Sterling (with whom he founded the Apostles' Club) he migrated to Trinity Hall, whence he obtained a first class in civil law in 1827; he then came to London, and gave himself to literary work, writing a novel, Eustace Conyers, and editing the London Literary Chronicle until 1830, and also for a short time the Athenaeum.
    0
    1
  • His court, described at length in Froissart's famous chronicle,.
    1
    2
  • Apollodorus, an Athenian who flourished in the middle of the and century B.C., wrote a metrical chronicle of events, ranging from the supposed period of the fall of Troy to his own day.
    0
    1
  • It is not so much a chronicle of Florentine affairs, from the commencement of modern history to the death of Lorenzo de' Medici in 1492, as a critique of that chronicle from the point of view adopted by Machiavelli in his former writing5,.
    0
    1
  • This work, generally known as the chronicle of Weihenstephan, gives among other legends a curious history of the emperor's passion for a dead woman, caused by a charm given to Charles by a serpent to whom he had rendered justice.
    0
    1
  • The Latin chronicle, wrongly ascribed to Turpin (Tilpinus), bishop of Reims from 753 to Boo, was in reality later than the earlier poems of the French cycle, and the first properly authenticated mention of it is in 1165.
    0
    1
  • Alberic Trium Fontium, a monk of the Cistercian monastery of Trois Fontanes in the diocese of Chalons, embodied much poetical fiction in his chronicle (c. 1249).
    0
    1
  • The German poet known as the Stricker used the same sources as the author of the chronicle of Weihenstephan for his Karl (c. 1230).
    0
    1
  • A story had gone about, even in the days of John of Gaunt, who, if we may trust the rhymer John Hardyng (Chronicle, pp. 290, 291), had got it inserted in chronicles deposited in various monasteries, that this Edmund, surnamed Crouchback, was really hump-backed, and that he was set aside in favour of his younger brother Edward on account of his deformity.
    0
    1
  • No chronicle, however, is known to exist which actually states that Edmund Crouchback was thus set aside; and in point of fact he had no deformity at all, while Edward was six years his senior.
    0
    1
  • The first mention of Prester John occurs in the chronicle of Otto, bishop of Freisingen.
    0
    1
  • Franklin's Autobiography was begun in 1771 as a private chronicle for his son, Governor William Franklin; the papers, bringing the story of his father's life down to 1730, were lost by the governor during the War of Independence, and in 1783 came into the possession of Abel James, who restored them to Franklin and urged him to complete the sketch.
    0
    1
  • The date of his death is not known, but his chronicle goes as far as 455, and the fact that Ammianus Marcellinus mentions him under the year 463 seems to indicate that his death was shortly after that date.
    0
    1
  • The violent death of Selred, king of Essex, is mentioned in the Saxon Chronicle under the year 746; but we have no more information of historical importance until the defeat of the Mercian king Beornwulf in 825, when Essex, together with Kent, Sussex and Surrey, passed into the hands of Ecgbert, king of Wessex.
    0
    1
  • The first recorded event of his reign was a serious reverse at the hands of Ceawlin of Wessex in the year 568 (Chronicle) at a place called Wibbandune.
    0
    1
  • See Earle and Plummer's edition of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • His chronicle of the world, a compilation embracing the whole period from the creation of the world up to the year 234, formed a basis for many chronographical works both in the East and West.
    0
    1
  • A great part of the original of the Chronicle has been published by Adolf Bauer (Leipzig, 1905) from the Codex Matritensis Graecus, 22 I.
    0
    1
  • The old monk's keen observation makes the book a far more valuable contribution to history than his professed chronicle.
    0
    1
  • In the second half of his chronicle, which is less simple in style, he translates from the French of Pierre de Langtoft.
    0
    1
  • Mannyng's Chronicle marks a change in national sentiment.
    0
    1
  • He became bishop of Sherborne before 900, and his death is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 910, although it is possible that it occurred a year or two earlier.
    0
    1
  • Asser's work, Annales rerum gestarum Alfredi magni, was written about 893, and consists of a chronicle of English history from 849 to 887, and an account of Alfred's life, largely drawn from personal knowledge, down to 887.
    0
    1
  • Before writing his history Eusebius produced a world chronicle which was based upon a similar work by Julius Africanus and is now extant only in part.
    0
    1
  • The middle ages were far more disastrous for the Monophysites than for the Nestorians; in their case there was no alternation of rise and decline, and we have only a long period of gradual exhaustion to chronicle.
    0
    1
  • It would seem, from a somewhat obscure passage in the chronicle compiled from older the progenitors of the Poles, originally established on the Danube, were driven from thence by the Romans to the still wilder wilderness of central Europe, settling finally among the virgin forests and impenetrable morasses of the basin of the upper waters of the Oder and the Vistula.
    0
    1
  • So anxious was Dlugosz to make his work as perfect as he could that he learned Russian so as to be able to read the Chronicle of Nestor.
    0
    1
  • He lived to the age of eighty; but, however great were the merits of his Chronicle, it was long considered a suspicious book on account of the leanings of the author to Calvinism.
    0
    1
  • There is also a Chronicle by Bartholomew Paprocki.
    0
    1
  • In 1582 was also published the Chronicle of Stryjkowski, full of curious learning, and still of great use to the student of history.
    1
    2
  • The Chronicle begins with the accession of Henry IV.
    0
    1
  • The value of, the Chronicle in its early stages is not great, but this increases when dealing with the reign of Henry VII.
    0
    1
  • As the chronicle of Axum relates, Christianity was adopted in Abyssinia in the 4th century.
    0
    1
  • The work has been described as rather a family chronicle than a history, the object of which was the glorification of the house of Comnenus.
    0
    1
  • Absalon first appears in Saxo's Chronicle as a fellow-guest at Roskilde, at the banquet given, in 1157, by King Sweyn to his rivals Canute and Valdemar.
    0
    1
  • On account of the interest shown by the compiler in the ecclesiastical aspects of the history, his work has been not inaptly called the " Ecclesiastical Chronicle of Jerusalem."
    0
    1
  • But (i.) Nero 2 is really September 56-September 57; (ii.) it is doubtful whether Eusebius had any authority to depend on here other than Josephus, who gives no precise year for Festus - Julius Africanus is, hardly probable, since we know that his chronicle was very jejune for the Christian period - and if so, Eusebius had to find a year as best he could.'
    0
    1
  • He wrote, apparently about the year 1143, a chronicle entitled Annales sive Historia de gestis regum Britanniae, which begins with Brutus and carries the history of England down to 1129.
    0
    1
  • Further, the Megillath Ta'anith (" roll of fasts "), an old source with a collection of miscellaneous legends, &c.; Megillath Antiokhos, on the martyrdom under Hadrian; Seder`Olam Rabbah, on biblical history from Adam to the rebellion of Bar Kokba (Barcocheba); the " Book of Jashar "; the Chronicle of Jerahmeel," &c. Liturgical Midrash is illustrated by the Haggada shel Pesah, part of the ritual recited at the domestic service of the first two Passover evenings.
    0
    1
  • During his professoriate he wrote many scientific and popular works, besides contributing largely to the Botanical Register, of which he was editor for many years, and to the Gardener's Chronicle, in which he had charge of the horticultural department from 1841.
    0
    1
  • His Diary is therefore a valuable chronicle of contemporary events from the standpoint of a moderate politician and a devout adherent of the Church of England.
    0
    1
  • Other works on Polish history which may be especially mentioned are La Pologne au moyen age (3 vols., Posen, 1846-1851), an edition of the Chronicle of Matthew Cholewa 1 (1811) and Ancient Memorials of Polish Legislation (Ksiegi ustaw polskich i mazowieckich).
    0
    1
  • The chronicle comes down to the death of James I.
    0
    1
  • The Chronicle of Alvaro de Luna (Madrid, 1784), written by some loyal follower who survived him, is a panegyric and largely a romance.
    0
    1
  • The principal newspaper is the Augusta Chronicle, founded in 1785.
    0
    1
  • The work is a lively chronicle of the incidents of camp and court life, and forms a very valuable source for the history of France during the period it embraces.
    0
    1
  • The chronicle was probably compiled in Hebrew early in the 10th century, by a Jewish native of south Italy.
    0
    1
  • Though the chronicle is more legendary than historical, it is not unlikely that some good and even ancient sources were used by the first compiler, the Josippon known to us having passed through the hands of many interpolators.
    0
    1
  • The Chronicle and the historical plays compared (London, 1896).
    0
    1
  • His history thenceforth becomes a chronicle of unwearied exploration and brilliant success.
    0
    1
  • According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the kingdom of Sussex was founded by a certain Ella or /Elie, who landed in 477, while Wessex owed its origin to Cerdic, who arrived some eighteen years later.
    0
    1
  • There is no evidence that it was still practised when the Roman and Celtic missionaries arrived, but it is worth noting that according to the tradition given in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Oxfordshire, where the custom seems to have been fairly common, was not conquered before the latter part of the 6th century.
    0
    1
  • See Naval Chronicle, xvii.
    0
    1
  • See Naval Chronicle, vi.
    0
    1
  • The chief contemporary authorities for his life are his own Sermons, John Stow's Chronicle and Foxe's Book of Martyrs.
    0
    1
  • Extensive portions of the poem have been incorporated by Wyntoun (q.v.) in his Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • The scandalous chronicle of her life was the commonplace of all Europe.
    0
    1
  • The scheme is not unlike that of a "chronicle play."
    0
    1
  • The possibility that it had been brought to England by Cabot or some of his successors earlier in the century is not to be overlooked, and reasons will presently be assigned for supposing that one of the breeds of English turkeys may have had a northern origin;' but the of tenquoted distich first given in Baker's Chronicle (p. 298), asserting that turkeys came into England in the same year - and that year by reputation 2524 - as carps, pickerels and other commodities, is wholly untrustworthy, for we know that both these fishes lived in the country long before, if indeed they were not indigenous to it.
    0
    1
  • It is first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the date 605.The ealdorman, or sheriff, of the shire was probably charged with the duty of calling out and leading the fyrd, which appears always to have retained a local character, as during the time of the Danish invasions we read of the fyrd of Kent, of Somerset and of Devon.
    0
    1
  • To' this use has been attached the absurd origin from "ne ' god," the words in which, according to the 12th century chronicle, Rollo, duke of the Normans, refused to kiss the foot of Charles III., the Simple, king of the West Franks.
    0
    1
  • And at first chevalier in its general and honorary signification seems to have been rendered not by knight but by rider, as may be inferred from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, wherein it is recorded under the year 1085 that William the Conqueror " dubbade his sunu Henric to ridere."
    0
    1
  • Before it was known that the chronicle ascribed to Ingulf of Croyland is really a fiction of the 13th or 14th century, the knighting of Heward or Hereward by Brand, abbot of Burgh 1 Comparative Politics, p. 74.
    0
    1
  • The presbyter John, whom Papias quotes, says distinctly that "he neither heard the Lord nor accompanied Him" (Eusebius, loc. cit.); and this positive statement is fatal to the tradition, which does not appear until about two hundred and fifty years afterwards, that he was one of the seventy disciples (Epiphanius, pseudo-Origen De recta in Deum fide, and the author of the Paschal Chronicle).
    0
    1
  • According to the pseudo-Hippolytus he was burned; but Symeon Metaphrastes and the Paschal Chronicle represent him to have been dragged over rough stones until he died.
    0
    1
  • The efforts of the dukes to increase their power and to give unity to the duchy had met with a fair measure of success; but they were soon vitiated by partitions among different members of the family which for 250 years made the history of Bavaria little more than a dejune chronicle of territorial divisions bringing war and weakness in Division their train.
    0
    1
  • In the Chronicle the title is given to Ecgbert, king of the English, "the eighth king that was Bretwalda," and retrospectively to seven kings who ruled over one or other of the English kingdoms. The seven names are copied from Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica, and it is interesting to note that the last king named, Oswiu of Northumbria, lived 150 years before Ecgbert.
    0
    1
  • In support of this explanation it is urged that the title is given in the Chronicle to Ecgbert in the year in which he "conquered the kingdom of the Mercians and all that was south of the Humber."
    0
    1
  • Although Wimborne (Wimburn) has been identified with the Vindogladia of the Antonine Itinerary, the first undoubted evidence of settlement is the entry of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, under the date 718, that Cuthburh, sister of King Ine, founded the abbey here and became the first abbess; the house is also mentioned in a somewhat doubtful epistle of St Aldhelm in 705.
    0
    1
  • We are told in the chronicle written by Desclot soon after his time, that Peter was only trapped into cohabiting with his wife by the device which is familiar to readers of Measure for Measure.
    0
    1
  • He wrote in French verse a Chronicle dealing with the history of England from the earliest times to the death of Edward I.
    0
    1
  • The earlier part of the Chronicle is taken from Geoffrey of Monmouth and other writers; for the period dealing with the reign of Edward I.
    0
    1
  • Langtoft's Chronicle seems to have enjoyed considerable popularity in the north, and the latter part of it was translated into English by Robert Mannyng, sometimes called Robert of Brunne, about 1330.
    0
    1
  • The story of its origin is given in the Saxon Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • At all events no value can be attached to the dates given in the Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • In his reign the Chronicle mentions two great victories over the Welsh, one at a place called Bedcanford in 571, by which Aylesbury and the upper part of the Thames valley fell into the hands of the West Saxons, and another at Deorham in 577, which led to the capture of Cirencester, Bath and Gloucester.
    0
    1
  • The dates are those of the annals in the Chronicle, with approximate corrections in brackets.
    0
    1
  • See Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, edited by Earle and Plummer (Oxford, 1892-1899); Bede, Hist.
    0
    1
  • The first part of his chronicle, covering only the reign of Peter the Cruel, was printed at Seville in 1495; the first complete edition was printed in 1779-1780 in the collection of Cronicas Espanolas, under the auspices of the Spanish Royal Academy of History.
    0
    1
  • See Saxon Chronicle (Earle and Plummer), s.a.
    0
    1
  • The chief original sources for John's life are Froissart, the maliciously hostile Chronicon Angliae (1328-1388), and the eulogistic Chronicle of Henry Knighton (both the latter in the Rolls Series).
    0
    1
  • The details of this contest, of his relations with the caliph Ma'mun, and of his many travels - including a journey to Egypt, on which he viewed with admiration the great Egyptian monuments, - are to be found in the Ecclesiastical Chronicle of Barhebraeus.
    0
    1
  • In addition to the lost Annals, Dionysius was from the time of Assemani until 1896 credited with the authorship of another important historical work - a Chronicle, which in four parts narrates the history of the world from the creation to the year 774-77 5 and is preserved entire in Cod.
    0
    1
  • The chronicle of Otto of Freising, which appeared in 1515, and the Vita of Einhard, which appeared six years later, are only two among the many printed at this time.
    0
    1
  • The Chronicle still survived as a medium of conveying information, though more often than not this was now written by a layman; but new stores of information were coming into existence, or rather the old stores were expanding and taking a different form.
    0
    1
  • Hroswitha, the famous Latin poet,, was a member of the sisterhood in the 9th century; and the rhyming chronicle of Eberhard of Gandersheim ranks as in all probability the earliest historical work composed in low German.
    0
    1
  • During this time he also edited the St James's Chronicle, belonging to the same proprietor.
    0
    1
  • It must suffice here to chronicle the remaining more important facts in Dr Howe's life, outside his regular work.
    0
    1
  • He is credited with the authorship of a chronicle covering the period 12 591306; this has been disputed, but the work is printed under his name by Riley.
    0
    1
  • Another work of his, of not much importance, is a chronicle entitled Recapitulatis brevis de gestis domini Edwardi, ?'c. He is probably not the author of other works commonly attributed to him.
    1
    1
  • Although the whole conception of the work implies that confusion of the provinces of poetry and history which was perpetuated by later writers, and especially by Lucan and Silius Italicus, yet it was a true instinct of genius to discern in the idea of the national destiny the only possible motive of a Roman epic. The execution of the poem (to judge from the fragments, amounting to about six hundred lines), although rough, unequal and often prosaic, seems to have combined the realistic fidelity and freshness of feeling of a contemporary chronicle with the vivifying and idealizing power of genius.
    1
    1
  • It is usual to speak of "the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle"; it would be more correct to say that there are four Anglo-Saxon Chronicles.
    3
    4
  • Of this fourfold Chronicle there are seven MSS.
    1
    1
  • The inference is that, shortly after the compiling of this Alfredian chronicle, a copy of it was sent to some northern monastery, probably Ripon, where it was expanded in the way indicated.
    2
    2
  • Copies of this northernized Chronicle afterwards found their way to the south.
    2
    3
  • The later parts of E show a great degeneration in language, and a querulous tone due to the sufferings of the native population under the harsh Norman rule; "but our debt to it is inestimable; and we can hardly measure what the loss to English history would have been, if it had not been written; or if, having been written, it had, like so many another English chronicle, been lost."
    0
    1
  • The editio princeps of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle was by Abraham Wheloc, professor of Arabic at Cambridge, where the work was printed (1643-1644).
    1
    1
  • The movements of Tethmosis in this first campaign, including a battle with the Syrian chariots and infantry at Megiddo and the capture of that city, were chronicled from day to day, and an extract from this chronicle is engraved on the walls of the sanctuary of Karnak, together with a brief record of the subsequent expeditions.
    0
    1
  • He is also supposed to be the author of the Skiby Chronicle,' in which he does not confine himself to the duties of a mere annalist, but records his personal opinion of people and events.
    0
    1
  • Arild Huitfeld wrote Chronicle of the Kingdom of Denmark, printed in ten volumes, between 1595 and 1604.
    0
    1
  • The fact that the new invaders brought their wives and children with them shows that this was no mere raid, but a deliberate 1 Where alternative dates are given the later date is that of the Saxon Chronicle.
    0
    1
  • But the evidence of the Continental Chronicles makes it probable that the Saxon Chronicle is a year in advance of the true chronology in this part.
    0
    1
  • Besides these works of Alfred's, the Saxon Chronicle almost certainly, and a Saxon Martyrology, of which fragments only exist, probably owe their inspiration to him.
    0
    1
  • As a result of further urgent representations by the Association, represented by Lord Burnham, Lord Northcliffe and Sir George Riddell, the following correspondents were authorized in May 1915 - Mr. John Buchan (Times and Daily News), Mr. Percival Landon (Daily Telegraph and Daily Chronicle), Mr. (afterwards Sir) Percival Phillips (Morning Post and Daily Express), Mr. Valentine Williams (Daily Mail and Standard), Mr. Douglas Williams (Reuters).
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  • Douet d'Arcq; Paris, 6 vols., 1857-1862) covers the years 1400-1444, and Georges Chastellain, the existing fragments of whose chronicle are published in his Ouvres (ed.
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  • Among the most interesting discoveries made in the island is the Parian Chronicle.
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  • Eyton in his history of Shropshire identifies it with one of the "Ludes" mentioned in the Domesday Survey, which was held by Roger de Lacy of Osbern FitzRichard and supposes that Roger built the castle soon after 1086, while a chronicle of the FitzWarren family attributes the castle to Roger earl of Shrewsbury.
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  • Other authorities are the Chronicles of Walsingham and Otterbourne, the English Chronicle or Brut, and the various London Chronicles.
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  • Thus (924) the English Chronicle - asserts that Constantine, king of Scotland, " chose Edward King to father and lord."
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  • It is clear to any reader of Ferrerius, Lesley and Buchanan that they all drew from a common source, now unknown, and this source may well have been a chronicle inspired by James's enemies.
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  • It is probably to this ballad that Melchior Russ of Lucerne (who began his Chronicle in 1482) refers when, in his account (from Justinger) of the evil deeds of the bailiffs in the Forest districts, he excuses himself from giving the story.
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  • We first hear of the cruelties of Austrian bailiffs in the Forest districts in the Bernese Chronicle of Conrad Justinger (1420).
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  • They are contained in a short chronicle written between 1467 and 1476, probably about 5470, and based on oral tradition.
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  • In the final recension of Tschudi's Chronicle (1734-36), which, however, differs in many particulars from the original draft still preserved at Zurich, we are told how Albert of Austria, with the view of depriving the Forest lands of their ancient freedom, sent bailiffs (among them Gessler) to Uri and Schwyz, who committed many tyrannical acts, so that finally on 8th November 1307, at the Riitli, Werner von Stauffacher of Schwyz, Walter Fiirst of Uri, Arnold von Melchthal in Unterwalden, each with ten companions, among whom was William Tell, resolved on a rising to expel the oppressors, which was fixed for New Year's Day 1308.
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  • In particular, while in his first draft he speaks of the bailiff as Gryssler - the usual name up to his time, except in the White Book and in Stumpff's Chronicle of 1548 - in his final recension he calls him Gessler, knowing that this was a real name.
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  • This division seems incredible, especially in face of the poem inserted in the chronicle (sub anno 942).
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  • Edmund, the "deed-doer" as the chronicle calls him, "Edmundus magnificus" as Florence of Worcester describes him, perhaps translating the Saxon epithet, was buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan.
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  • The facts of Owen's life must be pieced together from scattered references in contemporary chronicles and documents; perhaps the most important are Adam of Usk's Chronicle and Ellis's Original Letters.
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  • According to the traditional account given in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, it was in 477 that a certain Ella (IElle) led the invaders ashore at a place called Cymenes ora and defeated the inhabitants.
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  • Ella is the first king of the invading race whom Bede describes as exercising supremacy over his fellows, and we may probably regard him as an historical person, though little weight can be attached to the dates given by the Chronicle.
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  • Nunna is probably to be identified with Nun, described in the Chronicle as the kinsman of Ine of Wessex who fought with him against Gerent, king of the West Welsh, in 710.
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